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THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THl KSDAY. MAY 26, 193* 



I 'jil in Beach Suits 

Three times better than a l'alm Heath Suit are three Palm Beach Suits. 
SOLID STRIPE SPORT MODEL 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



Examination Schedule Repeated by Request 



Iiit -.<!»>. Ma> II. 1-3 1'. M. 

Sp 1 'mi M 8 • • Ami 111 -1 '■«'• 
,\ v K. M -"1 Al-'lmi -J 

Bat 26 Kl< P 41 H '»■' M 
U- Bng 72 limii.-i Tl 

Agran 12 union..- Be M 

Be t.4 H.M J, Miit I, 9t 

Eiik til Ol, A & HIV. nil -" 
VVrdnrsila>. June I. 6-16 A. M. 

Hort 26 WH B Poult M 

201A <h.tii 88 
20 Be Sfl 
CH A Bd ?6 
HM 2 Bag "- 



Mil II 



An Ec ■'.« 
A>-. roi. ■". I 

Bot 82 

K. 62 

K.I 7 J 
Phys 86 
l'hys I'M 74 



M Arch ■- WH Hint 82 

111 Zoo) 66 1 .v 11 Ltl Arch 

K 102 BB I' '/■'">> '>>'> 

Ol, D Siitunlai. Junt 1. ItitS A. M. I 

OL C Math - Mi M "" 1 

r , _■ - m, Anderson M 

MH i, BS D •<■ K Math SO 

SIS Mr. liouitli.- Mr. Anderson BB K 

¥ 102 >V 20V Mr. BoutaUa ¥ 210 

lOT Mr. Mill.-i (i 26 A 26 Mi Mi MB (S 

i; 'J 1 - Saturday. 2-1 I'. M. 

(. 26 Draw 26 WH Bnl 7-1 

ill French SO Oh B Aa Bag *0 

OL B Math 2G Mil 11 K«l 3d 



l)L C liwol 62 HI K 

WH Hltf "■- "1 I 

BB l- Bwna Be 82 Hi 

p. M. Musk 62 M Bktg. 



Vn-h 



11 1 

w h h 

\ I. i: 



All Knu :i" student* who are taking Chem 
-on <i Ami. I "i 8 "i Hi-t :U will take tht-ii Enir 80 
gn exam in tin- Tuesday afternoon section. 

Wedneedar, JttM 8, 10:1 .',- 12 : l.» 



EH K 

1 10 

1 1 ■, 



'..■nimn I, 1 1 2t> 
li» j rmaii J>i 

Mr. Ellert C 28 

Mr. I.sli- OL C 



1 \i) Bnt M KB I» A K Hot 



CH H 



PL H Math 76 MH A 

P Kd I'-yli ^6 lis 



Wednesday, Ill:l.".-I2:l". 
\y,<. n 2 u:i 111 BOC 2- OL \ A H 

Home Ec 32 1"2 

Wednesday. 2-4 P. M. 

Thys Kd 1 I' Kill lain i>2 <l And 

Thui>da>. June 2. H-HI A. If, 

KnK 26 Au.l. Phil 62 HI & IH* 

AetNtn 88 lUPhya 52 PL B 

Bot "-4 CH CPom ".li K 2ln 

Hot .,8 CH l'An HU»P 7 s H'2 

Dairy 62 PL 204 Bot T6 CH B 

Bng 66 OL A A BFren i« OL K 

Hort Mfg 52 HM ItOZool 80 BB K 

Thins.. June 2, 16:16-13:16 

Orient I Mr. Gltck 113 & 114 

(i Ami. 2li J v Mr. I'uivU 111 

Psych 54 

Thursday. 2-1 P. M. 
Bool H EB PMuaic T6 M Bids. 

Friday, June S, s.|u A. M. 

rV i« ii4 • Phye K.I 58 P Ed 



(ieol 28 


KB II 


Soc .1 


OL A 


An Hus 52 


101 


Be 78 


c 28 


Chem 62 


Q Ami 


Bd sJ 


in. 


Kc oS 


EH J) 


K.I M 


113 


EnK 70 


OL H 


Bnt 80 


KB K 


Flori 54 


r io« 


Got s2 


()l. 1) 


Home Ec 52 


FL 2U4 


P 10.1 7a 


T Ed 


Math 66 


MB A 


Boc -I 


OL Ami 


Music 62 


M Hldg 


Vet 86 


VI, B 


Friday. ItllS 


-12:i:> 




Hist 3 




Mi. Carey 




Mr. Caldwell 


OL Aa 


1. C & D 


OL 


A & B 


I'hysics 26 








CH A ; F 


102 & 209 



Friday. 2-4 P. M. 

Eil 74 113, 114 Land Arch sn WH B 

Ak- Bag 10 110 Kami Arch so WH B 

Dairy 50 Fl 2"4 An Be 7<i IMA 

Ent 66 KB K Ag Be SO 102 

Flori 52 V Hit! Bact >2 K 102 

For 66 F 209 Bnt 72 EB H 



K 


102 


OK 


B 


MB 


tJ 


PL 


B 


P 


Eti 


KB 


X 


CH 


A 


Q 


2L 




110 




102 


CH 


B 


F 


106 



Monday, June 6, s-m A. M. 

Chem 82 H And Dairy ?8 FL 2**4 I 

Mact 52 CH A K. -J OL C « I) 

I ieol 52 KB B Kd Am h St WH I 

I..I Arch 54 WH I'hysics 76 PL B 

/,«,! 62 EB K Physiol 70 ¥ 309 

Monday, 1*«I8 a. M.-i2:i:> P. M. 

Bot 1 ' "ut 26 

I'll A : KB 1) & K Knw 50 

Monday, 2-4 P. M. 
Chan 26 Math 62 

(i And. & 28 Physics 54 
Pom 26 F 21u Pliys K<l M 

An Hus 5C 102 Soc 62 

Bot 56 CH C B,t 80 

lier 56 OL 1» Chem s6 

Hist 54 OL C & B 

Tuesday, June 7, s-lo A. M. 
Zool 26 EB I' Vnon 7S 

Bact 02 CH A An Hus 82 

Be 52 C 20iloi 78 

Kim 72 OL Al'loii 76 

Ent 56 BB KM. .in.- E<: 82 HM 11U 

For 56 F 200Pi nil "J2 111 

Math 58 MB AiJuan 76 OL E 

Math .;i MB B 

Tuesday. 10:15 A. M. -12:15 P. M. 
Chem 1 (i 26 & 2s Knj; 30 
Chem 8 <i Ami. 

I Mi. Hokning) * Sects. Ila. IXa <>K H 

i Miss Hbrrlgan) * Sects, la. Ilia, 

IVa OL Ami 
Hi t 62 I & II OL A, ft D, K 

Tuesda>, 2-1 P. M. 
Enn 80 
I Mr. I low I All "h" sections Aud. 

(Mr. Hehnlng) Sect, via OL B 

I Miss HbrrlKanJ Sects, va. vlla, villa 

OL Ami. 

Wednesday, June s. s-10 A. M. 

An Hus 2« lOSPhya Kd 52 P Ed 

Flori 26 F H.HPhys Ed 56 P Ed 

tier 28 OL l>Soc 52 OL \ i I 

Phys 2s pl BSpaa 52 OL B 

Bng .2 OK A & BChem 76 G 34 

For :.s V 200 Lain ^0 FL 2" I 



'hi man £ 

Mi . Kll.rt ii All I 
Mi. Julian 

OK B. I). A 
Mi. K.i. I. OK Ami 

Wednesday 2-1 P. M. 

Aa Baa 32 110 Hi-i 68 <>K c 

Flori 58 K 102 PI Breed 62 F 810 

Thursda>. June H, s-ld A. M. 
Phyulol 32 ■ H A 

Thursday. 10:15-12:1.', 

French 2 OL A Mr. Coding 

French 6 At 8 OL Aud. & K 

Miss Brouillit French 5 & 7 

OL B OL Ami 

Mr. Fraker 

OL C & l» 

Thursday, 2-1 P. M. 
Home E< 2 113. 114 Mil 26 MH 

Mil 2 DH Mil 52 I»H 

Home Ec 3" Mil 76 I >H 

FL 204 
F'riday. June 10, s.|fl A. M. 
K. 28 G Aud & 28 I'-y.h 26 

110, 111. 113. 111. 
1 02 
Friday, June 10, 8-10 A. M. 
Bag l '• Ami Mr. Helming 

Bng 2 F 192 & 209 

Mr. Dubois Mtai rlorrlgan 

OK A & 1> OK Ami 

Mr. Goldberg Mr. Prince OK H 

G 28 A 28 Mi. Kami OK C 

Mr. Troy G And 

Friday 10:15-12:15 
By arrangement: Math 60 

I'hvs Ed 24 Music -i 



c«mlng int., closer contact with fundamental issues of 1 . 

.■ problems of manufacturing, com- Judism, ami Protentantism, 
mercial regearch, sales, personnel, ai d Horae show Open 

other subjects in economics. Tin- an- Th e length} program will ,. 

rtual award i- given jointly by the 2;00 p. m. Friday, June in, 

Danforth Foundation ami the Ralston Annual Horse Show is presei 

I'urina Mills to outstanding students f u j] pr ,, Kiam w jjj follow, wit' 

in economics or agricultural econom- uation exercises at 4:30 p, n 

ics who an- in high schoolastic stand- ,| a y. June 13. The Soph-Senii 

tng and who have tin- time for the w jl| conclude the events of t'n. 

Hip- end. 

A I lean'- list student, llixbv has al- ,,,, e ,, 

1 he program follows: 
so trained o letter in cross eountrv and ,, ..., . , ,. 

*~ . • 2:<oi p. in. Annual Spring 

participated in track. He is president cl ,,. ,. ., , c , (111 

' ' ' Show, Killing I ark; 8:00 p. m. ^ 

of the Animal Hushandrv Tluh, treas- . . . r , .. . . , . 

Oratorical Contest, Memorial Ha 
urer and historian of the 4-H Club ., .,., T , . IA . 

StoO a. m. Roister Doister 

and a member of the outinir club. He , ,. ,, „ ,,,..,,, 

tast, Drajier Hall; 10:30 a. !i 

is a resident of Sunderland and was _„ , ., . . . . . ,, 

„, . nual Meeting, Associate Alumi 

graduated fmni Amherst High School. „ • , ,, ,, .., ., . . 

K morial Hall; 12 m. Alumni Lui 

Continued U ■ !' J :u "' Speaking Program, Drill ii 

on the Soph-Senior Hop Committee, 2:48 p. m. Alumni Parade i 

and Maroon Key. He is also presi- Came; : , ,:.'!(i p. m. Varsity H. 

dent of Phi Sigma Kappa. G«ns* with Amherst, Alumni F . 

Robert Packard, Worcester, was Following the game— a half I 

president af Maroon Key and is a <*ert on chimes; 6:00 p. m. Fra 

member of the Class Ring Commit- and Class Reunions as arrai 

tee. Vice-chairman of last year's Win- organisations; 9:00 p. m. Roistei 

ler Carnival Committee, football sent "Ralph Roister Doister," ai 

squad, and is president of Theta Chi. niversary production. 

Sidney Beck is manager of the 9:00 a. m. Academics ami Va 

R. .ister Doisters, manager of hockey ( ' llll) Breakfast Meeting.-. Dra 

and a member of Alpha Epsilon I*i. Hall; 1 1 :<Mi a. m. Fraternity a 

Everett Roberts is on the Honor Reunions as arranged by orgs 

Council, Dairy Club, Animal Hus- tions; 4:30 p. m. Baccalaureate 
bandry Club, soccer squad, and is 



president of Q. T. V, 



v. . Eng s " 
An Ec 82. 90 
Agron 62 
Chem 92 
Ec 92, 94 
Ed 78 
Ent< B0, St> 
Ent S8 

Hurt Mfg 62, 71 82 
Home El: 77, s.4 



Ole.i 52. 74. IT, »% 
Phys 68, 86 
I'hys K<1 72 

Phyi Bd 62. 62 

P. mi 62, H 
P.., ilt 52. 7s, S2 
Psych H6 
Bool 70, 92 

Sue SO 



DANFORTH ARRIVAL 

Continued jrntu Page 1 
St. Louis and the American Youth 
Foundation leadership training camp 
on Lake Michigan for the purpose of 



GRADUATION PLANS 

Continued from Page 1 
Arts and Science, American Geologi- 
cal Society, and a member and coun- 
cilor of the American Chemical So- 
city. He was graduated from St 
Xavier's College in 189fi, and joined 

the Jesuits at the same time. He has 

. , . Hall; l:..(i p. m. Graduation 

taught chemistrv and geology m var- ... . _ 

' . , rises, Rhododendron Carden; Aiklr.-- 

lous colleges, and at present is head I , , , ., ^ , 

, . ' , t ... by .lames L. Mclonaughv, I're*. 

01 the department of geology at \\ es- ... , . ' 

_ „ * , . . ' . Wesleyan university: 8:00 p. m. 

ton ( ollege, where he has been since , _ . - r _, ... ,, ,, 

, , ,, ... Sophomore-Senior Hop, Drill Hall. 

1926. Reverend Ahem s not a strang- 



le ;it Rhododendron Garden 
di ess by Rev. Michael J, Ahem, > 
S.T.D., Weston College: 5:30 p 
President's Reception at President' 
House; 8:00 p. m. Concert on ■ 
College Chime; K::',n p. m. Si 
' 'lass Day Kxercises. 

10:00 a. m. Semi-annual .M 
of Hoard of Trustees; *4:00 p. in. 
i Academic Procession from | . 



er at State, for in December of 1933 
he addressed the annual meeting of 
the Religious Council, speaking on the 



If weather is inclement these 
ercises will be held in Physical Kd- 
ucation Building. 







ma ne^ 



an 




Chesterfield's my brand 

because they give me more 
pleasure than any cigarette 
f ever smoked— bar none. 

More smokers every day 
find a new brand of smoking 
pleasure in Chesterfield's refresh- 
ing mildness and better taste. 

It's because Chesterfields are 
made of mild ripe tobaccos and 
pure cigarette paper — the finest 
ingredients a cigarette can have. 



a n d r f. k ost 1 i a n i t / 

Paul whitp.man 

Df.ems Taylor 

paul douolas 



Copwialit I9yf, Dor.f tt a My^m Toimcho To, 



hesterfield 



vol. 




*K bAsiL b. AOOI^ 
LIBRARY 

Coorfof/ 

Library 
ssachnsetta 






XMHKKST. MASSACHUSETTS, WEDNESDAY, SKPTKMIiKK 21, 1»3M 



NO. 1 



First Class To Get A. B. Will Be Picked By Trustees Wednesday 



BAD WEATHER KEEPS 
REGISTRATION DOWN 

i reshmen Still I Ionic with 
Colds as Orientation 
Week Ends 



WKLCOMES STUDENTS 



316 FROSH HERE 



Mo iv Expected to Swell 
Total to a New 
Record 



i . : up by inclement weather and 

. colds among the entering 

eg -strati ons have been glow 

i iinplete as yet. The total 

I uesday morning had readied 

II indications point to an even 

. iiti'iing class than last year 

-tutilish a new record. 

rations have come from 

, \. a England state with the 

ptinii of N. H. and from as far 

cini. and N. J. There are several 

. New York registrations both 

gild state than of follnei \eais. 

li-t of freshmen as it appeared 

-.i.i v follows: 




record of 355 on FATE 0F STUDENTS MAJORING 

LATEST DEAN'S LIST , N ARJS R£STS W , TH MEE j, NG 



Clas 



Ol 



MS Leads as Increase 
I is Made Over 
Last Year 



Will Act on Recommendation of Faculty Body Degree Granted 

by Trustees at June 13 Meeting and Announced 

at Graduation Exercises 



President Hujjh P. Baker 



(lass of Hi 12 


— Men 


smson, Melvin 


Greenfield 


-. Paul .1.. Jr. 


Feeding Hills 


• Richard < . 


Florence 


. tiilberl S. 


South wick 


Ilaig 


Oxford 


d, Milford W. 


Holvoke 


. Winthrop H. 


Shrewsburj 


' . Winthrop 


No. Dartmouth 


Morris 


1 lorchester 


Leslie R. 


Holyoke 


tt, i ieorge N. E 


... Hadley Palls 


V. 


Suringlielil 


rd, Ralph M.. .1 


r. Lunenburg 


- p, Charles P. 


E. Walpole 


lohn L. Huntington. \. Y, 


i Id J. 


Dorchester 


Morris 


Dorchester 


.' n II. 


Chelmsford 


Harvey .1. 


Worcester 



R0DDA IS NAMED TO 
LEAD THEADELPHIA 

Elected President of Senior 

Honorary Society at 

Last Meeting 



Largest Dean's Lisi ever released 
by the Dean's Office topped other 
records considerably with 366 stu- 
dents from the four undergraduate 
classes, an increase of 54 over last 
semester's list. 

Leading the classes in enrolment 
l>\ a large majority, the class of *3S 
had 134 men and women on the list 
followed by '89 with 101; '4n with 
66; and '41 with 54. 

Group III led iii numbers with 223 
listed, the other two groups corres- 
ponding to their difficulty. The com- 
plete list follows: 

GKOVP i—»o-ion'; 
l«:i« 

I. (Ynwi'll, Mis*. Ihllllop, O'l Inn I,. II. 



SIGMA IOTA, T. E. P. 
AGAIN LEAD GREEKS 



SENIORS ELIGIBLE 



"TVps" Lead for Kip;litli Time in 

College Fraternity 

Averages 



A. Ii. Committee Report Held 

That Arts Majors Arc Ready 
For Degree 



III! 

Shan 



Ml 



(Sordnn, Kaplln- 



Charles Rodda '39 was elected head 
of Adelphia, senior honor society, at 
the last Adelphia meeting of the year. 
This is Hud's second head position 
M he Was elected captain of the '39 
BOCCer team at the close of the i | I 
son. 

Rodda has been active in many 
phases of the college activities being 

a member of the Senate, a major in 

military and chemistry, and an officer 



n<Mith. MIm, Ctaret alu 
i-ky. Ulaa, Tannenbauan. 

Continutd en /'.u'< I 

SIX APPOINTMENTS 
MADE TO MSC STAFF 



Sigma b>ta again led the State -..r 
orities and Tau Kpsilon I'hi was again 
the ranking fraternity as the semi- 
annual fraternity and sorority aver 
ages were announced by the Dean's 
office. Lambda Delta Mil was the 
second place sorority in the aver 
ages while Q.T.V. was runner-up In 
the men's Greek ranking. 

The 7!>.«»ii.s average of Sigma Iota 

edged the 7!U17 total posted by the 
"Teps." The general Sorority average 
bettered that of the men's organisa- 
tions by 7&8S9 to 76.917. The non- 
fraternity and non-sorority averages 
were about half-way between those 
of the top and bottom Creek socio 

. ties. 



What cl; 

ceive the 
Bjree, is tl 

front the 

tllev meet 



iss will be the first to re 

recently-granted AH. de 

ie problem that will en 

Trustee Committee when 
Wednesday . 



Raymond Otto, State Graduate, 

is Made Assistant Professor 

in Architecture 



Five appointment- t,, Instructor 
ships, one of them a promotion, and 
one appointment a- assistant prof* 



' ., ., V\ I 



of his fraternity, Lambda Chi Alpha. |sor wen- made b> president Baker 

Other Officers elected Were Kverctt 

Roberts, vice-president, and Robert 
Packard, secretary-treasurer. Robert? 

is president of Q.T.V. and member of 
the Honor Council, Packard ii pr< 
dent of Theta Chi. 



Work Of Administration, Alumni, 
Students Resulted In A. B. Degree 

ting of the A.H. degree ed in the • - I hair 



the Trusteea of the Col 

a rural le.-ult of a slow, 

ral movement for the lib- 
Massachusetts state Col- 

e the aim of the Land 

it Was liece- 

' ■ broaden it- under- 

iculum. Credit for this 

■ to three source,: the 
the alumni; and the 

ttee for the arts degree. 

Steps taken toward 
• that of L93S when 

ippointed a special 

Committee made up of 

of the class of '34 who 

majors in branches 

k. In its report siib- 

•lune 1 <»:i4 this committee 

recognition of a Di 

: • -. which would of- 
BR to the art- 



degree. 



s 'udent ( 



ommittee 



Student support was 
•re any action would 

Senate appointed the 

\.H. Degree Committee. 
1938 under the chair- 

i llannum ':',*;, the 

tailed its three year 

■ Tnll study of the 

and then presenting 

■dents, faculty, admin- 

• and others interest- ' 



m.n; first Hannum. then Shirley I 
'::s and thi Haj Ion '39, the 

committee cmbined the work of a 
I finding bureau and a pro paean da 

office until in the spring of 1937 the 

committee drew up, and with the ftp 
proval of the Senate and the W. S. li 

A., presented to the Hoard of Ti i 

a petition requesting, In the 
name of the student body*, the im- 
mediate grant of an ait degree. 
Those who served with this commit- 
ne Leonta Horrigan '".«'.. Dorothy 

N'urmi '36, (ieorge Munroe '36 Shirley 

Gale '87, Lucille .Monro,. '37, Henry 
Most "::. Carl Swanson '87, Herbert 
Brown '38, Karl Burnett '38, Shirley 
Bliss '::s, Cyrus French '38, Ann Gil- 
bert '88, Frederick Lindstrom v 
William O'Donnel '38, John Hoar '38, 



fall. 

Those appointed are Doric Alviani 

ol tmherat, insl ructor in music; Rich 

aid II. Colwell of Amherst, promoted 

teaching a bant t • • full in- 
structor in economics; s. Judson 
' of New Brunswick, N. .1. in- 
structor in botany; Thomas A. Riley 

of Northampton, instructor in tier- 
man; Miss Jay R. Traver, of Ithaca, 
\. v., instructor in zoology; and Ray 
mond II. Otto, assistant professo! 
of landscape architecture, 

Mr. Alviani is a graduate of the 
Boston Conservator) of Music and 
hold- a Bachelor of Music degrei 
the Boston University College 



Sniorit) 


Av,'. Mr 


lllhrrs 


If., i.i. 


\l|.hn Lambda Mn 


7vi;u 




12 


| 


Lambda I >• ■<-.< \i 


• 719 






• 


I'),, Z..|„ 


16.606 






8 


Sirniii It, t;. 1 hi 


7S.S46 






1 


■ i Iota 


76.9211 




II 


I 


1 IMll IllltV 










A 1 1 • 1 1 ■ i '.iiniiiK, |{||,, 


Tl ■•-.:! 




M 


11 


Alpha Sigma Phi 


1 




u 


•; 


\l|.lm Bpxilon I'i 


TT.Tii- 




L'l 


1 


Kaniui Sigma 


7.-..J7I 




u 


7 


Lambda Chi \ Ipha 


7 1 Ktm 




42 


I'i 


I'hi Sigma Kapfta 










U 1'. V. 


TS.S84 




41, 


■1 


Si inn Mih;i *£|iailon 






■ 1 


. 


I'hi K| 


■ 




16 


1 


i.p lion Phi 






ga 


1 


rtwu <iii 






i.i 


'i 




( I >,l:nin 


J 


MS /' 


Re 2 



ALUMNI AGAIN PICK 
BROWN PRESIDENT 

Kill, rir-a Man Named for 2nd 

Term at Annual June 

Meet in"; 



Hai rj Dun lap Bra* n '1 1 of Bil 



They will act upon the recommenda 
tion of the faculty committee coin- 
posed of Treasurer Keniny, Asst.- 
Dean Lanphear. and I'rofessor Rand. 
Those students now majoring in Lib- 
eral Arts are eligible for AH. de 
grees, according to the A.H. Commit- 
tee report of last year. 

The A.H. degree, urged by Alumni 
and student! for many years, was 
granted by the Trustees on June 13, 

and Was announced at the graduation 

exercises on that day. At the an 

iiouncement, ace.., dine to the Alumni 
Bulletin, ". . . a .beer went up and 
applause rang loud . . ." 
The A.H. Committees have 

lone and diligently with the full njp 

port ..f the Collegian to bring about 
the granting of the degree. It was 

emphasized continualK that Liberal 

\i> major- graduating with a \'>.s. 
degree were having difficulty m ob- 
taining teaching po itinns and retime 
oil., graduate school , A tiutent pe 
tition for the a.h. wa I ued last 

J ear b\ the ( 'omiiiitto. •.• ill, 1 1,,- ai. 

proval of all the student organise 
tions on campus, including the Senate. 

Fate of Majors 

I ho , -ho fate .■)' Liberal Art n 

■•> 'io\\ at Ma a, hi] I t1 

in the hand- nt ii-.- 'I rustee Cfimmit 

, ''''- ' h.- in. an impoi taut one 

!! it will command the attention of 

everj senior, <• peciallj tho <• l.ii,, ,.,! 
majors, who will find an a.h. 
m.ue valuable than a n.s. it | 

important to all ..tl.,., me,,,|„ , ,,f ,(,,. 

-indent bod) as .-. matei [al Indication 



of Music, The i • ,, h.. ha- been |,,, '"' ;i was reelected president of the "' ""• ftdvancement of state. ., that 

director of music in the Amherst pub Associate Uumnl of Ma achusett 

lie schools, coming there from a ,-im Stat.- College at the annual meeting 

itar position In Somerville. From m:::; '" -lime. Brown headed -i ticket that 



t.. i!i;;<;, he was director of music at 

the Huntington Scl I in Boston. Mr. 

Ah lani, a Foi mei i e -i<le,,t of Fall 
Ri ■ i . also a member of the Na 
tional Broadcasting, artist service. 

Colwell 

Richard M. Colwell was graduated 
from Rhode Island State College at 
Kingston with a n.s. degree in 1936, 
receiving his M.S. from there in Hi.'!?. 
Since that time he has held the posi- 
tion ..f teaching assi stant in the do 

partment Of economic- here. He ifl a 
member "f I'hi Kappa I'hi, national 



Mabelle Booth '39, George Haylon '39, honorary scholastic society, and of 



included tl,. ,. election of Mden C. 
Brett '12 of Belmont a ■ Ice prt 

dent; William I.. J),, ran ' I ,"• of Am 

■ i ecretary; and Clark L 
'1 hayer '13 of Amherst as i rea urei , 

New Directors 

Four new members were added to 

'he Board of Director- with terms 

running through to 1942, Those 

ed were David P. Rossiter '■'.! of Mai 
den; Zoe Hickney White "■•:! ..f Wor- 

Cesterj Alfred Wilkin- '15 of Wake 
field; and Frford Poole '!••', ,,f \„w 
Bedford. 



""I equal t., an\ othei de irable 
college. 



Football 

Rally 

THURSDAY NIGHT 



Arthur Noyea '4(1, Franklin Davis '40, 
Myron Hager '40, and John Film- 'Jo. 

The Collegian took an active part 
in the campaign for the degree with 
numerous editorial- in its behalf. The 
Index also played an important part 
by setting aside -even pages in the 
\",s annual for a thorough review of 
the case for the A.H. 

•associate Alumni 

All this time George Emery's office 

of the ASSOI late Alumni Wai far from 



Alpha Tau Gamma social fraternity. 
lb- i.- a former resident of Woon 

socket. R. I. 

Ewer 

s. Judson Ewer, a formo, resident 
<.f Springfield, waa graduated with 
rom M.S.C. in 1928, 

master's degree in 

Diversity of Illinois 

to Rutgers Univers- 

Mvick, N. .1.. in 1934, 

r of Sigma Xi. Tia- 

(..■ ntmutd on Page 3 



pro- 
Day 
,ng 



a B.S. degree 
lb- obtained I 
1980 from the 

and hi- Ph.D. 

ity in Mew Hi 1 
He i- a 



Accident 

Only mishap of the alumni 

gram took place early Alumni 
when a car driven by (ieorge C 
don "86 of Millis turned turtle on the 
slippery road just east -.f the Memor- 
ial Building. Neither Congdon nor his 
companion, Edward Caruso '38 of 
Springfield were hurt. 



is neeessary to 
baseball game 



necause it 
the icheduh 

Amherst Ofl account of rain, thr 
ni class reunions consequent 



ahcel 

P Ith 

alum 



ur wj|| be 

Thursdaj 

-houlfi be 



First rail) of the ye 

held by Ihe Adelphia 
m^lii at 7:00. EveryesHi 

present. 

the Adelphia plan- lo revive an 
old tradition of inducting the 
whole Fresh nun cl;,..*, and the cere- 
mony will he carried out in the 

manner of a f\wm\v ggts, when 
froah induction waa an every \«.n 
occurence, 

OPPOSITE PHYSI-B0CA6E 






I UK 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 



THE MASS.umsKITS COLLEUAN. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21. I!»ts 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 



/llbaesacbuV^WF- Collegian 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts State College. 
Published every Thursday by the students. 



Office: Itoom B, Memorial Building 



Telephone 1102-M 



EMERY MOORE '39. Editor-in-Chief 
ARTHUR A. NOYES '40, Mana K in K Editor MABELLE BOOTH "39. Associate Editor 



Campus 

JOHN B. FlUOfl 'M, Editor 
BETTINA HALL '39 
MARY I. MEEHAN '39 
FRANCES S. MERRILL 'S9 
JOSEPH BART "40 
NANCY E. LUCK '4» 
CAROLYN E. MONK "40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '40 
ROMA LEVY '40, Secretary 
KENNETH HOW LAND '4'. 
WILLIAM T. C.OODWIN '41 
HAROI.H FORREST '41 
CHESTER KURALOWICZ '41 
JOHN H WES Ml 

Feature 
LLOYD H I OI'ELANO '39. Editor 
MYRON FISHER '39 
KATHEI.EEN TOLLY "41 
EVERETT R, SPENCER 't" 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Sports 

FRANKLIN M. DAVIS JR. '40, 
I) ARTHUR COPSON '40 
ALBERT YANOW '41 

Photography 

LANE CIDDINGS '38 



Editor 



The Brat weekly rehearsal of the 
college band will be held ftt 7:30 on 
Thursday evening, September 22, In 
the Memorial Building auditorium. 
Any .-'anient wishing to play in the 

band is invited to attend rehearsal. 
Any student who lias had previous 
experience in drum-majoring is asked 
to see the band manager before re 
hearsal. 

Mr. Charles Fainum, who has been 
with the band for the last four years, 
will act as coach this year. 

There wfll be an important meeting 
of all members of the Collegian at< ff 
at the Collegian office in Memorial 
Building at ^:< l " p. m. Monday. Fleas' 
be present. 



Ketcheli. Gottld 

Kimball, George i 
Kirvin, Robert J. 
Knox, Charies 
Kolodzinski, Charles 
Faliherte, John P. 
Langton, George F. 
Leiand, Maurice w. 
Lincoln. Waldo ('.. J] 
Lind. Sylvan 
Litchfield, George V\ 
Long, Lewis R-. Jr. 
Lott, Henry J. 
I.ucey, John 
Lyons, Hyman A. 
MacCormack, Charle 



Belchert »wn 

Ami erst 

Pittsfield 

E. Longmeadow 



\o. 

Y 



Stm-khridg-e Correspondent 
HAROLD PHILLIPS S'SS 

( ollenlan Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '39. Editor 
JANET CAMPBELL '40, Assoc. Ed. 
t luminal Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE 

Kurulty Adviser 

DR. MAXWELL H. OOLDBERG 



SIGMA IOT \ 

i m.um.l from PJgt I 



(i.ri.-nil Average of Sororltj 7H.K39 

lienera) lv< rage ••> Pratei nity 



S. DICKINSON 



< lasses 
1038 
1939 

I'.'l' 
1941 



Mi ii 

'■ l> 

"8.67 S 

: 1,423 



WontM Total Class 

sii.:,j7 



:-.i"2 

77.226 
72,'Zsl 



BUSINESS BOARD 
ALLEN GOVE '!'.i. Business Ms 



ABR VHAM C *RP '39, k&v, Ugr. 

GEORGE C. BENJAMIN 
Business 
E. EUGENE DENAULT '40 
ROGER H. LINDSEY '40 
JOSEPH R. GORDON. JR. '41 
WALTER R. LALOR '41 



J. HENRY WINN '89, <ir. Kgr. 

■;:;i, Bubaci Ipl Ion Mans 

Assistants n ,,,.,„, lt , ,.,, 

i H VRLES A, !'<>\N ERS 10 
ROBERT RODMAN '40 
EDWARD J. O'BRIEN '41 
DAVID F. VAN METER 'II 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 18.00 PER YEAR 

Make all oi.lers iay.0>l.- to The Massachu- 
setts Collegian. In eeaa of change of address, 
subscriber will please notify the business man- 
ager as sunn as possible, Alumni, umlergrad- 
uate arnl faculty contributions are sincerely 
■neouragad. Any communications or notices 

mi-t be r iv.sl at the Collt'g-ian olbce before 

a o'clock, Monday evening. 

Enteieil as second-class matter at the Am- 
herst Pust Ollic. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of pontage provided for in Section 
1103. Act of October 1917, authorized August 
10. 1918. 



SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



College Avers 

M.i,'- \\ • i A ■ 

Women's Vvi 

Non-Prati 

Non-Sororltj 

::ai> WEATHER 

< ntintmd <• ■■ /'■-' ' 



i 
74.TOT 
72.107 
76.08* 

7.-.. 7»1 
76.808 

• • 
71.171 



1937 Member 1938 

Pbsockaled Go0e6iate Press 

Distributor of 

Cblle6«ate Di6e5» 



Burbank, Davit) Worcester 

Burnham, Preston J. Lynn 

Burns, J. Bernard Fore3t Hills, N. V*. 

Buxbaum, Alan Jamaica, N. V. 

Callahan, James W. R. Sunderland 



Printeil by Carpenter & Morehouse, Cook PI. 
Amherst. Mass.. Telephone 43 



alPRESINTIO FOB NATIONAL AOVSaTISINO BV 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Colletf I'ubliihers Rtfirtstntrntivt 
420 Madison Ave New York. N. Y. 

CMIOOO - BosroS • LOS AMSCltS - SAH FSANCISCO 



C W I T O I I A I 



FOR There is no need for a hackneyed "welcome freshmen" 

'12 at Massachusetts State College. Fa cry freshman who enters 
this fall should easily tell by the attitude and spirit of the 
upperclassmen that he or she is welcome. This attitude is the re- 
sult of a xvvy proper upbringing by former classes of each baby 
class, and Is surelv one which ought to be continued. 

You, freshmen, are welcome in a way which is evidenced by 
more than a mere smile or nod on the street, you are welcome lie- 
cause of the responsibility which is yours. Passed on by gradu- 
ating classes, this responsibility begins now and will continue for 
four years, a responsibility of keeping traditions and growth of 
our college steady. We have already won several hard fought 
battles, we are now a State College in name, we have an A.B. de- 
gree, both because of student responsibility, we have a wealth of 
tradition which must be kept intact to make life at college some- 
thing more than an existence in an educational factory. 

During this first week at college, many things have undoubt- 
edly faced you which seem strange and unimportant, but as time 
goes on you will realize that these things have a definite place in 
the college. As you start Out on this new adventure, have confi- 
dence in yourselves and in the support of the upperclassmen. 
LOADED Some mention should be made of the transfer ol an 
SENIORS outstanding senior, Cordon Najar. not alone for what 
he was and did for the college but because his absence 
shows clearly that, as in most colleges, the many organizations are 
handled by a relatively few men. Cordon, when he left, vacated 
five major positions as class president, Senate and Adelphia mem- 
I er. chairman of the winter carnival committee, and fraternity 

president. 

There is no doubt that one man can handle so many positions 
at once and do them well, but there is no necessity for such a one- 
sided state of affairs. In the average college class, there are many 
who can but who do not try to do their utmost. It seems to be the 
same throughout the college, one man who shows ability is shower- 
ed with responsibilities which could easily be handled by others 
with a well balanced distribution of men in position and a fair 
burden placed on many men rather than a heavy one on a few. 
Under the present set-up there is no limit to extra-curricular ac- 
tivities and positions but the time will come when this matter must 
I e considered and acted upon. 

RALLY Saturday the Massachusetts State football team starts 
RALLY another season. Thursday night. Adelphia is holding ;• 
rally. This year with a spunky team, the cheers and sup- 
port of the student 1-otly are needed more than ever. It has been 
;, policy of many upperclassmen and women to consider themselves 
too old for a rally and to count on the support of the freshmen 
for ralhes. With the excellent spirit which often crops up in the 
stands at (fames, there is no reason for n&t*e?\ at rallies. The sup- 
,rt of the school is needed by E»i find the team. let'- be sure 
they get it. 



Camp, Frank F... Jr. 
Carter. Daniel Ii.. Jr 

t assaza, William E. 

Cochran, Philip A. 
Cotlin. Richard F. 
Cohen, Frank 
Cohen, James 
Cohen, Jason 
Cohen, Norman F. 
Conkiln, Roscoe VY. 
Conley, John F.. Jr. 
Coughlin, Francis T. 
C wan. William A. 
Cre sy. Richard 
Dakin, Ralph 
Donnelly. Robert F. 
Doubleday. Flwyu J. 



Doyle, John A. 
Dunbar. Fniest 
Dwyer. Jack F. 
Dwyer. Paul J. 
Dwyer. William J.. Jr. 
Eaton, Melville B. 
Fdminster. Talcott W, 
Eldridge, Albert c. 

Emery, Clarence N. 
Frickson, Carl F. 
Frikson, A. Vincent 
Fskin. David IF 
Evans, William F. 
Farrell, Joseph W., .It 
Fertig, Harry F. 
Filins, Frederick A. 
Finkel, Myer II. 
Fnsnate. F. Courtney 
Fredd, Sumner G. 
Frodyma, Michael 
Fyf'e. Charles G, 

Galley, Douglas w. 
Gardner, John J. 
Gaumond, George W 



Pittsfield 
Wilmington 

Men im.tc 
Somervillo 
Dorchester 

Lawrence 

Chel ei 
I. .bury 

Somerville 
Hancock 
Brockton 
Taunton 
Pittsfield 
Beverly 
Dalton 

Worcester 

Enfield 

Pittsfield 

Barre 

Pittsfield 

Winthrop 
Holyoke 

Watertown 

F. Free' own 

Somerville 

Westbofo 

Attlehoro ; 

Northampt »n 

I'.ri okline 
Pittsfield 

Pittsfield 

Sheridan, Pa. 

West field 

Chelsea 

Hudson 
Dorchester 

Holyoke 

Worcester 

Bridgeport 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Worcester 

York. N. V. 

Weymouth 

Pepperell 

Housntonic 

Roxbury 

Maiden 

Dorchester 
Middleboro 

Ware 



New 

F 



Gewirtz, Alan 

Cillis. Kenneth C. 
Gilman, James W. 
Gfrard, Theodore 
(ilick. Saul M. 

Goldman, Joseph 
Golinsky, Harold 
Graham, J. Clifford 
Greenfield, Eric L. 

Hadley, l'etijamin F.. Jr. 

Bar Harbor. Me. 

Hatch, Ralph A.. Jr. 
Hebert. Rene Y. 

Hibbard, Russell E. 
Hobsoii. Robert N. 
Holbrook. Robert W 
Holmberg, Roy 
Horgan, John D. 
Hunter. Howard K. 
Hurley, .lame- M. 



Hutching*, John 
llutner. MeUin 
Hyman. Pert ram I 
Jodka. Joseph T. 
Joife, Irwin 
Johnson. Paul A. 
Kagan, Abraham 
Kagan, Milton 
Kaufman, Sumner 
Kessler, IF ma;. 



Brookltne 

Holyoke 

No. Hadley 

Florence 

HHford 

Ashland 

Belmont 

Pittsfield 

Northampton 

So. Amhersl 

Springfield 

Dorchestei 

Faw retice 

Springfield 

Amherst 
Chelsea 

I» Frche«te 

Chelsea 

Chelsea 



MacDougall, Alllster F. 

Mahan. William F. 
Mason, Richard R. 
McCutcheoii, Robert < '. 
.Mcintosh. William F. 
McFeod, Joseph W. 
Mcndall, Ralph 1'... Jr. 
Mezoff, Albert R. 
Millman, George H. 
Moffitt, Donald W. 
Morrill. David R. 
Morse, Freeman F. 
Mosher, Harold 
Mosher, William J. 
Mott. John R. 
Mullany, Robert A. 
Nau, Otto S.. Jr. 

Newell, William A. 
Noon, Richard F. 
Northrup. Cordon I!. 
Norwood, Howard F.. 
Nottenburg, Robert A 
Ogan, Norman 
I'app. Stephen 
Pearlman, Stanley 
Perry, Robert W. 
Pierce, Richard H. 
Plummer, Joseph C. 
pomerteau, Robert 
Potter, Spencer R. 
Powers, John F., Jr. 
l'russ. Harris 
Pushee, Warren 
Putnam, James 
Rabinovits, Irving 
Rabinovitz, William 
Rabinow, Morton P. 
Radding, Robert S. 
Rhines, Lorimer P. 

Rodman, Mitchell S, 
Rogosa, Israel S. 
Rosemark, Edward M. 
Rosenbloom, Arthur H. 
Rovno, Har-ry R. 
Rowe, Arthur E. 
Rubensteill. Jacob 
Schubert, Elliot \'. 
Seery, John J. 
Selkregg, James P. 
Shackley, Frederic. 2d 
:'haw, Howard W. 

Shepardaon, John L". 
Shepardson, Theodore 

Slack, Cornelius W. 
Smith. Richard R. 
Smolak. Henry M. 

Sparks, Edward J. 
Sparling, Harold, Jr. 

Steinberg, Maynard A 
Stone. Chester C. 

Stonoga, Benjamin 

Sullivan. Donald J. 
Sullivan. John J. 
Sunden, Howard H. 

Szmyd, Luden 

Szwaluk, Peter 
Tewhill. John Jr.. Jr. 
Thayer. Donald T. 
Tripp. F. Donald 
Trufant, Philip A. 
Wall. William Jr., Jr. 
Weiner, Herbert 
V.'erme. Carl I'. 
White. Paul A. 
Whiting, Frederick K, 
Williams, H. Edwin 

Williams, William 

Weiner, Milton 

Winston. Paul W, 
Winthrop. Justin I. 
Wolf, Henry R. 
Wolk, Lnuis 

w kock, Charles 

Workman, Rodger 
^i ale. ( reorge 
/tiller. Sydney 
Zielinski, Casimir A. 



<;. Florence 

Holyoke 

Arlington 

Natick 

Ware 

Brooklyn, N. \. 

Wayland 

Worcester 

Rosllndale 

Pittsfield 

Lawrence 

D„ Jr. 

W. Med ford 
Jr. Carlisle 

Lenox 

Maiden 

s. Deerfleld 

Amherst 
Pepperell 

Middleboro 

Lynn 

Mattapan 

Northampton 

Rowley 

Lynn 

Sterling 

Harrison 

North Attlehoro 

Hatfield 

Greenfield 

Holyoke 

Hudson 

F. Pembroke 

Jr. IF lyoke 

Waltham 

Holyoke 

No. Falmouth 

Roxbury 

Pittsfielyd 

Longmeadow 

Cranford 

Lawrence 

Norfolk, Conn. 

Braford 

r VT1 



A. 



Feed 



W. S, 
New i 
\s 

East 
New 



Nov. 

Stvle, 



Toi 



H. 



Housatonic 

i lanvera 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Mattapan 

Longmeadow 

Westfield 

Dorchester 

Lynn 

Dorchester 
Holyoke 

Fltchburg 

Springfield 

Mattapan 

Methuen 
Brookfield 

Holden 
Winthrop 

Canton 

Athol 

Athol 

No. Amherst 

South wick 

No. And iver 

Pittsfield 

F. Pride ater 

Fltchburg 

Auburn 

Watertown 

Salem 

Chelsea 

Worcester 

Holyoke 

s. Deerfle ld 

Northampton 

Worcester 

Willimansett 

N. Abington 

Northampton 
Mattapan 

Worcester 

W. Somerville 

W. Roxbury 

Stockbri \w 

Holliston 

Mattapan 

Marblehead 

Lynn 

Mattapan 

Dorchester 

South Hadley 

South Hadley 
Chelsea 

Maiden 
Holvoke 



Bentley, Barbara 

Retry, Mary F. 
1 terthiaume, Marguerite 
Blackburn, Justine B. 
Bowler, Mary F. 
Frown. Esther M. 
Burke, Catherine P. 

Butement, Barbara M. 
Cambridge, Ruth 
Carlisle. Jean P. 
Chase, Anna M 
('lark, Frances F. 
Coffin, Elizabeth M. 
Cook, Marion H. 
Couture, Virginia 
Culver, Mildred 
DiChiara, Rosalie 
Donahue. Mary J 
Doubleday, Lois F. 
Drin k water, Phyllis L. 

Drury, Mabelle F. Woons< 
Duffey, Kathryn R. Chict 

Durlantl. Priscilla F. 
Eyre, Mildred Nm 

Fariand, Virginia R. Savan 
Fiske, Wilma 
Rtzgerald, Ida M. 
Fox. Edith 
Franz, Elinor L. 
Gale, Margaret 
Gallagher, Marion L. 
Gassett, Ethel K. 
Gilchrest, charlotte 
Gillette, Eleanor I. 
Goldberg, Florence 
Goldman, Cert rude 
Gordon, Sarah S. 
Grayson, Dorothy A. 

Hale, Pauline 

Hall, Martha R. 

Handforth, Norma F. 

Harding, Una L. 

Hurley, Helen M. 

Hay ward, Dorothy N 

Heermance, Louise 

Helyar, Ruth M. 

Hourihan, Mildred A. 

lanis, Helen R. 

Johnson, Eleanor R. 

Judge, Mary F. 

Kelleher, Marie 

Kin":, Elenor 

Kozak, Mary 

Krastioselsky, Fva 

Lappen, Frances II. 

Feeper, Elizabeth 
Lindsey, Joyce H. 
Lockhart, Agnes F. 

MacNeill, Miriam E. 
Maisner, Helen 
Martin, Lillian 
Mclinerny, Phyllis A. 

McNamara, M. Jean 
Morrill, Marjorie F. 
Mothes, Arlene M. 
Moulton, Betty J. 
Nagelschmidt, Marion I 
Newell, Patricia A. 
Nichols, Marjorie M. 
Nielsen, Sarah L. 
Olson, Louise A. 
Pangborn, Elinor J. 

Pederzani. Alice 
Pelissier, Certrutle A. 



\, 



\1: 



An 

A-. 

Won 

Wesl Me 

11 

Lunei 

Uxii 

New II;, M 

Brattleboi 

Fa 
Mi;, 

So. Ii 

Won 

Sai 
Ms 

Eastl ai 

AJ 

l»..n 
Ths 



Gn 



. 



I: 



V, 



w. i: i 

Pittsburg ; 
\. 

Ar- ; ' 
Arlingl 
Wart 



w 



Plumb, Dorothy N. Springfit 
Politella. Y. Lillian 
Potter, Louise F, 
Prest. Dorothy R. 
Reynolds. Judith C 
Richardson, Kllen 
Sargent, Harriett N 
Shirley, Martha 1. 
Smith. Eileen F. 
Smith, Esther J. 
Staples, Frances F. 
Stone, Abigail M. 
jTarbell. Hariet F. 
'lower, Phyllis L. 
Van Buren, Meriel 
■Vantera, Vivian 
Waite. Joann 
Waldron, Ann G. 
Wainshel, Barbara 
Walker. Evelyn F. 
Ward, Evra 
Waft. Helen 
i Webber. Nancy R. 
Whittemore, Phoebe 
Wiley, Doris 



Laws 

v. 

Mar- 
Kit ■ 

BaMs i 

India: 
Vineyard 
Wat 

I 

I! 

|;.- I 
\ - 

E'ittKr- 

Soul • I 

1 ' 
ii. 

I 



Wi 



W omen 

Adei. on, Dorothy 

Alger, Nancy S. 
Angeil, Doris F. 
Atwood, Dorothea F. 
Avei J . Marion R, 
Banuzkewic, Matilda I. 
Barnej , Eiizabetri A, 
Barrows, Marjorie L. 
Beauregard, < !on ttance 

■ Pelk. Alice 



Holyoke 

Middleboro 
Westfield 

Feeding Hills 

Topsfield 

Pittsfield 

W. Roxburj 

Auburn 
Holvoke 

Montaaue 



COLLEGE STORF 

SEPTEMBER SI KHAU 

Desk Lamp &* ' 

Desk Memorandui 

(With Complel. FOB*!*" 
Schedtih'-' 



ON CAMPUS NORTH I 



(Hit 1 



Bewildered 

Uy Everett R. Spencer 

I met Bill Newell as he was 
mains down the Stockbridge 
«i, p.. He wore a nei\ou> smile, 
ippeared bewildered, and wa> 
,„t. | noticed that he parsed a 
,t too-hasty fiance at \arious 
ro-eds a> they smoothed by. AnJ 
nee hi* Up* formed the expres- 
sion "not bad." Here was the typ- 
ical freshman. I thought. A be- 
wildered lad tossed suddenly into 
the confusing trials of Orienta- 
,„,„ week. Perhaps there was 
-unit hope. I seized his hand with 
i he authority of an aloof junior 
,,11(1 drew him over to one side. 
Poor chap. I'd be a brother to 
hi in. I knew how he felt. I wa* 
i freshman once . . . almost twice 
Fd he his ray of li«ht . . . 
Freshman," 1 yelled in hi 



ACTIVE DITY 

I nder the Thomuson Act, which 

permits members of the advanced 

ROTC course, to spend one year in 
active duty with the regular army. 

eight '.i* graduates are seeiag 

service in Fort Ethan Allen. Ver- 
mont, and F<. rt Oglethorpe, 
Georgia. 

Fisted a> Second Lieutenants in 
the 3rd Cavalry at Ft. Ethan Al- 
len are: Floyd W. Towns ley. Nor- 
man K. Lindin. Clifford A. Curtis 
and Frank F. t air. As Second 
Lieutenants in the tith Cavalry at 
Fort Oglethorpe are: Warren S. 
Raker. Jr.. Frank A. Hrox, Richard 
C, Kins and Robert K. Morrison. 



MILITARY CUP GOES 
TO RALPH L. FOSTER 



Presentation of Stowell Award 
is Made at dune 

Horse Show 



tiey. 



's your cap'.'" I thought 



'•V'U know." groaned the dejected 

neophyte. "I'm lost. Mental tests and 
fraternity rushing. Speeches and more 
speeches. Honor councils and religion. 
All the upper classmen giving me 
as a Dead Ender. So did ! tlu ' ^ r|a(| han<l - l '^ rh - *md a rope pull, 

crowd of tall freshmen were gather- 
jorry, but golly, sir, . ■ . eh " lu - N " c °-eds among them . . . tsk, 
laven't had time to buy <me. ; this ve Hing of mine was doing me no 
Bill wa.- actu- K '""'- M Let'a go on t.. the college 

i store," | continued with a hasty 

glance at the tall -4'JV. 

"There is no peace for the wicked 
and innocent." I volunteered. To tease 
him, I asked, "Have you heard that 
there Is another college in Amherst?" 

"Certainly," was his reply. "Am- 
herst College. All excellent school. 

Many advantages ... a great place." 

I looked at him. Was he serious.' 
Here was a man with no bitterness 
iii his soul. He loved his fellow man. 
lb- was a gentleman . . . but he'd 
change. We all do. 



it right now 
taking, 
superiority went t 



tll\ he; 



10 

"Yea. will you see that you get out 

.in-, or before the Senate yoi 

\,I no wise cracks, mug." A 

U t ORD OF S55 

< oitlinutd frurn Page 1 



IHl» 



M 



Mi-- 1'.. Vnnnah. 



War- 



l'.tll 
Broderick. Smith. E. W 
\ Smith, F. K 

GBOI I' II— v".-<tn<; 

l!^3^ 

Barton. B. W., Btaumont, I)., B»l- 

ii i... i:. t .111:111 . Blxby, Mi--. Bloom, 

i • Mi-- K.. Collin*, W. J-. Corkum. 

Curtin, Hiaa. Klkiml. Fahey. 

• i. \.. For bush, < lane, • ilbbs, 

.1,. 1 , mm i . HmliM. Mis-. Heller, 

Joht 01 . II. H-. Kaplin-'s . Mian, 

Mi-- H.. Kinsman, Miaa, K»y- 

... I-:. I,.. Nelson, Miss. O'Conncll, 

p \ii .-. Putnam. Boaanbloom. 

. ma ■.. 1'.. Sle»in»ki, Streeti i . 

M .. 1 in riinilt. Tonkin. Whin . 

H 'A ... 1 1., W I. Mi-- l:. 

Ifftf 

K, l:. Ltone) . Blschoff, Btasabei •. 

Bdoy, Brawn, l». E„ <'iil>>. Cole, W. 

■ 1: M.. DexTaff, Elliott, ilynn, Mra., 

. .IiIIm i-.., [)., Ounneaa, Mi-s. Howe, 

v. K .'. Kiii/. Klntrabury, Miss. LeClalr, 

i l.\ni.-ii., Malkin, Miller, Nor- 

'•1 - pa< kard, Pamocnter. Paul. 1!«mIiIh. 

S Miss, Schmidt, Southwtck, Thonaa, 

1 \ itum, Warner. Mi-~. Zajehowskl. 

lata 

Mi--. Beamea, Bradahaw, Miss. Car- 

Mlat Mb, Oreenberxi Jacoha, Mi—. 

i- - ■■!.. Kniii-. Mi--, Martin, Morloce, 

O'Ni I:,.. Mi-- k.. Schoonaaaker, Sehretb. 

-• ., Mi-, M. C. 

em 

<■. Unit.. Bornatain, Flreatone, 
' ■ • M --. (itlman, Hartley, Mis-. How- 

-'■•:. '{.. Keller. I«i Prenlere, l^mt'. 
v • Pava, Puff.-r. Mi--. BeoJUn, Stein- 

CHMM I" III— hii-h.-,'; 

w.. Aviv, w . It.. Barton, 

'■-- E„ Beaumont, K. 8., Beeher, Mi—, li.- 

■ .ii-ii,n. m H k... muiiitui g. Bade, 

B ;.. I;. I.. Browa, H. K.. Biswu. 

M Caruaa, (asn/.za. Ctaaa. I' 

Cone, Oonta, Curtis. Duan, F>i- 

Bdaan, Miss T., BStoaoulaa, l-'iin- 

'• ■ '■ •. Finkel, French, Raakell, Mi--. 

-. Miss, Etalpern, H an4 » erger, 

" Jacobatm, Jenkins. Miss. Jmlil. 

C, Jnli:ii>. Mi- K.. Klaueke, 
KuklawkS, I.amli. ninil.n, lx>m- 

'' ' Irdy, M:n i.inl>ii , Mi--, Mnim, Miss. 

W Milkey, Mi-s. Millard, Ktaa, 

Mil , Pyeneon, Qnaat, Ban- 

i: • i '. \.. Biley, R.istii-iin. Batter, 

Mi--. Seal, Mi--. Silverman, 

Smith, H. »'.. Smith. It. K.. 

ill 'hi. Miaa, Stewart, Mi--, 

- Swlren, Thayer, Miss. Thotnp- 

Tewle, T.miii., Mi—. Walkey, 

Mi-, w.iik.-i-. Whitney, Wil- 

i Mis,. 

\n\> 
■ BeJarade, M., Blxby, Brad- 
■nch, Briaaet, Broadfoot, Oadt- 

tie, I lai»i>, Miss. Croaby, M 

KUI i iik'.-. K. W.. 

' ' ' i . l-'itt-. Mi--. Foerster, 

B '.ii.-. fJltek, <;1mw. Hall. 

"■ ■■'>. Herman, Mi--. Jablon- 

Leeh Madden, Mi--. Maa- 

Mlai M., Merrill, M 
M — . Meorehead, Myereon. 
P ■ ird, Pratt. Bit bardaon 
J Rob, 
-oi,, it. M 



SIX APPOINTMENTS 

Continued from P4tg l 






R 



Hon 

Shirman, Blati 
Wa en, Willan 

•i , \\ ini.'i slew in 



nil 



\ . hlbald, '... Miaa, 

eea, Beeket, Br a sd o n, 

K.. Cariaon, Cohen, 

• Miaa, Brikaon, Flehi, 

i. i Mi--, [rvlne, w .. 

M Rarahnrks, Lam 

!(. J., m. rt r, Me I 

U s illleai Miss, 



tioiial scientific society, as well as 
the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science and the Ameri- 
can Nature Association. He has pub- 
lished many article- on botanical sub 
Jects, both popular and scientific in 
nature and science magazines. 
Riley 

Thomas A. Filey is a graduate of 
Bowdoin College In the (las.- of Mil's 
He studied abroad at the University 
of Munich, in Germany, returning 

to this country to receive his Master 
of Arts degree in 1937. From 1928 
to r.i.'ii he wa- teacher of German 
at the American Institute in Muni 
He has published one textbook in 
Germany and has written various re- 
views in the Modern Language Jour- 
nal. He is a former resident of Bath, 
Maine. 

Miss Traver 

Miss Traver was graduated from 
Cornell University in l!*ix, and re- 
ceived her M.A. and Ph.D. from there 
in 1919 and 1981 respectively. From 
192(1 to I!»2M she acted as supervisor 

of nature study for the Wilmington, 

Del., public schools. She has also been 
connected with Shorter College in 

Rome. Oa., and University of North 

Carolina. A member of Sigma Xi, 
the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, the Entomolog- 
leal Society of America, the American 
Limnologies! society, ami the North 
Carolina Academy of Science, she has 
also published many scientific articles 

and was co-author of a textbo <k OH 

the Biology of Mayflies. 

Otto 

Professor Otto, who holds the de- 
gree of Master of Landscape Archi- 
tecture from Harvard University, la 
a former resident of Lawrence, Mas* 

sachusettS, and fof the past half- 
oar has held a temporarj appoint- 
ment at the state College. He Ii a 

member of the American Society of 

Landscape Architects and graduated 

from State in '->'■. 

Before coming to M. s. C, Profe 
-of into had held various positions, 

both with private concerns and with 
the Federal < iovernment. From 192fi 
to in:;:!, he wa- a draftsman and de- 
signer for a firm of landscape archi 
tects. From Flo-", to pi:;;,, he wa- C0H 

nected with the government, ftrsl as 
landscape foreman for the United 
State- Department of Agriculture, and 
later a- Inspector for the Department 
of Interior. Just previous to coming 
to the college, h« waa a landscape 
technician for the Resettlement Ad- 
ministration. 



For proficiency in horsemanship, 

Ralph F. Foster *S9, was presented 

the Stowell Cup Award at the 17th 
Annual Horse Show held on the Drill 
Field June H». The cup is to be held 
by, i he junior -elected for one year. 
The following winners were named 
in the seven idasses of the show by 

judges Ft. Luther F. WiUard, Cav. 

Res. ';;,",, and Ft. Anthony J. Nogelo, 
Cav. Res. "IT: 

Class 1. Junior Cadet Schooling; 
Robert H. Muller, first; Robert E. 
tain, second; Everetl Roberts, third; 
and Donald II. Cowles, fourth. 

Class II, Senior Cadet Jumping, 
Course P; Warren S. Baker, Jr., first; 
Marshall P.. Allen, second; Robert D. 
Pu/./.ee, third; Donald S. McGowan, 
fourth. 

CUSS III. Sophomore Cadet School 
itiK; Robert F. Dunn, first; Dominic 
I F. Xietupski, second; Franklin Hop 
I kins, third; and Robert I. Sheldon, 
! fourth. 

Class IV, Senior Cadet Jumping, 
J Course A; William B. Avery, lir.-t; 
Herbert F. Brown, second; Cyrus F. 
French, third; and Norman P. Flake 
; fourth. 

Class V , Coed Schooling; Miss Bet- 
ity Abrams, first; Miss Jacqueline Ste- 
wart, second; Mi.-.- Doris Jenkins; 
I hi rd; and Miss Frieda Hall, fourth. 
Class VI, Junior Cadel Jumping; 
Emerson W. Grant, first; Henry C. 
Andersen, second; Clifford F. Pippin 
cott. third; Robert S. Cole, fourth. 

(las- VII, Mixed pair.-; Cyrus F. 
French and Miss Doris Jenkins, first; 
Davis w. Beaumont and Miss Cooper, 
second; Floyd W. Townsley and Miss 
Jacqueline Stewart, third; and N'or 
man F. Linden and Miss Nancy I 'arks, 
fourth. 

The committee in charge of the 
horse how consisted of: Norman P. 

Flake. Floyd W. Townsely. William 
II. Avery. Warren S. Raker, Jr.. Davis 
W. Beaumont, Frank F. Carr, Rich- 
ard R. Irving, and Robert K. Morri- 
son. 

WORK OF ADMINISTRATION 
' antinnrd from p.i^ \ 



Static. An Alumni Committee, com- 
posed of Ralph F. Tabor 'lb, chair 
man, Alden C. Brett '12 and Joseph 
Forest '2K, after making a careful 
survey of the College, — first in com- 
parison with other Fand-Orant insti- 
tutions, and second in relation to the 
educational need- of the -tate, joined 
fmcrs with the students in the cam- 
paign. 

Commissioner of Education Reardon 

saw eye to eye with President Baker, 
on this matter, and approved the arts 

degree. With the appointment of two 

new tru.-tees with liberal views in 
May it was left only for the Trustee 

meeting in June to grant the de g re e 



HARRY BROWN 

( /. ■ /.,, , from I' i'i I 



came longer and more enjoyable af- 
fair.-. 
The class of '*:', and the class of '88 

reported with I'm per cent attendance 
marks. 



COLLEGE STORE 

EVERYTHING FOR 
INK STUDENT 

Luncheon*- 

Soda Fountain 

Studenl Supplies 
(looks ;ind M;iu;i/.ines 
Banners ;ind Souvenirs 



FLOWER APPOINTED 

Stanley A. Flower Ms has hten 
appointed assistant in the college 

news service by President Raker. 
He began the Irst of September, 

having been employed on the Am- 
herst Record during I he summer. 
During his undergraduate years 
at the college, Flower was aclixe 
on the staff of the Collegian and 
was managing editor as a senior. 
He was also active in the Roister 
Doisters. Press Club, and winter 

carnival publicity. 

Flower is a member of Alpha 
Camma Rho and served as cor- 
respondent for the Springfield 
Republican. 




1 1 MIA ^ .'::tii - 6:311 



r m 



1 I • > ■"■ GOOD B BASONS It 

jj ■ *©0 BE I'HrSI s I 



CHEERS 



LONG VKI.l. 
M.-i— .. Mil—.. Maaa'i hu atl 
Baa, Hah. Rafa, Rah, 

M.i --YliiisWis, 

Maaa'rhoaatta, 
Maaa'i huaetta, 

TEAM I TEAM I IK \M I 
SHORT YKl.i. 
mass. STATE" 

Hah, Baa, 
TEAM) tor player's i,. •„,„., 

M VSS \( II IS KITS VKI.l. 
H-A-S-S. \-i mi . 

S-K-T-T-S 

Maas i Im-i-iis 
Rah rah. Rah rah, Bah rah, Rah rah 
TEAM ! I BAM I TEAM '. 
IK. Ill' YKI.I, 
M.i ii a-.i-a--- ST \ IK! 

i .-hi team ! 

lii'lit train ! 

I lichl ! Fight ! I'i'.-iii ! 



2— nit; hits— 2 

W. , Baxter .., ■'"'-»—-' 

-III Give a "Kullte 
l)i ummond 
Million" i n Afric;," 

Mm I.. Newi 
Till Its., si fi. t: 

ON STAGE — IN PERSON 

RADIO I AMMMIIs 

JAKE and CARL 



I'lmsii |>M|.iil:u ihuImh 

| t|U liiiiohl, 



,1 yodel 



— On the Screen — 

'Wives Under Suspicion" 

« it I, Warrei W llliam 



lltl.SAT.. SIIT. LM -21 

I... i. Mi. You nil Rii hard hi 

,1 I, .1:1,11 

< I,, it, i Moi 



.I.hI m.i 



'THREE 
BLIND 
MICE** 

PI . I. i: 



"SKY 
til ANT" 

i N.'W 



Si N.-MON.-TI KJ*.. SEPT. l~> 
I mil. Sun t-tttSS I'. M. 

SON J A HENIE 



1 1 



My Lucky Star" 



— Ami Three — 
Donald l»uu I. < Sai toon 

M i l:... i in ••!•', In nir '■ 
'Itii iiolii.. Mmiern Seience" N.-w » 

Ut Sunrlm Till :i:l, I'. M. 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 



KOOM ACCESSORIES 



RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL JS& CO. 



6.'J So. Pleasant St. 



Amherst, Mass. 




JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



Neil' and Standard Books 

Lending Lilirary Loose Leaf Note Hooks 

Sheet Music Dictionaries (All Uuigajajges) 

Hook Knds (2.'>c :md up) Hox Filts (50c) 



SARRIS RESTAURANT 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN, INC. 

EXTENDS GREETINGS TO THE 

CLASS or 

19 4 2 



Always the beal 



in service 



in food* 



in refreshment! 



open from 7 a. m. to 12 p. u 



Buy a Meal Ticket and Economize 



M. A. C. Library. 






THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21. 1998 



Rejuvenated State Gridders Open '38 Sch edule With A. I C. Here Saturday 



W.P. I., MIDDIES R.I.S. 
ARE ON LOCAL CARD 

Lord Jeffs, Bowdoin, and Tufts 

Will be Strong 
Tests 



State will play the part of invaders 

for five of their football dates this 

season since only four teams are 

scheduled to be met on local turf, 
The maroon squad will face its stiff- 
eat opposition away from home but 
the games here will not he setups. 

After two years in a row on Alum- 
ni Field, the traditional "town title" 
battle with neighboring Amherst has 
moved south to the Jell's Pratt Field. 

The complete schedule follows: 

September 

24 Ainerirmi Intel nntioniil at M. S. ('. 

October 

1 liiiwdoin at Brunswick 
H Conn. State at Storrs 
15 It. I. Stair at M. S. ('. 
22 W. V. 1. at M. S. C. 
29 Ainberst at Amheist 

November 

S t'oaKt (iuard at M. S. ('. 
12 K. I". I. at Troy 
19 lull- at M. ell. .1.1 



HARRIERS OPEN WITH 
N'EASTERN AT BOSTON 



Statesmen Will Run Strong Huh 

Pack at Franklin Park 
October 8 



Cross country is rapidly Retting un- 
der way with new men reporting 
every day. On October 8th, Coach 
Derby will take a team headed by 
Captain Larry I'ickard down to Bos- 
ton for the opening run with Noith- 

eaatern. 

Last year's team took three out of 
live meets, defeating Amherst, Wor- 
cester Tech, and M, I. T. The team'- 
chances will be increased this year 
by the presence of three lettermen, 
Bixby, a senior, Scholz, a junior, and 
I'ickard, a senior. 

The schedule follows: 

October 

h Northeastern at Huston 
l.'» M. 1. T. at M. S. C. 
22 W. I". 1. at M. S. C. 
November 

1 Connecticut Valley Championships 

at Amherst. 
7 New Kngland Intercollegiate* at 

Boston 
12 Kensselaer at M. S. C. 



LEADS MAROON 




25 MEN REPORT FOR 
STATE SOCCER TEAM 



Ex-Captains Vin Couper and 

Jim Blackburne Will Aid 

^lentor 



Captain Clif Morey 
FOOTBALL CO AC I IKS 



Lou Bush and Km Grayson, former 

State Athletic greats, have been add- 
ed to Coach Kb Caraway's coaching 
staff for the season. Grayson handles 
the line, ISush the backs. 



With seven of last year's sixteen 

lettermen returning this season, the 
soccer team opened the season early 
this week and a squad of twenty-five 
divw equipment. Looking over the 
group, Coach Larry Briggs predicts 
an "unpredictable" season depending 
upon the ability of the sophomores to 
fill vital positions on the team. 

Two changes were recorded on the 
soccer schedule of the coming fall. 
Fitchburg taking the place of Tufts, 
and Springfield, last year's national 
intercollegiate champion, replacing 
Yale. 

The schedule: 

October 

I Dartmouth at Hanover 
*. i ..mi. State at Storm 

l.'i Fitchhurg at M. S. C. 
22 Springfield at M. S. C. 
2S Amherst at M. S. C. 

November 

. Trinity at Hartford 

II Wesleyan at M. S. < . 



OUTCOME IN DOUBT 
IN INITIAL GRID TEST 

Jackimcyzk, King, Santucc 
Irzvk are Starting 
Backs 



A scrappy State eleven will 
[the field against the yellowjai 
the opening tilt here Saturda 
this year's maroon squad has 
more pep and enthusiasm th 
: been in evidence for several s< 
Besides a small squad vv.i 
veterans, Coach Caraway ha.- | 
tend with the short space uf ju-- • 
weeks in which to condition h 
Happy however that the squad 
up in spirit what it lacks ii 
hers, Kb is sure that his team 
be in there battling on Saturda 
Coach Russ Peterson of A. 1. C. | 
had his squad out since Lahoi [. 
and the Aces got a taste i 
football in a pre-season scrip ■ 
with Amherst last Friday. 

Lamoureux, an excellent kicker 
passer will be a feature of the |. 
nat's while in the line Captain "Bah 
Meacham has been showing stand 
qualities at the center post. 




. . . and with more smokers 

ez y er\ day who find in Chester- 
fields refreshing mildness and he: 
ter taste just what they want in a 
cigarette. 

It takes good things to make a good 
product. That's why we use the best 
ingredients a cigarette can have 
— mild ripe tobaccos and pure 
cigarette paper — to make Chester- 
field the cigarette that smokers 
say is milder and better -tasting. 




..with MORE PLEASURE 
for millions 

Copyright I93t, I.tocrrr & Mvers Tobac ( I 





Mpo 






XL1X 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2«>. H»:is 



NO. 2 



hss of 1939 Chosen as The First to Receive New Arts Degrees 



[25,000 DAMAGE TO 

:ampus jncyclone 

ises Postponed as Freshmen 
Aid in Clearing 
Wreckage 



I ROSH COEDS SEE STORM DAMAGE 



111) TREES UPROOTED 

riant and Ground Crews 
Work Day and Night to 
Repair Damage 



[-- that 
Arn -' 



about $26,000 damage, last 

hurricane incurred n 

>ne hundred years will not 

p tt s Supt. uf Grounds W. 

DItg, There were no serious 

. - resulting from the 80 miles- 

hurricane. 

Days ami nights following the hur- 

■ fille<l with work and ef- 

remedy the damage. Service 

ments worked day and night. 

en aiiied in clearing campus 

ads. Flood refugees were cared for. 

short-wave communication was 

shed on campus. A storm dam- 

tiice by college officials 

place Monday. Mount Toby for- 

• aa- inspected by the head of the 

rertrj Dept. and was said to be a 

hazard. 

of '42 helped greatly in 
Kency. Classes being post- 
by I 'resident Baker Thursday, 
turned out in a body to aid 
ring campus roads of storm 
:■ and (alien trees. Swinging 

. pushing saws, and collecting 

•I-, the maroon-capped freshmen 

-."'! tirelessly and energetically. 

Armstrong wishes to state his 

'(latini of their good work. Only 

uu'h tin t help could campus roads 

been mad.' passable in one day, 

n the power plant, tele- 

grounds service depart- 

Continued on Page 6 




TRUSTEES VOTE FOR AWARD AT 
YESTERDAY'S BOSTON MEETING 



Name of Division of Social Sciences is Changed t.» Division of 
Liberal Arts on Recommendation of the 

Faculty Committee 

LATIN COURSES ADDED 

Economics, Psychology, Educa- 
tion, Politics and Sociology 

Are Arts Melds 



GLICK ELECTED TO 
FILL SENATE OFFICE 



Keil, Silverman New Members of 

Maroon Key — Set 

Kazoo Date 



Freshmen women pictured inspecting the damage in front of the 
Kussell house on North Pleasant street following the hurricane. 






PACKARD IS CHOSEN 
TO HEAD CARNIVAL 



Replaces Gordon Najar in Tost 

of Committee Chairman — 

Name Hager, Barrett 



Robert Packard was elected presi- 
dent of the Winter Carnival Com- 
mittee at the ftrsl meeting ><( the 
committee, held last Monday. Packard 
replaces Cordon Najar, who has 
transferred. Bob ii president of Theta 
Chi, a member of Adelphia, a former 
president of Maroon Key, and former- 
ly chairman of the Social Committee 
of the < 'arnival. 

Myron Hager '40 replaces Packard 
as Chairman <<f tin- Social Committee. 
Hager is president of his class, for- 
merly of the ttiaroon Key, ;i member 
< ntinued •■" P<*gt - 1 



CHAIRMAN 



^reshmen Come To Marry, See Farmers' 
Daughters, Escape Girl Friend, Make Good 




IJobcrt Packard 



Bj Myron Fisher 
'. eyes and an aching 
all unr hakyofl freshman 
i re were no hurricanes, 

I chaos. Hut it is with 
riping sensation that we 
Irst theme for English: 
1 feme to Massachusetts 
By now. we think we 



State College Is very democratic, 
that all are equal and very friend 
ly. And since it Is a highly sci- 
entific school, giving a U.S. (!) 
degree — which 1 want I decided 
to come here." 
L, I)., Knlield: (Telephone number un- 
known I 
•To get ;i husband." 



i> that isn't for publica Elliott Schubert. Methueii: 



rate, we decided to dis- 
unexpurgated reason, 

on a Greet Quest to 
lecting freshmen from 

to obtain a cross soc- 
class, we popped the 
waited for what we 
d he a typical answer. 
• amazing, so amazing. 
We thought it best to 
the answers anonymous. 

freshmen stray from 

to the wilds of Am- 



e> c r 



■ 
C I:, 

I 

I 
1 t * 

>rhar a H. 

«erm . 

"(on \\,, 



Roxbury: 

K>y who wants to make 



me out of every other 
fog this as the only 
'"Uld attend." 
' v Northampton: 
"'■ to see how firm the 
m » is. ti. e.. a geology 
■ i 

Mattapan: 

that Massachusetts 



"I came here to get a better edu 
cation so that 1 could get a good 
job." 
Cnknown Freshman: 

"I came here to see what farmers' 

daughters and backwoods girls 

look like. Also, i wanted to get 

far enough away from mj girl 
at home so that I COUld get ;"i 
other." 
Mahelle Drury. South licllingham: 
"I found out that this school offers 
the best course in biology, An 
other thing— I like the hills." 
Cnknown Coed: 

"Scram." 
Eleanor Gillette. Towando. Pa.: 
"I ,• the size of the school and 
the people here." 
William Mcintosh. Amherst: 

"I think it is as good a college ai 
any in the country." 
Mary Ann Kozak. Easthampton: 
"I came here to meet the hurri- 
cane; I knew it was coming." 
Ten Cnknown Freshmen: 
"We refuse to be quoted." 



MSC ENTOMOLOGISTS 
TO PRESENT PLAQUE 

Graduates expected to Confer 

at Meeting Merc 

Tomorrow 



Filling the vacancy left by the 
transfer of Cordon N'ajar, tin- Senate 
elected Herb Click, runner up in class 
elections, to the governing body of 
tin. college. 

Glick is president of Kappa Sigma 
fraternity and has been active in 

campus affairs as member of the Ma 
roon Key, Soph Senior Hop commit 
tee, and Winter Carnival Hall c >m 
tniliee <luring his sophomore ye • r 
He has also been an active member 
I of the Intcrfiateriiity Council. This 

is the first time the Senate has filled 

vacancies in this way. 

TWO vacancies were also tilled oil 

the Maroon K-y. N»mv rrmm b ^t* nr*» 

Dana Keil and Alan Silverman 'II. 

Keil is a member of Phi Sigma Kap 
pa, Silverman of Alpha Bpsilon I'i. 

Due to (he nature of Adelphia, 
there will probably be no further elec- 
tion to that organization until next 
spring. Adelphia, however, will in- 
duct the freshmen int.. the college 
Community with the restoration of a 

ceremonj used in previous years. 

The date for Uazoo Night, annual 
battle between freshmen and Sopho- 
morei has been >et for Friday night, 
( tctober 6 at ', p. m. The same rules 
used in former years will again be 
put into effect. 

Other Senate business included the 
change •■(' Informal price- from sev 
enty five to fifty cent- per couple. 

and revision of freshman rule-. 

The three upper clas.-cs of the col 
lege will elect their nominating com 
mittees Thursday at Convocation. 

Fleet ions of class officers will be held 
in the near future. 



Boston Mass.. Sept. 28 Seinors may 

"'reive the A. II. Decree accordllic t',, 
H Vote of the entire Trustee Hoard 
yesterday afternoon when they approv 

ed the recommendations of the Trua 

u ''' Commits n Faculty ami Pro 

gram of Study. This was made from 

findings of a faculty committee con 

slating of Professors Hand, Mackim 
mie, and Lamphear who reported to 
President Baker and gave him the 

basis for his report to the trustees. 

Three major decisions were made 
by the hoard changing the name of 

the Division of Social Sciences to the 

Division of Liberal Arts, confirming 
tin- establishment of two elective 
Courses in Latin, ami voting the fol 
lowing in regard to the A.n. Degree 
presentation: 

"Thai for the present all students 
who satisfy the freshman an.l soph 
on.ore requirements of the Division 

of Social Sciences as voted by the 
faculty in Mav 1938 ami who satisfy 
the junior and senior requirements 

Of She department, offering I.an 

guages, Literature and History should 
automatically be candidates for the 
Arts degree." 

"That student 

ior ami senior 

fields of E 

Education, Psychology, Sociology, and 
supporting their work in these' fields 

credits id' work lake,, f,om 
Continued ■ u /■ 



• III I V Hl|- the jllll 

requirement in the 

nies, Political Science, 



wilh IS 



DR. BAKER TALKS ON 
FOREIGN SITUATION 

That Troubles 
in Europe Hinder 
Progress 



Entomologists trained at Massachu- 
setts State < ollegC Will meet here 

at 10:00 a. m. tomorrow to unveil 
a bronze plaque on the .-..nth side 

of the present mat hemat ics building, 

formerly heauquai ters ^u- entomologj . 
Dr. C I'. Alexander, President Hak- 
er, Dr. II. T. Fen, aid. and Dr. E. I'. Tells Freshmen 
Felt will speak at th.- e\erci-e-. Ar 

rangements for the event are under 

the supervision of A. F. Burgess of 

Greenfield. Addressing the freshman convoca 

The group Will have a business tion last Wednesday, President Hugh 
meeting and discussion session in the I'. Baker took a large view of the 
afternoon. It is expected that a large world and its historic events by 
number of graduates will be back speaking of present day troubles in 
to confer on problems of mutual in- Spain and China as being terrible 
terest, to inspect the work of the incidents in ". . . the steady pfOgre 
entomology department, and to ex- of the world towards better things." 

Dr. Baker entitled his addre 

"From an Old to a New World," and 
-poke of the ". . . . gradual disap 
of old traditions and pro- 
He pictured the incoming 



COLLEGE LISTS NEW 
OFFICE LOCATIONS 



South College Departments Move 

as YVI'A Plans Work 

by Oct. 6 



i ... .in. 



ex 

amine the collections. 

PROGRAM 

Fernald Hall. 10:00 a. m. 

Arrangement report .... A. . . Burgess pearaiu 

Remarks Dr. C, I'. Alexander, cedurea 



Greetings .. 
Early entomi 



presiding students as ". . . . turning backs on 

President Baker an Old World to build a new." He con 

j at State eluded with an expression of faith 

Dr. H, T. Fernald ". . . in the ultimate accomplishments 

P r es e n tation of plaque Dr. K. P. Felt of goodness and peace," and with a 

Fernald Hall. 2:00 p. m. belief that students of today would 



lege, room 



Hrief business session 
Work and objectives of the 

Continued on Page 6 



work towards that accomplishment 
by ". . . making history as V"U would 
like to have it made." 



Offices and department of South 
College, rum moving to make wa\ 
foi a u CA renovation riant, will, 
by October ■'>. be located In the fol 
lowing manner: 

President's office Library .nth 

'•it readme room first floor. 

Chi. in it \ Library faculty 

second Moor. 
Placement North foil. 

18, 14, ic 

Treasurer's Office GoeSSRUUtn Hah 

oratory main office, Brat Boor. 
Dean's office. North College, room 

A, «;, 12, i. 

Short Course office North College, 

rooms J (i, II. 
Extension Service North College, 

Administration first floor. 

Home Economics second floor. 

Communit) Organisation anil 

Recreation basement 

4-H offices Bowditch Lodge. 

Department of Economics North 

College — rooms IS, ix 
Home Economics Stockbridge 

Hall. IK). 
Biological Survey North College, 

room 2. 
Agricultural Conservation, Stock 

bridge Hall, 217. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, rHL'RSDAY, SEPTEMBER 89, 1928 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, rHUKSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29. 1919 



BARTERING 
WITH JOE BABT 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Septvtnfofr 

SO I tedlcatioi 



WR-l 



flbaseacbiieetlP 1 Collegian 

Official newipaper of the MassaehuMtU State College. 

Published every Thursday by the students. 



Office lioom B, Memorial Building 

EMERY MOORE 
ARTHUR A. NOVES '40. Managing Editor 



"39, 



Telephone 1102-M 

Editor-in-Chief 
MABELLE BOOTH '39, Associate Editor 



Campus 

JOHN E. FILIOS "40, Editor 
BETT1NA HALL '39 
MAHY I MEEHAN a« 
FRANCES S. MERRILL 'S9 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '4n 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '« 
ROMA LEVY '40, Secretary 
KENNETH HOWLANH '41 
WILLIAM T. GOODWIN 4 1 
HAROLD FORREST "41 
CHESTER KI'RALOWICZ '41 
JOHN HAYES 'II 

Feature 

LLOYD B. COPELAND '39, Editor 
MYRON FISHER '39 
KATHEI.EEN TULLY '41 
EVERETT It. SPENCER '40 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Sports 

FRANKLIN M. DAVIS JR. 
D. ARTHUR COPSON '40 
MI'.ERT YANOW "41 



'40. Editor 



Photography 
LANE niDDINC.9 



'38 



Storkhridge Correspondent 
HAROLD PHILLIPS S'SS 

Collegian Quarterly 

SIDNEY ROSEN '39. Editor 

JANET CAMPBELL '40. Assoc. Ed. 

Financial Adviser 

PROF. LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 

DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS BOARD 
ALLEN GOVE '39. Business Manager 



Mgr. 



ABRAHAM CARP '39. Adv. Ma, J. HENRY WINN '39. Cir. 
GEORGE C. BENJAMIN '39. Subscription Manager 

Business Assistants -,,_,—», ,,,. 

E. EUGENE DENAULT '40 %£££** RODMAN U0 

ROGER H. LINDSEY '40 I' "BERl ™ P rHRiFN "41 

JOSEPH R. CORDON. JR. '41 . EI ? W ,r R i W*8 UrTFH -ll 

WALTER R. LALOR Ml DAVID F. VAN ME 



Kobody i-an print anything today 
without some mention of the hurri- 
cane, A I >ng with the damage which 
the hurricane has caused cornea a >i- 
guiaed blessing, Now the fro ihroan 
class won't need to remember that 
they are the class of nineteen Hun- 
dred and forty-two. They can il-utify 
themselves as the class of four years 
after the "Big Wind." 

Some students who were Stranded 
in 'Hamp after the storm wen pet- 
ting that the Math and l'hysics build- 
ings WOUid be blown half a mil" 
away. The others in the group Con- 
tended that the distance would be 
only a quarter of a mile. Why both 
-roups were wrong will forever re- 
main one of the quirks of Fate. 

* * 

While on the topic "Things 
which are not as mey were ex- 
pected to be," we came to Pat's 
English, Spontaneous generation 
is a fact in spite of what botany 
or bacteriology professors tell 
you, for now they got lots of 
little Pat's classes. 

* * 

The most heartless change to OC 
ur on this campus came when tht 



t plaque by EnUimolo- 
gistl ill Math building. 
Pruit-root-stoch eonfarwie* Pom« 

oloio Dei>t. 



Orloh.i 
I 



ri 



F' uit-ii"it--t 

otogy D> |i 

Hi. 'a Chi hulils it 



1'iini- 



1 Thfta Chi holds a vi<- dance, 
! Football vami-. Bowdoifl there 

; 3oce«r HUM, Dartmouth there. 

'' IVeshmnii IWSPtlon by M.-noiiih i lull 

in Memorial Hall. 7::i". 
g Octol.ci Conference <>t Extension 

foreetera, 
1 October Conference of Extension 

foresters. 
o Glee club rehearsal. 
7 Social Union. Ti'il Shawn moiip. 



Coed '42 



This Year's Frosh Woiru 
Exception to Genei 

Rule 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



them Club 

The Chemistry Club will hold its 
first meeting of the year tonight at 
7:00 in Goessmann Laboratory. An 
address by A. Omer Herbert on "Vis- 
ual Education in Chemistry" will 
come at 7 :.'<<> following a business 
meeting. Mr. Herbert's lecture will 
be illustrated with slides and motion 
pictures. Students of education are 
especially asked to attend. 

Men's (Jlee Club 

The Men's Glee Club will meet for 



PL'HSriUPTIONS $2 DO PER YEAR 

Make all orders nayable to The Massachu- 
setts Collegian. In case of change of ndrlreHH, 
subHcriher will pli>a»e notify the business man- 
ager as soon as iiossible. Alumni, undergrad- 
uate and faculty contributions are sincerely 
•ncourn^ed. Any communications or notices 
muHt be received at the Collegian office before 
t o'clock. Monday evening. 

Entered as second-cinss matter at the Am- 
herst Post Otlice. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in Section 
UOS. Act of October 1917. authorized August 
JO, 1918. 



SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 

Mooter 



Printed by Carpenter & Morehouse. Cook PI., 
Amherst. Mass.. Telephone 43 



1937 Mooter Wi 

Pbsocinted CbOedkfe Press 

Distributor of 

CoHe6»cte Digest 



RSPBSBINTSO FOR NATIONAL ADVSRTI9INO BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York, N. Y. 

CHICAGO BO«tOH • LOS AKttELIS • SAN FBANCI1CO 



Ills lc*Ill|'U.-> ».— «.™ — . 

German department decided to use , their first rehearse .on October 4th 
- more modern text in German I. I in the Memorial Budding at 8 o clock 
They must have been informed about The club will prepare compositions 
the sophomore who had copied all representing many styles and forms 
the written exercises in the old text of vocal music. 
from a more fortunate fellow who j Women's (Hee Club 

didn't flunk last year. These p-ip-r. ()„ October (i, the Women's Glee 
were all ready to be handed in when club will have its first rehearsal at 
called for. eight o'clock in the Memorial Build- 

* * ng. 1'he members have expressed their 

Ueinaerd's ghost came into the hope for an active season with a num- 
Collegian office yesterday. This is j oer of outside engagements, 
what the fox left on the floor. ( AH | index 



..y Kathleen lull \ 
Coeds come and coeds gfO, 
freshman coed is a perennial . 
nal oddity — and she is no i 
this year! 

Last week Suzy t'oed >ai« 
I come, you lucky college," 
rived in Amherst aceompan 
hurricane, a lost express 
enough luggage to outfit 
standing army. Someone told 
lots of luggage was a sure 
to make a good impression. A 
Russian army, her only opini 
the Russians should sit dow 
they get tired. 

Suzy has an extremely vagui 
of where to find her next c 
she can ALWAYS find the 
she eat'.' Oh boy! Very pron 
meal time she and her rollea 
storm Draper and then complain 
the line reaches half way I 
She carries her tray with n . 
expressions of anxiety and anticipi 
tion — she thinks, "I bet anything 
drop this" and simultaneously, [ 
wonder if Freddy will eat with 
Unfortunately, she knows as 
Freddy does that the form* i 
likely to o**Cttf tlum the latte . bat 
motto (3 'She Who Hesitate- is I....- 
— ao she sits with him (brazen has 
that she is) and talks of the « 
( ?) of Orientation and i.*r, Ldfflp 
all through the meal. 

Her beret is anotner think'. Shi 
howls soulfui.y about it all the I 
and doubts if she will EV id! ! 
to live till Columbus Day to take I 
thing off. She thinks upperclaj 

Continued on tut i 



E D I T © R I A L 



ACADEMIC 
SUPPORT 



ghosts is housebroke.) "Did you hear 
about the student who, after attend- 
ing a class Monday and Wednesday 
was getting none of the sublet mat- 
ter? After class he went to the in- 
structor and in a humble and apolo- 
getic tone he said, 'Sir. are you going 
fast in this class or am I just stupid." 
The professor replied, 'Why no. I'm 
not going too fast.' 



Assurances of a well directed, well balanced, well 
financed (dee Club should lend the impetus to try- 
cuts which seems to have been lacking during the 

,,ast years. Not only have men been lacking- in enthusiasm for 

the musical clubs, but there is slight doubt, now, that there is 

more material among the women of the college than has been 

evident of late. Of all the advertising possibilities in the college, 

tin <dee (dubs hold the most with its tours, local and radio con- 
certs. Amherst and Harvard have helped their name greatly with ^^ ^^J^ £ :Iiiunt 

the advertising their excellent clubs do, what reason is there to. J^J™, naine ta Evelyn Yellow 

a lack here at Massachusetts State College? ,,„,„,. The M(iunl Holyoke News car- 

Mr. Alviam leaves no doubt as to his aMht.es in creating ri , (1 lh , stl „, v that Miss Yellow Robes JJ^J^*^ must make 

enthusiasm as those seniors who heard the Hanger Quartet at „ a somber of the Sioux tribe > ot ^ rfJ ^ ^ ^.^ jn ^ 

Soeial Union four years ago can well testify, lie has excellent Jj^-^^^SM box in Stockbrh.ge Hall. This is made 

usie clubs but there remains J.- <■ a I ban ^ ^ ^ 



If this were a headline it would g«> 
Reds Invade American Colleges. We 
don't mean the A. S. U. 01 the kind 
Of Reds that the American LegK-n is 

a 



There will be a meeting of the 

Index Hoard tonight at 7:80 in the 

< Memorial Pudding. As this meeting 

is very important, all members are 

! urged to attend. 

Tryouts for chime ringing, and or- 
gan playing will be held by appoint- 
ment. All names should be in to Mr. 
Alviani, Memorial Pudding, by Oc- 
tober 5th at 5:00 p. m. 

Through an error, the rating of one 
student was incorrectly entered. With 
this correction the fraternity aver- 
age for Sigma Phi Kpsihm was suf- 
ficiently changed to give them third 
instead of fourth standing among the 
fraternities. Average 77.17. 

All persona wishing to have nn- 



PHI SKI PLEDGES 



Alpha chapter of Phi Sigma k 
takes great pleasure in Mtnounciaj, 
the pledging of Leo Santocci '4" 
Palmer, James W. Malcolm '40 i 
yoke and Christopher Paul '41 of Be* 
ton. 



OUT PATIENT HOURS 



splitting of con- 



eator and I graduate of C ■-!' ill 



necessary with the 

vocation groups. 

Collegian Hoard 
The Collegian Hoard will not meet 
on the new book shelf in (loodell 
this Monday evening because of fre h 



day at 5:00 p. m. His topic will be 
"(letting all there is from what little 
you have." 




support from the leaders of the m 

the questionable element of the student body's support 

It is not the musical chilis alone that suffer Iron, lack ot ( ., )nf , Ke . 
student interest. Although we have had and will have as good a WAM« N 

debating team as can be found in a college of our enrolment and SERGEANTJ^AIWBN 
menUl size, there has invariably been a don't want to bother RETIRES PROM SERVICE 
attitude 011 the Student body's part toward entering competition Sttfvnt James A WalT(>n ((f the man competition. Further .nnounc- 
and attending debates. # Military Department retired from ac- me nt will be made of the date and 

Whether editorial hammering can enlighten and liven the tiV( . se ,. vic . e j u l y 81, IWB with the Ume for the next meeting, 
students Of this college to the opportunities which are waiting rank (> f Major, retired. After nearlv Dr James (Jordnn (;ilkey of S pring- 
for them and their moral support is questionable. However, tf Udrty -one ^"J^ JJ£J » 1^ will speak in vespers this Sun- 
enthusiasm enter the field there is reasonable assurance that tliese )f ' '^ rvk>( ; ' as , m instructor in Mil dav at 5:00 p. m. His topic wil be 
academic activities will take a new and important lease on life. ^ sdence an(1 T actlcs at M. S. (' 

Sergeant Warren retired to prlvat- 
\ GRAVE Military majors at Massachusetts State College may this summer . 

PROBLEM well look tO their studies, for should war be in view, Sergeant Warren first enlisted in 
they wilI b e called for mobilization from their posi- the .^ JJ^J^ ^ 
tions in the R. 0. T. C, Ours is an insecure world. I after transferP(i t o the Philip- 

Recent events in world history have been alarming tor the ^ Islan(is and then left the service 
average American and perhaps as much to the college students jn l9M M a corporal. He was with 
of the country as to any other group of individuals, for we are a 5 „,ief troop on the Mexican horde, 
tcroS whiH. Will be Picked in case of another major disaster ^^^£^£1 
We Who are now in college have not the background of ho. o. ^^^ * w seas durill g the 
that the proceeding generation has. but we have had enough 01 the w Hi y ;n . M that timP when pro . 
economic and political effects to serve as warning. motions were made over night on ac- 

There is no common field upon which the youth of America tual results, he was raised t., the rank 
can mkV because of the ever changing and differing opinions - ( ^ ;; r in the 7St ^ijU . 
throughout the country. Some gn.ups desire .sola ton ent.re ly, ^^ p ,, ni otions were made 
others an alliance with the other Allied powers. Whatever the ^ ^^ ^ thp Military Dept. 
desire may be however, we must face the problem of American horo al tht> ( , )1U , K( ,. staff Sergeanl 
policy with clear and level heads. It is not the privilege of a col- R()V T nnf . r t^'J^J^ 
,ege newspaper to set the course of our nation and ourseves. bu geant f-J^f^^^pffi 
to warn and aid those who lead us. The youth of our country must SUte in ^^^ t „ a mfnm 
1 e heard, it is we who face a great part of any danger which may ^^ ]2 JWS aftpr a m . onl 1)f 
be brought on US by foolish acts or policies, it is Up to the men twtnty . siVOT years In the service. 
and women of this and every other college to make themselves Ht has been here at the college since 
heard in a peaceful war for peace. Ju,y 15 '*-'- 



Will students please take nolic 
of .he following hours at tkc MX 
patient building, and heed (hem <■ 
that there will not he any omfu 
sion. The outpatient clinic i> ip* 
9-11:30 a. m. and 3-6 p. ■• |V ' 
Saturday, Sunday, and holidj) 
when it opens in the morning onK 



PACKARD 18 CHOS.,.. 

Continued from P.tge 1 



of the A. P.. degree commit!.' 
Kappa Sigma. 

Harre.t 

Fred Healy ':<9. resigned M j 
0»r of the committee, due ; 
of time, and BIN Barrett 
elected to replace him. Ba 
basketball player, former Mj"" | 
man, and a member of 
Kpsilon. . 

The Carnival Committee "" 
weekly, and will relea- [ 

the Carnival next weeK. 



"COLLEGIAN^ 

(Quarterly 

There are positions open on the 
Collegian Quarterly for a junior 
and a sophomore editor. An open 
competition will be held, lie at 
the Collegian olfice. Room 8. 
Memorial Bldg., Monday night. 
Oct. I, at 7:30 p. m. 



COMPETITION 



Edi tonal 



Freshmen 

Candidates for the editorial, 
feature and sports hoards of the 
Collegian should meet, Monday 
night, in the Index office at the 
Memorial Pudding at 8:00. 

Miss Mabelle Booth, associate 
editor of the paper, will be in 
charge of the competition and 
ha< arranged a series of instruc- 



tive talks for the six ' * ' k ~ 
petition period. 

Freshmen will l» 
assignments on th« p»P 
he rated Ofl their R< 
terest. and amount of 
material. 

Businett 

Freshmen planning "• ^ 

for the business l»»™ '' 

Collegiar should me. « 

legian office at 8sS» 

noon or get in toii-I 

Cove at Phi Sigma K'l'P 

., L -ii k.. i«ked |0 n 

Freshmen wdl at 

. |tM 

present "" sl 



thin if* 



n»i 



th 

mailing and handling I 

an and to aid h> ■* 

work. 



TED SHA WN AND GROUP OF MEN DANCERS 
TO BE FEATURE OF FIRST SOCIAL UNION 

Known Author and Dancer to Appear on Program Friday, 
October 1- — Federal Theatre Group, Jitney Players 
Scheduled for Later 



AT SOCIAL IMO.N 



awn. whose experiment in 



LULLluL orchestra 



met with great success both 

country and abroad for the 

years, Will bring his men 

, Massachusetts State Col- 

,,, Friday evening, October 7th, 

,, feature of the first Social 

.. (U1 program of the year. 

'; aking away from the conven- 

! riiuila that every dance en- 

.■ u-t have more women than 

,\ui will present his dancers 

,,, -ram which has as thematic 

•,.;. rhythms of early North Am- 

history, motifs of sport, war, 

, ri ,, modern extravaganzas, and 

street theme*. All the dances have 

created by Shawn, and have 

,, ,,] music composed for them by 

:, ... Meeker, accompanist-composer of 

. | p-oup. 

KnoWll throughout America not 

on |j a- a dancer but as a writer and 

,,,, on the dance as a creative 

• Shawn spends his summers with 

men in Western Massachusetts. 

,g new dances and keeping fit 

fall and winter tours. His Farm 

School, as he calls it, in Lee. 

Mass. Jervea as a home for the eom- 

panj when not on tour, and has been 

. wenes since 1988 of summer lec- 

tures and demonstrations open to the 

, Those in the company in ad- 

on to Shawn are: Barton Mumaw, 

Wilbur McOormack, Frank Overloos, 

. i Heam, Frank and John Dolmar, 

John Schubert and Harry Coble. 

Other features which have been an- 
nounced by the Social Union Com- 
■■,, f<»r the coming year include 
the presentation of "Dr. Fausts" by 
federal Theatre Croup, on Nov. IK; 
md of "Rip Van Winkle" by the Jit- 
players, on Dec. 6. Roland Hayes, 
, will appear Jan. f>. 



HAS BUSY SCHEDULE 



Radio Broadcasts and Public 

Appearances Planned 
by Alviani 



Newly reorganized and now undei 
the direction of Doric Alviani, the 
Massachusetts State College Orches- 
tra plans to have more public appear- 
ance.-, than in previous years and sev- 
eral radio broadcasts. Plans are un- 
derway also to secure new orchestra- 
tions of such well-known selection- 
as Gershwin's "Rhapsody in I'lue" and 
melodies irom musical comedies by 
Jerome Kern ami Sigmund Romberg, 

First Rehearsal 

Anyone interested in playing in the 

orchestra will be welcome at the first 

rehearsal in the Memorial Building 

on Wednesday, October 5 at 8 o'clock. 

ALVIANI TO MEET WITH 
NEW MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



Heavy Schedule Planned For 

Year as Work Begins 

on Tuesday 



H ere 

l nder the pressure of 

R oaring winds, this 

R estaurant 

I n the Amherst 

C ollege community is 

A 

N ever failing 
xample of 
ervice to you 



F.AT AT 



College 
Candy Kitchen Inc. 



1 he hest in food" 



Due to rushing, the first rehearsal 
of the Men's Glee Club has been post- 
poned till Tuesday October 4th at 
K:0(i p. m. in the Memorial Pudding, 
with the prospect of a husy year, all 
men are invited to attend this re- 
hearsal. 

Under the direction of Mr. Doric 
Alviani, new instructor of music who 
is noted for his work with choruses, 
the Clee Club has planned a real pro- 
gram. Working with a full club of 
4<> men, a quartet and double quartet, 
and new music, the chorus hopes to 
carry a program of radio, tour, and 
local concerts as Hacking is in sight 
for a singing tour this year. 

In addition to the regular concert -. 
the club plans to sponsor college Ring 
sessions, a Christmas program which 
will start an annual series, and lie 
annual Musical Club presentation in 
the spring. Regular rehearsals will 
play a prominent part in the year's 
activities. 

Variety programs, and Fraternity 
sings are also on the schedule. Mr. 
Alviani hopes to visit fraternities in- 
formally and arouse enthusiasm for 
group singing in the house-. 

A group of 2. r > men will he selected 
for traveling from those in the reg- 
ular club. It is hoped that enough 
men will show interest to warrant 
further enlargement of the Clee Club's 
numbers later in the year. 




INTERESTING EXHIBITS ARE SHOWN IN 
G00DELL, MEMORIAL AND WILDER HALLS 

Library Bxhioil shows Work of North Shore Camera Club Mem. 

Building Has Collection of Photographs of Springfield 

Architecture While Third is of Informal studies 



BAND WILL PLAY AT 
RHODE ISLAND GAME 



To be rirst Appearance of t!i 
Year Will Travel to 
R. T. I. and Tufts 



B) Bettina Mall 
The campU3 has gone photograph 

WSCioUS >n a Itig was tin- u.-,k 
ith no less than three Collections of 
photos," all different and all interesl 



Th 



In Goodell Library where one would 
expect them is an exhibition of pic- 
tures from the North Shore Camera 

first public appearance of the ] (.,„,,_ u|)j( . (i |>|||||;||||s umwua | <liai . 



Ted Shawn 



CIAS5 TREES GONE 



Wind Destroys Historic Elms 

and Maples Planted 

(JO \ ears Ago 

Last Wednesday, in little more than 
an hour, many of the finest trees 
on our campus, some of which have 
been standing for over lit) years, were 

destroyed, leaving gaps not only in 

the former beauty of our roads, hut 
also in the memories and traditions 
of the college. These elms and maples 
destroyed were more than shad" 

trees adding to the stateliness of the 
buildings, they represented material 
evidences of the classes which have 

helped to bttild and cstanlish Mass. 
Stale. 

Although rather hard to imagine, 
the tract of land purchased in lKlil 
for the development of the College 

was completely covered by forest and 
swamp, all of which had to be com- 
pletely cleared before work could pro- 
gress. Five years later, in Ikc,!i, the 



hand this year will he on Dads' Day 
.it the Rhode Island Massachusetts 
State game. With new instruments, 

several new musical arrangements, 

and made-to order uniforms for the 
coed drum majors, the hand will make 
at least two trips with the football 

team, once to Rensselaer and once 

to Tufts. 

The first regular weekly rehearsal 
will be held tonight. Thursday, at 
7::ui in the Memorial Building. At 
this time tryouts for student leader 
will be held, and anyone wishing to 
plaj in the hand is welcome. 
For Military 

It is permissible for sophomores or 
freshmen to substitute band for mil- 
itary during the first half of the aeffl 
ester. 

RUSHING WILL CLOSE 
TEN SATURDAY NIGHT 



Vote From Houses .-.hows Most 
in Favor of Action 
Chapel Monday 



Original plans to dose rushing this 

Saturday at K) p, m. were made final 

yesterdaj despite complications re- 
sulting from misunderstanding and 
tie-up due to the storm. At meetings 

class of 1871, realizing that this clear- of the Inter-fraternity Council held 

ing process had left the campus too 'during the rushing season, il VMM 

barren, planted l'7 trees around and questioned a. :<> whether an extension 



near North College. From that first 
gesture grew the movement that led 

to the planting the elms and maples 
along the roads and around the huild 
ings. 

In ikt:i, the class of "78 carried <>n 
the work by planting the elms which 
line the road in the south side of 
the campus, and in the same year 
the class of "iC< went to the bills of 
Pelhain and brought hack the sugar 
maples which grace the main road 
through the campus. The elms along 
the road on the north side were plant 



of the season would be advisable. Thi 

plans were made definite when a vole 
from all houses found the majority 
in favor of closing rushing a- 
scheduled. 



From Rhode Island State we And 
that thirty girls reported for hockey 

practice, ine coeds will miss one of 

their traditional foes this year Con- 
necticut State College due to the 
abolishment of all varsities women's 
-port at this institution. 



INDIA AND PERSIAN 

Prints 

for 

TABLES OR DRESSERS 

or 

WALL HANGINGS 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



Because of the excitement caused 

by the hurricane and lack of facili 
ties in the fraternity houses for ci; 
tertainnieiit anil visiting, it was not 

possible to hold regular visits to the 

houses the latter part of last week, 

and such visits were abandoned y- 
terday when only ■ handful of fre h 

men turned out for the second 
cd two years later by the classt ol ,x, 

.... i.i scheduled for luesday evening. 

and the main highway was planted 

Continued em Ng* 4 This is the only opportunity fo. 
freshmen to pledge house according 
to the present rule- of the Interfr 
ternity Council which voted last year 
to have all rushing of freshmen clo«e 
with the regular pledge chapel. 

Closed rushing will be in effect 
over the weekend and all freshmen 

men will meet in the Memorial Build 
ing at 7:30 on Sunday evening to re 
ceive then- hids. At pledge chap i 
Monday morning at 7:80 freshm m 

will signify their choice of lion i 



EXHIBITS 



I. Memorial Ituilding 

Photographs of Buildings in 
Springfield 
II. Gaedell Library 

I'hotouraphs from the North 

shore Camera club 

III. Wilder Hall 

Miscellaneous Photographic 

Studies by Waugh 



M. S. C. PLACQUES 
M. S. C. BOOKENDS 

See Herb (ilick. Kappa Sij> House 
or 

JEFFERY AMHERST BOOKSHOP 



actor studies, and lovely landscape-., 
as well as several animal studies. 

Upon examination of the collec- 
tion, two men stand out as being par 
ticularly skilled in the field each ha-, 
chosen. These men ;ne Standish, whose 
work is <lear, concise and picturesque: 
and Fddy, whose character studies 
have the glow and mellowness of 

fit Id paintings. "Winter Sunshine," 

which has been placed first in the 

collection, merits its place hy the 
sheer beauty of its lipht treatment, 

the delicate contrasts, and fine lines; 
'Architectural Detail." a "trick shot" 
repeats Standish's skill with its 

sharp pattern, and "dead end, shows 
a strong sense of proportion and 
balance. Those who like portrait stu 
• lies will lind "Madolyn, and "And 
the Day l»rew Nigh," interesting, and 
may even proclaim "Mingo Mont," 
with its very Rembrandtosipie air the 
finest picture of all. 

Probably most of the students by 

this time have seen the exhihit iii 

the Memorial Building, which Is one 
<>f unusual interest, ami certainly 
worth more ilian just a passing glance 

The collection of photographs was 
compiled by I>r. Hitchcock Of Wes- 

ley.in ( diversity for the Springfield 
Museum of Fine Arts, and consists 
of studies of styles and details of 
architecture existing in Springfield, 

Mas.-., using well-known building, in 
the city as examples. 

It would he pointless and useless 
here to go into a discussion of tb,. 

different styles of architecture repre 

sented in this exhibition, for the pic 
lures accomplish much more towards 
that end than words could possibly 
However, for those who ;, r ,. interest 
ed in the pictures .and what they 
stand for, a printed text accompanies 
each photograph, giving briefly what 
each picture demonstrates. 

The third exhibit, which is in 
Wilder Hall, is entitled "Miscellan 
eous Photographic Studies," by Pro 
lessor Waugh of the Landscape Ar 
chilecture Department, and arthougi 

it is a small collection, contl ins OIP* 

pictures of interest, unuauaJneas and 
beauty, 

The most striking photograph, i 
perhaps the one "Summer Rain, 
I'lah," wnich not only is notable for 
its subject but also for composition 
balance ami the subtle hade ,,f half 

light and dark. ( antra* tin:' 'Si- "p . 
erty Grass" is a bright cheerful pin.. 

tograpll which show what can be 
done with ordinal, \ and familiar ma 

terial. Lastly "Springtime" has the 
typical softne of pi [ng and is In- 
ter* tine, for Hie water m fa -e , ;i, l ,| 

leflecl ions. 

There are other photographs too, 
which deserve mention; mainl) "Pal 
li.k," by Met. air. "Wistful," by Hall, 

and "Ferocity, by Bell, three Cue ;ini 
tual lode-; .m.l last, hut not lea I , 
"Silhouette, by K • < ■ F i . a pICtUK <•( 

shadow; with the charm of a .lap 
■■in. i print. 



Now that the floods and hurricanes are over, come in and get acquainted with 
the oldest clothing store in town. High-grade clothing and habadashery at prices 
you can afford. See our Reversible Coats at $19.50. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



A 1 3 d V S . h 3 i ¥\ Tis 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2'.>, 1938 



CCCD NCTES 

BY JACQUELINE STEWAKT 



The opening of the 1938-39 year 

at State lias prooably been the moat 
exciting since the founding <>f the 
college. What with tornadoes, flood, 
Daylight Saving-Eastern Standard 
Time, we have been wondering wheth- 
er it lias been worm the effort. 

From what we can gather only one 

sorority was damaged by the tornado 

ami then only slightly. All houses 
are without electricity and hot water 
(except one). This is a distinct hard- 
ship and consequently the Abbey is 
swamped with upperclasswomen (now, 
now, don't get the wrong idea) they 
are only ( ! ) there in the interest of 
cleanliness. 

The upper (lass men and women 
and the faculty have already dis- 
covered that this year's freshman 
class is the nicest, most outstanding, 
and brilliant class that ever matric- 
ulated at this college. (We hear the 
same thing every year.) Bat seri- 
ously, the "Windy" class of "42 has a 
lot to live up to. 

The social season was started by 
the informal after the victorious foot- 
hall game last Saturday. "Vic" par- 
ties will be getting underway soon, 
so we thought that you jitterbugs 
might be interested in this swing vo- 
cabulary that we have collected dur- 
ing the summer. The lingo changes 
constantly and many expressions 
which may be considered "hot" today- 
are cold as ice tomorrow. There are 
some, though, that seem to be per- 
manent such as: 

Cats — dance musicians 
Alligators, Hep C a t s— non-per- 
forming Swing fans 
Sends 'Em — inspires audience 
Schmaltz— sweet music; Icky— 

oversweet 
Jam Session— Swing players im- 
provising privately for their 
own amusement 
Gut- Bucket. Screwball, Wacky- 
degrees of hotness of Swing 
Corny, Strictly I'nion — old fash- 
ioned stuff 
Papermen, Salon Men, Long- 
Haired Boys — musicians who 
can't improvise 
jive — Swing, music of hot bands 
Hot- Licks. G e t-Offs— individual 

improvisation 
Shoot the Likker— when an im- 
provising soloist hands over a 
theme to another 
Clambake— a poor performance 

hy a swing band 
Golf has become a major sport in 
the girls Physical Education classes. 
This summer two local gals walked 
off with cups from the local golf club. 
Marion Gunness won one of them (She 
is a good golfer). Yours truly won 
the "Booby" cup. 

Sigma Beta Chi is very happy to 
announce that Mrs. Rowe has taken 
the position as house mother vacated 
by Mrs. Flanders this summer. An 
introduction tea will be held for Mrs. 
Rowe npxt Saturday afternoon. 

Many of coeds were counselors at 
girls camps last summer. Others got 
their exercise by toting trays; and 
still others stayed at home indulging 
in tennis, golf, swimming, etc. 



Engineering, Political Science Are 
New Majors Offered By The College 



"TIME MARCHES- 



By Fiances S. Merrill 

Students returning to the State 
campus have .ound an enlarged and 
improved course of study available; 
not only is a general four-year course 
in Engineering, leading to the degree 
of liachelor of Science, now offered, 
but several changes and additions have 
been made in the old courses of study. 
The freshman course has been re- 
vised to include the choice of a full 
year of either biology or chemistry. 
This will replace the former botany 
and chemistry courses which were re- 
quited for half a year each. The new- 
biology course will include the for- 
mer botany course, but also includes 
a study of animal life. Dr. Gilbert 
Woodside and Prof. Ray E. Torry will 
instruct. 

Increased interest in problems of 
government and political methods 
have resulted in the adoption of three 
upperclass courses, all to be taught 
by Dr. Charles J. Rohr, assistant pro- 
fessor of political science. The three 
courses are a survey of public ad- 
ministration, political science, and 
state and local government. A major 
Political Science has been started. 
Scientific Courses 
Two scientific courses have been 
added. A study of foods for grading, 
adulteration and values will be made 
by students in the horticultural man- 
ufactures department under Dr. John 
Clague. A general course in physi- 



ology will be given by Dr. Nathan 
Kakieten. 

The purpose of the new Engineering 
course is to train students in the 
fundamental principles of engineering, 
with the expectation that proficiency 
in a specific field is to be acquired 
in graduate work or in industry. 

During the freshman and sopho- 
more years the student is offered a 
broad training in the fundamental 
sciences of mathematics, chemistry, 
and physics and in such cultural sub- 
jects as English, psychology, and eco- 
nomics. During the junior and senior 
years the application of science to 
engineering is provided in courses 
dealing with mechanics, structures, 
and machinery, with ample opportun- 
ity for the election of work in the 
sciences and humanities to give a 
broad and liberal education. Courses 
along specific lines of engineering are 
available as electives in the junior 
and senior years. 

Many of the electives of the junior 
and senior years may be chosen from 
other departments to help fit the stu- 
dent for a specific vocation. Courses 
in bacteriology and chemistry are es- 
sential for one interested in sanitary 
engineering; courses in economics 
help fit a man for sales and manage- 
ment phases of engineering; and 
courses in agriculture prepare a stu- 
dent for work in agricultural engi- 
neering. 



Has anyone the correct time? If 
so. it's nothing short of a miracle 
after the last four days. 

It seems that the state of Mas- 
sachusetts was scheduled to switch 
from Daylight Saving to Eastern 
Stnadard time on Saturday night. 
But due to the damage caused by 
the storm, Gov. Hurley issued a 
proclamation on Saturday after- 
noon to the effect that the state 
would remain on Daylight Saving 
for another week. All very fine. 
But . . . 

Dean Machmer decided that, 
since there was no way of notify- 
ing the college employees of this 
change (they never read the papers, 
of course), the college would 
change to Standard Time on Mon- 
day and then revert to Daylight 
Saving beginning Tuesday. So it 
was that Monday morning found 
students arriving an hour early for 
classes, resettling mistaken watch- 
es, and in general getting all 
balled up. 



KNOX ELECTED HEAD 
OF FRESHMAN CLASS 

Helen Janis, Jean Cadis! y 

Posts — Perry is 
Treasurer 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, lilt RSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, ISM 



Amid much confusion the ;•'. 
man class, guided by the 
elected temporary officers but 
Charles Knox, of East Loiign 
was elected president, and H. . 
Janis of Turners Falls, viee-pr. 
.lean Carlisle, of Saugus, was 
Secretary and Robert W. Pen 
Pittsfield, treasurer. The capta 
Sergeant-at-arms, respectivel 
Benjamin Y. Hadley, Jr., oi 
Harbor, Me., and Carl P. Wei 
Worcester. 

The regular officers of the 1 
men class will be picked in i 
three weeks after the Senate de 
that the class is well ac q ua in ted 

HORSES NAMED 



A.S.U. TO OPEN WITH 
A FROSH RECEPTION 

New Chapter Commences First 

Season on Campus — 

Ideals Stated 



COED *42 

Continued from Page 2 



BAKER HONORED 

Dr. Hugh 1'. Baker, president of 
Massachusetts State College, is one 
of about 100 prominent business and 
educational leaders who will serve as 
members of the Northeastern Divi- 
sion Council of the United States 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Dr. Baker has accepted an invita- 
tion from W. Gibson Carey, Jr., of 
New York City, vice-president of the 
U. S. Chamber. 



PRE-MED CLUB 



Pre-Med Club will hold its first 
meeting Wednesday, October 5 at 
the 1-H clubhouse at 7:00 p. m. 
Drs. I.orimer. Allen. Lake, and 
Harrington, who have just gradu- 
ated from Harvard Medical School 
and who are giving the physical 
exams on campus, will hold an in- 
formal discussion on Pre-Medical 
training. Everyone is invited to at- 
tend. 



Opening their initial season at the 
college, the Mass. State Chapter if 
the American Student Union is plan- 
ning a freshman reception to be held 
next week. The time anu place will 
be announced. 

"The ideals of the Student Union," 
said George Curran '40, president, 
"center about the word democracy. 
As an organization, we give the 
American college student an op- 
portunity to discuss his own ideas 
on important issues of not only the 
campus but the world, and to com- 
pare his ideas with those of others." 
The American Student Union has 
many thousand members, and has a 
chapter at almost every college or 
university in the country. A National 
executive exists, but the chapters are 
virtually autonomous in deciding their 
programs. Such programs consist of 
discussions, lectures by world import- 
ant people, dramatics, peace programs, j 
and other active and interesting work. 
The ASU chapters at Smith, Mt. Hol- 
yoke, and Amherst, have been very 
active, and, according to Mr. Curran. 
will join with the Mass. State Chap- 
ter in many of its programs. These 
chapters will be invited to the fresh- 
man reception. 

An attempt is being made to secure 
a particularly interesting speaKer for 
the reception, someone well acquainted 
with, if not actually a participant in. 
or victim of the European situation. 
As a parting shot. Mr. Curran added, 
"The American Student Union shows 
its true democratic spirit by accept- 
ing members regardless of their 
creeds or ideas and by the fact that 
it has no connection whatsoever to 
any political party in the country." 

The new tennis courts have been 
greeted very enthusiastically by the 
coeds and a tennis tournament will 
soon be in progress. 



are rather cruel at times, but a senior 
man is what she prays for every 
night. Toward this end, she attempts 
sophistication with lots of lipstick and 
a "Why was I born . attitude which 
fails entirely when she floats regally 
into the wrong classroom. 

She giggles, gurgles, gushes and 
blushes — all her profs are "to cute for 
words," the boys in her classes are 
"darling," college is "divine," and the 
hurricane was "more fun." 

Heavens help her, poor girl. Thatch- 
er is the center of her universe, and 
"I know the most wonderful man" he,- 
favorite phrase. How could college get 
along without her? 



CLASS TREES GONE 

Continued from Page 3 



Ten new horses received this m< 
by the Military Department have I 
named after military majors if 
past two years. 

The fonowing names and nan 
have been assigned: Blake ";:: 
Peterson "17, 19 Townsley "38, 34 
gelo "M, 36 Morrison '38, 4(J I 
': J ,7, 41 Lyons "M, 5<» L,apham ' 8" 
French "18, 5:* Fillmore "M after 
Eleanor Fillmore, first Bono 
Colonel during Colonel Aplingl 
time here. 

Some of the horses temporaril] 
tired last year have also been 
on service this year. 



with its elms by the class of '82. The 
only other period of wholesale plant- 
ing such as this occurred a few years 
later when the then-existing walks, 
and the road on the east side of the 
campus were planted. Since that time 
the only additions have been of indi- 
vidual trees here and there. 

This brief review of the history of 
the trees serves only to reveal how- 
much we have lost by the hurricane; 
we can but hope now that classes 
coming along will see fit to replace 
some of the beauty, and for the pres- 
ent be thankiul that so many trees 
were spared by which we can re- 
member those who helped build and 
establish Massachusetts State Col- 
lege. 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



New and Standard Books 



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SIN.-MON.-TIKS.. OCT. -'-' 
Cont. Sun. 2-10:30 I'. M. 

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M 111 HI SIS 

BY Aivi I'OPSON 



. lain*' turnout for last 
game wag one factor in the 

,, ega Is" us certain at it is 
of thi' line spirit and loy- 

. ii is present <>n the State 
Unfortunately, there will 
Me more home games ami 

mes <>f the team may rise 

le away, but we hope that 

,t of the student body will 

adj whether State Is listed in 

i logs column. 

tion swimming at this early 
.illy out of plate since thus* 
, with the sport realize thai 
J8 an all yen- affair, start 

the opening of college and 

to the end. Joe Rogers' 

. been Ul the water now for 

eek, and will soon be round- 

• the shape which gave State 
n Rye of its six meets last 

I \w reason for this creditable 
record which incidentally makes 
swimming one of the most suc- 
cessful sports sponsored by the 
college, is the material, the way 
the material is handled by ab'e 
( oath Rogers, and the enthusi- 
asm of the squad. 

[) ,- within our power to give the 
g team a better break than 
ire scheduled to get from this 
season's work. Under the pres- 
ent system of six meets on a year's 
, . a man who swims a fifty yard 
,;;,-! trains two hours every day and 
at night during the season for just 
inutea ol swimming competi- 
, a hundred yard sprint swimmer 
vrorks for five and a half minutes 
>etition. 
Among the colleges in our class, we 
-land alone as a team with less than 
I ■ meets. Most of our opponents 
hgve ten OI more tilts. With a small 
.;<!. the difficulty of winning a let- 
tei will be so great that it is unfair 
the men who really work hard. 
■ importance of swimming on the 
is is well established. It rank 
a- a major sport. Yet it places 
i smaller burden on the finances of 
partment than any of its sister 
Surely the team deserves a 

rjditions to the schedule, perhaps 
ii. Colby, or some college in 



State's Second Grid Test Slated For Saturday At Bowdoin 



HANOVER GAME TO 
OPEN SOCCER SLATE 



.VI AKRON ACE 



Captain liodda will Load Maroon 

Team — Positions 

In sec n re 



Saturday will find the State Hooters 
treking up to Hanover for the sea- 
son's opener against Dartmouth. Un- 
der Coach Larry BriggS, and his as 
sistants Vin Couper, Bob Hunter, and 
.Jim Hlackburne, a pretty fair eleven 
has been whipped into shape. 

Last year, the Maroon OUtOOOted the 
big Green 2-1, and the team is on 
the trail of a repeat this year. Al- 
though, Coach Briggs can offer a ten- 
tative lineup for the game, few posi- 
tions are certain. Wilson, a senior 
will be in the goal, the fullbacks will 
he chosen from among Podolak, 
Jacobson, Jakobek, and Auerbach. the 
halfbacks from Hurr, Hrown, Gould, 
Simonds, Fwing, and Howe, and 
wings from Bowen, Johnson, and (aii . 
At center will be Captain Rodda, 
while on the insides will be Schoon- 
maker, G Iwin, or Johnson. 

Admittedly, the linesmen have as 
big a front line and the best shots 
seen hereabouts for some time. How 
ever the ability is less plentiful be- 
hind this forward line. Most of the 
hacks are Inexperienced, and sopho- 
mores make up a good part of the 
team. 

Only a slight edge is conceded to 
Dartmouth depending on the amount 
of new sophomore material that the 
Dartmouth men have uncovered. The 
State team will not be confident, but 
ready to fight, and a Rood battle can 
be expected. 




BRUNSWICK TEAM WILL RATE AS STRONG 
FAVORITE OVER SCRAPPY MAROON CLUB 

Game Will be First Contest for Heavy, Fast Polar Bears Loss of 
Stan Jackimczyk May Hurt Coach Caraway's Offense 

Against Maim 1 Champs 

GRADUATION LOSSES 
NOT FELT BY BEARS 



Johnny Hlasko 

Johnny Hlasko. home town boy, who 
turned in a wry creditable perform- 
ance Saturday in the opener against 
A. I. I'. To Johnny's credit were three 
pass interceptions and a good defens- 
ive same throughout 

STATE FOES BREAK 
EVEN ON SATURDAY 



Well-Drilled Walshmen liea.lv 

— Boast I nnteen 

Lettermen 



Rhode Island Tops Maine 1 !-<» 

While Coast Guard Bows 

to Wesleyan 



TRACKMEN OCT MONDAY 



Spiked shoe artists will report for 

fall work next Monday according to 

Coach L, U Derby. All men inter- 
ested in trying out for the varsity 
may draw < quipment at that time. 
Regular track sessions may be ar- 
ranged as usual three times a week. 



55 Yard Touchdown Jaunt By Sub Back Cohen 
Gives State 12-6 Win Over Tricky A.I.C. Squad 



■ lily confused by a fast 

attack which kept them in 

for several minutes of the 

quarter, Caraway's spirited 

came through last Saturday to 

take A. I. C, 12-fi on the home turf. 

eleven which Coach Kuss I'eter- 

>"ii brought to Amherst to repeat or 

season's tie game was a 

-■II drilled outfit with a clever 

wnbination. 

Jackimcysk, a local sophomore 

kled in the early period, teariri! 

long runs around the Yel- 

Banka. Even at that, the ball 

ar the State payline until 

isko, stalwart Maroon Pivot 
'ke up the A. I. C. clicking 
'«p hy Intercepting a Mur- 

riurley toss to *ro for s Rain 
yards. 
plowing by Chat Com nl and 

brought the agate Into 

position and hero Allan 

I wobbler which was cleverlv 

Up hy Howie Rudtfe for the 

ei of tne (tame. At the end 

nd period the board showed 

i i. C. o. 

Hon to his sterling play on 

midge showed uj) well when 

to punt, pettinff off two 

far into enemy territory, 

other end Captain CI if 

• - playing a steady game, 

>' blocking power and mak- 
vell calculated rushes on 
pssser which were instru 
the several State intet - 

Its pulled a little hocus 
; the bap on their kickoff 
the opening of the third 
1 li enabled them to briny 
"l.v to the midline. Hanna. 
■ quarterback received the 
Blasko, ran to the ripht. 



faked to IfacNeill, the ripht end, then 
lateraled t>> Ropulewia who lugged the 

ball to midfield. 

A feu plays later, a Yellowjaek 
pass Lamoureux to IfacNeill made 
the score 6-S, A ru.->h by Novak was 
nipped ami the point after failed 
State trailed until I'ayson ami Morry 
lunged in to block a Hornet punt 
setting the stage for the second Ma- 
roon tally. Art Cohen, speeded in to 
■coop up the ball and headed toward 
the jjoal line with several Yellowjaek^ 
on his heels. A couple of beautiful 
blocks by Hlasko and Rudge and a 
pretty reverse by Cohen and 'I i cor,- 
stood State 12, A. I. C. C: Pa/*»M 
failed to convert. 

In the fourth quarter, A. I. C. Riled 

the air with passes, but the .Maroon 
defense tightened, and the action re- 
mained about midfield with both 
coaches making numerous replace- 
ments. Especially noticeable was the 
way the yuard seconds worked show- 
ing Kb that he has little to worry 
over in that quarter. Smart defense 
by Morey. Ttlasko, and Conant look 
the Stfng out of the A. 1. C. ae,'.i ; s, 
and the Scoring was over. The hlssl 
score was M. S. C 12, American In 
ternational '">. 

Adam Walsh, liowdoin mentor.sto; 
pad in to watch the game and do a 
little scouting for the Mowdoin-State 

game this week. According to pres- 
reports this week, he did more than 
a little as the Uowdoin Jayvees were 
using the State unbalanced line all 
week against the Polar Be*! 1 varsity. 

Three American International Col 
lage players were hurt durinjr the 
gam* enough to keep them from thi« 
week's game ami perhaps one of them. 
Hanna, will he out for the season. 



State's opponents broke even in 
their opening engagements, last Sat 
urday, as only two of the grid m 
chines scheduled to meet the Maroon 
pot under way. Rhode island State. 

this year's .'ad's Da) opponent, livei 
up to its promises by downing Maine 

14-6 while Coast Guard Academy, a 
mid-season foe, bowed before the 

strength of Wesleyan, 

Paced by Lou Abruzzi, sophomore 

triple-threat back who promises to 
he one of the greatest athletes ever 
to wear the lilue of Rhode Island, the 
Rams outplayed the Maine team i'> all 
departments. Abrussi romped for 
both the Rhody markers behind good 

blocking. Prank Keanny, 22f> pound 

sophomore son id' the Rhode Island 

coach, played ivell at tackle and pull 

ed out from the line to hoot both the 
points after touchdown. 

Down at Middletown, Wesleyan 
proved too strong for the Middies and 
scored 27 points while holding the 
New London team to three first downs. 
When Cardinal Captain Daddario 

went out in the fir t quarter, Injured 

after scoring the first Wesleyan 
marker, the Guardsmen picked up for 
a moment but the reserves of the vie 
tors proved too much to contend with. 

Both Amherst and Connecticut had 
yames scheduled but the Jeffs were 
not able to reach Hobart and the 
storm kept the Natmeggera from then 
hijr test against Brown, 

15 CANDIDATES ARE 
OUT FOR X- COUNTRY 

Only Three Letter en Will Face 
Northeastern in Opener 

on Oct K 



Hy Richard K. I ukey 
(Special to ( iiIIikihii i 

Brunswick, Me., Sept. 2l> Hacked 
up by a squad containing 13 letter- 
men from last season, Adam Walsh's 
liowdoin Polar Hear Eleven is primed 
to open the new campaign Saturday 

I taking the field against the Mas.-a 
chusetts Statesmen hen-. 

Five of the starting lineup played 
in the state game last year altb >ugh 

the team is well seasoned with good 
material to replace those lost hy 
graduation. Intent upon claiming 
fourth successive Maine State Cham- 
pionship this season, the Polar Hears 
will enter the preseason campaign as 
a smoothly working squad. 

Walsh has had one combination 
working together as the Polar Bear 
first team for past two weeks. Such 
daily drill whipped the eleven into 
determined outfit. 

The five to take field again this 
year against the Statesmen as /ecr 

axis of last year's tussle, include Cap- 
tain Ell Corey at left tackle, Walt 
Loeman left guard, Hill Bro, r iK'>t 

tackle, Mack Deiiham, left end this 

year, ami Pleet Footed Benny Kar 
sokas, who was shifted from right to 
hit half back. 

John Marl,!.' is >late<! for tin- riyht 
end position while Ralph Howard will 
probably fill the righl «uanl position 
Saturday. Quarterback John Cartland, 

righl half back, Lloyd Legate, (nil 

back, Oakley Melendy, versatile four 
letterman, and Karsolas make up 
varsity backlield. 









SAUK DAY'S 


LIN KIT 
BOWDOIN 


STATE 




Morey 


re 


Marble 


Nelson 


it 


Bro 


Lavrackas 


rg 


Howard 


Hlasko 


r 


Web iter 


Zajchowski 


Is 


Loeman 


I'rusi.k 


it 


< 'apt. < ore} 


Rudge 


le 


Deiiham 


l./.yk 


Mb 


Cartland 


Cohen 


rh 


Melendy 


Allen 


II. 


Kai sokas 


Conant 


fb 


Legate 



ALUM S C OPPONENTS 
TO PLAY THIS WEEK 



Saturday's Games will Toll F.H 

Caraway Much About 

Grid Foes 



Cross Country, is well under wav 

with a squad of fifteen men working 

out under Coach I.. I,. Derby. The 

first meet on the card is with North 
eastern down at Boston on Oct. Xth. 
For this meet, only three lettermen 
Bfe available although Charlie Slatel 
who had some experience last year 
and showed up well toward the close 
of the season will be a Strong point 
for the Maroon harriers. 

Noyes, sn experienced runner srill 
he lost to the team because of a kne 

injury. Harold Rose, a senior, and 
Tilson, a sophomore shape up as good 
possibilities. Two good men were lost 
from last \ ear's teams. One, Hunk, did 
not return to college and another, I'ut 
ney, will not be able to go out be- 
cause of work. 



The Saturday's football Karnes will 
tell a tfreat deal about the sea on 
chances of Kb Caraway's fighting 
football squad. With all of the Ma 
roon opponents in contests, comparn 

tive scores and evidences of strength 

and ability should be closely watched. 

Neighboring Amherst College will 

pull the curtain on its ]'XiX season 

a week late when Springfield College 
calls at I'raiL Field. Not quite as 
strong as a year ajjo but still a typi 
cal .Jordan team, the Soldiers of the 
Kiritf should win over the Indiana 
with the score the focus of attention. 
Rhode Island State, good H it is, 
sticks its nose out a little too far 

in facing the powerful Holy Cross 

team. If Coach Keanny can salvage 
any of his men in one piece after the 

game, he may continue to a success- 
ful season. 

Tufts opens its season against the 

McCoy Giants from Colby. With a 

knack of finding Mg College material 
i in a small School, McCoy may have 

I In his Colby Mules just the opponent 

Lew Manley won't want to face, but 
I the odds must go tin- Medford club 
by a shade. 

Connecticut State stormed out of its 
opener with Brown last week will take 

the tieid against Wesleyan this Sat 

unlay in a game that will tell the 

itory as far as the Nutmegger'i 
strength is concerned. If C< s. C. play* 

even with the Cardinals then all op 
I poiients of the Blue should prepare 
'for a major name. R. I'. I. open- it- 

llate against Hamilton in what ap 

peart to he an even iram<\ 



Massachusetts state'., starless 1938 
grid machine will take the field, this 
Saturday at Brunswick, as decided 

underdog against a strong Bowdoin 
team. With no man of star ranking the 

locals will stake their chances on their 
one attribute spirit and will out 
ti^ht if not out score the Polar Hears. 
The Maine champions will he playing 
their first contest of the year but 
already Coach Adam Walsh has 
formed a well drilled, dangerous at 
tack. 

The loss of Stan .lackimc/yk, speedy 
sophomore back, will be felt by th • 
Statesmen but Art Cohen, another 
soph who romped to th-> winning mar- 
ket last week against A. I. ('., will 
be a capable substitute at the right 
half post. Judge I'ayson, varsity 
guard who has been laid up in the 
infirmary for the past three days, may 
make the trip to Brunswick but it is 

certain that Coach Caraway will not 

start him in the game. Babe Lavra- 

kas, another junior-, looms as the man 
to fill I'ayson's shoes. 

Hlasko Near-Star 

The rest of the local line up will 
he about the same as that Kb used 
against the Aces. Captain Clif Morey 
will hold down his right end post 
while Howie Rudge will cover the 
other flank. Johnnj Blasko, fast ap* 
1 preaching the Btar category, will start 

at center- Hanked by Zajchowski and 

probably Lavrackas. Nelson and Pru- 

sick will be the starting tackle- with 

Brud Malcolm a cinch to see a lot of 

action at either tackle. 

The hacklield will find Al Ir/yk 
calling i he plays with Cohen and Don 
Allen at the halfback posts. Chet Con- 
ant will probably get the call at full- 
hack with Leo Santucci, pint sized 
full, being used on climax plays. San 
tUCCJ has a knack of getting away 
when needed most and he \.ill pro'i 
ably he sent into the game to cany 
the mail near tne Bowdoin goal line. 

90 FROSH EXPECTED 
AT FIRST PRACTICE 

Frigard to Greet Candidates 

This Afternoon Have 

Regular Schedule 



About 90 freshmen will report to 
Freshmen Coach Mill Frigard, thil 
afternoon, for the first practice of 
tin' frosh tfrid team. Paced with t In- 
first regular schedule in the history 
of plebe football at the college, the 

men of '42 loom as one of the stroni' 
BSt filst year teams in years boa-' 

ing a great number of large and ex 
perienced gridmen. 

In spite of the fact that the frosh 

have a regular schedule the only 

chance for them to gain numeral 
from their activity this fall will he 
to win the annual Freshman-Sopho- 
more numeral clash that closes the 
local ijrid season. 

As the squad will he too large to 
work with, Frigard will probably de 
vide the men into two groups, one of 
experienced and promising gridsters 

and the other of those interested in 
the sport but still In the primary 
stage of grounding in fundamental-. 



M. A. C. Library. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29. 193X 



We Sell Quality Merchandise at Fair Prices and You Will Come To Us 
Sooner or Later. Those who come Later will wish it had been Sooner 

This is the time to select that Hickey-Freeman Suit 
THOMAS F. WALSH 



MORE THAN A TOGGERY 
A COLLEGE INSTITUTION 



$25,000 DAMAGE 



Continued from Page 1 

ments, working day awl night, par- 
tially restored the college to normal, 

at least to permit classes to contin- 
ue Friday morning. 

Refugees, sent l>y buses from Hood- 
id areas, were sheltered, as in 1 938, 
in the cage. During the day, short- 
wave sets were set up ami messages 
were broadcast to nearby communi- 
ties. C. Nelson Julian "5K, ardent 
"ham," transierred his station \\ 1 - 
DVW from his home to Stockbridge 
Hall. Another short-wave set broad- 
casted in the I'hysics Building. 

At a conference Monday, college 

officials estimated total damage t<» the 

campus at |26,000. Not included was 
the time lost by faculty and students, 
and the sentimental and aesthetic value 
of uprooted trees, especially class 
t rees. 

The list of damages 1S as follows: 
Heat and Klectric Department e\- 
penses — $1400; damage to buildings 
—$48(10; labor for clearing campus 
of trees and debris— $4(MMt; repairs to 
u.ads and walks— $2500; damage t<> 
college farm— |8000; and other dam- 
ages— $4300, 

In a survey of tree damage on cam 
pus 1411 trees were found uprooted. 
7<» damaged, and 68 less damaged. 
This figure, a total of 278 trees, con- 
stitutes one-fourth of all trees on 
campus. 



Two oldest trees at State College, 
those opposite the Brosdfoot and Tom 
Powers residences, were felled by the 
hurricane. These trees were planted 
during the lifetime of Ceorge Wash- 
ington in 1788. The giant elm which 
was the class tree of 1 S7«',, also yield- 
ed to the hurricane, blocking Stock- 
bridge road. 

Many of the specimen trees in the 
Rhododendron Garden either fell or 
wen- damaged. Used in advanced 
botany and forestry courses, these 
trees were imported at great expense 
from Europe and Japan, and were the 
most valuable on campus. Few trees 
in the forest behind President Baker's 
home were left standing. 

About three million feet of timber 
was felled on tuOUnt Toby, accord- 
inn to Prof. R, I'. Holdsworth. Several 
members of the forestry department 
and Professor Holdsworth struggled 
three hours to travel a distance on 
Mount Toby ordinarily taking thirty 
minutes. 

After crawling on hands and knees 
and climbing over the fallen timber. 
Professor Holdsworth noted the dan- 
ger of fire in the near future. 

"All students are urged to refrain 
from visiting Mount Toby in order 
to protect both themselves and the 
forest from tire." he emphasized. 

The most ancient anil flimsy-appear- 
ing building on campus, the I'hysics 
Building, remained untouched — con- 
trary to all predictions — except for 



a new antenna rod. Another old an- 
tenna ro I withstood the hurricane. 

Hurricane damage to campus build- 
ing.-- was slight in comparison to Am- 
herst College and the rest of New 
England. Some shingles were blown 
off; a few windows were broken in 
greenhouses behind French Hall; and 
larger falling branches also added to 
the slight damage. \o accidents were 
reported, but a source of danger pre- 
sented itself when a gable corner of 
South College crashed to the side- 
walk. 

Undermining of old walks by over- 
flowed drains on Wednesday afternoon 
was the first reported damage of the 
windstorm. The cause of tbe overfln.v 
was inadequate size of drain pipes 
which were installed years ago. A 
striking instance of this situation was 
the three-foot fountain issuing from 
a supposed "drain in the rear of 
Memorial nuilding. 

Rain Hooded Cocsmann Laboratory, 
Memorial Building, and Fernald Hall. 
The drain pipes leading from these 
buildings were filled with roots of 
trees. 

Because of 11.98 inches of rain that 
fell from Saturday to Wednesday af- 
ternoon, an underground brook 
threatened to wash away part of 
Thatcher road. A grounds department 
crew just pi evented the wash-out by 
digging a ditch northward when the 
hurricane began. 

The crew then was sent to Presi- 



dent Raker's home, the chief danger 
point since it was on a hill and since 
it was entirely surrounded by tree.-. 
There, at the height of the hurricane, 
the men stood on guard after they 
boarded up windows to protect val- 
uable property in the house. Their 
fear that the surrounding 75-foot 
virgin maples would crush the house 
and breaK steam pipes, was fortu- 
nately not realized. Soon nine vir- 
gin maples thoundered to the ground, 
missing the house and crew; then, 
toward the end of the hurricane, two 
giant pines in front were blown down. 
Slight damage to the house resulted 
from falling limbs. 

Of the 278 trees that fell or were 
injured, the most diseased and de- 
crepit trees were left unhurt together 
with very young trees. The most 
valuable and oldest trees fell like 
dominoes. A long row of pines behind 
President Raker's home all were de- 
stroyed by the hurricane. Most of the 
pines on Clark hill and the spruce 
near College Pond were also uprooted. 

Recause of the bad state of Mount 
Toby forest, field classes in Forestry 
will now be held on the Tuxbury lot. 



MOUNTAIN DAY OH 



Mountain Day, long an annu 
torn at Massachusetts State ( ., 
will be discontinued this year i .. 
the fact that registration of 
bridge students will be held 
week on the day original!} ti 
as Mountain Day, and also bi a 
id' the poor condition of the t ra 
on Mt. Toby caused by the 
storm. The fact that class si 
would be disrupted was also 
tor in deciding against the year, 
through the Mt. Toby Re.-ervati 

CLASS OF 19.59 



M. S. C. ENTOMOLOGISTS 



Continued from Page 1 
department Dr. Alexander 

Remarks on entomological 

training Dr. Fernald 

Informal discussion 



Continued from Page 1 

junior and senior courses in I. 
guages. Literature, History and I 
osophy may, if they do desire, l>< < 
candidates for the degree Bach< 
of Arts." 

This vote was one of great 
cance to members of the two upp.: 
classes who had felt that the oris 
plan of delaying such presentation 
the class graduating four years 
the initial vote of the board, mighl 
put into effect. 

The renaming of the Division ot 
Social Science is akin to that of 
ting up a Division of Engineering and 
the two Latin courses now offered » 
aid those who plan to enter the libera! 
arts or teaching field. 




straight to more pleasure 
. . . that's where Chesterfield 
makes a solid hit every time 

. . . gives smokers what they want 
. . . refreshing mildness and better 
taste and here's the big reason . . . 

It takes good things to make a good prod' 
ucU That's why we use the best ingredi- 
ents a cigarette can have . . . mild ripe to- 
baccos and pure cigarette paper, . . to make 
Chesterfield the cigarette that SA TISFIES. 







esterfield 

. . more pleasure 
fir millions 



Paul WH ITEM AN 

Every Wednesday l.venint 

Gkorgi; Gracie 
burns allan 

Every Iriday Evening 
All C. It. S. Stations 



Eddie Dooley 

Football Highlights 

Every Thursday and Saturday 

If Leading N. H. C. Station 




V„l. XLIX 




AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY. IHTOKER «. 1938 * 



NO. :t 



DR. BAKER SAYS COLLEGE WILL 
HAVE TO TAKE MORE STUDENTS 

g at Dedication of Entomology Plaque, President Tells 

That M. S. C. Turned Down Half the Applicants 
For Admission 

■ •Kl "ARTMENT PRAISED FR0SH-S0PH BATTLE 

,, , , ,, rfTWrity „ f ! SCHEDULED TONIGHT 

Massachusetts is 
Highlight 



KAZOO BOSS 



rig that it had been necessary 

I select some three hundred .students 

■ 1 a list <>f nearly 80Q applicants, 

]■ • - Baker, speaking at the ded- 

• a bronze plaque on the math 

building commemorating founding of 

entomology at the college, said that 

. College must be prepared to take 

■ I larger numbers of students. 

He further said that whether or not 

pt this obligation will depend 

■it the people of the State and 

the willingness of the Legislature to 

ipriate necessary funds. 

Speakers 

Other alumni and speakers present 
dedication were four distill- 
led graduates of State College. 
Reading like a page from Who's 
Who in America, the list of alumni 
included Dr. H. T. Fernald, 
1 I'. Kelt. Dr. .J. R. Knight, and 
Prof, A. F. Burgess. Prof. Burgess, 
-•(I'll largely in the donation 
plaque and arrangements, first 
i brief report. 

d< ni Baker, the second speak- 

i emphasized the expansion ,,f m. g, 

the Department of Bnto- 

•I typical example of the 

• College. 

Next Dr. Fernald gave a brief his- 

the entomology department, 

kin t' ■ arly and effectively as if 

Continued on Page 3 



"Kazoo Night" Starts in Cage 

and (Joes Outside For 

Battle Royal 



I lie aimuaf freshman-sophomore 
battle known as "Rasoo .Night" will 
be held this evening, the contest be- 
ginning in the Physical Education 
Cage at eight o'clock under the di- 
rection of Frank South wick, '39 pres 
•dent of the Senate. All sophomore 
and freshmen contestants are reques- 
ted to be present at 7:45. 

The contest will be divided into 
the following three sections: boxing 
and wrestling matches, the "night 
shirt" contest, and the battle royal. 
Five points will be awarded each 
winner of the boxing or wrestling 
matches in the Cage, following which 
the fighters will adjourn to an arena 
roped off for tne night shirt contest. 
At the signal, the sophomores at- 
tempt to remove the shirts from the 
freshmen, only one sophomore being 
allowed t,, tackle one freshman. After 
ten minutes, the sophs will receive 
one point for each shirt removed, and 
the freshmen one point for each shirt 
retained. 

In the battle royal each side at- 
tempts to capture members of the op- 
position in its "pen," two men being 
allowed (o tackle one of the other 
side. A man i.~ "dead" when he enters 
the pen. and is out of the remainder 
of the contest Victory for the nlghl 
will go to the side obtaining the great 
est total in all conte 




FRATERNITIES PLEDGE 211 AS 
FALL RUSHING SEASON CLOSES 

1st Freshmen, 2 1 Upperclassmen Included on List* From Houses 
as Record Number Signify Choice in 
Spite of Delay 

33 ARE ELECTED TO 
CLASS COMMITTEES 

Upperdasaes Pick Boards to 

Select \'i8 Class 
Officers 



79* f OF FROSH PLEDGED 



'IVps Lead With 82 Followed by 

Kappa Sijr, phi gig ail( | 

Theta Chi 



Franklin South wick 

DAD'S DAY SET FOR 
COAST GUARD GAME 

I 

Horse Show and Skits Feature 

Week-End - Want Large 

Turnout 



With a football game against Coast 

Guard as its highlight, Massachusetts 
State College will play host to stu- 
dent fathers at the annual Dad's Dav 
program scheduled for Saturday, No- 
vember 6. The entire campus, and its 
| buildings, will be open to parental 
loop* lion and m » . s of past Dad's 
Hays, it wul be no perfunctory in- 
Bpection. 

In the morning, sophomores, juniors 
and seniors will participate in a horse 
show, with the freshman military class 
also demonstrating dismounted drill. 
State's gridiron team will meat the 
('oast Guard eleven in the afternoon 
at 2:00, ami during the half, the 

Middies led by their band will pre 
sent a colorful military drill, The 
•Man. on and White band will also ap- 
pear at the game. 

Dads will be entertained at soror- 
ities, fraternities, and the college caf- 
eteria for lunch and supper. The pro. 



The first class meetings of the yeai 
for the sophomore, junior ami senioi 

classes were held last Thursday aftei 
Convocation for the purpose of elect 

Ing nominating committees, who will 
prepare the ballots of class officers. 

In each class, twenty men and women 
were nominated from the Mod, with 
not more than three from an\ one 
fraternity or sorority; the eleven re- 
ceiving the highest vote in each case 

from the committees. Those elected 

were as follows: 

'.'{!»: John Click, Kverett Kldridge, 
Beryl Brigga, .John Pratt, .loan s-.ui 
Delia, Olive Norwood, Doris Oyer, 

Binary Moore, Robert Swanson, 
George Benjamin, and Charles Branch. 

'4(»: Wilfred Shepardson, Charl >s 
Powers, Hart Koville. Dan O'Connell, 

Dorothy Morley, Rosa Kohls, F, >., 

Hall, Frank Davis, Arthur \,,y. -. Ken 
Pike, and Frank Dalton. 

•i- John Keyman, Walter Miles, 
Rosalie Beaubien, Don Allan, .lean 
Taylor, John Retallick, Ed O'Brien, 

Patience Sanderson. Francis Blatter . 
Frank Simons, and Gladys Fish. 

These committees will meet ne<< 
Tuesday for consideration of mem 

hers for class officers. At the prasenl 

tone the Senate is considering a re 
form in the rules for CUSS nomina 

tion; the changes to be announced 
next week. 



Tabulations of pledging results re 
veal that 7!» per cent of the incoming 
freshmen men, numbering approxi 

match 235, have pledged in State Ira 

termties. is? freshmen and 24 upper 
classmen bring the total to 211. Tan 
Epsilon Phi leads with .".2 pledges, 

leading Kappa Sigma by S men. 
Theta Chi, leading last year with SI, 
dropped to 21, The total this year far 
exceeds that of last year, and the per- 
centage of freshmen has increased 

greatly, 

Pledgee 

The numbers pledging each bouse 

are as follows: 

Tau Kpsiion Pin, :fL!; Kappa Sigma, 
27; Phi Sigma Kappa, 23; Alpha Epsl 

Ion Pi, 21; Theta < "hi, 21 ;Alpha Sigma 

Phi, 20; Alpha Gamma Rho, 16; Sis. 

ma Phi Kpsiion, ir,; Lambda Chi A I 
pha, 12; Sigma Alpha Kpsiion, 12; 

11 T. V., I. 

Those pledging each hoti e are ■ 
follows : 

Alphii KpaUm PI PffrffM 
I Inns of |f4J 

Jaj en < oh, n, i;., bui i I' ... i. ,, i 
>•■ < M.. it. in Itni.u, i. «. Miiiiiu,:,,, , t„,,i.-v 
I', .ii iiii.-m. Roxbury : ii.-iiumi Hywrnw. bar- 

■ lllMl.l ; Kllwillll If,, . ,,,;, , | |,,. . || (|| . 

old (killnaky, [tor, i,. u i .1 b Rubon U h 

Mattapan . .i.,m. i .,i,, ,,. < i„ i , ; , i,,.,, w..ik, 

Unrein U i DwvM K I In, H i hi,.- . i„,„,,, 

Militant), MatUpi i Ju Un M li thraii I..,,,, 
M.-,M,i,i Bloom, ii.. ,. i,. i. , . i ran I i .,i„ ,, 
Continued un I'.ivc 6 



Fraternity Rushing System Gains 
Approval Of Majority Of Freshmen 



Bj Myron YV. Fisher 
IQwstlon of the Week: (To Freshmen) 
FOU approve of the present 
nynttts ..f fralernity rushing? If 
what do you suggest as an 
| mprotement? M 

that more of the schol- 
-ment associated with 
"y should be stressed. 

social life should lose 

' its prominence to add to 

twee of scholarship in a 

med to me that all the 

showed good sports- 

wlth little mud-throwing 

ice " 

( .! 



•w, 






L r »t more of a chance 

' l "' fraternities before 

'"'ting up early in the 

entertain the Abbey and 

'liuht rather mixed 

for US. Vet, it was a lot 



""1 ;« system as I've 



dinary circumstances, I 
it. but this time. P.e- 

"• hurricane, it should 
lengthened, l gut to 

'"'■ houses on account of 
the storm caused." 



II. S. : 

"On the whole, it was very fine and 
impressed me a lot, Hut because of 
the storm, the majority of us saw- 
only three or four houses. On Mon- 
day and Tuesday the last two 
nights of house-visiting, only half 
the freshmen showed up." 

M. \V.: 

"There is no question but that 
second semester rushing would be 

much better. The idea of giving out 

bids to everyone Is no good, as they 

dont know who is really getting 
a bid. The fraternity just hopes 
that freshmen, many of which are 
unknown, will come through their 
way." 



gram for the evening, include.- a ser 
ies of interfraternity skits t,, be held 
in Bowker Auditorium, replacing the 

Kay State ReVUe. At the .same time, 
the combined sororities will p res e n t 
a shit of their own. 

In charge of arranging the Dad's 
Day program, are co-chairman of tin 
Dad's Day Committee, Robert Sheldon 
'40 and Lawrence Regan '40. Secre- 
tary of the Committee Is Bettina Mall 



Originator Of 'Pats' Was Pioneer 
In Liberalizing College Curriculum 



DEUTSCH WILL TALK 
HERE NEXT TUESDAY 

European Problems Are Topic of 

Speaker Sponsored by 

Three Clubs 



R. W. P.i 

"I think the system is far from 
perfect. There should be more 
time to let incoming freshmen 

get acquainted with themselves 
and with upperclassmen of the 

fraternities." 

I). B.: 

"It has its good points. The fresh- 
men gel easily acquainted with the 

upperclassmen, who give them val- 
uable advice about the school. Put 
rushing should not interfere with 

the freshman's period of adjust- 
ment to the college." 



Cooperating in an effort to acquaint 
the students at Massachusetts state 

with a first-hand view of the Kum- 

pean situation, the christian Feders 

tion, American Student Union, and 

the International Relations Club are 

sponsoring a talk by Dr. Karl Deutsch, 

Tuesday, in the Memorial Building, at 
4:.'i0 p. m. 

What Dr. Deutsch Is speaking on 
has not yet been announced, but the 
organisations promise an extremely 
interacting meeting, since the speaker 
is an Austrian emigre, exiled hy the 
Nazi'invasion of his country, Dr. 

Deutsch has already spoken at many 
colleges throughout the country. 
What he will have to say about 
Europe should be of interest especially 

tfi majors in History and Government. 



Everett R, Spencer 

"In our gratitude to the living, let's 
not forget the dead," suggested Dr. 
.Maxwell ii. Goldberg in referring to 

the praise that has been, and is being, 

given to those responsible i',,v the inc. 
cess of the movement liberalizing our 
college curriculum. 

During a recent Interview, Dr. 
Goldberg, a graduate of the state 
College an<l Vale Universit) and also 
one of those alumni greatly respons- 
ible for the success of the drive for 
the granting of the A.M. degree, re. 
quested that recog ni tion be given to 

I the contributions of a late member 
of the faculty who, according to Dr 
Goldberg, did much to advance the 
cause of liberal arts on our campus. 

Advanced Arts 
"Very little has been said about 

a man," continued the assistant pro- 
feasor of English, "about a man who, 
in my opinion, did a great deal, both 
directly and indirectly, to advance the 
Cause of liberal arts on the campus. 
I -peak .,;' the late Charles ||. |' ; ,t 

terson, familiar to present itudent* 

only through the name 'Pat'- Eng- 
lish'." 

Dr. Goldberg went on to explain 
how in tlw not !«,., distant past talk 
concerning tin- liberalization of the 
Collage curriculum, was, to .-ay the 
least, considered inexpedient. General 



Copyright W8, Liggett & Myfr* Tomcio Co. 



and official sentiment was against it. 
Advocacy of such liberalization a*M 

>,.n idered unorthodox. 
No Agitator 

It Was during that time that I'f, 

f( or Patterson worked steadily, 

quietly, and patiently for the lull 

recognition of the Indie he loved. 

"He wa.> not an agitator," trcssod 
Dr. Goldberg. "Me di.i not „ ,. th< 

tactics of the demagogue. In ti.nl, | l( 
did a great deal by his personality. 
He was an old line liberal arts gra.l 
Bate with a training in the classics, 
and a great love of the humaniii.- 
ami the fine arts. I'.ut he wa .,1 ,, 

very sympathetic to studies that were 
not connected with the hutnanitie 
He was very muih Interested in the 
natural sciences, applied sciences, ei 
pecially those science* applied to ag 

ricultUre. HC own garden wa> an ex 

ample of Rich an inten I 

"Tactfully, Prof, Patterson lowly 
brought about a much more favorable 

attitude toward the liberalizing of the 

studi.- that had generally prevailed 
before his influence began to be felt. 
Specifically the annual language and 

literature talk,, now almost a collage 

tradition, wen- originally itarted by 
Professor Patterson. During the pen 
od of his influence, a large number 
of th» present course) In languages 

Continued '>n Pn-t 6 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOHKR «. IMti 



/Iftassacbuse 




BARTERING 
WITH JOE BART 



STOCKBRIDGE * 



Collegian 



Official newapa 
Published 



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EMERY 

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the 

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raday 


eauseti - 
l.y the 


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■tudent 


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Editor-in 
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ss 



JOHN K. 1 1 1. ins "40 
BETTIN A HALL '89, 
MARY 1 MKKIIAN 
FKANi l-.S S. MKRRIKL *3» 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
CAROLYN E. MONK i" 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART l" 
ROMA LEVY '40, Secretary 
KENNETH ROWLAND 'II 
WII.I.l AM T. GOODWIN '41 
HAROI.lt FORREST II 
CHESTER KURALCM U V. II 
JOHN II WES II 

Feature 
LLOYD H. OOPBLAND '89, Editor 
MYRON FISHER '39 
KATHLEEN TULLY II 
I \ ERET1 R. SPENCER '4u 



l>. Al! I HUB CORSON '10 

ALBERT YANOW '11 

I'lliitllKI l«|ill> 

LANE CIIHiIN(;S '38 

Stwkhridffr < 'iirrenpondent 

HAROLD PHILLIPS S'38 

Collt'ire (Juartorly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '89. Editor 
JANET CAMPBELL '40, Assoc. Ed. 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
hit. MAXWELL H. CJOLDBEBG 



With the development of a sepa- 
rate department of Engineering cornea 
the introduction of what bids fair to 
become the Conservatory of Music. 
The fourth floor of Thatcher boaata 
■ Tuba player, a man with a set of 
drums, two trumpeters, and an assort- 
ment of aweet potato whistlers. Pos- 
sibly they are responsible for the biff 
blow we had, for it didn't come until 
they had been here a few days. 

While on the subject of winds with 
overwhelming proportions it seems 
fitting to BUggeat this poignant re- 
form. The Senate should be petition- 
ed to pass a ruling that would make 
c.uh professor who holds his class 
past the e id of his hour a candidate; 1 

for a Pond Party. 



BUSINESS BOABD 
ALLEN COVE '89, Business Manager 



AHRAHAM CARP 



'89, Or. Mm-. 



E. EL'OENE RENAULT '«< 
la m. Kit II. LINDSEY '40 
JOSEPH It (iORDON, JR. 
i'ER R. LA LOR 11 



•89, Adv. Mar. «» HgNBY WINN 

GEORGE c. BENJAMIN '89, Subscription Manager 

Business Assistants (H ARLES A. POWERS >«l 

ROBEBT ROHM AN '4n 
EMVVARH J. O'HRIEN II 
DAVID F. V VN METER '41 



•11 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YK\K 



SINGLE COPIES in CENTS 



Make all orders payable t" Th»- ftfassaehu- 

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ager :>- kkmi us possible. Alumni, undergrad- 
uate and faculty contribution! are sincerely 
encouraged, \ny communication! or notice! 
inu-t I..- received at th.- Collegian office before 
'i o'cloc) . Monday evening, 



Entered a« second-class matter ;it the Am- 
Herat Port Office. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for In Section 

1103, Act nf October 1917, authorised August 
■jo, 1918, 

Printed bj Carpenter A Morehouse, Cook PI.. 

Amherst, Mass.. Telephone 48 



1997 Member 193* 

Ptisociated GoQe6icfe Press 

Distributor of 

CoHe6*ate Digest 

ncpxcsiNTiD ran national advsbtisino by 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publiibtm Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York. IM. Y. 

Cmicaoo • Boston ' Los Angclis - S»s Fhanciico 



The Outing Club might do well 
to get out of the Woods in this 
vicinity and take a look at what 
the Amherst College Outing Club 
is doing. For example, the Am- 
herst club has plans for joint 
hikes with Mount Holyoke and 
Smith, which is certainly a step 
in the right direction. Smith and 
Bit. Ilolyoke, however, have some- 
thing to do with it. 
* * 

That hurricane may be a thing of 
the past but winds can yet be heard 
that echo from the trip- the Military 
majors took "en masse" the past sum- 
mer. There is one story about one of 



Stockbridge School registration is 
Completed with the largest freshman 
class on record, approximating two 
hundred members, and a senior class 
of one hundred and twenty-five mem- 
bers. 

The Foods and Wild Life courses 
are filled to capacity with a total of 
10 each, while distribution in the 
other courses is as follows: Animal 
Husbandry — 50 students; Dairy Man- 
ufacturing — tc; Poultry — 20; Floricul- 
ture — 30; Fruit Growing — 11; Hor- 
ticulture — o5; and Vegetable Garden- 
I ing — 6. 

Orchestra 

There will be a rehearsal of the 
hestra, Wednesday evening at 8 
p. m. in room 114 Stockbridge Hall. 
I 'lease be prompt. 

Registration 

Opening with the largest freshman 
class of its history, Stockbridge School 
is beginning its 20th year on campus. 
188 have registered in the incoming 
class including 9 women. Among 
these women is a representative of j Adam 
the second generation of Stockbridge 
students, first to enter the school. 
Miss Oaudette, majoring in poultry 
husbandry is the daughter of a grad- 
uate of the class of '23, one of the 
veterans of the war who has his own 



poultry farm in Whitman at | 

(legist rations to date arc 
lows: 

Placement 
The placement addressee 
1 Seniors majoring in Foods at, 
John Brewster— Parker Hou 

tel, Boston, BIsss. 
Harold liriesmaster — Midi 
Inn, Middlebury, Vt. 

Eugene Gieringer — The i-., 

Manchester, Vt. 
Albert Mitchell — Chatham 

Inn; Chatham, Mass. 
Charles uuls — The Death,, 

Dearborn, Mich. 
John I'lotezyk — Northfiel, 

Northfield, Mass. 
David - readway — Mountair 

House, Whitefield, \. H 
William Whelan — Darker 

Hotel, Boston, Mass. 
Francis \» nitman — Dark 

Hotel, Falmouth Height . 



Hits, or 1940 



lead a discussion on the topic "Re- 
ligion in the Life of an Educated 
Man." All interested students are cor- 
iiallv weicome to attend. 



.i, 



these majors who couldn't be con- \,. wman c'lub 



ELITCKUL 



vinced that French doors are win- 
dows. Another source relates the anec- 
dote about two of the boys who were 
out all night. When the officers 
charge investigated he issued an or- 
der that no more leaves would be 
signed if me hour of return was 5 
A. M. Such boys. 

* * 



MORE 

FKOSH 



There will be a short but very im- 
portant meeting of the Newman Club 
tonight at 7:15, at the Parish Hall. 
All members are urged to be present. 
Christian Federation 

Don't forget the Christian Federa- 
tion freshman party to be held next 
Sunday evening after Vespers in the 
Memorial Building. The Christian 
Outreach Commission will show mov- 
ies of the Lisle Christian Mission 
Service Fellowship. 

On Thursday afternoon at 4:45 >n 
the Mem Building, Rev. Raymond A. 



There are quarters on this campus 
With no disaster, but with another record, Stockbridge where the new music director is spok- 
School is hack again to open its twentieth year of class- if? » f . "• ■ PJ™» imposing on an 

„,. , , .* - ., , , i historically established right of the 

es. With the yearly growth of the school, more and 1^ bm , y namely t() sleep in con . 
more recognition must be given to the fine group of students who V()Cat i n. Last week he aroused these jwaser of the First Congregation?! | ch 
enter this two year course and it is with a true feeling of wel- j quarters from their periodic lethargy Church will lead a discussi 
come that we men and women of the college greet you, Stock- and made them really feel like sing- j subject "Religion vs. the 

ing. Oh! Unpardonable desecration. 
The college has taken him into its 
heart. 

Editor's note — If you find that 



Harold W. 

Adrlance, Henry L. 
Ankwitz, Paul M. 
Annitage, V* arret) E 
Atkins, Leonard L. 
Hader, Henry M. 
Bailer. Donald w. 
Hall. HiiKh E. 
Balentine. William H 
Hanas. Edward J. 

Itartl.tt, Kay I... Jr. 
HarwiMxl, Augustus V 
Hansen. Thomas H. 
Hatey, Thomas E., Jr. 
HenHon. Richard J. 

Bent, Trowbridge C. 
Berkeley, Elinor G. 

I'.i M.'li.iin. Donald E. 
Blackwood, James J. 
Hluemer, Constance M. 
Boone, Konald M. 

BoSWOrtb. Clyde O., Ji 
HoHworth, Henry M. 
Bowman, Norman I.. 
Brown, Samuel H. 
Hrown, Percy E. 

Brown, Rooart L. 
Browning, Qaorsje U 

Hurke. John J. 
Calling Wood. Frank M., J 
Carhary. Clarenos T., Jr. 
Cembalinty. Aioert L. 
ChaHe, Williston C. 
Chartier, Bernard J. 



Northami ,•, 

Peias 

Attleb 

Belcherto* 

Ariingti 

Willimana 

Melrose Hitfhl.it 

Aubu 



Jr. 



bridge. 

You, Stockbridge freshmen, will soon recognize and enter the 
spirit which prevails here; so it is the sincere hope of all that 
you will come to he another integral part of this college, ft col- 
lege in all senses of the word and all the possibilities for the 
future which have ever been the fortune of any college, or uni- 
versity, between here and California. 

LIMITED The future growth of this college has again heen 
EXPRESS laid to the people and legislators of the state of 
Massachusetts. IVexy, commenting on the large 
numbers of applicants which must be turned away each year, has 
put the developments of yean to come at our feet and at the (hem club 
feet of the Commonwealth. There will 



you can't get a laugh out of 
Hart's column, save it 'till 
Charlie McCarthy's program and 
read it while you listen. Then, if 
you don't get a laugh, McCarthy 
isn't funny either. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



This discussion will be sponsored by 
the Christian Federation Cabinet. 

Phi Sig 

At a meeting held last Monday 
night the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity 
elected the following men to the of- 
fices left vacant by the absence of 
Gordon Najar and John Murphy; 
Parker E. Lichenstein 'Mil. president; 
H. Gardner Andersen 'oil inductor: 
Paul Fanning "89 auditor; and Lewis 
Norwood '40 steward. 

BAND 



I vnesmn. Robert C. 
1 on the i ChunRlo. Charles F. 
Clark. Leonard M. 
Clement, Roland C. 
Cleveland. Melvin F. 
OUggOtt, \» iiiiam O.. 
Clougfa, Lauren A. 

CoateH. Charles H. 
Connor, John J. 
Corbett. Fred M. 
Cornel.!, Richard L. 
Crane. Joseph J. 
Crudden, John F. 
Cunningham, William 
I la vis, Warren F. 
Haley. George E. 



Brockton, M 
Hadlsy, 

Weslti.-M. V | 

Stoneham, '•! . 
Wastoi •■ 
w. • 

Jamaica, 1. I , N Y 

Fnuningbam, H 

Newton Centre, M ; .. 
Fitchi, ir . 
SayU-svil' ■•, 1: | 

Holy,,;-... H 
West EnneU, '! 
Halifax, Km 

Halifax, M.,~ 

WefctUora, " 
Newton On." 
So. Hanwi 

Brain tree, Hi 

Lincoln. Mu 

Medford. M, 

r. Greenfield, N 

IClddlesex, Hss 

Northfield, 4, 

Bsnuisea, Km 

Willimansstt, M 

Behuate, )fa 

Hadler, Km 

Milton, N V 

Fall River, Mi- 

Tiebury, Ihs 

M..lt. il V 

Rreennood, Km 

I.yii, I 

Worcester. Ms- 
New Y" 

Worcester, KM 

Sstesi, Km 

Rssjllndak " 

Mald.-n, KM 

Wakai 
S.'ilt-m. UM 

Continued "" rVP ; 



Jr. 



K. 



There will be a rehearsal of the 
be a meeting of the band tonight at 7:W> in the Memorial 
It has heen a traditional attitude on the part of the student chemistry club on Oct. <*>, i<>:{8 in Building. Any student who could not 
body to demand and DU»Ue a reasonable growth and betterment Goe*wmann Auditorium at 7:H0 p. m. appear for the first rehearsal last 

, ' , ... . n i, r „ ...k.,.- ;* ,-. ,,,,... ii, n ri*m\ i< The speaker of tne evening will be Thursday and who would liKe to play 

of Massachusetts Mate ( olleffe ; to what it IS now, uie nasi IS . , . , . ., . . , • . . 

hi m<u»ai.iiuBvivo * /ill Lieutenant i.olonel John A. Baird, j n the band is invited to attend. 

responsible, for what it will be tomorrow, we alone can he held ( . lu>mi( . a , ((lli( . (1 ,. s ((f the Rrgt ^ The band js partit . u i arly in nee d of 

responsible. area, who will speak OH the subject {clarinet and saxophone players at 

There has been much talk among members Of ftdminStra- "Chemiltry U1 Chemical Warfare." this time. Anyone who has played 

tion faculty, and the student body about the growth Of this Hans are being made for a Hal- either of these instruments in his 

ii i- •*., n««4-«; M l« MMimmtui nsMSAsmisrsM tlm lowe'en party to be held in the Chem- prep school or high school hands is 

colleen- into a I niversitv. < erta n v, everyone ieco^ni/;es me ,.,,.,,/.. L , , • , i 

tont^« iiin» n uunwsiv .• ... , istrv building. Refreshments are to be asked to report for rehearsal. 

necessity for this change in the future how tar ahead we may s(m . v(i() , t is wquegted lha t those who Also, any Btockbridge student who 
not know, but we can and will do the utmost to speed this de- wis h tl) attend sign their names on wishes to play in the band is urged 
V'elopment. tne ,ists tnat wil1 he P" s,<m1 in tll,> to attend rehearsal tonight at 7:.'W> in 

•\ most necessary step forward is an increase in facilities, Chem building and elsewhere on cam- the Mem Building, 
both in physical equipment and in teaching stair. For years the '^.J^^r way , ' v, ' , ' y " n " "'" , "' 
tendency toward marked increases in enrolment have heen met '^^.^ ,•,',',<. (hlb 
with no such change in other parts of the college. The legis- Attention Coeds, Thursday, Oct. 8. 
lature has not a8 vet voted funds for a mUCh needed Physics w . start a new year with the Worn- 

Building or addition, the proposed Women's Building still hangs en'a Glee Club. We want if possible 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



04 TOHKR 

6— Valine; KhcuU.v Membri- Miflini 
7 — 1:30 Phi Kappa Phi 

ItM i'fil Shawn (irau|) 
s — I oathall. (nnn. Stalf. tl»" 
Sarrcr, Conn. Stale. Thiic 
Cro-m Country. Northon*l« i»- 
Vic particn: 

Lambda Delta Us 
Sigma Alpha BjIsUeS 
Alpha Sisma I'ln 
Alpha (Jamma Rh» 
( ii-c-d Party 2:30-.'. Mem W*J 
9— Minorah Club. Mem. Hl"«- 
II — Patterson Players 



Ihfn 



ire, and the need for a larger auditorium capable of seating 



n. make our club a recognised organ- 
ization on camptlfl, and with your sup 



tudents and guests comfortably seems to have found no cham- port w . ( . ;ui )|n w r ,, ni( , aI1(1 st;n . t 
on in the legislature. the good work, Thursday, October •'-. 

Stockbridge Hall was built for expansion. This expansion st 8:00 p. m. in room 114 Stockbridge 
has already overreached the limits thought satisfactory, until it Hall. 

: ,,.. longer possible for the entire body of students and faculty {hl " u ' '■•.vouts 

■ . ' , , ,, . ., ,. , .,, Anyone Interested m ti\mg out toi 

to gather in common assembly. Year by year the standing buiW- ||i( |)nsiljnn of pUyirig t)l( . ( . ni mes ,„■ 
[ngi are receiving a much-needed renovation hut no encourage- 
ment is given for expansion, with new buildings to care for new 
men and women. 

Before we can ever attain the statu- of a university, Mas- 

achusett must help with the problems of housing the many 

eagei < irehers after knowledge, who come in increasing numbers 

i-arl' . 



Ahirini as 



the organ should nee Mr. 

Soon a |i..--ibli'. 

Wesley Foundation 

The Wealej Foundation will meet 
Sunday at 7j45 p. m, at the homo of 
In. ami Mrs. Adrian H. Mndney on 
Mount PleSMnt. Professor Welles, 
Head of the Dept, of BMucation, will 



WHAT HO! THAR SHE BLOWS! 

cried Ahah. Mohey Dick? No, just the COLLEGIAN Qt 1 KU 
IKK1.Y on the horizon. So «et busy, you literal ii. and fa** 
ipare the ink! 



Rhyme-Reason -Rhythm 

BY PETER BARtUBCA 
taken thirty years of steady 

. to make musicians realize 

, Ve been building up to an 

, | down. Statistics show that 

• , services of all musicians can 

<;,, j dispensed with for at least 

. -. This mean-, that if every 

iai were to go on strike, not one 

, dependent upon music for its 

would Buffer. 

tate College fraternities are 

-f "industries" operating 

■lly mi recordings, a few 

tempo, arrangement, etc., may 

Whiteman tried to tell the 

Song of India" in a current 

d in, an outraged English critic 

n : "Stick to jazz and keep your 

inds off musical betters"! . . 

Mel •■ hut after hearing Larry 

arrangement of "Dance of 

Hours" from "La Gioconda," 

\ . ■ . 25805 B) I don't know hut what 

,: mil is a darn good thing. 

Isrinet figures swing easily 

:i relaxed rhythm that makes 

mosl danceable tune in ages . 
. other side is "Gavotte," a faster 
i al by liea W r ain. 
fessin'," with Lionel Hampton 
. idbraphotte and vocal, (Victor 
25*558 At is some good slow swinjj; 
nctl} a one man show . . . The 
"Ilium Stomp." is a shag 
rersatile Hampton on drums. 
(food clarinet and drums on last 
rtop chorus. 
Ticket." (Victor 25899 B) T. Dor- 
d Clambake seven; a disappoint- 
[ r gamarole with too much Edith 
Wright vocal, and not enough T . . . 
Reverse, "As Long As You Live," dit- 
■ 

"Will You Remember Tonight," 
Ifteccs 1!»2:'. A I Busse; very compel! 
ng and danceable with that 6|8 up 
mil down-stairs rhythm . . . Reverse 
M; Best , ishes," soft and "smewth. ' 

"Lullabye In Rhythm" (Decca HKI 
Bl Woody Herman; Not too good ex- 
tvp\ fur piano and boogie rhythm if 



TED SHAWN GROUP TO BK HERE FRIDAY 



r 




TED SHAWN WILL PRESENT HIS ORIGINAL 
DANCES SHOWING PHASES OF HISTORY 



Scene from "( I Lihertad" 



Professor Waugh's Collection Of Photos 

Of Campus Buildings Shows In Wilder Hall 



There are no new exhibits on the 
campus this week, but there is a col- 
lection of photographs which Pro 
feasor Waugh has put up in Wilder 
Hall which many students should find 
most interesting. 

The collection is one showing dif- 
ferent buildings on the campus, and 
demonstrates the development and 
changing trends of architecture which 
go to make up the general aspect of 
the campus. Although it was primari- 
ly intended as an assignment in 
Landscape Architecture 78, many of 
the photographs are pictorially note- 
worthy, and one of the most outstand 
ing things about them is that they 
show very nicely what opportunities 
for fine photography exist in the 
familiar Bights, and should I |. 



By liettina Hall 

peeially worth the study of aspirins; 

amateur photographers. There are 

three prints especially thai would 
grace any exhibit; these are: one of 
tin Homestead framed by a large tree, 
one of the doorwsj at Wilder Hall, 
and one of the group of windows on 
the front of the Abbey. Also in the 
collection is a picture of one of the 

nicest views on campus, i. e. the en 
trance load leading up to the Me- 
morial Building. 
The photographs are not of the 

worthwhile sort to write a criticism 
on. fur they were never intended as an 
exhibit, but If those who think that 
the campus is ugly should take a look 
at the pictures they would find that 
after all there are some parts of it 
thai are worth-while. 



BAKER SAYS 

Continued from Page 1 

he were lecturing to one of his class- 
es years ago. 



end . . . Reverse, "Don't Wake Unveiling and presentation of tin 
My Heart": too short clarine* l ,,;,< i l, «" '" President Baker followed 
contrasting some pretty sour 



M>rk 



Fifty students registered at the 
!-' meeting of the Massachusetts 
Outing club. This is many more 
appeared last year, and the 
predict a final membership 
oi .me hundred. Plans were | 
for more and better hikes this 
' "■'""• ft has also been decided to do | 
mcthing about a volunteer crew to 
-'' '* fir- on Mt. Toby. This is very 
' -i'-v iii view of the fire hazard 
by the hurricane. 



Just the Right 

Weather 

For Candy 

""" , assortment and Hii»h 
| ( l«;iliiv. Just in fresh, to treat 
Fourself or treat some one else. 
The Place With Good Things 



College 
Candy Kitchen Inc. 



h« best in food" 



Immediately anerward Dr. Pelt re- 
called the struggles of the entomology 
department, mentioning that the 50- 
year war against the gypsy moth be- 
gan in the old entomology building 
which they were commemorating. 

In the afternoon Dr. C P. Alex- 
ander reported on the work and oh 
jectives of the Department of Ento 
mology at state College; and Dr. 
Pernald made ■ speech concerning 
present and future entomological 
training. 

When asked for his opinion on the 
advisability of the trend toward a I'm 
versity <>f Massachusetts, Dr. Knight 
said. "I have always heen in favor 
of that change in Massachusetts 



the retired president of the Aorricul 
tural College of Poena, India. He had 
graduated from Mass. Agricultural 

College in l.v>~ 

In addition to his prediction of a 
University of Massachusetts in his 

greetings, President Baker Indicated 
that state College, like the University 

of Michigan and other colleges, should 
launch out and undertake field- that 
belong to land grant colleges, but it 
should go slowly. 

"It is natural that our rurricul.ini 
should be broadened to meet the needs 
of the state of Massachusetts," he 

-aid. "but that necessitates a larger 
number of students. As for the erec 
tion of new buildings on campus, I 
feel thai it can wait more effective 
teaching, research, and cultural ad- 
vantages mu t come before building. 
My term here i- or will not be noted 
for it^ building, and I am proud that 
this college is, and has been, turning 



Male Dancers Will Give "0 I.iU'itad" at Kirsl Social Ininii oi 

Year in Bowker Auditorium Other 

Concerts Follow Soon 

PLANS FOR COLLEGE £E£JLZiz&2Z 

CriMs UnCiV CTADTrn °' American history, Ted Shawn, and 

OUrilj DUUIS. Ol AK1LLJ his group of male dance,-, w,ll appear 

this Friday evening at eight o'clock 
in Stockbridge Hall a- the firsl Social 
I nion program of the year. Made up 

of dances created b\ Shawn to musii 
by .less Meeker, accompanist for the 
group, this American saga is divid.d 
into three parts. The I'ast. The I're- 



Songwriters Requested to Give 
Efforts to Committee 
Ready in Spring 



Killing a long felt want on campu.-, 
a Massachusetts State College song 



book has been started by a group of , ' n '- SUd The future, dealing with 

students headed by Fletcher Prouty significant periods in history that lend 

'4d under the supervision of Mr. Al themselves to rhythmic treatment, 

viani. The idea has already had en The program opens on a scene of 

thusiastic support from Dr. Fraker, barbaric pomp, "Nucha Tristo de 

Dr. finding, Professor Dickinson, Dean Hoctozuma," the fearful episode of 

Macbnier, and many students contact Hernando Cortex's butchery of the 

ed by the Committee. Aztec chieftains. In an atmosphere 

Included in the new I k. which P«»8ag«ng the impending doom of hi.- 

is expected to be read\ for sale bj '' m l'H«", Moct o/.uma , A/tec emperor, 

spring, are to be many of the tradi •''<<''ve.- the new, of the Slaying of 

tion.,1 melodies already familiar on his ehiefUlBS by the treacherous 

campu.-. class songs, alumni songs. Spaniards. 



and any new ones which may be se Portraying the crucial momeni of 

lected. Medlies will also be included lll «' im i'»<"t of the European civilfra 
under Massachusetts songs. Songs of ''""• wlMrl1 <am '' '" conquer a new 
other colleges will we printed and hi continent witn R sword in one hand 
gestions from the student body are ;uhI ,i "' croM '" t,H ' " ,ll, ''' s . the dame 
requested. combine.- splendor and tragedy. 

The second scene, "Los Kerfianoi 
I'enitoiites" show- a < iood Friday tel 
ebration of a fanatic sect 01 Francis- 
cans, which, while chronologically o*it 



In 



i combination with the many col 
lege songs, will be a number of old 
favorites and specialty songs of this 
and past generations. Another fea 
ture of the book will be several pic 
tures interspersed among the song: 
which win all be arranged in foUl 
parts for easy group singing. 

Work will start soon on selection of 
numbers and both M r. Alviani and 



of order, shows in striking contra i 
the effeel of the new civilisation on 

some of the indigenous people. It 

portrays the flagellants of the sect, 

and the crucifixion of one of its mem 
hers, whose siloes, following bis death, 



are borne to the doorstep of his par 
I roiity will be glad of any suggestion, ( . ||ts 

offered, 



One of the big opportunities offered 
by this book will be that for new 
songs or old songs with new words. 
Anyone who feels that be or she could 
write new songs should submit them 
to the committee as soon as possible. 

Fraternity ong . old medlies, or 

drinking songs may also be sub 
mitted. 



"Peonage," another result of the 
Spanish domination of Mexico, is the 
title of the next dance, which is based 
upon a labor rhythm of Mexican peons 
working in a sugar refinery. 

As the peons exit, Shawn, at I 
dashing grandee, enters to dance as a 
solo " I laconnailo de California," which 
by contrast depicts the life of ease 

in which the Spanish liidalgoes and 

their families live al the expense of 
sweated labor. 

Following this period in California 

The Pre Med Club, organized in Came the gold rush, which i. ppito 
I9S0, began its fourth year last night mixed bj Shawn in a rowd) dano of 
with a meeting which proved highls the "Forty Niner " with the lull en 

interesting to all who attended. Drs. < ruble, and concludes the ection on 



Pre-Med Club 



State College." Dr. Knight, who spent OUt well-educated people in tesd "' 

about thirty vears in the Orient, is merely professional people." 



Noit' On Salt'.' 

VALHALLA 

AM) OTHER POEMS 

By 
ROBERT FRANCIS 

AN AMHERST POET WHOM COMPETENT CRITICS 
HAVE NAMED AS THE MAX WHO WILE SOME DAY 
OCCUPY THE PLACE IN NEW ENGLAND LITERATURE 
now HELD l'-V ROBERT FROST. 

JEFFERY AMHERST 
BOOKSHOP, INC 



Lorimer, Allen. Fake, ami llarrine 
ton, who have just graduated from 
Harvard Medical School, held an i 
formal discussion on pre-medical 

I raining. 



The Past. 

The Present open- with a campus 

scene typical of an\ Ann than college 

of the years before the war "Campu 
1914", By a ublio (ran ition tlii 



the college manli i transformed into 

a wa • march, en. hue the v oiith of 

America off to the battle Relda <>i' 

France. "No Man' I, and" follow- with 



Mi.- club was founded to promote i changed into a martial atmosphere, 

the interest.- of the ever -increasing 
number of -indents who came to Ma 
achu i-tl - State for their pre modi 
cal training. I!i weekly meeting- an 
held at which some member of the I the ensemble represent (nfl ih trad 

medical or allied profession presents elements of modern warfare, which 

a topic "f interest to the member, 'he soldier experience > > ingle 

These discussions are not limited to protagonist, symbal of the millions 

pi< medical students but are open to who fought and died. After the -. 

all who are interested. Mtion of hostilities, On hi return to 

Several trips are include,| in th,. '" native land, he finds everyone 



I'm- Med Club schedule every year. 
East year trips were made to the 
Coolev-Dickinson Hospital, where ,stu- 

Continued on Page 6 



CARDINAL 

Book Props 

Unexcelled for reference hooks on 

typing 

Tic Racks 

Intense!) practical and not trick> 

Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



wanting to loic.l the war, and he and 
his uniform are onl) an annoying re- 
minder. Embittered, lonely, he wan 
den away to a Veteran ' Home to 
die. 

Chronologically the war motif i 

followed by "The Jazz Decade," in 
which eight masked figures give them 

selves '" the cheap, neurotic rhythm 

Continurd on Putt '• 





EXHIBITS 






1. 


MEMORIAL mix.. 




Photographs of 


Springfield 




Houses 






II. 


LIRE \KY 








Photographs from 


the 


North 




Shore Camera Ch 


h 





REVERSIBLE TOP-COATS 919.50 
Other Hiqh Grade Clothing oi>.<l Haberdashery «it Prices You Can. Afford 

F. Ms THOMPSON & SON 









THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THIKSDAY, OCTOBER 6. 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I 111 BSD AY, tHT'OIIEK «i. IfSa* 



CCCD NOTE* 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



COUNCIL VOTES FOR Suzy Coed Finds Difficulties Of Studying THIS YEARS' INDEX 

2nd PLEDGING DATE /„ Abbey Are Remedied At Goodell Library TO RESEMBLE LAST 



The social season of the coeds start- 
ed oil' very successfully with the 
Abbey tea held yesterday afternoon 

at the Abbey. Marge Shaw did an 

excellent job on it. Saturday after- 
noon, the annual Coed party will be 
held upstairs in the Memorial Build- 
ing. Helen Downing*! orchestra will 
furnish the music. The recent hurii- 
cane gave the girii in charge the 
idea for this get-to-gether am | they 
have hinted that old clothes are in 
effect — in other words, "smooth" 
clothes are out. My, my, we won't be 
able to tell the sororities apart! 

The tennis tournament is getting 
under way soon. A greet many coeds 
have signed up for it and some of 
the matches should prove very inter- 
esting- The juniors are playing the 
seniors in hockey tomorrow afternoon 
at 4:80. The juniors are favored of 
course. L'pperclass women had better 
get their riding clothes out of moth- 
balls and get their boots polished 
because coed riding classes will be 
starting up soon. 

More social news -Lambda Dett is 
holding a "vie" party "" Saturday 
evening. The chaperons will be Mr. 
and Mrs. Karle Carpenter and Dr. and 
Mis. liullis. l'hi Zeta's patronesses 
gave them a supper last Saturday 
evening. Sigma i.eta is planning on 
holding their annual Hallowe-en par- 
ty Oct. 2x. Alpha Lambda Mu has 

chosen an ushering committee to con- 
sist of Beatrice Davenport, Helen 
O'Hearn, Roaa Kohls, Olive Jackson, 
Marion Tolman, and Sally Kell. 

In the W. S. G. A. meeting held 
last Tuesday evening lona Reynolds 
was elected sophomore member of 
the W. S. G. A. to replace Jane Leigh- 
ton. A golf tournament was discussed 
by Millicent Carpenter. We will tell 
you more about that later. 

From Kent University we hear that 
regardless of the fact that cold 
weather hasn't started in earnest yet, 
the girls are extremely cold. It seems 
that heat in their new dormitory has 
been held up due to the fact that 
there are two divergent school of 
thoughts on how the heating plants 
should be put in. 

CLASS OF 1940 



Rushing Will Carry Over Till 

Next Semester; Skits 

Announced 



V. change in rushing rule.-, for the 
rest of the year was made by the 
Interfrateriiity Council last Right 
when they voted for second semester 
pledging unanimously. This change 
was made in view of the condition- 
under which rushing was held this 
year resulting in a much shortened 
period for some houses on campus. 

Conditions for Interfraternity Skits 
were also made and an announcement 
of eliminations for Dad's Day enter 
tainment sent out. These eliminations 
will take place on November '•',, the 
best skits being held for the 5th. 



Continued 

lie Vine. Karl B. 
Iir Witt, William P. 
I • ■ • kie, Rebecca 8. 
l»i GregoriOi A Unit A. 
Ho.-. Robert EL 
Dorchester, Chester H. 
Dow, Eugene L. 
I it ins ning, Raymond .'. 
Eautwian, Ruaaajl G, 
Kkiniul. Norman S. 
Ki.r. Dorothy C. 
Fairbank, Robert P. 
Farineau, Arthur 

Foster, Arthur W. 

Foster, PbUlp i '. 
Fmppler, Arthur Si 
1'iiy, William S. 

iiissiil, Chnrlei E. 

i.iaham, John W. 
Urnham, Kenntth H. 
Harney, Edward V. 
Karri*, Burton K., Jr 
I l.i leajagn, Herman E. 
Hibbardi <;< or^e C. 

Howard, Samuel L. 
iluLri'lman. Allan N. 
Hurlburt, Wataoti M. 
Ouirnon, .lane C, 
liamaehe, Robert C. 

Gaudette, Ethel M. 
Qlaaler, Orroan H. 

i .(iiiilsvin. ltrure H. 
i.mil.l, John A. 
IIaii:-on. Joseph Hi 

Hatch, Gordon ff, 

tlimnn li eii h, Italph C< 

Holland, Edward W, 

Morton, Karle It. 
Ilnsmer, Samuel M. 
Howard, Frank L, 
Irish, Robert A. 
Jachowskl, Ali>h<n: • .1 
Jackson, Donald P. 

JaCobi, Ma mill. Jr. 

Jarkci, Ellen A. 



jrom Page 2 

Ferriaburgi vt. 

(iranhy, Mans. 

fitt.sliilil. Mass. 

Walthum, Mass. 

WalerttiNvn, Ma.--. 

Marlboro, Iftaaa, 

Canaan. N. H. 

Htilynke, Mass. 

Ixiwell, Mass. 

Draiut. Mass. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

North Springfield, Vt. 

Maiden. Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 

So. Dennis. Mass. 

"Ipi I ill. field. Haas, 

Grafton, Mass. 

Dudley Hill, Mass. 

Kensington, Oonn. 

Lowell, Mass. 

Cambrtdae, Mass. 

Lincoln, K. I. 

Monstin, Ma-s. 

North Hatlley, Mass. 

Klnderhook, N. Y. 

Anilover, Conn. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Northampton, 

Leominster, 

Hanson, 

Deveritt, 

Leominstaa , Mass. 

Wart. Mass. 
Wohiirn 

Shirley 

(iranhy 

Bronx, 

Attlehoro 

Ooncord 

Natit-k 
Bridgeport, 111 

, Hathelil, Mass 

Shrewsbury. Mass 

Wootlmere, ta, 1 

Fltebburg, Mass 



Mass. 
Mass. 

Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

N. Y. 

Mass. 
,.iass. 
Mass. 



Johnson. Edward V. 

Kalatznik, Paul A. 
Kulish. William J. 
Reyes, Pearl P., J;-. 

Koniet'/riy. Edward 

Koeakowaki, Stephen K. 
Ladd. Charles V. 
Lambert, William N., Jr, 
Iai Boat. Anthony A. 
Leach, Bradford s. 
Leonard, Duane It. 
Lamsa. Torio W. M. 
Lloyd, John B., Jr. 
I, likens. John P. 
Macneil, Mack K. 
MalinoNSski, Adolph A. 
Hatgallon, John E. 

Marshall. Walter F. 

Martin. George B, 
Maynanl. Everett E. 
Mi-Cnily. Chailes A. 
Mil lonald, James L. 
.Mi Lean, Matthew F. 
McNamara, John E. 
Mi Tirnan, Donald 
Merriam, Ilion It. 
Messier, Jack H. 

Miller, Cordon P. 
Molinari. David J. 
Morris, John \V. 
Morse, Wayne H. 
Morvant. Michel A., Jr. 
Mulrenin. George J. 
Nil si in, Farley C. 
Neville, John D. 
Newton, Gordon B. 
O'Gorman, Joseph B. 
dll.ain. John H 
Oppenheimer. Carl F. 
Nicki-rsnii, Charles R. 

Ormo, Arthur 
Oaetak, William F. 
Pantanella, Anthony A. 
Pease, Waiter A.. Jr. 
Peek, William C. 
Pelletteero, George J. 
I'erham. David 
Peter s o n , Donald N. 
Pattett, James A. 
I'atton, Willartl M. 
Pollock, Alan It. 
Price. Cole B. 
Ray, Bernard H. 
Raynes, Everett J. 
Reed, for rest 
Rally, Eugene 
Richards, Richard C. 
Ridgeway, Thomas W. 

Itiese, Louis H. 
Rogera, Frank 
Russell, Paul 

Ryan, Thomas 

Balamandra, Eugene 
Sargent, Fred 
Sargeat, Raymond 
Scott, Lewis 

ShiveiNvitk. Prank 
BtecaJ, Edward w. 
Smith. Leonard 

Smith. Wesley 
Smyth. Thomas It. 
Spear, William R. 
SpiiiKUe, Call W. 
Stanley. Arthur 
St i lis, Henry It. 
Stone, Alice 
Sullivan, Timothy 
Sullivan, William 
ftsafir, Charles 
Taft, Itichanl 
Takala, John 
Taylor, Roland F. 
Teehan, James 

Thurlow, Gordon 

Tiirnev. Lawrence 
Tohan, Harold 
True. Everett 
Turnbull, James 

Turnqutat, Barbara 

Vinson, Taul 
WaskitNvis, Stanley 
Wiiisloss, Charles 
Whiildcn. Richard 
Wilson. Itichanl 
Worcester, .issel 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Conn 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



Mass. 
Mass. 



Barnstable, Mass. 
Taunton, Mass. 
(■urdner 

Amhi-i >t 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Whitman 

Amherst, Mass. 

Hadley, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. 

Temideton, Mass. 

Fitcnburtr, Mass. 

Kinderhook, N. Y. 

Belmont, Mass. 

Wellesley, Mass. 

Amherst, Mass. 

Amherst, Mass. 

Wohurn, Mass. 

Cheshire, Conn. 

MaWlen, Mass. 

Maiden. Mass. 

So. Broton, Mass. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Waterhury, Conn. 

Needham, Mass. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Mnl. II. -lii lil. Mass. 

Wattingford 

Dorchester, 

Fisktiale, 

Greenfield 

Mattapan, Mass. 

Monson, Mass. 

Wohurn 

Athol 

Boston, Mass. 

Quincy, Mass. 

Natick, Mass. 

Orleans, Mass. 

Sharon. Mass. 

Hat-field, Mass. 

Waltham. Mass. 

Lutllosv. Mass. 

New London, Conn. 

Worcester. Mass. 

Clinto, Mass. 

Plymouth, Mass. 

Salisbury, Mass. 

No. Amherst, Mass. 

Franklin, Mass. 

Scranton, Pinna. 

Oxford, Mass. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Pelham, Mass. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Greenwich, Oonn, 

W. Springfield, Mass. 

Worcester, MaBs. 

No. Weymouth, Mass. 

Belchertown, Mass. 

Chieopee. Mass. 

Meriden, Oonn, 
Brownsville, Vt. 

Clinton, Mass. 

No. Hadley, Mass. 

Melrose, 

1 ion hester 

Springfield, 

t Ireenliilil. 

Hazard, Conn 
V.-awatn. Mass 

Weetbora 

Pembroke, 
Weatfield, Mass. 
Roslindale, Mass. 
Brockton, 
Brookline, 
Hadley. 

Newport , 

Leicester, 

Hutlson. 

SprinRfield, 

( Iron field 

Cambridge, 

ltoslindale, 

Salisbury, 

Waltham, 

Maiden, Mnss, 

Winchendon, Mass 

Amherst, Mass 

Newton Highlands, Mass 

Maiden, Mass 

Melrose, Mass 

Hollo,, Mass 



By Kathleen Tully 

Remember Suzy Coed '42? She'; 
back again. She's improving, too. She 
still thinks she has to eat everything 
on the menu at cafe, and she still 
pronounces Goessmann Lab "Goxe- 
man," but college is gradually wearing 
her down. She's even decided to do a 
little studying — in spite of the last 
Sonja Henie college picture which 
convinced her that college was just 
a gay round of informals and winter 
carnivals and stuff, and that books 
were just something the boy friend 
carried home for you on his other 
arm. 

Hut Suzy can't study in the Abbey 
There aren't any hoys there. She 
knows a much nicer place — the library. 
Suzy arrives, all dressed up — she 
can study much better when she looks 
like the perfect example of what Hol- 
lywood Missed — ready for an evening 
of good, solid studying. She steps 
inside the door, sighs lustily, and says 
"I've got soooo much work to do" — 
when really the only one big awful 
anxiety of her life is Pet Passion 
Freddy studying with another girl! 
She clomps around the library for a 
half hour, simultaneously trying to 
find Freddy, and yet look as if she 
didn't care two hoots whether he 



horrib 1 



Unusual features Are 
Secret; Positions t< 
be filled 

Q. What has been done go 
the making of the 1939 Index 

A: It was impossible to 
work of a substantial nature 
the summer but we have est: 
a general idea of what the bi 
be. 

Q: What is the theme to be 

A: It will resemble last va 



K. 



WATCH THIS 



All Stockbridge students are warn- 
ed that a town ordinance forbids bi- 
cycle riding on the sidewalks. One 
freshman on the day of registratio 1 
was most courteously ? and kindly ? 
treated by one of our local polic 
force, who without customary wan- 
ing to the stranger in our fair town 
(as usually practiced in most civil- 
ized communities, not entirely depend- 
ent on the good will of their college 
student population as here) deliber- 
ately issued a formal summon? re- 
quiring his appearances in Northamp- 
ton Police Court along with >th?r 
flagrant criminals on next Friday, 
causing much inconvenience, expanse 
and loss of class time. 



lived or died a slow and 
death by arsenic poisoning. 

Suzy digs up a surprised expres- 
sion when she sees him. Freddy think-* 
"Omygosh, she's here again, ' but 
what can a fellow do? After all, *l e'-; 
not BO bad — now that she's cart fully 
hung her profile against a be ■, .tiling 
wall. Not bad at all. Of course SuZj 
is studying hard. She reads two whole 
paragraphs of "How We Think" n 
twenty minutes — and she still can't 
think straight. Q. B, D. At »:80, h >w- 
ever, she drifts nonchalantly toward |^ j 
the door with both fingers crossed and 
loaded down with the books she liTi't 
quite get to studying. 

Peculiarity enough, Freddy he 
might as well go home now, too. Su".v 
Coed uncrosses her fingers and smi <•.- 
Myrna Loy's special smile — she .it. 
it down to a successful science after 
an afternoon of practice in front of 
a mirror. Freddy — poor man — melts 
There's absolutely no point in bein^ 
a woman hater. Besides, can he help 
it if the Abuey is on the way to 
Thatcher? Certainly not. 

Yes, sir, Suzy Coed finds the li- 
brary a "too divine" place to do a 
half-hour's work in two hours. One 
meets such very interesting people! j Stune thfi former busim . ss ma| 

but this position will be tilled \. 



improvements. 

(I: Do you plan to have a 
usual features' 

A: Yes, but these mu.-t 
secret. 

Q: What progress has bet- 
since the start of the school y< 

A: A permanent secretary, 
ard tiiendon '40, has been app 
The Hoard will meet every Ti 
at 7:30 p. m. The meeting tonig 
be of especial importance, as 
stitution wid be presented foi 
al. Also, a vote will be t;u 
gard to the filling of two va< 
on the boar... We are partii 
hampered by the loss of 



Nor 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



Th.all. Milton 
HeriH-lin, Kdward 
l!i i.smaster, Haroltl 
Han scorn, Lloyd 
I.awton, Norman 



Weston, Mass. 

Whitman, Mass. 

Northfieltl. Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 

Koxboro. Mass. 



With over sixty aspirants report- 
ing at the Memorial Building to try 

| out for the Men's wlee Club at the 
first rehearsal luesday evening, Di- 

■ rector Alviani started the season b\ 
testing voices and beginning work 
on songs for the winter program. 
This unusual number of applicants 
will undergo a process of further 
testing and elimination later on in the 
season in order to carry out Mr. Al 
viani's plan of forming a Varsity 
Glee Club. Anyone who did not try 
out this week and is still interested 
in applying for a position in the club, 
however, may report next Tuesday 

at eight n'clot .. in the Memorial 
Building. 

Songs which were started at this 
week's rehearsal included ■ series <>f 
negro spirituals, and Morning by 
Speaks. 



soon. 

Q: What about competition? 

A: The sophomore will be noti 
shortly about this. 

Q: By the way, when will ti,,- I 
! be issued? 

A: ..ork will be completed by A 
first, and it will . e issued on Can 
on or before May 1 or bu.-t. 

Found 

An excellent camel-hair coat, 
at Deady's Diner, which will la 
turned to the owner upon 
See Al. 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 

Ma.--. 



Mas. 1 
Mas> 



Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
R. I. 

Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



WEBSTER'S 
COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY 

$:1.50 



FOREIGN 

LANGUAGE 

DICTIONARIES 



U. S. TOPOGRAPHIC SHEETS 10c 



J* THEATRE ^ 



LAST TIMKS TODA^ 

Knv Frant'is - (ieoree Brenl 

\SE( RiviS OF AN 
ACTRESS" 



—Co-Hit— 

I < hi is Hay waul 



"SAINT IN NEW YOKK 



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RGA.VftG ROMANCE 
lln ihtntdi i i"! i 'ii 
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LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 



ROOM ACCESSORIES 



RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL %T>Z\ CO. 



63 So. Pleasant St. 



Amherst, Mass. 






.LEGE STORE 



Everything for the Student 



Luncheons 

Soda Fountain 

Student Supplies 

ON THK CAMPUS 



Manners and Souvenirn 
liooks and 

Magazine* 

NORTH CAMPUS 



COMPLETE 
CAMERA AND PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT 

We Stock — Argus, Contax, Loica, Rollicord, Super Ikonta, 

Bell & Howell 

and also many other cameras 

Time Payments on the Above ('an be Arranged 

Wellworth Pharmacy, Inc. 



I»\ie to an error, an in urn it add was in-.rt.tl for th. W.llworth Phnrmnry Inst we.-k 




TftE 

Joan BENNETT • Randolph SC3TT 



Co-Hit 



Warren William 

(Jail Patrick 

In 

WIVES UNDER 
SUSPICION" 



Plus: Cartoon N« 



SINDAY-MONDAY-Tl I BDA* 
Cont. Sun. 2-10:311 V. M. 




Are Featurettfi! 
All New 

MARCH OF TIM 
'Football Thrills of 

Mickey Mouse C 
"Mickey's Trail, i' 
latest Pat In- 



ifATE^iCNTS 



Conn. State Rules As Favorite Over Maroon This Saturday 



iht »P< 

v>rT»' 

lint 

nifi't* 



i»" 
me i 
,t! 
the 

.nt- 



,tai. fi'cin time to time, this 
cams in f" r ' ts share ti 
„ | ; ,u;-e -puiles were called 
- year before the sports 
v urts underway we plan 
the policy of Statements. 
I if, , olumn is not on the sport 
, to boost or knock. It does 
„, .,ive as a Monday morning 
,,, t, i kick. Neither is the ob- 
, .., t,, write on topics already 
jentioned, on the same page, in 
,it- stories. If any of these 
aim, it would he better 
to have the column. "State* 
is the sports editorial. A 
, )lllt - editorial, just as the news 
HliioiiaN on page two, is the 
editor- <>wn opinion. When some 
pi,;,., of the State College sports 
-rail) stands out either for its 
,t- or its faults, it is the ob- 
ot this column to touch on 

subject. 

mugh from time to time State- 

gone into personalities, the 

, column is to deal in ob- 

d plans of the athletic set- 

thc college and in other 

• nl institutions. When the 

a- seen fit to mention names, 

for the cause of giving 

v. ho has been ignored has 

.. - ,i to prod some athlete who 

the team; but, wno by his 

attitude, is hurting the moral 

i whole club. Uut rarely does 

iunin voice itself on these mat- 

| when it does it is backed by 

facts hut an overwhelming 

SOS State College gain its 

r the athletic sun. 

.,- the editor-in-chief of this 

ristoni a University of Massa 

and directs his editorial pol 

i $ toward this goal, so does the 

;, rts editor of this paper turn his 

i and his column to the at- 

:ii of a first class athletic plant 

Massachusetts State College. For 

: the Collegian sports editors 

campaigned for tennis courts— 

. them now; for years a policy 

f outside aid to athletes who are 

good scholars has been recommended 

l -• year the alumni started such 

i policy; the aim of the Department 

f Physical Education to have ath- 

•ic- for all has been strongly sup- 

fieii by this paper and winter 

:.!'- fencing, folf, and tennis are 

■tig to get some of the atten- 

ion they earn. This year oiatement.- 

.mam lie one man's opinion — ac- 

• (it it as that. 



SOCCER TEAM MEETS 
CSC THIS SATURDAY 



leads harriers 



Locals Arc Favored in Game at 
Storm — Tom Lyman 

to Start 



ist 



■tt.- 



Experience-wise by a defeat at the 
hands of Dartmouth, the State Boot- 
era will trip down to Stuns .hi Sat- 
urday to meet the l!».'iS edition of 
Connecticut State's soccer team. 

Last year the Maroon handsomely 
trimmed the Nutmeg State aggrega- 
tion 7-1; and seem to be on the trail I 
of a repitition except that they may I 
be overconfiuently inclined to under- 1 
rate the men from Stores. 



A hard rebound of opposition is ex- 
pected from the Nutmeg Hooters, who 
wire swampeo last Saturday by a 
veteran-studded We.-leyan team to the 
tune of S-n in a sloppily played game. 
Only the first period gave the Cardi 
rials any trouble, the advantage see 
sawing back and forth; but when their 
offense started clicking, the Reds roll- 
ed up seven goals during the second 
and third periods. Captain Kichin, 
liryn Hammarstrom, stellar center 
forward, and goalie Wen ('note were 
strongest for Wesleyan and will bear 
watching when they meet the liriggs- 
men on Nov. 11 for the last game of 
the current season. 

No tentative lineup has been re- 
leased by coach Uriggs, who is finding 
it hard to work to pick a team after 
eeing the ability of his substitute 
material last week; but one change 
was noted. Tommy Lyman, who did 
not play against Dartmouth, will be 
back in uniform day after tomorrow. 

Others of the soccer team's oppon- 
ents besides Wesleyan to win games 
were: Springfield, who took Cortland 
o-0; and Amherst, which to.ik a prac- 
tice game .'1-2 from Worcester's 
Swedish -American professionals. 

TENNIS 




NUTMEGGERS HAVE BEST TEAM IN YEARS 
WITH LINEUP TWO DEEP INi EVERY POST 

Statesmen Have Learned Much From Last Week's Loss to Bow* 
doin — Warren Tappin, Jim Payson, Dana rfrandsen 

Return to Fold to Give Added Strength 

HARRIERS WILL RUN wntMn 
HUSKIES AT BOSTON *< "< ^1™ 



Only Three Lettennen on State 
Team — Captain Pickard 

is Lone Star 



With only three lettennen, Captain 
Larry Pickard, Larry Bixb) and l'"vi 
Scholz remaining from last year's 
strong team. Coach L. L. Derby's 
cross-country charges open their sea 
son this Saturday at Franklin Park, 
Boston, against Northeastern Uni- 
versity. 

The Huskies, victors over Conn, (""••''it any stronger 
State last week, are already a tried the rest of the year 
outfit and should out run the locals; 
but the Maroon still has a good 
chance if Harold Rose, Dick Hay ward 

Lig Green, Paced by Captain or Charlie slater can keep up with 

Tom Bailey, Scores Twice the leaders, rna loss of last year's 

in Fourth Chukker captain, Mitch NeJame and Obbie ln- 



Capt, Larry Pickard 

HANOVER B00TERS 
TOPPLE MAROON 2-0 



Morey 




KK 


Peterson 


: Nelson 




KI 


KosikowsJd 


Payaon 




RG 


Robinson 


Hlasko 




c 


Roberts 


Zajchowi 


ki 


l.(. 


Mounter 


{ Malcolm 




LT 


I ad roe ke 


Badge 




LE 


I'anciera 


Irayk 




QB 


W alt man 


, i often 




KM It 


Posner 


1 Allen 




Lint 


Donnelly 


< on. mi 




FK 


Schwolskv 


><U\f till 


'.V 


will not fa 


'•' another oj 



than Bowdoin, 
Massachusetts 

State's green football edition will take 
the field, this Saturday at Storrs, with 
little chance of beating Connecticut 
State but odds-on favorites (,, „ u t 
Rght the man mountain Nuttneggers, 
Last 



week's loss to Bowdoin taught 
Bjrara Is keenly felt by the harriers Ml Coach Carawav 
these two paired with Pickard for a 



Showing a fa.st forward line, and ">•»■ »« l' air «' , » w,in ric«aro ior a , Kn .. lt <1( , a) ;iM(| (|i)i |!|||( wj|| ^ 

capitalizing on their breaks, the Dart- front trm that made State one of the al ,| t , tu rU() nV(| . ^ ^ ^ 

mouth hooters topped State 2-0 last I l, *' tt,r NVw England combines. At fashion Adam Walsh's charges did at 

Saturday in the season's ..peer at present, it ie expected that Schola and Brunswick, The return of Pudare Pay 

Hanover. The big Green's forward Bixby ra " k,,( ''' UB near ln '' leaderB aon at tacaue, Wane., Tappin and 

line paced by Captain Tom Bailey at ,,ut *« chancea of another strong trio jj^m pvandaen to halfback posts a 



In order to get action before it is 
too late, the sport stall' would like 
to have the names of all those stu- 
dents interested in the college starting 
a tennis team next Spring. Now tha 
the Massachusetts Slate has propei 
courts, it is time to look for good 
material and get the campaign under- 
way. Last year, the college showed 
an interest in such a plan. 



Brilliant Bowdoin Bears Beat Battling 

Statesmen 32-0 With Ftrst Half Attack 



me by S terrific attack and 

Irons reserves, the Massachusetts 

eleven came up on the short 

rj. game with Bowdoin, 

llrunswick, Maine, last Sat- 

Polar l'.ears scored four of 

touchdowns In the first two 
Ishing back a spirited but 
Maroon team which had won 
ther start. 

a brilliant brand of foot* 
•i with fine blocking, Coach 



to Kowson. 

Late in this second period. State 
put on its only serious drive, begin- 
ning from its own 4U yard line and 
making three first downs in a row 
mostly through passes, with ZelaKo 
and Don Allen on the throwing end 
and Cohen and Irzyk fining the re 
ceiving. The longest pass was a to-- 
from Allen to Cohen which netted X'. 
yards. This drive was soon halted and 



center, repeatedly (lashed down to 
threaten the State pay box, but a 
strong Maroon defense held i iutit for 
three (matters. 

Both of the two goals made by the 
Indians tame in the third period. With 
both teams evenly matched, it appear- 
ed that the game would be decided 
by the breaks for both goalies were 
exhibiting brilliant defense work. 
However, with about ten minutes gone 
in the fourth quarter, Dartmouth's 
fast left wing carrying down the side, 
centered to Bailey who was lucky 
enough to be standing in position to 
receive the ball ; nd make the C n 
version. 

With the score one to nothing in 
Dartmouth's favor, State battled f.,i 
a goal, but a few later, another stroke 
of luck gave the Indians their aecond 
score. A free scramble in front of the 
Maroon goal developed, and the loo • 
ball was finally secured by Dartmouth 
for the score. 

Substitutes were plentiful on the lo- 
cal's side with Coach Larry llrigg.s 
attempting to find the ideal lineup. 
The subs however played well, ami 
the situation is anything but settled. 

A feature of the game was Captain 
Rodda's play at center and the brain) 

Maroon leader should be headed for 
a good season. I'odalak, senior full- 
hack, linked n'i"d ami the State goalie 
Wilson showed up well in the toned 
spots. 



are very slim. 

The Hub team is built around a 
nucleus of live men who ran against 
the Statesmen last season in a close 
2<i-27 meet captured by Northeastern. 
They are Captain Bob I'ritchard who 
should battle State's Pickard all the 

way, Dave Lockerby, Loring Thomp 

son. Kddie Landsman ami RUSS Kip 
pen. Coming up fast to make a bid 
for top honors is Sam Drevitch, cap 
tain of last year's nusky pups who 
may be well in the front this Satur- 
day. 



if- 

ter a brief stay on the hospital list 
will add strength to the Maroon at- 
tack. Stan Zelaao, another state back, 
just slowly rounding into shape after 
a late arrival hurt his ankle Tuesday 
and is lost t.. the club. King, another 
back is also nut. 

Two Deep 

Victors last week over Wesleyan 
by a 18-6 count, the Blue is two dee,, 
in every position. At the half back 
poatS Conn. State presents Poaner and 
Donnelly, touchdown twins, who both 



Amherst Has Strength to Will 

Hut Tufts May Out- 

Pight Them 



'42's GRID SCHEDULE 
LISTS.4 OPPONENTS 



counted In the Cardinal encounter and 

JEFF - JUMBO BATTLE I !' h 7' as lT ,lhli a " ,im " K "' a,s "" 

the Blue ledger. 
LEADS I OES SLATE Caraway's starting lineup against 

Connecticut is problematical but it 

is safe to figure a starting team of 

Captain ciif Moray at right end, with 

Howie RudgS at the other (lank. Carl 
Nelson and iirud MsUCOm loom as 
the starting tackles while /ajchowski 
will be joined again at guard by 
Pudge Payson. The center will of 

course be Johnny Blaako, who has 

played almost all of the first two 
games and looks better each time out 

Al ir/.yk at quarterback ami Chet 

Conant at fullback are th,' only two 
Maroon backfield men sure of start 
ing against the Nutmeggers while the 
half backs will be picked from Dmi 
Allen, Dana Krandsen, Warren Tap 
pin, Art Cohen. Leo Santucci pint 
-i/.ed fullback should see a great deal 
nf action while Warren Tappin may 
be sent int., the game at half. 



an intercepted pass thrown by Allen, 

A'I;hi Walsh's charges kept hammer- after the Maroon bad taker the ball 

• light State line all after- OB downs, paved the way for the 

lendy and KaraokaS, starring Hears' fourth score. 

backfield, tore off runs Threatening several times in the (w ~, T .,, 1F 

rd at a time, but the most second half, Bowdoin was succea fulP SUKkh £$f? e .^ h ^ MtJIermon, 

run of the game came in checked except for the 63 yard sprint 

quarter when sophomore by Bonsagni in the third quarter, One 

rni, left halfback, broke dlivi culminated on the twenty yard 

Ie in the line, reversed lj n ,.. Another took the ball over th 

d dashed 63 yards for Bow* goal line only to be called back for 

lichdown, Marches of 68, a clipping penalty. The moat effective 

rds featured the Bow- men In the State line-up were Captain 

hi the first half, hut for < ' l i I T" Morey, Chet Conant, and Walt 

of the game were held Zachowski. 






Williston and Sophs 

Are on Card 



Maroon in contrast to 
of the game when the 
ke through at will. 
'• and Rarsokas tearing 

md round tne ends, the 

d the goal line on the 

of the game. Melemly 

short while after with 

'■<■ of the game, and he 

6 extra point. With the 

capably substituting for 

Bowdoin scored again 

111 'h Up the field which 

'■"1 pass from Haidane 



The lineup: 






Stale 




Mow doin 


Rudge 


LE 


Denham 


Nelson 


LT 


Corey 


Zachowski 


l.c 


Loeman 


Blaako 


C 


Webster 


Lavrakas 


RG 


Howard 


Pruslck 


RT 


Broe 


Morey 


i:i 


Mauley 


Irayk 


Q 


' irtland 


Allen 


LH 


Legate 


Santucci 


KH 


Karsokas 


< '..iiant 


I'M 


Melendj 



Released this week by Curry Hicks, 
head of the department of physical 
education, the freshman football 
rhedule showfl an Increaae of one 
gam, over former years. The games, 
however, will be no more formal than 
in pa -t j ears, I ten ive coaching will 
be allowed, and 00 high-priced official 
will be imported. Numerals, as previ- 
ously, will probably be awarded for 

winning-wide participation In tha an- on November II will try for it 
nual sophomore freshman battle on 
Armistice Day. 

The schedule: 
October 

•ji i Stockbridge School 

jr, Mt. Hermon, there 

November 

2 Williston, tl - " 
I ] Sophomore* < IOiOT a, m, i 



The opponent's game that will be 

most closely watched, this weak, by 

both the coaches and team of State 
College and the Maroon's followers 
will be the meeting between neigh- 
boring Amherst and major rival 
Tufts. 

Both Tufts and Amherst failed to 
live up to pre-season promises lasi 
Saturday when the Jumbos dropped 
a surprise 26-0 game to Al MCoy's 

Colby Mules and the Soldiers of the 
Kinu were lucky to gain a n-o' tie 
with Springfield. The Med ford club 
fields one of the best lines in recent 
Brown and lilue grid history but so 
far bas shown nothing but the Notre 
Dame shift in the backfield. Amherst 
has a powerful team in all positions. 

The Jeff backfield Is two deep and 

fast while the I'urple line Is U good 
as it is heavy. The big faull vith 
Lloyd Jordan's (barges is that they 
can't seem to get interested in the 
game. If Professor Jordan can talk 
his charges into the belief that Tllfl- 
is William-, Lew Manly and comp'l 
should ii"i plan on any celebial In i - 

on the Hill Saturday night, bul I 
Amherst play.- the same type ii oall 
again M the Jumbo* as it did at ih 

weak Springfield it will take rmr" 
than a lucky fumble to keep the lefFl 

out of the losers column. 

i:. I\ I. scheduled to meel 

,id 
. t 



win of the 

the l'ni\ei 
base an '" 



.' I '. ' 



• a in Saturday 

Ity of Rochester and 

.en chance of gain in 

Coasl Guard, another late sos 01 

take- the field Saturda\ 



TROPHY IS GIVEN IN 
THOMPSONS MEMORY 

Will be Awarded to Baseball 
Player Most Valuable 

to Team 



A large silver trophy to be award 
ad to the most valuable player >>n 

tin Ma achusetta state College ba e 
ball squad hai been donated by Thorn 
as Thompson o« Amhei I In memory 
of be brother E. Jo eph Thompson, 
foi in- i state < lollege athletic great, 
who wa> kiile.i in an automobile acei- 
denl la t spring. 
The trophj i at pre enl on display 

in the wind. ,v, of the H"" '• Of Walsh 

in Amhei t. 
The award will 



mane a 

e.l nil .'III 



ifain t h 



highly favored Middlebury foe *hi 

Rhfjde Island State should run tp 

hijfh .ore over s bady Injured A 
* ', team. 



i warn 

of each baeb;ill -,;i or) and the pl.iv 

• r will be picked by Coach Ebb Cara- 
way, A high atting average or top- 
notch fielding or pitching performance 
will nut necessarily mean the award 
of the prize as the player is to be 
picked on hb contribution to the spirit 
and performance of the team 



u. 






C. Library. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, (HTOHEK B. 1938 



SPALDING ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT 
THOMAS F. WALSH, Agent 

College Outfitter 



I-KATKKMTIES 



No. Amlover ; 
Juhn Ti'whill, 
Worcester ; 1-^,1- 

Hc-niy I^itt, 



Kilwui 1 1 



Continued from Page 1 

].;i«niii'i' ; Hyinaii Lyons, Lawn nit- ; How* 
;inl Kiislnn; Milvin Hulliii, S|n lli^lii 1(1 
Hill iv Wolf, M ;i 1 1 :i | ..in . Hniviy llruniit-ll 

Win i-i'-ii r ; Irwin Joffe, Springfield. 

Alpha Gamma Kim Pledge* 
Class nl I HI I 

HiaK Koobation, Worcester. 
Clans ol IMS 

Gilbert Aiiioiii. Bouthwiek: W, Bailey, Part- 

mouth ; frank Camp. I'itt.sfit-M ; Tulc-otl E«l- 

mlnster, Freetown ; jam en Putnam, Danveis 
Loiirnt-i' Khincs, Wisttul.l ; Hichaiil Smith 
Southwick ; Henry Smolack 
l'hilip Trufant, Ablnjrton 

Northampton ; Carl Werme, 
wunl Williams, StOCkbrUg 
Boallndale ; Cheater Conklin. 

Alpha Sigma I'hi Pledges 
(lass of 19 III 

Prank Hopkins, Livtittt. 
Ciais of 19-11 

William Hi mil ickson, ScitUtte i 

l'lynn ; I'niil Prooopio, Brockton. 

(lass or IMS 

Paul Adams, Feeding Hillb ; John Hor^im, 
Belmont ; Bobert Holbrook, Mlllord i Theo- 
dora Girardi Houaatonle; Hubert Mullany, 
ll.itliilil ; K. Donald Tripp, Williman.sett ; John 
Sullivan, Chelaea ; John Lucey, Pittafieid ; 
Howard Norwood, Holyoke, Joseph MrLeod, 
l'ippcri'll ; Kohi-rt Trlggl ; Ralph Bickford, 
Lunt*nbui°K ; Frederick WhititiK. Koxbury ; 
David Morrill, Rowley ; Waiivn I'ushee, Hous- 
tonir ; James liilman, I'ip|ierell. 
Kappa Sigma Pledges 
(lass of lift 

William Fltzpatrick, Ann .-bury. 
(lass or l''.ia 

Edward Frame, Woiiistei. 
(lass or I'll 

Robert Everson. 
(lass of 1941 

John Blahop, Huntington, N. Y. . Daniel 
(aitir. Wilmington; Rusael Clark; Richard 
Coffin, Dorchester ; W. A. Cowan, Ptttaflald; 
Robert Donnelly, Worchester ; William Bar- 
row; Walter Daniels; James Graham, Middle- 
bo ro ; Charles Knox, E. Lujivrmeiulow ; Don- 



ald l.e, , l.elil.e 1 .11 li f lull , A I li lie to|| ; I,, 

I., eault: Eric Greenfield, Wan . Charlec Ma. - 
Cormlck, M.-iiiord : George McLaughlin, Am- 

hersl ; Richard .Mason, Maiden ; Ralph Man- 
dall, Middlelioni : i.oidon Northriip, l'emhioke; 
Joseph Rluiniiiei , Cranford ; Richard Fierce. 
l>iiii4ineadow ; Andiew Fierce; John Seery, 
llrookheld. 

I'hi Sigma Kappa 
(lass or INI 

Allister MacDou^all, Jr., Carlisle; Casimir 
Zielinski. Holyoke; Milford Atwood, Holyoke; 
Robert Ferry, Fittslield ; Francis Ward. Wm- 
ceater ; Benjamin Hadlsy, Jr., Far Harbor, 
Me.; Chester Sione Auburn; William Kirn- 
ba... Amherst ; Charles liishop, East Wul- 

pole ; Frederick Shaekley, Wlnthrop ; Paul 

Dwyer, Winthiop; Richard ('ussy, Heverly ; 
William Ca/.a/'/.a, Merrimac ; Ueiijamin Cie- 
it.is. Fairhaven ; William Dwyer, Holyoke; 
KrncM Dunbar. Barrej Lambert Erickaon, 

Attleboro; Joseph Jodka, Lawrence; 
(lass ol IM1 

John Fymak, Lawi'ence ; Christoiiher Paul, 
Huston, 
(lass of I 'i I 'i 

I. iii Santucci, Palmer ; James Malcolm, Hol- 
yoke . and Lester Fhillips, FittHfield. 

(J. T. V. Fledges 
(lass ol I'liu 

Joseph Hart. Northampton. 

(lass or 1942 

llaie Aioian. Oxford; Vincent LaFleur ; 
Charles Kolodzinski, Florence. 

Lambda Chi Alpha Fledges 
Class ol 19411 

John Hlaska, Amherst. 
(lass or 1941 

John Hayes, Worcester ; Robert Halloan. 
Northampton. 
(lass of 1942 

Roy Holmbeiv. Ashland : William Mahan. 
Lenox ; Edward Sparks, Fittslield ; John Pow- 
ers, Braford ; Woatcott Shaw, Canton ; Donald 
Sullivan. Salem , John Doyle, Fittslield ; 
George Kimball, Amherst; Paul Winston. 
Marblehead. 
Class ot 1942 

Sigma Alpha Kpsilon Pledges 
John Shepardson, Aimil ; Theodore Shepard- 
son, Athol ; Kenneth (iillis, Weymouth ; Ualjih 
Dakin, Dalton ; Howard Hunter, Pittsfield ; 



Spencer I'utter, Norfolk, Colin.; Hubert Mc- 
Lean . Harold Hoaber, Starling ; wealie Ben- 
entails, Holyoke; Rene Hebert. Holyoke: John 

Laibcrtc. Holyoke; Elliott Schubeit. Melhiiei, : 

Richard Noon, Hudson 

Sigma I'hi Kpsilon Pleuges 
(lass of 1942 

Herme Hums. ores) Hills, N. Y. : John 

i..i, i.y. Brockton; Charles Woodcock, S. Had- 

lev : John Hutchins, Amherst ; Frederick I il- 
ios, W'estlield ; Arthur Rowe, Springfield, 
George Henoit, Springfield; Philip Cochran; 
John Diwoll. Bellows Falls, Vt., Otto Nan. 
Greenfield ; Benjamin Btonoga ; William Wall, 
Northampton ; James Hurley, Northampton ; 
Robert Kirvin. 
(lass of 1940 

(bestir Tiberii. (harleton. 

Thela (hi Pledges 
(lass or 1912 

Wlnthrop Avery, Shrewsbury ; Louis Line., 
Worcester; David Hurbank, Worcester; How- 
ard Sunden, Watertowii : Melvin Eaton, Wat- 
ertown ; Preston Hurnham. Lynn ; William 
MeCutcheon, S. Deerfleld ; Charles I'yfe, Wor- 
cester ; Wituam Williams. HolltatoB ; Robert 
Pearson, Briarcliffe Manor. N. Y. ; Courtney 
Foegate, Hudson; John Marsh, Danvera ; John 
Brady, Greenfiald ; Rodney Emery, Weatboro; 
Alfred EldriiR'e. Bomervills I Paul White. 
Somerville ; Freeman Mors*-, L> nn : James 

Selkregg, State College, Penn. : Donald Thay- 
er, Worcester ; Richard Cox. Bridgewater, 
Judcomb Sparling, East Bridgewater, 
(lass of 1940 

Tau Kpsilon Phi Pledges 
Morris Hurnkoff. Boston : Elliot Josephson, 
Boston ; Sidney Abramovits, Heverly. 

(lass of 194. 

Melvin Abrahamson. Greenfield; Louis 
Abrams, >,inthrop; Norman Cohen, Somer- 
ville; Morris Bloom, Dorchester; Allan Bux- 
baum. Jamaica, N. Y. ; Allan Collier, Dor- 
chester ; Hyman Finkel, ( ...Isea ; Saul Click. 
Boston ; Joseph Coldman. Maiden ; Harold 
Hbrwits, Roxbmy ; Sylvan l.ind, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. : Abraham Katran. Chelsea : Milton Ka- 
KftB, Dorchester : Albert Mezoff, Lynn ; Albert 
Mikels, Robert Nnttenberg, Waltham ; Nor- 
man lliran, Holyoke; Harry Rovno. Fitohburg i 
Irving Rabinovitz, Roxbury ; Israel Rogosa, 
Lynn; Mitchei. Rodman. Dorchester; May- 



nard Steinberg, 
kfattapan ; Mil'.i 
den Hani- p 
Robert Raddlng 

lilooni, Holyoke, 



Fitchbui ■ II. rberi Welni i . 

■ Winei . Sidney Zeitier. Mai- 

las, Lyani Daniel Ballaban ; 

Longmeadow ; Arthur Rosen- 



COLLEGIAN C0MPE1 



llu\ 



TED SHAWN 



Continued from Page 3 
which tame with the aftermath of 
war. Following this is a two part solo 
by Shawn: "Depression and "Recov- 
ery." Depression which was coincident 
with the peak of "modernism in the 
dance" has been treated in the first 
half as a satire on the most fantastic 
of the modem dancers." Shawn then 
dances "Credo," which may be as- 
sumed to be an art form of Shawn's 
own life done abstractly. 

"Olympiad" and "Mobilization for 
Peace" close the Present section. 
"Olympiad" is a suite of six dance 
of sport done by members of the com- 
pany: "The Manner Hearer," "The 
Cheer Leaders," "Decathlon," "Fenc- 
ing," "Boxing,*" and "Basket Ball." 
The majority of these dances were 
created by their soloists, this being 
the first time that chorography by 
members of the group has been pre- 
sented on Shawn's programs. "Mobil- 
ization for Peace" is danced by the 
entire company. 

The program closes with "Kinetic 
.violpai," a suite of eleven dances in- 
dicative of a direction in which Am- 
erica may proceed — the athleti art 
of the Dance as a field of creative en- 
deavor for men. The dances of this 
suite are based on Strife, Love, 
Death and the Things Beyond Death. 



Positions on the editorial 
ineas boards of the CoUegigj 
"pen. Competition has ata 

there is room for more Edii 
board members should rep..- 
belle Booth at Mem Building 
Monday night, business men 
(jove at the Collegian office 

ORIGINATOR OF 

Continued from Page . 
and literature were instituted 

Professor Patterson, Dr. , 
pointed out, inspired several 
tions of undergraduates wit! 
desire for the liberalizing of 
riculum. He did BO by his i 
humanity." He did so, too. i. 
them specific counsel as to i . 
and yet effective ways of 
their ideals. 

"So by both what he was 
what he did," concluded Dr. <, 
Professoi Patterson played a 
portant part in that movement 
eralizing our curriculum and | 
creasing the value of the coUee 
the citizens of the state, of wi. 
adoption of the A.B. degree 
an episode." 

PRE-MBD 

Continued from Page i 
dents were allowed to view operati 
to the Northampton State II 
and to the Westfield Senator . 
This year trips to similar institution 
will again be made. It is else- p 
to present several films dealing 
some phases of surgery at Bome 
future meetings. 



W 





P\ll WlllTHMAN 
/■.very Wednesday i.vening 

GBORGB Gkacif 
Burns Allkn 

/■very 1 riday h'.vening 
All C li. S. Stations 



. . . you could 

man a fleet with the 

fellows asking for 

Chesterfields today!" 

Millions of smokers arc 
signing up with Chesterfields 
. . . glad to find a cigarette 
that has what they want . . . 

refreshing MILDNESS 

better TASTE 

pleasing A ROMA 

And here's why. . . Chesterfields 
give you the best ingredients a 
cigarette can have. . . mild ripe to- 
baccos and pure cigarette paper. 



BODIB DOOLBY 

I ootbnll Highlights 

P.very Thursday and Saturday 

$2 Leading ft. li. (.'. Stations 



..with MORE PLEASURE 
for millions 




c 



XLIX 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER Hi. hi:ts z 



NO. 4 



NINE SENIORS NOMINATED FOR 
PHI KAPPA PHI MEMBERSHIP 

I, Booth Recipient of Society Scholarship: Reverend Ogilby, 
President of Trinity College Speaks at 
Honors Convocation 

BRANCH PICKED FOR 
INDEX MANAGERSHIP 



R. (). T. ( . BALL DEC. 1 

I'hms are already underway for 
the annual Military Ball to be held 
December 'J. according; to George 
Benjamin ".'■:>, chairman of the Ball 



Wl 



price 
ill ncr 



i: 



ating nine seniors, Phi Kappa 
, made known the names of 
idents picked to be honored 
ibership; and named Miss 
ioth as I'hi Kappa I'hi 
recipient. The selections 
for today's scholarship day 
at which the Rev. Remsen 
president of Trinity Col- 
on "i ne Joke of the By- 



„k 



hi-iilc- Miss Booth, those honored 

. Milton K. Auerbach, George H. 

; , Leon S. Ciereszko, Constance 

C. Fortin, Harold T. Gordon, Jean- 

H> imam Anne V. Kaplinsky. and 

\ exander A. Miller. 

Miss Booth 

M - Booth was graduated from 

tboro High. Foxhoro, Mass., and 

majoring in economics. She is ac- 

m extra-curricula activities, be- 

i! associate editor of the Collegian, 

member of the Winter Carnival 

Committee, treasurer of the W. 

G, A., and a member of the Wom- 

Glee Club. She served on the 

nior Hop Committee, and is 

ember of Lambda Delta Mu sor- 

\ graduate of Classical High, 

. ■ Id, Mass., Auerbach is a pre- 

"I major, a member of the Men's 

Club, the Monorah Club, and the 

Club. He is a soccer letterman 

pledge of Tau Kpsilon I'hi fra- 

Rischoff, a graduate of Hoi- 

' High School, Holyoke, Mass.. is 

Continued on Pjge 4 

SIX SKITS PLANNED 
ON DADS' DAY CARD 

Elimination Contest For the 
Fraternities Will be on 
November ."> 



Fills Vacancy Left by Transfer 

of Norman Stone — Meeting 

Tonight 



( Committee. Hours of the dan 

be 9 p. m. to 'J a. m. and thi 
of tickets has been set at $'A, 
couple. 

This is an open dance for the 
entire student bodj and the corn- 
mittee wishes the cooperation of 
the college body in making it a suc- 
cess. 

The committee consists of cadet 

officers George Benjamin, chair 
man. II. Gardner Andersen, Clif- 
ford Lippincott, George Haylon, 
Ralph Poster, Charles Griffin '.'Iii, 
and George Pitts, '40. 

ELECTION CHANGES 
MADE BY SENATORS 



Nominating Committees to 

Picked From Fraternity 
Candidates 



nation contest tor the inter- 
kit.-, to be presented on 
11 . November 5, will be held 
• ' Auditorium, Thursda} 
• a 7:::n p. m. Kach fra- 
will present a short skit, the 
d best to he presented ;i 
;i Saturday night program 
fathers, Points will be 

; '''"l ■■" the final performance t'.o 
the lust three place,, and 
will be totaled in the year 
rnity competition, 

Skits 

■ill take the place of the 

Revue, held the past few 

1 ; •> was not an Interfrater- 

1 it ion. In addition to fra- 

ticipation in the Dads' Day 

bined intersorority skit 

ented. 

Dads' Day program 

e morning when soph- 

and eniors will par* 

8 h I how, with the 
' 'rating dismounted 



At a meeting of the Index Board 
last Thursday night, Charles Branch 
'39 was elected business manager to 
fill the vacancy left by the transfer 
of Norman Stone. Branch is a resi- 
dent of Amherst and held positions 
on the Amherst High School paper 
and yearbook. He is a member of 
I'hi Sigma Kappa, and was recently 
elected to the senior nominating com 
mittee. He has participated in soc- 
cer, winter track and freshman has 
ketball. 

New Members 
There are several positions yet to 
be filled in the junior members of the 

Board; these will definitely he decid- 
ed upon at the meeting of the Board 
tonight. 

Myron Fisher, editor-in-chief, ha 

decided to keep the more unusual in- 
novations secret, to he left as a sur 
prise when the Index is issued on 
campus, However, he says that as 
usual the 1939 Index will profit h\ 
the shortcomings of the previous year 
hook. Furthermore, there will be no 

outstanding break with the general 

motif of the 1988 Index, except that taking moving pictures of life on cam- 

the i:>- - i!» hook will probably be small P us ''"' >''•'"' round. This \\\\\ include 

or. with yet moie stress ot photo classes, dances, carnival, sports, and 

graphs. The opening section will be "' |, «''' things of interest. 

more colorful, and there will be moie The body also voted to huv 



Earn Prolonged Applause After 
Performance Friday in 

Bowker Hall 



In their meeting Tuesday night, the 

Senate voted a change in the nomin- 
ating committee rules. Each fraternity 
and sorority, from now on, will nom- 
inate one person \\, r the nominating 
committee. Two non-fraternity men 
and oi e non-.-.orority woman will be 
chosen by the Senate. From this list 
Of nineteen, the class will elect eleven 

as usuaL 

i ins change was made because it 
s felt that too much planning wa 
■ lone beforehand and becaui e of the 
difficulty of getting representation on 

< lass lists. 

The Senate also voted $125.0(1 to 

Professor Barrett for the purpose of 






a new 



color running throughout the book. Alto Horn for the hand. 



B> Sidney Rosen 
Prolonged and loud applause irom 
a capacity audience was the tribute 

given to 'fed Shawn and his .Men 

Dancers after they presented their 
Dance saga, "o, Libertad!", at the 
first Social Union last Friday eve 

nine, m Bowker A nditoriuin. 

And the applause, the reviewei 

feels, was Well deserved, hecause t he 
Shawn hoys really worked for It. It 
almost exhausted the onlooker to 
wadh their rhythmic calisthenics 
pet I'm mod with such ease, though 
with much perspiration. The Dancers, 
including Ted Shawn himself, are 

physiological phenomenon.-; their 

body development is unbelievable, the 

kind one generally associate., with an 

i-ient Grecian sculpture. 

Backstage, before the performance, 

most of the dancer-, in .-, petit i nudi 

condition, were prancing, hop-skip 
ping, and jumping about. < Ine fellow, 
dad in a while linen robe, gave com- 
plicated lighl me and . po| directions 
i" a rather bewildered student jani 

tor ( who did an excellent job, h. the 
way). Another dancer opened bundle 
and bundles of costumes quetzal 
feathers, pants, shorts, anklets a 
'■ •■ of miscellai r material I 

made the Stage loo., mote like an i 

auction counter at the Morgan Me j 
morial. At 7:30, a half hour before the ! 
first number, the chaos became order 

' uitnurd on I'.iy, 



UPPER CLASSES PICK NOMINEES 
FOR NEW SLATE OF OFFICERS 

Flections to be Meld in Convocation a Week From Today Uriel* 

Sketches of Leading' Candidates For Each Class 
Office is Included 

oHAWIl J> L1BLK1AD Meeting Monday evening the nom- 

QrTsPFQ HIT cpiTi A V '"''"" K """" l ' lu ' , ' s ' ,, ' , ' ( ,r ' 1 lasl w, '*' k < 

UVUIaEoJ fill rKIL/AI made nominations for class officers. 

'Elections will be held a week from 
todaj . 

The nominees are as follows: 
i«i President 

Howard Steff, Dartmouth, is an En- 
tomology major. He was a member of 
the Maroon Key, Class Captain, last 

three years, and a basketball, foot 
ball, and baseball player. He belongs 
to Theta Chi. 

Francis Kiel, of Turner.. Fall.-, Ul 

a French major. He was president of 
his freshman class, a member of Mi 
loon Key, and is a member of the 
Senate. Ho belongs to the intercla 
athletic committee, and plays basket- 
ball, football, and baseball, 

Vincent Schmidt, of New Bedford, 
is a cheni major, and a imhtai j major. 
He i president of the Interclass ath 

letic hoard and belongs to Sigma Al 
pha Kpsilon. 

Franklin Southwick. of \\ hi te 
Plains, N. v.. was a member of Ma 
roon Key, and is a senator. He is a 
football and basketball player and be 
longs to Lambda Chi Alpha. 

I'oherl Cain, ol Conwaj . I a for 

'• -<'■;■ major. He plays in the orche 

' ia, and i.> a senator, lie i ., 
and t rai k man and a miiita - 

H( i a Kappa Sigma. 
\ i' ■«■ Pre Ident i 

(Constance Fortin, Holyoke, 
: rlish major, she ha b< ■<> , i,, 

t'ntitiin.l n /';,■, i, 

POSTPONE RAZ00 TO 
WEEK FROM FRIDAY 



(iccer 

major. 



an 



Alviani Holds Singing As One of The Best 

Methods of Unifying Student Spirit at State 



Krosh-Soph Battle Delayed 
There Arc no Lights 
Athletic Field 



.i 



on 



: noon, the speedy Coast 
team will meet State's 

nl Field at 2:00, Dur- 

■■ en from Ww Lon* 
i colorful military 

tl e Mi,],]:, 

White will 



B\ Myron Fisher 

Three week- ago, at the opening 
Convocation, the student body 
violently and pleasingly arou d out 
of Its usual Convocation lethargy; 
that wa* news. That it was something 
out of the ordinary was due to the 
fact that it took an extraordinary 
person to do this. Who was this stim- 
ulating personality that to luddenly 
set voicea and spirits soaring? w i 
was responsible for the amazing turn 
OUt at the glee clttb tryouts, for the 
enthusiastic reception at Convocation 
and for making Massachusetl Si i 
College music-conscious? None othei 
than the latest newcomer to the music 
department, Doric Alviani. 

We suspected that here was a man 
w jt!, active plans for the future, 

someone worth sounding out. II ■ 
after the Tuesday night glee club r" 
bear sal, we managed to obtain ■ m 
Informative Interview, 

Can singing be ased as ■ method of 
unifying student spirit? 

"Yes, tl pertain- to the old theory 

it make- everyone think of the same 

band. The thing. For example, a patriotic long 

ilso take to arouses ■ certain response in this 



another. Thui . if forty out if fiftj 

are Binging, the other ten will soon 
be brought In." 

Man) -tii(lent> were fa\or;ihlv im- 
pressed ni»h the way you conducted 
Convocation xinninn. hut they are of 
the opinion thai the Alma Mater was 
MlUlg too fasf. Should it he done so'.' 

"There are certain reasons for that. 
Musically, it was written in 4 1 time, 

and would mean singing in a dirge 

like way. But the word have a cei 
tain dignity and power. This mean 

thai the melody and word- are not 
working; together well. One of tl-- 
two must he changed. If it i- to l>, 
a ong of retrospect, the melody 



r,, 



Military B; 


md dem- 


way. if a group Is singing, fchos 


drill under 


student 


it will think of only one thing, 
the emotion transmitted from on 



INFORMAL 

The second informal of the year 

is to be held thix Saturday evening 
in the Drill Hall at BfM p. m. as 
a climax to the Rhode Island foot* 
ball name. 
Following the course set by the 

Senate prices "ill he at the low 
-cale. $.$Q per couple, and I he 
dance i>. open to the entire student 
hod j. 

The Informal Committee has oh 
tained the Lord Jeff Jesters of \m- 
her>*t College for a hand. 



should be preserved, but with word., 
as 'give our college three timet thn ■- . 

there should be moie : nap and Vigor. 
\ ong like 'Dear Old Ma achu etts' 
would be good for arousing memory 
and retrospect 'When Twilight Sha 
dowt Deepen' would make an excellent 

Alma Mat. r. 

In view of this, (hen. do >oii think 
we lack one outstanding nong such as 
Cornell's and other colleges? Have 

we a son*, alreadj for this, or should 
■ new one he written? 

"I think we d,, need a new -one. 
Bui we could make one of our old 

f 'HR like thi through publicity, ra- 
dio broadcasts, baring well-known 
bands play it, and the- like. Although 

we could U.-e g |,cw BOUg, .1 

should be given to I already 

composed. Vet, with a new . one. the 

old one- are bound to be . iini' " 

Incidentally, Paul Whiteman, ia a 

recent article, stated that swing, 
on the wa> mit. Do >ou agree? 

"Swing i not on the waj 
haps 

but thi typ 
conti 



I'o tpoiied becau e of the lack of 
''J-' 1 ' 1 on the athletic field, Razoo 

Night, the annual I'm hman opho 

more fray, i cheduled for Oct. 21 
In the physical education cagi Tl ■ 
program will begin at B:00 under the 
direction of Frank Southwick '39, 
I'"' "l""' of the Senate. All opho. 
more and freshmen contestant are 
reque ted to be pre nl at 7; 16, 

Boxing and wie Mine matches, the 
"night hut" coni. i, and the haul 
royal will feature the .onto t in wl 

Hie sophomores are traditionally ou 

numbered by the fro h. Five poll • 

Will he awarded to each winner of 

ll " boj inn or wrci tling mati he in 
the cage, following which the flgl I 
Wl11 •' emble in the arena roped off 
for the night ihiri conte I 
The sophomore will attempt to 

"•"ee , the hirt from the fn- ' 

at .-i given irnal. ,,.,!>• one 



Is 



name 



la t ing 
Swing 



lone 

mo 



■if 

■ Ing 1 will <h ap[, 

n| mu lc will make a 

lUtion to dance mu i. . 

ind ' Wei I ' mil |C Will coin 

m.p k' a new i • pi [jf (jai 

Continued sa I', 



more being .allowed 

f I' 1 lima n \i'.,. i . . 



tack I 



nmen, 
opho 

Olle 



o p I ( 

hlrt 
oint 



V 



! I' 



I I 

ie battle 



at I en:|i 

nppo ii 

being 

other 



Battle 

point ■ 
royal i 

o i aptui 

oe n it 

ved to 



mi n 
the 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBKR 13, 19 



{8 







BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOE HART 



* STOCKBRIDGE 



/IftaseacbuselwF Collegian 



Alpha Tau Gamma held Iti first (too much. All 

get smoker last Tuesday night. There was attend to this 



Official in a |.ai>' 
Puhlinhed i 



if the MuMcbuMtJ 
> Thursday by Um 



State College 
students. 



otli 



Room 8, Memorial HuiMir.K 



Telephone 1102-M 



AIM HI i: \. NO YE 



EMERY 

Maiiuifinn 



MOORE 
Kilitur 



'39, 



Editor>ln-Chlef 
MABELLE UOOTM 



Ivliti 



KIHTOUIAL ItOAItO 



( ninpus 

JOHN K. III.IOS 'I", Editor 
BETTINA 1IAI.I, '89, Art Rlitor 
MAlfY I. MKKHAN "89 
FRANCES S. MKItltll.l. • 
JOSEPH HART '40 
NANCY K. LUCE "40 
CAROLYN K. MONK "40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART "40 
ROMA LEVY '40, Secretary 
KENNE1 II HOWLANM II 
WILLIAM T. c.ooMWIN 'II 
HAROLD FORREST II 
CHESTER KURALOWICZ "41 
JOHN HAYES II 

Feature 
LLOYD H. COPELAND '89, Editor 
MYRON FISHER '89 
KATHLEEN' TILLY II 
EVERETT R. SPENCER 



Sports 



D ARTHUR COPSON 

\LHERI YANOW '41 



•in 



Photography 
LANE UIDDINOS 



'38 



It seems that this column blundered 
badly last week when it printed an 
item advising the Outing Club to 
«>ut uf the Woods" and obtain joint a large attendance of seniors and 

hikes with Mount Hoiyoke and Smith freshmen. 

Outing Clubs, As a matter of fact, The program consisted of reels from 
our Up-and-coming elub had already last year's football highlights, winter 
done that very thing. We apologise, carnival, and campus life, shown by 

Professor Barrett. Music was provid- 
ed by several of the fraternity's mem- 
bers. 

Refreshments of cider, doughnuts, 
popcorn, and apples were served after 
the pictures. 

Seniors returning this vear are 
( arlopopohsis with a few 220 pound 

Smiths and Joneses thrown in. 



Storkhridire Correspondent 
HAROLD PHILLIPS 8*91 

College Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '89, Editor 

JANET CAMPBELL "40, Assoc. 



Casualties seem to lie dogging our 

football team. Before long Eh will 

have to be putting "liish" in at full- 
back. What we think the team really 
needs Is a few Grawszawpjoakis and 



mem hers u •!. 
matter mu.-i 



Ed. 



'40 



Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS HOARD 
ALLEN GOVE '39, Buainena Manager 



Mm-. 



ABRAHAM CARP "89. Adv. Mgr. J. HENRY WINN '39, Clr 

GEORGE C. BENJAMIN '89, Subscription Manager 

liusiiuss Assistants 

E. El t;ENE RENAULT i" CHARLES A. POWERS 

I.O..KI; II LINUSEY '4U ROBERT RODMAN '40 

JOSEPH R t;ORDON, JR. - ll EDWARD J. O'HRIKN II 

. ER R. LA LOR '41 DAVID F. VAN METER '41 



President, I'roctor Houle; vice-presi- 
dent, Arthur Berry; treasurer, Alfred 
Norton; Secretary, Stephen Morse; 
Great Britain and France may be Serjeant at arms, Richard Sparks; 
tumped in their attempts to reach a > Historian, Norman Hubbard; House 
permanently satisfactory settlement Manager, Richard Mayberry, Charles 
to the problem of Herr Hitler an I Rein, Lawrence Woodfall, Leonard 
Europe, but a State College sopho- Treat, William Ogden, James He- 
more has a solution. He suggests that Penough, Raymond Taylor, Binning 
the military department send H tier Went Worth, John Kadi and John 
thai famous horse. Powder as a gift. Fuller. 

We were going to work in that gag Much interior redecorating has been 
about "Oh, you Nazi man" in Jon- done. All of the rooms have been re- 
fill i shed. 

Indications are that a large group 



in 



notion with this, BO there it is, 
Razoo night comes off tomorrow- 



It 



SUBSCRIPTIONS lt.00 PER YEAH 

Mnki- all ordera payable to The Massachu- 
setts Collegian. In caae of change of addreaa, 
subscriber will pleaee notify the buaineaa man- 
ager as eoon ai possible. Alumni, undergrad- 
uate and faculty contributions arc sincere!) 
encouraged. Any communications or notices 
must !>«• received at the Collegian office before 
U o'clock, Monday evening. 



Entered Bl second-class matter at the Am- 
herst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in Section 

UOSi Act of October 1917, authorised August 

JO, 191K. 

Printed by Carpenter & Morehouse. Cook PI.. 

Amherst, Mass., Telephone 4U 



SINCLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



1937 Member I95S 

Ptssoccted GoflGr5iate Press 

Distributor of 

Gofle6iate Di6es» 



teems that no one knows if the abo- 
lition of the gauntlet run on the cin- 
ler path is to be a permanent ruling. 
This reform which was instituted bv 
the Senate last year has saved fresh- 
men's skin which Doc Radclilfe sai 1 
was lost by the square yard there- 
tofore. 

Here's a tip to the freshmen on how 
to keep your shirt on during the ex- 
ercises. All you do is single out a 
sophomore smaller than yourself and 
go on the offensive. Hold him on the 
ground for ten minutes and your 
shirt is yours. Remember also that 
a sweat-shirt is a shirt and the best 
thing for the occasion. Don't wear 
a broadcloth shirt for most of the 
PRESSING Conditions at the Social Union performance last sophomores live in fraternities and 
NEED Friday evening - brought to a head a realization of have a peculiar affinity for other guys 

the inconvenience and impossibility of Bowker | shirts, uemember too that the tough- 

, est sophomore was a freshman last 



of freshmen will enter the house 
The (Colony Klub looks forward D 



pared to state their ca.-e i„ 
council. 

Any freshmen who are 
in acting as cheerleaders ai. 
ed to contact Norman Hubbi 
dent council president. Expei 
this line is an asset but not 
sity. 

Stoekbridge Sports Column 

Due to the hurricane onh _, 
reported for football practice ■ 
first week. Since the squad 
larged to <">2 men, the major 
freshmen, Coach "Red" Call 
the men through a rigid tra 
calisthenics, drill, signal pracl 
scrimmages. 

Captain "Prock" Koule tl . 
guard predicts "A successful i 
This is the squad: Captai 
Sparks, Mandell, I'redni/.. | 
Ogden, Mayberry. Bodwell, \V ; 
Busso, Taylor, Lovois, McD i 
ami W'entworth, Mg. all senii rs, 
son, Bingham, Chase, Clesvi 
Corvett, Davis, Frappier, Hasen 
Hibbard. Howard. S., Howard, F. 
mach, Hosmer, Jackowski. Jar 



one of its most successful years. Much jJacoW, Johnson, Konieczny, Ki 



KKPRKSSNTSO FOR NATIONAL ADVINTIIINa BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Chicago ' Boston ■ Lot Angelh - San Fnanciico 



work has been done in fixing up the 
house. 

We hope that other alumni will 
make us a visit as did Donald Luther, 
Elliot Hall, and Louis Schwaab this 
week-end. 
Student Council News 

All freshmen are urged to secure 
hats at the college store without dc- 
lay. The necessity of procuring and 
wearing these hats cannot be stressed 



i nm 

'urni 



ski, Lambert, Lamsa, Mai 
Martin, MciJonald, O'Heam, 

Raynes. Scott, Stanley, Sulli 
Szafier, Taylor, Teehan, I 
Teirney, As. Mg., True, 
Vinson, Waskiewis, Lawton, 
Stoekbridge Sorority News 

Tri-Sig Sorority elected Ba 
Turnquisti a freshman, as Be 
in place of Barbara Packard who 
not return. 






C D I T C LQ I A L 



Auditorium as a place of assembly for members and friends of 
the .Massachusetts State student body. At a social event which 
should have attracted every member of the college, student or 
faculty, many were not in attendance because of the crowding 
and necessity for "standing room only." When such an event, paid 
for by everyone, and open to all, is not made conducive for at- 
tendance because there is not room, stock 
situation. 

President Baker and Dean Machmer, during the past few 
years, have repeatedly emphasize dthe fact that Stoekbridge Hall 
was built under protest to house many more than ever seemed 
likely to attend this college. That this quota has long been sur- 
passed is self-evident. The need for a more suitable building is 
still more evident. 



year. Go get 'em, '42. 

Item: Second semester pledging 



the Chemistry Club officers and those 
interested in club affairs, Friday, Oct. 
14, at 8:()(» p. m. in Goessmann Lab. 

Chem Club 

On October 20, at 7:00 p. m. the 
Chemistry Club will hold its Hal- 
lowe'en "Shindig" in the Farley 4-H 
Cluhouse, instead of Goessmann Lab- 
oratory, as previously announced. 
There will be refreshments, movies, 
slides, demonstration, short talks by 
members of the department, and on 



sanctioned by Interfraternity Council, i introduction to the entire Chemistrv 

This headline, freely translated means facultv . Ali ma j ors in Chemistrv and 

that upperclassmen will live in com-| a „ ied sub j ects are C ordiaI!v invited 

must be taken of the paratively clean houses for a few more 

months, freshmen will save money on 
Sunday night suppers, the Amherst 
Theatre will do a bigger business, and 
Prosperity will return. What foresight 0ct J4 
the Interfraternity Council has! 



to attend. It is requested that those 
who desire to attend sign the lists in 
North College and the basement of 
the Chem building, before 5:00 p. m. 



Pre Med 

There will be a meeting of the Pre 



Last Thursday night, there Wl 
med club Tuesday as previously an- .exceptional turnout for tiyouts in 
nounced. 



OUTING CLUB 

The Outing Club held two 
during the past week. The full moot 
which lighted the supper hike te SI 
Pastures, Sunday was enjoyed by 4" 
hikers. Another supper hike wa- 
Wednesday. Roth were among 
most successful yet conducted l>. 
rising State College association. 

Betty Snow, Fred Cole, Bob I 
John Ralcom, and Ed Willard mem- 
bers of the Massachusetts State Out- 
ing Club, will spend the week end I 
Hanover, N. H., as State represent) 
tives to the Intercollegiate OutiflJ 
Club Association. The I. 0. ('. A 
to be the guest of the Dartmouth I 
C. for the weekend. The program * 
include hikes and a barn dance. 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



total this year. 



condition of the present houses. By now the need for these seems 
to I e a recognized fact among the citizenry of the state in con- 
tact with the college. 

Few, however, of the legislature or state citizens realize 
the pressing need for a suitable meeting place for students as a 
whole. 

One of tne most lasting impressions of college life may be 
obtained from college sings etc. Under the excellent leadership 
of Mr. Alviani, the sing this fall was well received. Nevertheless 
the senior class will, under the present set-up, miss most of any 
such programs. With an improving type of Convocation, it will Hunance 
cease to become a burden to seniors, and will in turn become an 
inconvenience to be forced to miss college gatherings. 

The pleasure of a general get-together can not lie used as the 
only reason for a new building. The music department with many 
and Varied organizations in its field, can well use more con- 
nected and convenient quarters. Hand space, orchestra and glee 



Outing Club 

There will be a joint hike to Mt. 



women's glee club, sixty-five '• 
present for this. Due to the [argt 
ber, the club will be put on a v:r- ' 
basis, with the first rehearsal* 



* * 

After the shabby way that the 
Massachusetts Collegian publicized the 

During the past years there has been considerable work j arrest of a Stockbrid K e> frosh for rid- 

, , ,. ... , „, , ,, ., T> ... ing on the local sidewalks we may 

and promotion done lor new Women S, Physics, and Math Build- , .. nnA u atior „i iaririla tn 

' expect bigger and better charges to 

ings because of the increase in student population and deplorable u„ hrmnrht atriinst the students of Monadnock with the Amherst Outing 

M , l,,,ntt^f,te hv the Amherst I Club, Sunday, October 16. Anvon* Regarded as tryouts. At present ' 
Massachusetts State b> the Amherst .,/,. udub has something definite to : 

Police It is regrettable in view of the WMIung to go should sign up at the \ M 
great number of "breaks" that thel librar >' for bus reservations. Ruses 
local CODS have given State College i wiU ,eavp the East Experiment Sta- 
in past year. Last year the toUi num- tion Su " da >' at 9:0,) - 
ber of arrests was six. but watch the Math Club 



for. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



The Math Club will hold its firsc 
meeting of the year, Wed, Occ: 1f>, 
in the Math building at 7:00. Rvety- 
one invited. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



-1 



October 

18. Senate RamiiH't 
II. Rnzoo Ni^ht 

Q. T. v. Vir r*rt> _ ., 

IS. Footbnll. R. I. SUte, h- ■■• - ■ 

Cross Oonntry M. I I 
17. Sterna Xi. Steckbriditc Hon 



.lack Durrance Of Dartmouth Col- 
lege will speak on hiking in Appleton 
Hall, at Amherst College, tonight at 
7:30. The public is invited. 

Newman Club 

Plans are being mad • for i c im 

munion breakfast Sunday, Oct. 16, 
club rehearsal halls, space for the Carnegie Music Collection, sl ten o'clock in the parish hall. II 
dass rooms for this and other departments could be nicely in- ******* wi « 1 - kh « K " v - i ' 1 - Snnnnon 

, i ... . . ... of this parish. Everyone i- u'-ge.i to 

corporated with a new and more spacious auditorium. , 

attend. 

If Massachusetts State's hospitality is judged entirely by 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

HOW ABOUT SOME COMPETITION FRESHMEN. 
THERE IS PLENTY OF ROOM FOR MORE MEMBERS 
ON THE EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS BOARDS OF 
THE COLLEGIAN. FRESHMAN MEETING MONDAY 
NIGHT AT 8 IN MEM BUILDING. 



the surroundings presented to a guest at a college dance in the 



Wesley Foundation 

Dean .Machmer will speak it the 
Drill Hall, opinion must run high in praise of the dirty, unconi- regular Wesley Foundation mi-et'np 
Portable quarters provided for both men and women there. The Sunday evening :it *:< |n p. m. i» the 
entire building is without comfort or atmosphere necessary for home of Dr. and Mrs. Undsey. At the 
the important factor of social life. lasl meeting the following officers 



With these points, the surface need has only been scratched. 



were elected: president, Wallace Wy« 



man 



'!<•; vice president. Law mice 
Such a need. Unrecognizable Ul the outsider, mUSl have pushing Plokard '39. secretary. Doris John-. 11 

by those of us who face it, if results are t-> be obtained. Student mi. 

support has in the pns( been successful; support for a new audi- ( h|%m ()l|n 

torium may Vel make it a realization. There will be a business meeting of 



STOP HEATING AROUND THK 
MULBERRY BUSH 

Swing your beards over your shoulders and out of 
wav, and gaze down at those empty sheets of while pap*^ 
'Cause it's COLLEGIAN QUARTERLY time! 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. OCTOBER IS, 1938 



NOVEL COLLECTION OF G0DEY COSTUME 
PRINTS ONE OF BEST SEEN ON CAMPUS 

Building Art Exhibit Shows Work From First Women's 

Magazine Published by Louis Godey Plates 

Made in America 

REV. KINS0LVING TO 
SPEAK AT_VESPERS 

David Morton, Amherst Profes- 
sor, Spoke at Meeting 
Last Week 



•t 



1 d BS an art exhibit in the 

Building for the next few 

one of most fascinating ami 

ng collections that the cam- 

teen for a long while, a col- 

tiodey Costume prints. 
,autiful colors and exquisite 
jld be reason enough in them- 
,r the collection, and yet the 
ui' much more to offer in the 
, i.aracterization, and human 
that the exhibit is indeed 
: time and study. 
Oritfinator of Magazine 
Though most people are familiar 
with these prints, few know the story 
f Louis Antoine Godey, who started 
. , Gedey'a Lady's Book in July 18W), 
, : ,| continued the publication for 
.. x years before he realized that 
,• needed a woman editor. Soon after 
w bought out the Ladies Magazine, 
securing the services of Louisa Jose- 
:i Hale, and with this turned out 
She first publication devoted to wom- 
en. After a while he broke away from 
the method of incoroprating reprints 
f English articles, and the magazine 
became one of American interests and 
American writers. It was through this 
that Godey became the pioneer of 
American magazine literature. 
American Plates 
Despite the belief that they are of 
English origin, all the plates were 
printed and hand-colored in Philadel- 
phia, Mime being done in the Godey 
plant, and others being done by worn- 
in their homes. This is one of the 
reasons why the prints sometimes 
don't agree, that is, two of the same 
print will be colored differently. This 
fart, incidentally, is one of the proofs 
' authenticity for the prints. 
Tin prints in the collection date 
from 1883, lod8, 1858, 187<*., 
and 1888, and presents a picture of 
the changing styles, but also, in the 
quaint way, an admirable cross-sec- 
Ml of American Society of the times. 

Wilder Kxhibit 

The exhibit in Wilder Hall for this 

k \s another collection of photo- 

ftraphs by Professor Waugh; this time 

ted exclusively to studies of 

i are some especially lovely pic- 

DJ the collection, which contains 

plain straightforward pictures, as well 

;is unusual studies. Particularly ottt- 

ng are Aspens by the Lake. 

ntrasta the vertical lines nice- 

With lacy foliage. Birches by a 

Continued on Page 4 



David Morton, Professor of Am- 
herst College and noted poet, spoko 
at Vespers last Sunday on the "Four 
Seasons in Amherst." His discourse 
included a reading of many of his own 
poems as well as interesting comment 
on the spiritual value to be derived 
from nature. Next Sunday the Rev- 
erend Arthur Lee Kinsolving of Trin- 
ity Church, Boston, a former pastor 
of Grace Church, Amherst, will speak 
at Vespers. 

Menorah 

The Menorah Club held its annual 
reception to welcome the new fresh- 
man members last Sunday night in 
the Memorial Building. Dr. Goldberg 
and Mr. Williams addressed the 
group; and Miss Jeannette Herman, 
acting president of the club, outlined 
the program for the year. Entertain- 
ment in the form of a cornet solo, 
reading of dramatic poetry, and danc- 
ing followed refreshments. 
C. F. A. 

The Christian Federation has held 
two Sunday night suppers — the first 
in charge of the dramatics commis- 
sion under Marion Masehin. at which 
Ba Thane, a play of Burmese life, 
was presented; the second in charge 
of the v oristian outreach commission 
under Helen .darshall and Esther 
Pratt, at which movies taken by John 
Balcora portraying work at the Lisle 
summer conference were shown. On 
October 2.'* there will be a third sup- 
per meeting in charge of the peace 
commission. A discussion meeting, the 
first in a series of bi-weekly discus 
sions sponsored by the Christian Fed 
eiation, was held last Thursday under 
the leadership of Reverend Raymond 
Waser of the Amherst Congregational 
Church. 

Newman 
At the first Newman Club meeting 

i of the year plans were made to hold 
a Communion breakfast next Sunday 
morning following the !» o'clock Mas 

I Eleanor .Jewell was elected to be pub- 
licity chairman of the club; and 
George Haylon '39, and Elaine De- 
lorey '41, were elected to form a coin 
mittee to no in charge of speakers 
for the vear. 



HAM) TO APPEAR 



.Making its first appearance at 

a game this year, the college hand 
will parade at the Rhode Island 
football game this Saturday with 
about 4'2 members. 

Irma Ahord will be signal drum 
major and Dave Kskin '42 will be 
featured as baton twirler, taking 
the place of Stanley Boxek who 
graduated last year. 

The regular weekly rehearsal of 
the band will be held tonight at 
7:.'{(i in the Memorial Building. 

The band is still in need of clar- 
inet players. Any student who has 
played a clarinet in high or prep 
school is asked to appear at re- 
hearsal. 



FIRST PART OF SHAWN PROGRAM RATES 
MOST PRAISE AT HANDS OF REVIEWER 

Past. Dealing with Moctezuma and the Azteca is Considered 

Much Better Than Scenes of the Present, Portraying 
War and the .la/./. Epoch 



ALVIANI 

Continued from Page 1 



Just the Right 

Weather 

For Candy 

'"""l assortment and High 
fcttlity, Just in fresh, to treat 

'•'n >elf or treat some one else. 
Tin- Place With Good Things 



College 
Candy Kitchen Inc. 

• he best in food" 



Should every Convocation open with 
singing? 

"Yes, since at this time of morning 
there is a certain inertia to be over- 
come. Most of the students have 
probably had a full day before this 
and look forward to lunch rather than 

the speaker. Furthermore, it Is the 

only time when most of the school is 
assembled, so that all should have a 
chance to participate in singing." 

What are your plans for the oper- 
etta, glee clubs, broadcasts, and other 
presentation^*? 

"I am very anxious to have the 
musical clubs perform in public. We 
have various things planned for each 
group, and are developing types of 
programs for these presentations. The 
operetta will probably be a Gilbert 
and Sullivan show, especially for this 
year. 1 am planning to have the choir 
give some concerts in churches. 

"We are contemplating a Music 
Week here, to be in April or May. 
This should mean much publicity and 
would help the various musical group 
This would mean a music festival on 
campus, with outside groups coming 
here to pei form. During this week, 
we may work in the operetta. In 
fact, last week the Western division 
of the Massachusetts State Music Fe 

tival Association announced thai the 
festival will be held on this campu 

I this spring." 

Is it true thai yon are gfdag lo 
the fraternities and sorori.ies to con- 
duel siny s ess ions? 

"Yes, as part of the meetings, and 
done so as not to take too much 
time. There is no need to sing things 
already known; new songs should be 
introduced. Generally, fraternities do 
pretty well with songs. I also plan to 
start singing traditions such as lan- 
tern parades, >tep singing, and seren 
Continued on Page 4 



EUROPEAN WAR TO 
COME IN FEW YEARS 



Continued from Page 1 



Dr. Caldwell Sees no Peace <>w 
Seas in Substitute Talk 
For Deutsch 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH 
"LISTEN! THE WIND" 

j us t Out — Gel a First Edition 
The story of the trip from Africa to Brazil in Dec. 1933 



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63 So. Pleasant St. Amherst, Mass. 



"War in Kurope is very likely with- 
in a tew years," asserted Dr. Theo 
dore ('. Caldwell of State College 
in a talk sponsored by the Christian 
Federation, American Student Union, 
and the International Relations Club. 
Dr. Karl Deutsch, in whose place Dr. 
Caldwell spoke, was unable to arrive 
because of his wne's illness. 

"And United States would go to the 
assistance of Kngland if England 
should tie drawn into the expected 

war between greater Germany and 
Russia, according to general opinion 

ill Kngland," continued Dr. Caldwell. 
Hitler Wants Russia 

Assistant professor of history and 
sociology, Dr. Caldwell is considered 
a reliable autiiority on international 
relations. Reinforcing his statements 
with proof, he revealed several new- 
aspects of the Czech crisis. "The con 
servative llritish cabinet favors dic- 
tatorship instead of democracy," "Hit 
ler wants all Russia and the present 
British policy approves of this annex- 
ation," "Kngland is certain of a war 
caused by Hitler in a short time," and 
"Chamberlain gave Czechoslovakia to 
Hitler," were chief points of Dr. Cald- 
well's talk. 

Tracing significant incidents in his- 
tory from the American proposal of 
intervention in China to the Czech 
Crisis, he linked Britain to each and 
emphasized Britain's desertion of the 
principle of collective action. Then the 
the principal causes of this desertion 
Were given. 

Other talks 

"State College students should re 

alize the importance of contemporary 

international affairs. They ought to 

be acquainted with news events, be 
cause, in then hands, there lies the 
future of United States and on tint 
backs, the burden of a possible wai. 

said Sidney Ro>en, member of the 
American Student Union, in a for* 

word. In addition he announced a • 
ie> of talk., by other authoritative 
speakers, also sponsored by the Chri 
tian Federation, American student 
Union, ami the International Rela 

tionS Cittb. One of the subjects to be 

covered is "United States and War." 
All student and guest- are Invited 
ami urged to attend. 

"Hitler himself predicts vital dra- 
matic events of the next few years," 
Dr. Caldwell pointed out, "especialh 

in a speech at Nuremburg: 'If I had 
Continued on Page 4 



EXHIBITS 



I. MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Gedey'a Costume prints 

II. GOOOBLL LIBRARY 

Photograph* from North Shore 
Camera Club 



and the dancers settled down to a 

chair ami cigarette, and a chat with 

the reviewer. 

No Corn 
Strangely enough, their main source 

<d" wrinkled brow and frowning • ye 
was not worry over that night's per- 
formance, but over the fact that con 
did not grow well in the soil ,,f their 
summer camp at Lee, Rasa. Was tin- 
reviewer an "Aggie" man? Why 
didn't the corn mature'.' Was it the 

soil? The barrage of questions rather 

stunned the reviewer i a Liberal Arts 
major), hut he faithfully promised to 
take the matter up with the soil ex- 
periment laboratories. The dancers 
all said they liked travelling, but 
didn't go to Mexico because the fre- 
quent revolutions interfered with per- 
formance contracts. And on the topic 
«>f dancing, it was admitted that there 
were other good troops of dancers in 
existence, such as the Itallets Russe 
and .loos. Rut, Agriculture remained 

the main theme of the dancers* con- 
versation. 

Three (iroups 
The dance, "O, Libertad!", was di- 
vided into three groups; first, the 

Fast, dealing with Moctezuma and the 
Aztecs, peonage, and the gold rush; 
second, 'The present, portraying the 
war and following jazz epoch; and, 
finally, the Future, a series of ab- 
st ract ions. 

'I ne reviewer was definitely most 
pleased with the tirst part of the pro 
gram which bad the most definite 
dance rhythms, the most suggestive 
music, and the best acting. The open 
ing scene with the mass movements 
of the Aztec warriors was a small 
masterpiece, executed with precision 
and liming of a linotype machine; es- 
pecially interesting were the various 
post uii's ami body positions, copied 
directly from actual Aztec paintings. 

The costumes of long, man) colored 

quetzal feather-, (were they leal?) 
added to the dash and beauty of the 
scene. 

Next, the number called i,„ s n,. r . 

manos I'cmtenles was, to the review 
Br, the best in the hi t and all groups. 

'The dance told the itorj of that 
strange sect of Mexican Indian con 
verted to Christianity, who, once a 
year, whip themselves up a hill to 
a cross on which the) actually cruel 
fy one of their number. 'The mixture of 

the primitive and the Christian iii 

this strange "Passion May" was well 

brought out by the dancers, though, 
.according to one professor who ha 

seen the real thing, their imitation 

of frenzy was not frenzied enough. 

Hot Harry Coble, dancing as the • in 
Cl'fied one, turmd out a marvelous 
piece of work. His portrayal of the 
agony of being lashed and then nailed 
to tne cross was so real, one could 
almost Imagine the actual crucifixion. 
Ted Shawn's dance, Hacendado de 
California, wa a fine number. The 
dance reflected the carefree attitude 
of the land owners in Mexico — the 
careless tossing away of the money 

earned by the sweat of the peons or 

serfs. The last number in the ^pnip. 
Continued on Page 6 



COLLEGE STORE 

Everything for the Student 



Luncheons 

Soda Fountain 

Student Supplies 
ON THK CAMPUS 



Manners and Souvenirs 
Hooks and 

Mara/me 

NORTH COLLEGE 



SULDE JACKETS All Wool SHAKER KNIT SWEATERS 

$6.50 to $12.50 $5-00 to $7.50 

NEW IOT OF MIB0W SHIKTS M ST IN FOR ItlDIM, BOOTS SZZ ( HAKI.KS POWKR8 AT KAI'I'A Sic; 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Till RSDAY, OCTOBER It, IMS 



COED NCTES 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



Rumour has it that "our little fresh- 
men" have to wear their Oh-so-be- 
coming white berets another week. It 
seems that too many of the "smooth- 



Suzy Coed Learns Love By The Trial 

And Error Plan At The Fraternity PflrtyU &**&* »«** and 



NINE SENIORS 

Continued from Page 1 



By Kathleen Fully 

Take it from Suzy Co-Kd, girls — 
Never go to a vie party wrapped up 



ies" thought that it detracted from in one-half a bottle of "Nuit d'un 
their appearance and so misplaced mille baisers" perfume — because the 
them. (Quite unintentionally, of label means JLoi what it says. Suzy 
course.) 'Twould seem that since ! longed to be a woman with just one 
every class has had to wear them, the I big Armorous Adventure in her life, 
freshmen should realize that it is an but after last week-end she has den- 
old tradition and consequently respect j nitely changed her alleged mind. (Jive 
it. This college has very easy rules her good old Freddy, who never even 
imposed upon the girls. At Hates col- heard of the game of Post Office, any 
lege, their freshman class is not al- day! 

lowed to coeducate until Thanksgiving. ■ All this came about when Freddy 
Can you think of the consternation ' pledged Phi Phi Phi and the Phis had 



among the freshmen and the upper- 
class boys if this class of '42 were not 
allowed to date until Thanksgiving? 



a vie party last week-end. Suzy was 
ecstatic — she even forgot to act bor- 
ed. She spent three simply hectic- 



All the clubs and organizations" on hours getting ready— and every ten 



the campus are getting under way 
with subsequent meetings. The W. A. 



minutes or so she squirted on some 
more "Nuit d'un mille baisers," which 



A. cabinet is meeting soon to discuss! was all very well (she smelled like 



club functions and plan for their tea 
to be held in the Abbey. The first 
meeting on the Home Ec. Club will 
be held next Wednesday evening. Dis- 
cussion of the Massachusetts Home 
Ec. Club's annual meeting will be 
held. We'll hear more about that lat- 
er. 

Last Tuesday evening, Phi Zeta, 
held an open house "vie" party where- 
in all the other sororities were invited. 
This evening, P. E. Shearer and part- 
ner will give a social dancing exhibi- 
tion. All youse jitterbugs will be in- 
terested in The Lambeth Walk. These 
dancing classes are invaluable to the 
freshmen. 

The fall sports are all well under 
way. Last Friday, the seniors beat 
the juniors 1-0 in hockey. Monday 
evening, the sophomores beat the 
freshmen 1-0. Friday afternoon will 
find the sophomores and the seniors 
battling it out. Archery practice will 
be held every Monday and Wednesday 
afternoons from now on. Those people 
who are interested in this sport are 
cordially invited to attend. 

The first round of the tennis 
tournament has been played. Speaking 
of sports, we find the Boston Uni- 
versity Department of Physical Edu- 
cation has very definite ideas and 
believes that "there was a day when 
woman's place was in the home, but 
now it's the baseball field." 

The International Settlement com- 
monly known as The Block house has 
elected officers for the coming year. 
Miss Sanderson is president; Miss 
Critchett, treasurer; Miss Stone is 
secretary and incidently everyone's 
big sister; Miss Cadwell is corres- 
ponding secretary; Miss Davis is the 
Social Chairman; and Miss Robinson 
is head proctor. There are some other 
offices but our girls are too bashful 
to have them published, or something. 



fifteen funerals) except that poor 
Freddy had hay fever and sneezed 
continually all the way from the Ab- 
bey to the Phi house. Swell romantic 
time, thought Suzy, who wanted some 
very exciting love life before she got 
to be a Sophomore too old to appre- 
ciate it. 

Now nobody told Suzy about fast 
senior men. She thought all of man- 
kind was just as mild as Freddy — un- 
til she danced with Samuel. Samuel 
was no prize — he weighed close to 
2oo on a clear day and could talk 
the left arm off a wooden Indian, but 
he had one big advantage — he was 



a member of 
both the Chem and Math clubs. Cier- 
Mi>ceptible to the poisonous fumes ofl*"* was also graduated from Hoi- 
Suzy's perfume and without even 



reading the label he got the idea right 
away. Suzy began to get that "What 
will 1 ever say next" feeling common 
to Freshmen. Suddenly she thought 
of the famous advice of College Ad- 
justments' class "Keep conversation 
on a high plane," so she dug out her 
friendly-and-inte rested-but-not-too-in- 
terested smile and said, "Do you en- 
joy playing ping-pong?" 

That was unfortunate. He certainly 
did. And he knew just the place to 
play — downstairs in the ping-pong 
room. Wow. 

But nobody down there was much 
interested in the great American game 
of ping-pong, and least of all Sam- 
uel. The perfume was working mir- 
acles. He held Suzy's hand, but she 
said icily, "It's not heavy — I can man- 
age alone, thank you, and thought "I 
certainly didn't want to be this glam- 
orous." But seniors never give up so 
easily — so Samuel proceeded to put 
his arm around her and decided to 
maKe those one thousand kisses 999 
net. But Suzy yelped "Help! Murder! 
Police!" and ran quickly in the other 
direction. 

Samuel, the Cad, didn't catch on 
very quickly because he was still knee- 
deep in a perfume fog, so he said — 
"Suzy, can't I see more of you?" 

"I'm sorry, but this is all even my 
best friends see— Ohhhh FRED— DY! 
Help!" 



ALVIANI 

Continue J from Page i 



EUROPEAN WAB 

Continued from Page 3 



w 



the Ural Mountains with their incal- 
culable stores of treasures in raw ma- 
terial, Siberia with its vast forests, 
and Ukraine with its tremendous 
wheat fields, Germany would swim in 
plenty." 

Gives Russia 

The Daily Mail, a large London 
newspaper, virtually gives Russia to 
Hitler in editorials. But the Russians 
may have something to say about it, 
added Dr. Caldwell. Hi also showed 
that Britain would ally with Germany 
and Japan, and would forsaKe France 
in the next war — if Britain is Impli- 
cated Government officials in Britain 
feel that peace can only be obtained 
by permitting Germany to absorb 

Poland, Hungary, Rumania, and Rus- 
sia, which countries would, theoretic- 
ally, be benefitted by Hitler's rule. 

Id. Caldwell observed that "We are 

afraid to have ( 'ornmunists in the 

( 'rnied State.,; and the British con- 
servative party Ifl afraid of commun- 
, m In Ru -i;i. Thai It why Chamber 
lain Mipportfl Hitler." 

The audience of about . • itudenta 
afterward gave a general approval of 
I),. Deutsch' wostitute. A discus 
ion period of ten minute concluded 
the first of ■ series of talks on the 
European d1 Hal ion. 



ades. Several fraternities could march 
down to campus at night, or twilight, 
coming in by different roads, sing- 
ing alternately as they come in. At 
the same time, the sororities could 
come in by other entrances, with all 
groups meeting, for example on the 
library steps to join in song. We 
could also have pre-examination 
sings." 

What do you suggest to improve 
singing at football games and other 
athletic events. 

"I will suggest regular game songs, 
such as some colleges have. A well 
known tune could be taken and words 
added. These should be short, rhyth- 
mic, and easy to learn and sing." 

Have the students here as much 
musical ability as other colleges more 
noted for musical fame? Is this a 
latent ability? 

"We certainly have much potential 
material, but it will require develop- 
ing. As an example, the glee club: 
rather than have a group of fellows 
come in and sing catch-as-catch-can, 
the idea is to have them sing well 
certain types of music. Once we get 
a group trained, it will act as prece- 
dent for newcomers and will serve 
to raise the standard of the club." 

Should this school have a dance 
hand, such as Dartmouth's Barbary 
Coast band? 

"There should be a group on the 
campus, somewhat connected with the 
school, that can play with some de- 



NOVEL COLLECTION 

Continued from Page ? 



Pool, which is entirely soft half-lights 
and shadows; Pines, Cape Cod, with 
the frugality of line, and the balanc- 
ing of mass of a Japanese print; and 
Old Timer, I tah, an arresting study 
on the beauty of line in a twisted old 
tree-trunk. Although these seem to he 
the most outstanding, there are sev- 
eral others worthy of mention, as: 
Crepe Myrtle, and Cypress, which look 
like woven designs with their abun- 
dance of vertical lines, Willows by 
Trout Pool, which brings out the 
shape and form of the tree, and 
Tupelo, which is interesting for the 
form and balance of the photograph 
itself. 

One will notice that for sheer per- 
fection of form, and unity in them- 
selves, trees are unequalled for pho- 
tography, and make fine and exquisite 
subjects. B. H. 

gree of skill light and dance music. 
A campus group should be able to 
play well both classical and modern 
music. The orchestra plans to put or 
a concert similar to the Boston "Pops' 
concerts, in which Gregorian as well 
as Cole Porter's latest will be played. 
This should serve both for pleasure 
as well as intellectual development." 

Do you find that the hardest job 
you have here is in arousing the in- 
terest among students? 

"I've been very much encouraged 
and have not had difficulty so far." 



yoke High, and is a four year mem 
ber of the Math and Chem Clubs. 
Miss Fortin, another Holyoke High 
graduate, is majoring in English. She 
held class office as a secretary and is 
now the class vice-president. Her ac- 
tivities include membership in the 
Roisters Doisters, the Newman «71uL. 
the Student Religious Council, the 
Soph-Senior Hop Committee, the 
Freshman Handbook staff, the Inter- 
sorority Council, and the vice-presi- 
dency of Phi Zeta sorority. Gordon, 
also a graduate of Holyoke High, is 
majoring in zoology. 

Miss Herman was educated at Me- 
morial High School for Girls, Boston, 
and is majoring in chemistry and bac- 
teriology. She is a member of the 
Women's Glee Club, the Menorah Club, 
the Chem Club, the bacteriology Club, 
and Sigma Iota sorority. Miss Kap 
linsky is a major in English, coming 
to State from Holyoke High. She is 
a member of the Menorah Club snd 
of Sigma Iota sorority. Miller com 's 
from Rockville High School, Conn. He 
is a chemistry major, and holds mem- 
bership in the Chem Club and Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon fraternity. 

Initiations 

Initiations of the nominees to the 
honorary society will take place some- 
time during the next month. 

The Rev. Remsen Brinckerhoff Og- 
ilby B.D., LL.D., Litt.D., who spoke 
at the exercises today has had a wide 
range of secondary school administra- 
tive experience as well as his execu- 
tive term at Trinity College. He was 
at one time master at Groton School, 
Groton, Mass., and later master of 
St. Paul's school in Concord, N. H. 
He spent some ten years in the Philip- 
pine Islands as headmaster of Baguio 
School. He was graduated from Har- 
vard University, and the General 
Theological Seminary. He was award- 
ed a B.D. at Episcopal Theological 
Seminary, an LL.D. from Wesleyan 
University, and a Litt.D. from Colum- 
bia. Made a curate of St. Stephens 
Church in Boston in 1908, and has 
since 1920 been president of Trinity 
College. 



Rhyme - Reason -Rhythm 

By Peter Barreca 

"Why is the Jazz music- 
fore the Jazz band? As well 
is the dime novel, or the gn 
ping doughnut? All are 
tions of a low streak in rm 
that has not yet come out 
ization's wash. Indeed, one , n . 
father, and say that Jazz 
the indecent story syncop: 
counterpointed. Like the imp 
ecdote, also, in its youth, it w ,. 
ed to blushlingly behind closed | 
and drawn curtains, but, like all 
it grew bolder until it dan ; 
surroundings, and there was 
because of its oddity." 

Big John Special: (Victor _' - 
A shag tempo by Goodm 
further proof that BG has 
the swing throne for shag aim rat 
plently. A cute melodic trirk 
iations never gets monotonous. I . 
of rides in which the bag of ■ 
is wide open . . . (reverse) Plaj F 
. . . Enough is too much of this • 
by anybody . . . 

Date With a Dream: ( Victui 
26000A) Goodman again, with 
ing brass and smooth clarinet 
>f quick figures; Martha Tilt 
through one . . . (reverse) Could V | 
Pass In Love: . . . The inest 
vocal, and the usual precise ami • . 
chanical brass . . . The band i.- tr.- 
so you can drop a nickel in 
know just what to expect . . 
fection . . . 

Indian Love Call (Bluebird l!"": 
Art Shaw . . . You should ren 
his slow swing from the Seni. 
last year. Swing as it should be: - • 
primitive tom-tom and clarinet »• 
a freedom and elasticity that <i 
man can't touch; A Tony Pastor v 
and a clarinet on the war path. 



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THRILLS 
CHILLS and 

c II oc O-laT e 

thrill-packed game, even when 
You'll enjoy every moment of the 
the chill seeps right through 
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with its steaming fragrance and 
delicious fbmn . 

Wellworth Pharmacy 
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fWHSPS 



THIRS., OCT. 13 



Fivnn 

^OumnIUVHUIIO 

■■UUMRilKfU 

Funic MOW 





FOURS R CROWD 



A f>d m/i c rawd •> 



Plus: Musical 



Cartoon 



IMhf: 



FKI.-SAT., OCT. 14-11 



i OHCt Jj J 



TTCHWCOIU 




LEYtMNH 

WMNE MORRIS ■ CLAIRE TREVOR 



Co-Hit 



I*o Carrillo - Edith F.-How» 
In 

"CITY STREETS" 



Also: Cartoon 



1 



SI N.-MON.-Tl K.S.. OCT. WW 
Cont. Sun. !-10:3U P. M. 




FANNIE HURS' '■> 

_ Four « 
Daughters 

Claude RAINS • l aitf H'ftH 

1 nark Mr'- 

ISISTI RS 

IPmcillJ. I 



-I'd 



m<; hank 

EVERY WEDiN 
REGISTER 



ilK 
,1)0 



<>rvrtMtNT$ 



ir 



IV 



tree is ojF again. 
a group ol colleges 
086 gracefully, Williams, 

u .j iit-ai bj Amherst make 

: . Latest trouble with the 

..lines from Connecticut 

cyan, bottom club in the 

..•'," finds defeat at the 
onnecticut too hard a pill 

doesn't mind Losing to 

d Williams, the Cardinals 
• to. But when the work- 
pom Storm rise tip every 

I while to knock otf their 
als from Middletown, Wes- 

take it. Two weeks ago a 
an. State team, the same 

• polished oft the Maroon last 
. ,,;, ed and outfought Wes- 

uain B long awaited win. 

■gger's expected their jusl 
gratulations wen- in order. 

lid he given them. Hut in- 

uecticut was accused of dir- 

ii p and pooi- sportsmanship. 

Nutmeg line charged hard, 

i-.-d of playing to hurt 

,i players. When the Wes- 

iJii. Daddario, was hurt in 

.Matter, the blame was not 

th< fact that he had started 

. still suffering from an in- 

\ i nun. State was blamed. 

It -eems that the "Little Three" 
t an't understand how teams with 
lower paid coaching staffs and 
-tudent- drawn only from one 
-late should beat them every once 
in a while. As soon as they see 
■ name in the opposing line up. 
Miles* it is another blue blood 
tram, that sounds like the Sons 
of Italy or Polish-American A. C. 
the] rise up in wrath (if beaten) 
and holler about dirty playing. 
Only the Pillsburys and the Wil- 
loughbys play clean ball! 
When the Maroon topped Amherst 
I a baSKetball game last year, you 
ifll remember that Massachusetts 
too, was accused of 
[sportsmanship. 



Abbruzzi Paced Rams To Invade Maroon Lair This Saturday 

STATE SOCCER TEAM 



LEADS ROOT hits 



TO FACE FITCHBURG 

Locals Fresh From 5-0 Win Over 

Conn, state- Strength of 

Teachers Unknown 



poor 




Fresh from a 5-0 win over Connec 

ticut State, Coach Larry Brings" 1938 
soccer edition will meet Pitchburg 
State Teachers' College this SatUT 
day at Amherst. Little is known of 
the normal school club hut as Pitch- 
burg has no football team it is ex- 
pected that there material will be 
of l"|j ranking. 

The Maroon should not treat Pitch- 
burg as a breather in spite of the fact 
that it is the only non-league oppon 

i lit on the slate as the teachers have 

made plenty of trouble for the locals 
In the past. 
Against Connecticut the Briggsmen 

showed too much clas.- and .-pec) for 

the Blue and wore never in trouble. 
Captain Rodda BCored once Karl How- 
en counted twice while Tommy Ly- 
man, flash) inside right, and Whites 
Johnson added the other two Maroon 
markers. 

Line-up 

The State line-up will remain iliout 

the same as that which started the 

Connecticut game. Wilson will play al 

goal; I'oradlak and Auerhack will 

start at fullback; Burr, Brown and 
(iould at halfback; Bowen at outside 
left; Cain at outside right; Ackroyd 
at center forward; Lyman at inside 
right; and Kv Roberts at inside left. 
Playing In a league of teachers col- 
leges whose strength is not known, u niversitv 
Pitchburg presents an unknown quan- should ;i(1< i plenty 



RHODE ISLAND IS STRONG FAVORITE TO 
HAND FIGHTING STATESMEN THIRD LOSS 



Stan Jackimczyk, Sophomore Star, is 

Sec Action Against Blue 1 
Should Put Up 



lack in Uniform and May 
ocals Have Now Plays and 
Hard Battle 



STATE HARRIERS TO 
RUN MIT SATURDAY 



Close Meet Should Result 
Engineers Try to Avenge 
Last Year's Loss 



(apt. I :ud Kodda 

FOES PLAY OUTSIDE 
GAMES SATURDAY 



Amherst Meets Rochester, Tufts 

Faces Mi.ldlchnrv, \Y. P. I. 
vs. A. I. ('. 



to the Briggs board of strategy, 
opponents already faced by the 



tity 
The 

teachers have been normal schools 
who leave no means of comparison 
Captain Hud Kodda, who was one of 
the leading scorers in New England, is 
due to be the big gun in the local 
attack. Last week Kodda got his first 
marker of the season after being held 
pointless by Dartmouth the week he- 
fore. Goalie Wilson is fast develop- 
ing into a star and will make Maroon 
followers forget many of his prod 
eci'ssors. 



Reserve Strength Of Nutmeggers Results 
In 19-0 Win For Conn. State Over Maroon 



lla 



By Art Copson 

Magging hard against a heavier and 

Com .. ticut State outfit, the 

■ griddera went down to defeat 

• Saturday 19-fl on the Nutmeggers 

rounds. Leo Santucci, diminu- 

PV« State halfback, ran hard all af- 

r the losing cause, and of- 

iM\e the opposition something 

worry about. 

"I backfield posts which put 

m men against the experienced Nut- 

mlted in some rather un- 

ball handling in the opening 

with numerous fumbles mar- 

teara'i otherwise ragged 

Dana Frandaen, was back in 

«"ter being held up by an 

try, 

eatened the Conn, state 

• i few times during the 
repeatedly thrown back 

ball handling and failure 

• to click. The driving 
pepress" Santucci caus- 
es! in the initial period 

the advantage hy fum- 

• ntered about midfield 

the period, with neither 

'■••■ advantage, 
""""••Hy to Rankin 

"'"iid period, the Nut- 
•mbine Donnelly to 

i to click and the first 
in the quarter on a 
hi the end /"He with 
honoi . 

Maroon defense held the 

rorelesa in the third 
ite managed to piek 

1 on short passes over 

'wever really threaten' 
'' -t ronghold. 
ter found the locals 
reserve strength of 

;||| "«' two tallica, Pos 

" k broke awav but 



was overtaken by the vigilant San- 
tucci on the six yard stripe. Rankin 
lugged the melon up to the three yard 



Except fo" sporting interest, the 
game, of State's gridiron opponents 

thi.-> .veek are of little importance u 
the Maroon follower as not one of the 

team- that the locals are to face is 

playing another State u|>ponent-to he. 

L'p to the south end of town the 

charges of Lloyd Jordan play host to 

Rochester and 

of points to the 
right side of the ledger. 

Tufts, major rival, faces Middle- 
bury in a game that will be given 
to the Vermont team on paper but 
should be a lot harder to win on the 
Medford OvaJ than the Cats figure. 
Amherst had the backs to run through 
the strong Jumbo line. It is doubtful 
if Middlebury will make much yard- 
age on the ground as Compared with 
the Jeffs. The Cat backs are good 
but not that good. 

Worcester Tech plays host to Am- 
erican International College in what 
looms as another defeat for the Aces. 
Playing way out of their class, the 
Springfield club is doing well to show 
Up for eacifl week's game. 

R. P. I. faces BrooKlyn College at 
Brooklyn and should bow to the buys 
from the flatbush. Sid White, last 
year's leading eastern scorer plays for 



Out to make up for the defeat last 

week at the hands of the Northeastern 

harriers, the State cross euunt ry team 
will tackle the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute cit' Technology team next Satur 
day at home. A team i<\' seven will 
compete in this meet which will he 
timed to finish between the hahes of 
the football game between Massachll 

setts state and Rhode Island state. 
M. I. T. was beaten in an earlier 

start by Conn. State by a so. re com 
parable to that by which Mass. State 
was defeated by N. C. The strong 
Nutmegger team also defeated N. I'., 
but by a score of 28-29. Hence this 

coming meet should provide a very 
close race on the basis of the previ- 
ous exhibitions of the various teams. 
State Won in \*I7 
In the meeting of these two squads 
last year at Franklin Park, the State 
harriers bested M. I. T. 'I'l -'.V.*,, in a 
meet which featured a triple tie be 

tween Nejame, last \ ear's captain, 
Ingram and Pickard, this year's lead- 
er, of these three, only Pickard is 
left to carry oft, 

JEFFS ESTABLISHED AS 
THE TEAM TO DEFEAT 



SATUR 


DAY'S 


LINEUP 


RHODE ISI 


AMI 


STATE 


Whalc> 


lc 


Radge 


Pet re 


II 


Prusick 


Orlando 


Ik 


Zajchowski 


(iates 


c 


Blasko 


I'l.vnu 


ri 


Malcolm 


Hagee 


■ t 


Nelson 


1 abricant 


re 


Moray 


Xaniinarchi 


qb 


Irsyk 


Abru/.y.i 


III 


Santucci 


r'ranchiiek 


rh 


I'Tandsen 


Bobblee 


II. 


Conant 



marker and Posner went over on a the Brooklyn club and will be out to 

buck for the score. make ametids for the goose eggs he 

Final Score drew last wee. in the scoring race 

A moment later, a Frandsen toss When be failed to make more than 

was snarled by the Conn. State sec- ten yards all afternoon against St. 

Oftadar) to give the ball to the oppo- Anselms. 

sition on the State thirty yard mark- --_ _ - - g\f\i^ 

On the next play, a lateral netted N. U. OUTRUNS MAROON 



Win Over Tu''ts Shows Amherst 

Tower — Jumbos Lack 

Good Hacks 



Amherst College established itself 
BS one of the hardest team for the 
Maroon to beat, last Saturday when 
it ran all over Tufts to the tune of 
.'14-7 in what was supposed to be a 



er 



21-37 IN X-COUNTRY 



twenty yards for Conn. State and the 
Maroon defense was unable to halt 

Rankin in an off tackle thrust and the 

Nutmeggcr went over for the second Captain I'ickard Places Third 



score of the period. State was unable 
to break the blank, and the final gun 
showed Connecticut to be the victors 
to the tune of 19-0. 

Main Maroon defensive points were 
Morey, Zajchowski, and Nelson in the 
line, and Conant and Santucci in the 
backing up spots. Crashing ends foiled 
the Conn. State reverses and forced 
the Nutmegger* \>> take to the air, 



to Lead Statesmen Over 
Boston Course 



Paced by ita sophomore ace, San 
Drevitch, closely followed by Captain 
Boh Pritchard, Northeastern Uni- 
versity last Saturday defeated Mas- 
achusettl State in a cross-country 
meet whirli took place at Franklin 
Park, Boston, bj a score 2\-'M. Dre- 



toSfl laterals, and find "ther points of vitch, who was in command all the 
attack, way, negotiated the four mile course 

Sparky Chei Conant and Santucci in '£■: minutes, 14 leconds, 

I nfamiliar 
Unfamiliar with the tricky Franklin 



weie bright gpota in the losing of 

fensive cause with Leo making some 

fine gains "ii off tackle and end plays 

and Chet looking well on the line 

bucks. I>ana Frandsen turned in some 

good blocking during the tussle. 
The lineup: 



CONN. STATE 




STATE 




|e 


Mon 


Androskn 


It 


Nelson 


Monnier 


Ig 


Malcolm 


Gordon 


i 


Blasko 


Robinson 


m 


/ 1 !( howski 


Kowsikow 


rt 


Pro 


Cimino 


re 


Rudge 


Waltman 


qb 


Irsyk 


Donnelly 


11,1, 


HanttK ci 


To-iii r 


rhb 


Prand en 


|'an< iera 


fb 


C manl 



Park course, and eemingly nol in a 
good condition a theil opponent.-;, the 
State harriers, led by Captain Larry 
Pickard and Harold Rose, who show 
cd great Improvement ovei last year' 
running, took four places in the first 
ten. I'ickard and Rose finished third 

and fourth in that order, while Sholtt 

rind I>i<k Hayward took ninth and 
tenth respectively. Finishing in order 
aftei Rose were Lockerby, Mar-hall. 
Cartel, and Landsman, former State 
College -tudeir. Lockerby, Landsman, 
and Pritchard are veterans who com 
peted against the Maroon last yeai 
and finished well up i' 1 the rat e, 



close game at the Medford Oval. 

Paced by Vic Pattangil, brother oi 
Keitn who used to run wild for the 
Jeffs, the Soldier's of the King, start 
ed on their merry way in the second 
period after the Jumbo's bad gotten 
off to a first quarter lead, and had 
everything tneir own way throughout 
the rest of the garni-. I'attengil romp- 
ed to four markers, twice on long 
runs and twice on off -tackle slants 
inside the Brown and Blue's ten yard 
stripe. Captain .Joys also counted for 
the .Jells as did A I Furman. The only 
department that Amherst looked weak 
in was in conversions after the touch- 
down when Hill Cordner, who kicked 
thirteen : n a row last season, missed 
his first three chances. 

Traditional rival Tufts looks like 
u i e thing from the State point of 
view. The Jumbo's have a good line 
but their backfield's only contribu- 
tion is plugging in holes in the 
huddle. The Brown and Blue did show 
a good passing attack, however, and 
gained two hundred yards in toe air 
as compared with about sixty on the 
ground. Some of the credit for the 
-lace-- of the Jumbo passes must be 
given to the Amherst backfield, how- 
ever, lather the Purple didn't can 
whether Tufta completed their pa e 

or not, or Jusl couldn't atop them | 

a question a- Lloyd Jordan' team 

play for wins, not for rout-. Itefore 

the Jeffg get their hope- too high for 

an undefV-.t. d I .i on they will 1 
to do a lot of work on their- air de- 
fense. 

'I hi ■•■ < •!.' opponent, Rhode I iland 
State look very good dropping A. I. 
c. b> ■ ii\e ti uchdow n count wfc Ip 
w..i. . ', , Poly Tech played well In 
downing Trinity. 

Ju t when peopl 

think that K, P. |. hi 

team In years, Ro 
over the engineer 1 1 

toijchdou ns. 



The Maroon gridsters will resume 
their home activities in a second inter- 
state tussle Saturday against the 
Rhode Island Rams. To the credit of 
the Rhody team are wins ovei Maine 
and American International and the 
only loss was to the heavy Crusader 
crew against which were- able to tally 
twice. The Rams nipped Maine for 
two touchdowns and held the Down 
ECastera scoreless. Duke Aooruzzl 

was the man in the saddle that day, 
making both scores and earning hack 
field stardom. Against the Rams, Holy 
Cross rolled up forty six points but 
Rhody dented the I'urple for two 
scores with Anbru/./i again doing the 
homos. 

Down at Kingston last Saturday, 
the Rams blanked the A. 1. C. outfit 
and piled up live touchdowns. Against 
this same A. I. C. club three weeks 
ago our Maroons edged a 12-6 win, 
so comparative scores Would make the 
Rams favored on Saturday when they 
visit State. 

Abbruzzi 

Duke Abbruzzi will be in at left 
half and this fast back will certainly 
be the man to watch. Big Mike Fran- 
chuk, a sophomore who earned his 
spurs against Holy Cross will be at 

the other half, Robblee will manage 

the fullback post, and Zammarcbi will 
complete the backfield. 

Back in uniform, after a layoir oc- 
casioned by an elbow injury, Stan 
Jackimczyk may be one of the start- 
ing backs Saturday, but Prandaen ami 

Cohen are out for the same spot and 
should make the choice bard. I'ayson 
should net the nod for right guard 
and "Iron Man" Walt Zajchowski 
will be his running mate. 

Equipped with a good assortment 
of new plays, and undaunted by two 
defeats, State will be waiting for the 
Rams when they come. 



TEPS AND I, C. A. TO 
OPEN SLATE TONIGHT 



Will 



Play Football and Soccer 

as Greek League (U*ts 
rndcrvvay 



Opening the Interfratemity sport 

competition will be football ami hoc 
car Kame.s betwe e n Tan Epsilon ami 

Lambda Chi Alpha tonight in the 

cage at 7:80 ami BrOO respectively. 

The gam.- chedulod for last I' te 
day between Sigma Phi lip Holt and 
Alpha Qamma Rho were postponed 
because of M Vic" dam e . and will be 
held next Tue daj in itead. The nlj 

Other eaine- of the Week will he •■, 

morrow when Alpha lip lilon I'i (;•! >■ 

on a non Fraternity team 
La t yeai '« trinnei in thi at 

•' <}. T. V. in football with Alpha 

Slg a runner up. ami ii 

pha Si| won the honor 



whib 



A I 
Phi 



had begun to 
id ■ first Mont.' 

he '••!■ ran wild 

i the 'on.- of four 



Sia; rami in 

Due to the 

during th< 
poit .. there 

heard frotn 
a much a I 
w Inch to abid 
ifi charge o 
drew up ■ e 
the purpfl 



New b'ul. 

fact that in 



fliven 

here 



|OU 

.1|| ir 

i no 



mpi; 

and 

llle - 



lll- 

l.V 



Sid Kauffman, who | 
intramural athletic , 

of rule w huh co\ it 
int famui.il -port -. 



Ai3dvs OaDiw i r n d 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, (HTOHEK 1.1. 19S8 



TAILORING 



CLOTHING 

HABERDASHERY 

THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



HAND PRESSING 



TED SHAWM 

Continued from Page 3 



l'orty-Nincrs, was very tunny and 
enjoyable, ami the audience liked it. 
The dance pictured a gold-strike by a 
group of miners who then proceeded 

to get very drunk and rambunctious. 
The music was very catchy, with bits 
of O Susanna, and other goldrush 
songs sprinkled throughout; and the 
end of the dance, with the sudden 
grouping of all the miners into an 
old daguerrotyue, was unique* 
Freshman Cap 
In the second Act, the dance, 

Campus — 1914, caused a small riot 

when a freshman cap made its ap- 
pearance on the stage. The reviewer 
thought the sequence, War. was a 
little overdone, but the next dance, 
Ja/./. decade, was a fine bit of chor- 
eography; Barton Mumaw was lithe 
and pathetic in a well-danced "Blues" 
interlude. The Olympiad Suite was 
merely a pantomine representation of 
different sports, rather cleverly done, 
but not unusual. 

The final Act. called Kinetic Molpai, 
which at first sounded like a Japanese 
volcano, but was explained in the pro- 
gram as the ancient art form which 
had for subject matter, Strife, Love, 
Death, and Things Beyond Death. The 
whole was a continuous series of 
eleven dances, abstract patterns and 
movements, that left the audience 
(and the reviewer) rather cold — until 
the last one, where the dance went 
>m to the strains of snatches from 
Strauss, and this the audience under- 
stood. 

If, as Mr. Shawn predicts, dancing 
is headed for the Kinetic Molpai kind 
of abstract rhythms, then the review- 
er feels a little sad about the whole 



thing. Abstraction, as an interlude, 
is a tine tiling -mass motion and 
dance patterns can be appreciated, but 

up to a certain pmnt. Beyond that 
point, it all becomes a dull meaning- 
less performance — something like the 
movement of a Brownian particle. 
Down with the Molpai, Mr. Shawn, 
and more of Moctezuma and the Past! 



UPPER (LASSES 

Continued from Page 1 



vice-president for the last three years. 
She is a member of the student re- 
ligious council, the Newman Club, the 
Roister Doisters, and the intersoiority 
council. She is vice-president of I'hi 
Zeta. 

Bettina Hall, Foxboro, is a Pre- 
Med major, a member of the Col- 
legian stall, and vice-president of the 
Women's Athletic Association. She be- 
longs to Lambda Delta Mu. 

I Sendee Sedolf, of Winthrop, is a 
history major. She is secretary-treas- 
urer of the Menorah Club and a 
member of the intersorority council. 
She belongs to Sigma Iota. 

Nancy Dark, Sherbon, is a chem 
major. She belongs to the Women's 
Athletic Association and the inter- 
soiority council. She is a Sigma Beta 
Chi. 

Marjorie Ksson, of Dorchester, is a 
Home ec major and belongs to the 
Women's Athletic Association. 
Treasurer: 

Robert Class, of Arlington, is a 
major in Entomology. He has been 
class treasurer for three years. He 
belongs to Theta Chi. 

Everett Roberts, Quincy, An Hus 
major, and military major, belongs 
to Q. T. V. 

Frank Healy. Huckland, chem major, 
football manager, is a Sigma I'hi Ep- 



silon. 

Darker Lichtenstein, Melrose, Psych 

major, is President of phi Sigma Kap- 
pa. 

Seaton Mendall, Middleboro, ent 
major, belongs to Kappa Sigma. 
Secretary: 

Dorothy Nichols, Westfield, Lambda 
Delta Mu. 

Elizabeth Clapp, Springfield, Sigma 
Beta Chi. 

Ileatrice Davenport, Mendon, Alpha 
Lambda Mu. 

Sylvia Coldman, Worcester, Sigma 
Iota. 

Shirley Nestle, Amherst. 
Class Captain: 

Charles Rodda, Lambda Chi Alpha; 
Gardner Andersen, I'hi Sigma Kappa; 
Stan Dodolak, Sigma Alpha Kpsilon; 
Philip llurgun, Sigma I'hi Kpsilon; 
and Donald Mayo, Alpha Sigma I'hi. 
Sergeant at Arms: 

John Bemben; Stanley Zelazo; 
Frank Fanning, I'hi Sigma Kappa; 
Milton Auerback, T. E. P.J and Don- 
ald Cowles; Lambda Chi Alpha. 
MO President: 

Myron Hager, of South Deerfield, 
is a I're-med major, a member of the 
Honor council, class president last 
year, and a member of Kappa Sigma, 
played football, basketball, and base- 
ball. 

John Illasko, Amherst, is a major 
in the I', and 15. sciences. He played 
football and basketball. He belongs 
to Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Gerald McAndrew, of Darre, was a 
Maroon Key He is a chem Major, a 
member of the Roister Doisters, the 
Carnival committee last year, and 
the Newman Club. 

Arthur Copson, transfer from I?os- 
ton College, is a I', and B. science 
major, and a member of I'hi Sigma 
Kappa. He is a member of the New- 



man Club and member of the Col- 
legian stall'. 

Albin lrzyk, of Salem, is a I', and 
1!. science major, and a football and 
baseball player. 
Vice-President : 

Marjorie Smith, Springfield, is a 
major in home ec and class vice-presi- 
dent for the last two years. She is a 
member of Lambda Delta Mu. 

Catherine Leete, of Mt. Kisco, N. 
V., is a social science major and a 
I'hi Zeta. She is a member of the 
W. S. G. A. and was in the Bay State 
Revue. 

Dorothea Smalley, Worcester, home 
ec major, and a member of W. S. (J. 
A., is Sigma Beta Chi. 

Carolyn Monk, Groton, is a home 
ec major. She is a member of Alpha 
Lambda Mu, and a member of the 
Collegian staff. 
Treasurer: 

oeorge Atwater, was Sergeant at 
Arms last year, and a member of I'hi 
Sigma Kappa. 

John Osmun, Maroon Key, soccer 
and hockey player belongs to Kappa 
Sigma. 

James BudCley, football, soccer, 
hockey and track man is a member of 
Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. 

George I'itts, Maroon Key. fresh- 
man nominating committee and a 
member of Theta Chi. 

George Tobey, hockey player is an 
Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Bob Sheldon, Maroon Key, Lambda 
Chi. 
Secretary: 

Virginia Gale; class secretary first 
two years is a member of Sigma Beta 
Chi. 

Irma Malm, is a member of Phi 
Zeta. 

Katherine Rice, is a Lambda Delta 
Mu. 



bia Davis, belongs to Si 

Ohve Jackson, belongs 
Lambda Mu. 
Class Captain: 

Larry Reagan, Alpha Sij 
Warren Tappin, Lambda < 
William Goodwing, Kappa aj. 
Malcolm Harding, Phi Sign 
and Robert Staples, non \: 
Sergeant at Arms: 

Isadore Cohen, T. E. P.. Ed 
man, Alpha Kpsilon Pi; Eric - 
berg, K. S.J James Payson, i , i 
Gerald Levitch, non fraternity, 
'41 President: 

Harry Scollin, Kappa Sigma, | 
ent Burr, Theta Chi, Richard M 
thy. Lambda Chi Alpha, Hew 
zych, Alpha Sigma Phi, 
Crimmins. 
Vice-President: 

Jean Phillips, Vivien Hen 
is Ross, Kathleen Kell, ami V 
Freedman. 
Secretary: 

Barbara Critchett. II, , 
Kathleen Tully. Margaret l;, 
and Dorothy Wright. 
Treasurer: 

Ronald Streeter, John Haskell, 
id Van Meter, John Prymak. 
( lasty Ajouskas. 
Sergeant at Arms: 

Paul Skogsberg, Dana I 
Alan Silverman, Edward O'C 
and Alton Cole. 
Captain: 

John Gould, T. C, Parker J,,;- 
K. S., Richard Smith, Edward 
son, and John Bract. 

ATTENTION FRKSHMhW 

Competition for freshman ass;-;. 
•managers of track is still open, I 
didates report to Coach Derby*! 
between M :.'*(» and 4. -.'50 thi 

Home Ec Club 




More smokers everywhere are 

turning to Chesterfield's refreshing 
mildness and better taste. 

It takes good things to make a good 
product. That's why we use the best 
ingredients a cigarette can have— H$ild 

ripe tobaccos and pure cigarette paper — 
to make Chesterfield the cigarette that 
smokers say is wilder and hettcr-tasting. 

Liggett \ Myers Tobacco Go. 



*c 



Bfe 



MORE ^™ l 

PLEASURE 

for millions 



Put WHITBMAN 

F.vcrv 11'rdnrsday Frenint; 

Gborgb Gracis 
Burns allbn 

livery Friday F.vetii we 
A 11 (■■ /.'. £ Stations 



Eddie Doolby 

football Highlights {£ 

I 'v rv Thursday and Saturday 
S2 I >adi»H S. II. C. Stations 



ASIL B. 
H»AAAY 



*00D 





Vol. XLIX 



Mttinfl 




AMHERST. MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 19: 



MS Z— 288 



NO. 



ASSEMBLY HAS 
JOURNALIST AS 
SPEAKER TODAY 



arold Bennison, Reporte 
Answers Often Asked 
Questions 



MASS. LAWYER 



n For Legal Reporting of 
Millen-Faber 
Trial 



Harold Bennison, reported and fea- 
rre writer of Hie Boston Traveler 
j- the speaker this morning at the 
ppilar convocation period answering 
he question, "Why do Newspapers 
rint Such Stutt?" 

In newspaper work since 1916 and 
sritfi the Boston Traveler for the past 
years, Bennison is also a member 
f the Massachusetts Bar and a prac- 
ticing attorney. Explaining this. lien- 
nison stated that the field of law 
(fives a newspaperman a broad out- 
"k «>n news that is hard to obtain 
mi way. In addition, he is pro- 
fesscii of journalism and an expert 
the field of public relations. 

Harvard Medal 
A graduate of Harvard and the Suf- 
sw School, part of Suffolk Uni 
veraity in Boston, Bennison was 
carded a Harvard Tercentenary 
Medal for his work in reporting the 
"• on Arts and Sciences. ||, 
- |«rlia|>> better known for his re- 
during the famous Millen- 
nial, written under the by- 
• "B) the 13th Juror." 

talk did not defend the stories 

! the many newspapers hut 
explained the many 

Ke explained that editorial pol 
ph»> an important 
■'■ news storv. 



OLD CLOTHES PARTY 

The active Ht.iH State College 

I informal committee continue* its 

program this Saturday by sched- 

[ uling another informal for Satur- 

I day night in the Drill Hall. 

This week's informal will he an 
old Clothes party to the music of 
j Johnny Newton and his popular 
western Massachusetts swing com- 
bine. The prices for the dance are 
those recently set by the student 
Senate, tifty cents per couple. 

Stan prices have not been ad 
vertised by the committee as the 
question of stags is becoming a 
serious one at .,ie dances. If stu 
dent and Senate opinion does n.»r 
interfere, informal* may soon b, 
closed to stag lines. 

MID-SEMESTER DATE 
SET FOR CARNIVAL 



ANNUAL HORT 
SHOW PUT OFF 
BY COMMITTEE 



PASSES ON 



'•amaji't' by storm Causes 
Exhibit to be Postponed 

to IB 1(1 



the 



February 2, :>, \ Picked Foe 

Winter Event— Tentative 

Program 



AS.U. PRESENT TALK 
BY DR. SU ON CHINA 



February 2, :t, and 4, the last week 
end of midsemester vacation, is th ■ 
date set for the State College Winter 
Carnival this year. 

The Winter Carnival in the future, 
the Carnival Committee believes, can 
never be the successful event it should 
be if it must be crowded in between 
classes and compete with school roil 
tine for the students' participation 
and support. 

Some plan of cooperation betwe 'i 
fraternities has been suggested where- 
by certain houses will he turned ovei 

completely to the use of out-of-town 
guests. 

Schedule 
According to a tentative schedule, 

reasons behind the Ball will open the Carnival pro 
gram on Thursday night. Skiing and 
skating events, a hockey game, bas- 
ketball game, and swimming meet 
will In- arranged for Friday and Sat 
unlay. The ski hoot informal will take 
Continued on Page 2 



part in tl 



Because of extensive hurricane dam 

age incurred September 21, the 4uth 
Annual Horticultural show is cancel 
led, according to an announcement by 

the Faculty Advisory Committee. 

Since tlie hurricane damaged much 
of the material to be used in the shou 
in particular fruit which was to have 
formed the central feature, it was 
thought wiser to omit the show than 
to stage an exhibit which could not 
be up to th,. standard of previous 

years. Also, departmental funds, time 
and energy must he directed to the 
work of reconstruction. 

Th.- Show, Sfhich attracted a record 
i iowd of 2.''.,IH>0 visitors last year from 
all over New England, is expected to 
redouble the quality of next year's 
exhibits to make up for this year's 
loss, member- of the stair and stu- 
dents in the Division of Horticulture 
are looking forward to and planning 

for the I:..,. Horticultural Show. 

From ;i very I limbic beginning in 

1908 the Horticultural Show hai 

grown to become a significant event 

to State College and 23,00(1 pe iple 

n New England. 

Thirty years ago the Show wa 
held in French Hall conRii ted mainly 
of exhibits by students in Horticul 

tUre courses. There were only two 
prizes which consisted of "twelve do! 
lars in cash, a copy of Scott's 'Man- 
ual of Floriculture.' and a five year-' 
subscription of 'Horticulture'." The 
Show was held iii one room and the 

greenhouses adjoining French Hall 
wen- open to the public- if any. 

The advance in thirty years' time 
could be seen in lasl year's Show. Held 

Continued as Page f> 




J. E. 0STRANDER 
PROF. EMERITUS 
OF MATH., DIES 

Passes Away \etttcrday Morn- 
ins; After a Long 
Illness 

IIKKK .17 YKAKS 



'resident 
Cites 



Baker, in Tribute, 
lis "Keen Interest 
in College" 



Professor J. K. Oatraader 

SENIOR POLLS OPEN 
FOR 3 DAY VOTING 



to Vote Foe ( lass 

1 1 nisi lay, Friday 
Saturday 



arc 



'39 is Asked 
Officers r I 

and 

Members of the Senior class 
requested to cast their votes for class 

officers in the Senate Room in the 
•Memorial Building this week. The 
room will he open the following 

hours: Thursday, 1-4 p. na.j Friday. 
9-12 a. m., ii p. m .; Saturday, '■> )2 

a. in. 

The candidate^ f, ir president are: 
Robert ''.iin, Conway; Francis Kiel 
Tinner Palls; Vincent Schmidt, New 
Bedford; Franklin Southwick, White 
Plains, V V.; and Howard 

Dai ' mouth. 
Vice pre lidential candidate* 

Constance Fortin. Bettina ll;il 

nice Sedoir, Nancy Parki . an. 

jorie Ksson. 

Nominees lor secretary; Dorothy 
Nichols, Elisabeth Clapp, Beatrice 
Davenport, Sylvia Goldman, Shirley 
Nestle. 

< 'aiidid;it< 



Stelf, 

are: 

lie,- 

Mar 



es for treasurer: Robert 
(;i:i • Everett Robert! . I rank He il 
Parker Lichtenstein, Seaton Mended. 



'"! Lecturer to Speak Tomor- 
row on "China Todav— 
Plan Reception Wed. 

ed by the Massachusetts 
'" of the American Stu- 
l»r. Frank Kai-Ming Su 
W« "China Today," in the 

Building, tomorrow, at 4:.'?(> 

l»r 

of 



Liberalizing of College Will Not Effect a Decrease 

In Agricultural Students at Massachusetts Stat 



John K. Ostrander, known to thou 
sands of students as "Johnny" .uni 
for t hiriy seven years professor and 
head of the department of mathe- 
matics at the State College passed 
away here yesterday morning after 
an illness following a shock sustained 
last July. He was v.! years old. 

"Johnny" retired from active teach 

ing in in:!;-, after he had attai I 

wide recognition as a mathematician 

and astronomer. He was a member 
of the American Society ,,f Civil Iin 
gineers, contributor to Johnson's En 
cyclopedia in 1898 and to Webster' 
Dictionary in I 'Mr?. He performed im- 
portant res. arch on the variation of 

the magnetic needle. 

He was horn in Singci lands, \'. \ 
in 1886 and was graduated from 

Union College in Ihxi;. Aiter working 
two years as a private engineer he 
taught several years al Lehigh Uni 
versity and the University of Idaho. 
He became a member of the staff of 
Ma achueettfl state College in ix<»7. 

Meteorologist 

He erved as college meteorologist 
at t ho college from 1897 to 1928 and 
also ;i i bead of tin. mathematics de 
partment until bis retirement in 1935, 

Ostrander was a membei of the In 
ternational Committee on Teaching 
.Mathematics, a member of tli,. Public 
CoMtimntd "ii Viyc (, 

CONCERT CAMPAIGN 
WILL START OCT. 31 



P State College Has Highesl Per- 
centage oi Members ,,, 



- !, i organiser for the Chi 

Council, is a graduate 



By Everett It. Spencer 

Because of the success of the move- 
ment liberalising our college curric- 
ulum, the question has arisen as to 
just what ifl the future of the Divi 
sion of Agriculture at the state col- 
lege. To ascertain the present posi* 



University, Peiping and ,ion ' ' tn '' (livisi " n " f agriculture and 



graduate courses at Wis. 
'"I Harvard. He is a contrib- 
'' "' to the magazine "China 
1,1 lias travelled much in 
' Speaking before vari- 
ed organisations. He ii 
"» excellent speaker, and 
\id ( 



in order to determine its future policy, 
the Collegian has interviewed Victor 
A. Rice, professor of animal hushan- 

dry and head of the division of agri- 
culture. 
"I do not believe that the position 

of the division of agriculture," ex- 
plained Professor Rice, "is any dif- 
ferent from what it was previously. 
The liberalising of the college will 

marked effect on division. 



t 



Copv 



& Mvrp.-; Ton' 



ounefls are backed by 

Bishop Francis J. Mc- 

SheKon Hale Bishop, 

« 8. Wise, Sherwood Produce no 

'd many others. Personally, I am in favor of all lib- 

dng Wednesday. Oct. 28 ^ralizing. and I am especially pleased 

'■ Student Union is hold- at tn »' broadening of the scope of our 

mdent reception in the .institution." 

lildlng at 7:30 p. m. A Culture Trged 

Of the evening will he i The students majoring in agricul- 

dancing led by Lor-iture, Prof. Rice continued, are taking 

'4d, Secretary of the courses t<> prepare them for a Specific 

'utive committee plan- 'and definite field. They are not pri- 

' consists of (Jeorge tnarily in college to obtain polish and 

"^dent, Sidney Rosen, ' culture, "hut. my wish is that our 

Tt. Lorraine Creesey hoys in agriculture will take all of 

the work in other courses that they 
can. I have urged them to take Eng- 



lish during their four years at col- 
lege. In fact, we've pas nod a ruling 
in the department requiring that the 

hoys majoring in agriculture take no 

more than il semester courses in the 
division of agriculture during their 

junior and enior years. Therefore 
they have to make up the necessary 
<|iiot;i in other courses." 

No Decrees* 

When asked if he anticipated a de 

crease In the numbers of students 
taking agriculture, Professor Rice 

stated, "No. There Is no reason to an- 
ticipate a decrease. There will prob- 
ably he an increase rather than a 
decrease fot two reasons. One, most 
businesses or professions are rather 
overcrowded; and since that condition 



has not been true in the Held of agri 
culture, more me n ;,,,. annually 
specialising in that type of work. 
There hs not been a single year in 
the last in where one of our agri- 
cultural majors has failed to get a 
job upon graduation. General!) peek 

ing, we have had more jobs than 
we've had boys for. And, secondly, 
there has been an Increased Intere I 
in agriculture from a national view 

point, and because of this national 



the ( lountry 



Under the management of Mi 
Charles P. Fra<ter, the Annual I fern 
munity Concert Campaign will i.< 

on October :u. 

The conditions of membership an- 
as always, $2.50 admitting a membei 

to a minimum of four cone.. its in 
Amherst and many others iii Sprint- 
field and Greenfield. 

Highest Percentage 
According to Prof. Stowell C. God 



interest in agriculture, its Importance *• wl '" '"" '" c h»«ge of membership 



IS being definitely realized by 

and more people." 



more 



on campus, Massachusetts State Col 



Dorothy Rourke '40, 
Arnold Glashow '40. 



ORCHESTRA 

After three rehearsals under the 
expert tutelage of Doric Alviani. 
the college orchestra shows great 
promise of having a most SUCCess- 
ful season. The membership of 
about 30 is greatly inlarged and 
the instrumentation is better bal- 
anced than in previous years. Ten- 
tative plans include several broad- 
casts, a convocation, and a pop 
concert. 



lege has the inj.'li< i pi rcentage 

Community Concert members In th.. 
Stockbridge Gap Widening Qnlted St .„„ s „ ,„.„„, |)( . ,,.,, . 

in «py to io«Htk« concerning which the college houid be proud 

the Possibility that the StockbridgS Also, he an, ,un,,.,| ,!,„ ( ,„e 

School of Agriculture might eventu- concerts in Amherst would be tl 

ally take over the state college's agri ,„„ Sinfonietta. ,■„„,,„ 

cultural division, Prof. Rice said, "The of th 
Stockbridge School j, primarily a vn 

cational course, in its two-year 

course it prepares students for quite state last 

definite assignments in the field of 
agriculture. Its work is different from 
the degree course in that the latter 
prepares students to go into research, 



proud 
.f the 
|. Bo 
r member 
Orcheet ra, 
edlei ; thi 



tie Boston Symphony 
ind conducted by A rthur I 
irganisation came t., Masaachu 

year a- part of th<- S 
Union program, and were verj 

received by the student 

Those student- who Would 111 



•ial 



services. Thesi 
aims of the «| 



somewhat 



tfi 

IS 
ampaign see Profe oi 

ing St once; preference will be 

■ given to those who participated la«t 

year. His office |g j„ Room 10, Old 

Chapel, 



• rn a fn-t- membership bj tah 

■ governmental regulatory part in tl 

different Goding at 

given to 
Stockbridge School are more likely to 
widen than to coalesce." 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THl KSDAY, OCTOBER 20. 19.18 



& 



/IlbassacbuselraF Collegian 





Ollici 


(»ili,. K(«.ni 


-, Minidi in 


ARTHUR A. 


NOYKS 'in 



;tl rifu s|.;i \n-r 

Publlshad >-v. 

ial r. hi. In ■ 



■ f the Mas-iii 
'v Tim r -'In ^ 



ehuaetti 

by th.i 



Slat.' < 
student 



.ll.i." 



Telephone 



1 102-W 



KMKKY MOORE 
Manatriiiv' Editor 



':',!». 



Ulitoi-iti-l'hiif 
MAltKI.I.E ISOOTH 



AMOciate Editor 



< ninpuH 

JOHN K. III.IOS to. Eilitor 
HETTINA HALL '39. Art Editor 
MAKY T. ME EH AN ':(!< 
PRANCE? S. MERRILL '89 
JOSEPM BART in 
NANCY E. LUCE "40 
CAROLYN E. MONK '40 
JACQl EI.INE L. STEWART '40 
ItOMA LEVY in, Secretary 
KENNETH HOWI.ANH tl 
WILLIAM T. COOMVVIN II 
HAKOI.I) FORREST '41 
CHESTER KURALOWICZ 'II 
JOHN HAYES 'II 

Feature 
LLOYH B. COPELAND "ft*. Editor 
MYRON FISHER '89 

KATHLEEN TULLY '41 
EVERETT It. SPENCER '40 



EIHTOKIAI. HOAKI) 

Sports 

D. ARTHUR ropSON '40 
ALBERT YANOW "41 

Photography 

I ANE GIDDINOa '38 

Siockhridgt- ( oircspondi-nt 
HAROLD PHILLIPS S'38 

i ..Hi i;. Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN "■'■'■'■ Editor 
.1 VNET CAMPBELL '40. Assoc. 



Eil. 



I'inanrial Adviser 
PROP. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

I ... uliv Adviser 
I»K. MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



BUSINESS HOAKI) 
ALLEN COVE '89, Buslnea* 



Manager 



Cir. Mftr. 



ABRAHAM CARP '89. Adv. Mgr. J KBNR* WINN '89 

GEORGE C. BENJAMIN '39, Subscription Mansger 

CHARLES A. POWERS 
ROHEI1T RODMAN '40 
EDWARD J. O'BRIEN '41 
DAVID P. VAN METER Ml 



E. El i, EN E RENAULT '40 
KOi.Kl: H. I.INDSEY in 
JOSEPH K. <;oi;noN. JR. mi 
,i'ER R. LA LOR II 



In 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 PER YEAR 

Make all ordera payable to The Mas.-tarhu- 
ICttl Collegian. In COM of change of addrewt, 
■ubserlber will pleaee notify the business man- 
ager as soon as possible. Alumni, undergrad- 
uate ami faculty contributions are slm ely 

encouraged. Any communications or notices 
must In- received at tin- Collegian office before 
it o'clock, Monday evening. 



SINCLE COPIES in CENTS 



1»»7 Mfbcr 19M 

fcuocksted GoteeiOte Ptess 

Distributor of 

Gofleeide Digest 



BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOE BART 

Text of the speech of Theobald J- 
Tweedlethumbs, member of the (Jen- 
eral Court. 

"When tli*' Pilgrims landed on the •■ 
shores they encountered a winter of 
hardship and privation, In the face 
of these difficulties some of them sur- 
vived, and their children survived, and 
their children's children. Yea, I say 
their children's children." 

"Now there is a hill before this 
body asking for an appropriation 
for the construction of a new 
physics building at the college far 
in the other end of the state. I 
am opposed to this excessive and 
needless waste of the taxpayers 

money. Everything that can be 

done to decrease the load which 
tax-payers are carrying must be 
done. To appropriate funds for 
such b purpose as the building of 
such a building would be a vio- 
lati m of the public trust, Gentle- 
men. Besides, most college stu- 
dents are not old enough to vote, 
and when they are graduated they 
are too busy." 

"When the unbiased facts are told 
you too will be convinced that there 
is no need for such a building. Those 
who favor the bill assert that the 
building is out of date, excessively 
over-crowded, not provided with ade- 
quate toilet facilities, difficult to 
1 eat, and a list of alleged objection- 
able features that would extend from 
the sunny shores of California to the 
rocky coasts of .Maine. These facts 
are all lies, gentlemen, lies! I have 



STOCKBRIDGE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I Hi KSDAY, OCTOBER -M). 1938 



Saturday afternoon Stockbridge 
varsity played their annual game with 
Vermont Academy at Saxtons River, 
Vei mont. 

The first half of the game gave 
Vermont a slight edge over Red Mall's 
"Ram Hods." In the second period 
Vermont after a series of dives and 
passes came into scoring position. 
With a pass over their own left end 
they scored. The point was added with 
a kick. 

The second half started with a much 
determined Stockbridge team. It was 
not far into the third period before 
the "Ramrods" pushed across for a 
score and a point. The game ended 
with the Stockbridge team heading for 
another score. 

Stockbridge outplayed Vermont in 
first downs and yards gained. 

For the first frame of a new team 
they showed up fine and to come out 
even they did well. Koskowski was the 
star of the day coming through with 
the score and also making the extra 
point. McDonald gave the Vermonters 
trouble whenever he carried the ball. 
The freshmen showed great promise 
for a good team next year. 



Entered as norond fines matter at the Am- 
herst Pout Offlco, Accepted tor mailing at 
special rats of postage provided tor in Section 

1108, Art of October 19X7, authorised August 
20. 1918. 



Printed bj Carpenter & Morehouse, 
Amherst, Mass.. Telephone 



C.Hlk PI.. 

48 



«H'»fUNItu FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Chi »so - Boston ' Los Ansilis • san Fhancisco 



EDITORIAL 



PRESENT 
PROBLEMS 



K. K. 

Kolony Klub held a successful 
smoker a week ago Tuesday night. A< 
guest. Mr. Davis, of the Expert I i 
Station, spoke on his hobby of col- 
lecting antique guns. Many interest- 
ing guns were shown. Refreshments 
Were served. 

Plans are being made for a alumni 
seen the building and know whereof j^ ^ bp he , ( j ^.^ thp Amherst 

I speak." week-end. 

-The vicious fores favoring this Officers for this year are: President, 

'•ill mi intatn that although the col- Robert Abbott; Vice-president, Rich 

lege is co-educational there is only a ,.,| Gordon; Treasurer, David Tread - 

a men's room in the building. This way . Secretary, Harold Ilriesmastei ; 

may be so. but it develops poise t.> House Marshal, Raymond Potter: 

walk out of the building and into n,, use Manager, John Hibbard; His- 

nearhy French Hall when the ne ! ' torian, James Doherty; Reporter. Kd- 

arises. Today a woman needs pi e war ,i Harrington. Other seniors back 

Furthermore, the mens' room is so are: George Ferris. Donald Williams 



A good group of freslinii 
peeled to join the house ti 

A. t. (;. Highlight* 

A. T. ti. held a very 
smoker last Tuesday night 
Kid fellows present incluiln a 
men and senior students Ol % 
bridge, alumni of A. T. (,. 
Pitt of Amherst College. P 
last year's carnival, foot! 
many other activities were 
•pop" Barretti our faculty ;„j v 
Refreshments were servi 
doughnuts, and apples, aim 
i - >t*ii machine was kept {join 
ually during the evening. "I 
rett, Proc Houle, and the 
alumni gave short talks. Ti ,. a 
who returned were: Henry G •' 
year's Student Council Pre 
am) Wild Life Major, Rill 
former "Chicken Duster" v 
working for the National l> 
and (iil Doty former veg 
major and last year's A. 'I. i, 
president. Other alumni \v> i 
during the last week were: J , 
frank, S. S. A. '82 win. !. 
signed his position as greenskeep 
the Merrimac Valley Countrj C 
Lawrence, Mass. in order to gag 
few months in Florida. Maurici 
an S. S. A. '32, wno has ju-t • 
over the p isitinn vacated bj 
frank. Frank Dolan S. S. A. '32 
Trooper from Tukesbury, Mass, 
has just completed a thou : 
trip through the Catskill ' 
and stepped on his way l>:i k, ! 
the home. 

If any information can be bn 
to light concerning the squash 

given at 2 a. m.. Oct. 12th please 
municate with Amherst 8637. 



While not outwardly expressing them as such, the 
recently released report of the 1938 Senior Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs presents practically all large that a part of it is partitioned aml r) ( , U jrlas Henderson. 

ol the major problems connected with an expansion program at ff and i.- now heing used for a ph >- 

Massachusetts State College. tographic 'dark room.' The improper 

Most obvious was the housing problem raised in connection h««*ing *■ ; l «•• ** '" on « « ? e lah ," ANNOUNCEMENTS 

, , „ .. . . .... •. oratories in the basement through 

with an expanded fraternity system. A static fraternity aggre- whi( . h g lloatinK main pass( , s to a 

oat ion, as recommended by the report, ami expanding enrollment greenhouse the temperature was 120, (hem Club "Shindig" 

figures, as witnessed by the present freshman class, lead to the and in the laboratory on the north n,„,' t fo^et the first annual Chem- 

solution presented by the report, of the building of more college end in which the student's were war- i st ,. v club "Shindig" to be held 

dormitories. This is a moot situation, widely recognized in recent J* hats coats ami gloves it wt,« 1C Thursday evening October 20^at 7:00 

degrees. Iherefore, scientifically, 1-" p. m . m the Parley 4-H Clubhouse. 



A committee with Arthur P«n 
better known as "The Kill Wl 
Do Anything" as chairman, and 
Woodfall, and Taylor to as -' 
been chosen to make arrangi 
for the dance to be held An 
week-end. 



swarm of hornets whose nest was di 
lodged by the hurricane found r ■ 
to fly about in the vacant air in thi 



years. Last year a plan for an alumni-built, loan-f'.nanced. self- phw ]( . l()ta)s 1;)< . degree8 for t-o 
liquidating women's dormitory was spiked by a state legislature ,. (M)ms yielding *'-s degrees for an av 
committee; and in former years there have been continual requests mage. The excessive overcrowding i 
in the administrative budget for more housing, office, and audi- a myth for the time I was there t 
torium space appropriations. 

Tied up more closely than is expected are the report recom- 
mendations concerning athletics and the plea made for bettei 

understanding of the College. Popular interest in a college today -There are many other unitrpirtan' 
rests more than ever upon the publicity given to. and the success objections which the proponent- of 

Of. its footbdl ii,„l other athletic- team.; an, alar hit,.,,,, is ^""^J'Z^tZZ 

what makes for widely-bruited information. Popular interest more- sively over . t . r()W(le( i.' There is no 
over, is a factor in generous appropriations for what is considered room f or a department library.' 'On 
nece88ary to an expanding College. warm damp days a hangover from 

As to the raising and maintenance of scholastic standards, its years as a stable permeates the 

. „ , , , i i_ , a ,.».....„ nlace.' Such are the silly objections, of the Christian Federation with H. 

these too are influenced bv. and are accessory problems to expan- i"<"i- ' m " a,c / J 

uu.st munn iuiiwikw ■ , '"" m " • ' The storage of apparatus offers no Parsley leading, in the Memorial 

sion. Course reforms and revisions are well introduced by and prnblem Move out tne WMpi and Building Thursday night. 
with new teachers who must come with a larger student enrolment. hanR t ] ie apparatus from the ceiling | ♦ * 

For the enlarged, smoothly-running, well-supported State in their place. Library space ..tfers 
College of the future that is expected in many quarters, the neces- no problem. During my inspection of """** ««»P 

, .... ,• , • 4. r? .the huildimr 1 noticed that a few of All sopno 

sity of cooperation and diligent diplomacy is now apparent. For «J ™™% nw*M and the .pace positions on 
certainly ..ie problems raised the contemplated exiiansion are ot usp( , fo) . sh(i)f room T)ijs s ., mr tWng ( . ome t() the 

sufficient magnitude to require the efforts of the best brains in ( .,, u i ( | be done to the remaining win- night at 7:80 in the Senate Room in 
the administration, the alumni and the student body. 



Fun, foolishness, and food will be 
the order of the evening. Among the 
attractions scheduled are movies 
demonstrations, short talks by facul 
ty members, and last but far from 
least, a comedy skit presented by Leo 
Fay and company. 



Chris! ian Federation 

There will be a meeting of tin 
Christian Federation Peace Commis- \ 
sion after Vespers in the Memorial 
Building. 

There will be a Discussion meeting 



Communications 



Tho MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN •• 

not nwt'ssarily Berai with or : :■ - 
opinion! voiced in this column. 0>mm. r ... 
rations need not be lisMd, but the wn*' 
must be known to the aditor-ift-ckitf. 



Index Competition 

mores in competition for 
the Index staff will please 
used for shelf room. This same thing come to the meeting of the board to- 



An Open letter to the Collegian; 

An editorial printed in tl- f« 
legian seemed to necessitate i • 
It accused the Interfratcrnity C 
■ il of blithely passing tin 
tern that had been employed pr* 
ly. It then went on t.. i 
tern in present use. It SO 
dissatisfaction with the entire -' 

of fraternity rushing. 

There are weaknessc 
of rushing rules. The ru 
at Mass. State are tlO e> 
brief investigation this summer • 
ed to show that the prevalenl 
of rushing was that of salatorj « 
lect. The individual fraternitieJ 
ed up the incoming fn 
the summer and were resdy I 
pledge pin on them within tlw ' 
few days of school. Poinl fcr J 

the system employed fa 

Contm: 



J. F. 



SENIOR 
VOTING 



For the second time, it is necessary for seniors to vote 
outside of convocation. As belore the ballots will be 
handed in at the Senate room where names will be 
checked carefully. 

Although this arrangement is by no means as convenient as 
was the old method when all were assembled, it should mean no 
less a record vote by the entire class. 

No less & democracy than any other form of government for 
us, the citizens of Massachusetts State should feel it a privilege 
and duty to vote for good representation and leadership. 

Last year it took an unnaturai cause to get seniors to vote, j 
this year there should be ample time for all to register their ap- 
proval or disa] proval of the nominees presented to them. This is [ 
the banner year in every senior's college life. Make it one under 
leadership you have taken trouble to vote for. 



dows in the building. As for the 
equine smell, I need say no more than 
to mention how invigorating the vol- 
atile odors are." 

"In conclusion I should like to 
add that since 1903 the college 
has repeatedly asked for a new 
physics building. Now it is 1938, 
the college has become larger, 
but it is still using the same 
building. Is that not proof that 
there is no real need! If this leg- 
islature is to appropriate more 
money for construction, let us 
spend i" where it will do us the 
most good. Bigger sidewalks 
along the state highways'. Great- 
er murals in our public buildings ! 
Higher flagpoles on our civic 
structures that the flag may float 
fat up in azure sky and pro- 
claim that democracy is inviolate!' 1 



the Memorial Building. 

All basketball men, either veterans 
or candidates for the varsity, who are 
not out for any other sport at pres- 
ent, will have a meeting October 20, 
4:.MI in the afternoon in Room 10 of 
the I'hys. Kd. Building. 

All sophomore men interested in 
trying out for Assistant Manager of 
varsity basketball should be at this 
meeting; or see Dave Hornbaker at 
Theta Chi Fraternitv. 



Continued front Pit Re 1 

place on Friday night, and the pro- 
gram will close on Saturday night 
i with sleigh rides and fraternity house 
dances. 



CAMPUS CALFNDAR 



Thursday. Ortnhor 20 
Reception for biaeopal 

portal Churrh 

Franklin and Hump-hii. i 
Meeting 

Friday. Ortohrr 21 

1-H Men I,.-.i|.T» - Mi • ' 
Thiitrher H:ill tlnnre 
AlphR T.nm»>ilii Mil I'nm 
Home Rrnnomiri. OfOUl I 
field 

Saturday. Ortoher 21 

Fonthnll W. P. T. hi 
Cms* Country W. P. 
Sorrer Sprln^fielil hi 

1-H Men Leader*' M«* ' 
Infnrmnl Drill Hnli 

Sunday. Ortnher IS 

4-H Men Lenders' M- ' 

Mnnday. Ortoker 24 
Wnirner Concert ofM 

Tupuday, Orloher H 

Rtim»on Cluh 
Wrdnmday. Ortoher 2fi 

4-H Club Faculty Ch* H ' vl ^ 
Thamday, October 27 

Fnoulty Tea 



EXHIBIT OF WORK FROM "CAMERA CRAFT" 
MAGAZINE SHOWN IN G00DELL LIBRARY 

essional and Amateur Photographs of Note are Included in the 
Collection — Critical and Technical Material 
Explains Bach Print 



RA/.oo 



ir.'ii 



liv Bettina Hall 

i :■ ,a Club exhibit in Good- | 
I'm- this week is a col- | 
photographs from the semi- i 
rnpetition sponsored by the 
Craft Magazine, and is an! 
• ne exhibit containing pro- 
as well as amateur work. 
,ni|H-tition is divided into two 
.ne fur advanced photo- 
., and one for amateurs, with 
m both groups represented 
, collection. There is, also, ac- 
L nying each photograph, critical 
, , finical material which gives 
mam interesting facts about the pic- 
■ ;,,.- ami the photographers, and fa- 
- Mudy of the prints. 
Shirley Sparkles 
The critical material is expert and 
excellent, bo it is rather pointless to 
live any more here; but a few of the 
;niun> are worthy of mention. The 
rgt picture in the exhibit, Shirley, 
. one which ought to catch the at- 
tention of everyone for its sparkle 
;,m1 human interest; Hungarian Noble- 
man is an unusually powerful and 
cynical character study, with the qual- 
ities of fine portraiture; and Time 
Worn is one of the most appealing 
md sympathetic pictures in the col- 
.tii. For those who prefer most 
[decorative pictures, Sand, with its ex- 
quisite patterns should be interesting; 
or Eucalyptus, which has delicate 
tracery of line and fine half-tones 
of light; or Iris, with the flat all- 
• i effect and balance of a Japanese 
1 "oral design. 

Hark: A Lark! 
One of the most effective prints, 
land perhaps the best animal study 
has been in any collection for 
i bug time, is Hark! A Lark! an 
resting and beautiful study of two 
tats, which is a tribute not only to 
thp technical skill of the photograph- 
ist to the patience and sympathy 
|vith which he has handled a difficult 
subject 
There an' several still lifes in the 
ection which are worth study, and 
ndeed all of the pictures are fine 
lamples « »f photography. 
I Leal 

A silver and black handed Parker 

• nnl Mimewhere between the En- 

h m»l"Ky P.uilding, the Memorial 

[Building, and the athletic field mi 

Tu.-„ Oct 11. 19H8. If found pleaM 

irn to Alden Mlodgett. Lan.hna 

I' > : Alpha. 



EXHIBIT OF WAUGH 
SKETCHES IN WILDER 

I'en-and-Inks of Trees Contain 

Fine Examples of 

Technique 



Hanging in Wilder Hall this ue.-k 
is a series of pen-and-ink, anil pencil 
sketches of trees hy Frank A. Waugh, 

containing fine examples of technique, 

as well as interesting studies of tho 
subject. 

The collection represents lor tin- 
most part many different ways in 
which trees may be handled as sub- 
jects for pictures, and shows partial, 
individual and gmup drawings of 

trees, bringing ..ut different aspecta 

by the modes of treatment. 
For Tree louvers 
Chestnut Holes, is a particularly- 
fine pen-and-ink sketch portraying by 
the directness of treatment, and sim- 
plicity of lines, the grandeur of the 
trees; Kurnham Beeches, is an un- 
usual study in form, bringing out all 
all the beauty in the deformed and 
aged trunk. In a most decoratine vein 
are Staghorn, Sumach one of the 
outstanding sketches with its delicate 
sweeping lines, and fine balance, and 
Scrub Oak, a sharp, sympathetic 
study which gives piquancy to a fa- 
miliar subject. There are other ex- 
cellent sketches in the collection, and 
tree lovers especially should find it 
interesting. 



Twice* postponed Raitm Niulit 
has been postponed again accord 
tag to an announcement today by 
Senate President I- ra ik South* ick 
"89, and the nen date !..:- I.e.-!'. m'( 
tentatively for next Spring. Three 

weeks ago it conflicted with a BOCial 
union function, last week there 
were no lights on the athlelic field, 
and this week the date was decid- 
ed against by the Pean's ollice. 

A Fall tradition at State dating 
back to the turn of the century. 
Kazoo has been held between fresh 
men ..nl sophomores each year. 
I'he program would have include I 
boxing and wrestling matches, the 
"night shirl" parade, and a battle 
royal. 

The question is. how much inter- 
est will there he in Kazoo next 
Spring? 



NOVEMBER ENGAGEMENTS SECURED FOR 
CHOIR AND MEN'S GLEE CLUB BY ALVIANI 



choir t<> Sing- in riolyoke'g Grace Church on November 6 Glee 
Cluh Performing in Concord November 1<» 

al County Affair 



WHITNEY PHOTOS ON 
DISPLAY IN PHYS-ED 

Architectural Detail a From 

Mam Buildings in 

Exhibit 



SENIOR COMMITTEE 
FINDINGS RELEASED 

Five Suggestions For Improve- 
ments Made by 
'88 Crads 



CALDWELL EXPLAINS 



Dr. T. C Caldwell has requested the 
opportunity to clear up snnie state- 
ments attributed to him in the Col- 
legian's synopsis ,,f n j a lecture on the 
European Situation at a meeting Oc- 
tober 11 sponsored by tho Christian 
Federation, the American Student 
Cnion, ami the International Rela- 
tions Club. 

Dr. Caldwell did not predict a 
Kuropean war, but indicated that cer- 
tain opinion in England regards a 
war between Germany and Russia as 
a logical possibility, anil that one 
motive of British policy may be tu 
isolate such a war to eastern Europe. 

Dr. Caldwell did not predict an al- 
liance of Kritain with Germany, hut 
presented evidenio to show that cer- 
tain elements of the British Conserve* 



Released this week from President 
IhiKer's office, the report of the l'J.'lH 
Senior Committee on Student Affairs 
contains five suggestions for improve- 
ments at Massachusetts State Col- 
lege, the most significant of which 
deal with athletics and fraternities. 
The committee was headed by Wil- 
liam (',. O'uonnell of Milford, last 
year's Phi Beta Kappa scholar. 

Concerning athletics, the report 
says in part, "We believe that the 
chief problem in regard to athletics 
al Massachusetts State is to prevent 
tin commercialisation of any sport 
the subsidization of athletes. So long 
:■- Massachusetts State does not pay 
its football players to come here, the 
College will not have a first-class 
football team. Put we do not consider 
the lack of a first class football team 
a verj great calamity. The subsidisa- 
tion of players at other colleges has 
generally led to a lowering of ecs 
demic standards, and we believe that 
the result would be similar at Mas- 
sachusetts State. Although We oppose 
subsidization, we do not disapprove 
of any plan that Would grant schol- 
arships to good athletics who are also 

good students." 

Fraternities 

N'o specific objections to the fra- 
ternities at State were raised; in 
fact, (he fraternities were conimend- 
Continued nn pjge 6 

tive party are pro-German rather 
than pro-French in sympathy. 



In the Physical Education Building 
is a collection of photographs by 
Joseph p. Whitney, representing 

architectural details from many well 
known buildings of Spain and Italy, 
as well as several miscellaneous pic 
tures of gardens in England. 
Composition 
Por elaborate design and attention 
In detail, the picture Moorish Door- 
way, is Interesting as it brings out 
these points clearly, with an at ten 
tioti to composition as well. Garden 
Vista, and Straight Stairway, both 
taken at the Villa d'Estfl in Italy, are 
striking for the lovely landscaping 
that they portray. Cardcn at Iloat 
is. perhaps the most outstanding pic 
ture, for the expert handling of light, 
and the unusual angle effect that it 
seems to portray, as well and the 
tine framing of the photograph into 
a highly decorative theme. 



Preparing the Men's Glee Cluh and 
the college choir for a series of en 
gagements during the winter, direc 
tor Doric Aiviani has announced thai 

these groups will make then lir-t mil 

side appeal aiues in November, The 

Men's club will give its first concert 
in Concord, Mass., at a county atfan. 
on November 16, The choir, which . •; 
initiating something new in that il 
has never traveled outside the col 

lege for appearances before this year, 
will be presented as part of the eve 
ning service at Grace Church in iiol- 
yoke on Sunday, November t>. 



COMBINED CLUBS TO 
HEAR MISS FELTON 



Traveler in Orient to Speak on 

Relations of China 

and Japan 



Just the Right 

Weather 

For Candy 

'""' assortment and High 
luality. Ju s t i n fresh, to treat 

'" ' K or treat some one else. 

lu ' '''ace With Good Thinps 

College 
Candy Kitchen Inc. 

"The best in food" 



elAMFS A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



FUNNY BOOKS 

MY SISTER EILEEN 

by Ruth McKennev 
S2.00 



STANDARD 
POSTAGE 

Stamp Catalogue, 1989 
S.'J.OO 



WITH MALICE TOWARD 
SOME 

by Margaret Halsey 
$2.00 



COLLEGIATE 

DICTIONARY 
93.50 



Wednesday afternoon at 4:'M) in 
the old chapel, the Christian Keilera 

tion, the International Relations 
Club, and the American Student 
Union will present Aliss Mary Felton. 
Miss Kelt on, just back from a year's 
travel in the Orient declares that the 
present undeclared war of Japan up- 
on China is a brutal manifestation of 
an Imperialist policy which .Japan has 
learned from the Western imperial 
ist powers. "The masses „f the .lap 

anese people have no quarrel with 
the Chinese, nor do they want to 
settle n China," Miss Felton say.. 
"It is the military clique in .Japan, 
backed by the large finance houses, 
who seek to win over China so that 
they may exploit her resources aim 
her people." Miss Felton goes on to 
say that the burden of Japan's war 
is falling upon the people who are in 
Creasingly being pressed for even I he 
necessities of life. 



THATCHER DANCE 



The Men's Glee Club with two ex- 
tra rehearsals a week, is at present 
at work on songs which will comprise 
its Concord program; tryotits on these 
songs were started at rehearsal Tues- 
day evening to begin the elimination 
of members from sixty to thirty six, 
who will comprise the varsity club 
for outside concerts. Mr. Aiviani 
Stresses the fact that the elimination 
lis not merely to obtain the best qual 
ity but also for the sake of conven- 
ience on tours and in the matter of 
using music. 

The choir, which is limited in pos- 
sibilities of performance to sacred 
compositions, has started on the works 
of the early church composers, some 
of which will be included in its llnl- 
yoke appearance. The choir will con- 
sist of thirty members. 

The Women's Clee Club will have 
a varsity club of between twenty-four 
and thirty members. Prospects of ap- 
pearances at the .lones Library in 
Amherst and at Cuniminglon, Mass., 
have been discussed, but are not deli 
nite as yet. Eliminations for the vara 

ity dub will start in the near future; 
those who do not make the mh 
may attend rehearsals and appear in 

home concerts, however. An extra re 
hearsal each week has been add 

and it is planned that later ill tho 
season joint rehearsals of the men' 
and women's clubs will be held in m 
der to combine on some numbei 
Eliminations will also he held for tin 
joint club. 

The orchestra ha l.irleil rehearsals 
with thirty four members; it- ar 
rangement is to be that of a concert, 
rather than a symphonic orchestra, A 
strong, violin -ection is featured, and 

Leonard Levin "■'•'■< has been appointed 
concert master. I'laiis are beins, made 
for a Pops season tu be held in the 
spring. 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 



ROOM ACCESSORIES 



RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL BesttL, CO. 

63 So. Pleasant St. Amherst, Mass. 



The residents of Thatcher Hall will 
hold a "vie" party in the dormitory 
recreation room on Friday evening, 
October 21. Winthrop Avery is chair 
man of the committee in charge of 
arrangements for the party. 

A large number of new records has 

been purchased for the affair. Moat ..f 

the latest popular selections have been 
included along with many old favor 
ites. Money for the records was raj 
ed by donations of (en cents from 

each resilient .,f the dormitory. 



1. 


K 

Memorial 


XHIRITS 






Kinldini: 




(iodev 1' 


tints 






II. 


(.oo.lell 1 


ibrary 








Camera 


C r a f 1 < 


o in pel 


ition 




riioioi i . 


iph> 






Ill 


. Wilder Mall 








Drawing 


s of Trees 


bv 1 


. A. 




Waugh 








IV, 


Physical 


Kilucation 


Huildinn 




1 'hot og r« 


tphs by J. 1 


». Wh 


tney 



COLLEGE STORE 

Everything for the Student 



l.tinrheonH 

Soda Fountain 

Student Supple 
ON TBI CAMPUS 



Hairnet- and Souvenir* 
Books and 

Magazine* 
NORTH COLLKGE 



TRY A MALL0RY 

Mallory is making one of the finest hats in the country for a five dollar bill. The Fall shapes and colo 

are new and different. Other good hats at $2.95 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



rs 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20. 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20. IH-'I* 



ill 



C€»CD NCICS 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



OUTING CLUB PLANS Rhyme -Reason -Rhythm State Coeds Getting Stouhter, Men Thinner, 



FOR ACTIVE SEASON 



■ ;il ways retires at ten 
ier parents and elderly 



The Kill wh 
is loved by 

men. 

The above little < i i 1 1 > was request- 
ed — vvt . hail nothing to <i" with it. 
Which reminds us of something equal' 

ly as had. Puni air funny but poems 
are verse. 

Similar to the freshman's wire hold- 
ing on the highway running through 
the college, was the practical joke 
a Wheaton g-irl pulled on a dear 
friend of hers. She put his name in 
the obituary column of the town paper 
this summer. The gentlemen received 
Mowers hefore the error was Correct- 
ed and thoroughly enjoyed the affair. 
From Lambda Delt, however, we find 
that Marjorie Smith has heen appoint- 
ed Correaponding Secretary to replace 
Dorothy Merrill who has transferred 
to the Boston School of Occupational 
Therapy. Also, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Car- 
penter will he guests at the Sorority 
house, Thursday evening for dinner. 
Alpha Lambda Mu is holding a "vie" 
party at the house on Friday eve- 
ning- Mr. and Mrs. Pushee, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Kverson have been asked to 
chaperone. Jessie Chase "M, Sandra 
Culben '86, Angela Filios "M, Kdna 
Sprague '87, Lois Wood "M and Sally 
Hopkins 118 were recent visitors of 
Alpha Lambda. Sigma Reta's annua! 
Hallowe'en l'arty will be held the 
28th. 

Several faux pas were pulled last 
week-end. One young lady decided 
that a fraternity "vie" party was get- 
ting too (lull and wanted to follow 
the rest of the crowd out into their 
respective cars. She picked out the 
best-looking car in the outfit and she 
and her friend climbed in. Imagine 
their embarrassment when they found 
out it was the chaperone's car! 

The second round of the girl's ten- 
nis tournament has been played. The 
sophomores trounced the seniors in 
Hockey on the girl's athletic field 
last Monday evening. We won't print 
the score for two reasons; first, it 
might embarrass the dignified sen- 
iors; and second, we don't know what 
it was anyway. 

ATHLETIC BOARD IS 
HEADED BY SCHMIDT 



1-Collt'oc Hike, Winter Spoils 

Program, Barn Dance Are 

on Schedule 



ex- 

the 

not 

In 



Numerals Awarded to Class of 

1941 in Baseball and 

Track 



Newly elected officers for the Inter 
class Athletic Hoard for this year are: 
I'res.. Vincent R. Schmidt ':<!>; Yice- 
Pres., James l'ayson '40; Secretary, 

Clement Hurr '41. 

The following men of the class of 
1P41 were awarded numerals for in- 
terclass baseball and track at the re- 
cent meeting 04 the Interclass Ath- 
letic Board: 

Haseball 

Donald Allan, Isaac Higler. Robert bridge Sch 
Breglio, Carl Friedman. Thomas 

Gordon, Stanley Jackimcayk, James 
H. King. Robert Leary. William Len- 
non, Walter Miles, Carl Xastri, Hen- 
ry I'arzyck, Robert Siegal, Francis 
Slattery, William Walsh, Irving Mey- 
er. (Mgr. ). Herman View eg, (Mgr. ). 
Track 
Merton Bernstein, Chester Buds, John 

Crimmina, Richard Curtis. John Has- 
kell. William Joyce. Kdwin Lovitt, 
Chester Putney, Richard McCarthy. 
Jack O'Connor. Russell Rucker. Dave 
Skolnick. Saul Klaman. Dana Frand- 
Ben Chester Kline, William Kcnnon, 
Robert Riseherg. Wood few .lacobson, 
John Nye, Clement Hurr. William 
Warren. 



Contrary to the belief recently 

pressed elsewhere ill this paper. 
State College Outing Club does 
need to "get out of the wood.' 
spite of the near-by forests 'being 
closed,' the club has planned a very 
active program for the coming sea- 
son. 

In addition to : dkes !o Northfteld, 
the Experiment Station Farm, Shutes- 
bury, Mt. Haystack, Sunderland, and 
Chesterfield (Jorge, several interesting 
meetings, a barn dance, a winter 
sports program, and a four-college 
hike are in the offing. 

Winter to Speak 
At the Nov. 1 meeting, Wilfrid Win- 
ter, a member of McMillan's Arctic 
Expedition in 19.S7, will show movies 
of and speak on his experiences last 
summer in the Rocky Mountains. At 
the same meeting, Doric Alviani, 
newly-acquired musical bombshell, will 
lead in a song fest. On Nov. <> a 
much-to-be-looked-forward-to hike 
will be held with Amherst, State, Mt. 
Holyoke, and Smith Outing Clubs par- 
ticipating. Over the week-end of Nov. 
11, 12 and 11?, a bicycle hike to the 
Northfield Youth Hostel is on the 
calendar for the club. Two bike hikes, 
one to Shutesbury and one to Chester- 
field (Jorge, will give the members a 
chance to view the autumn foliage. 
Climb Haystack 
Dec. 4 the group will climb Mt. 
Haystack in Wilmington, Vt. A two- 
group hike will be held Dec. 11, one 
group to seek fossil remains at Whit- 
temore's Landing in Sunderland and 
the other to hunt Indian relics on the 
Hadley flats. At the Dec. 5 meeting 
Seaton Mendall will speak on Indian 
relics and exhibit his excellent col- 
lection of arrowheads. 

In addition to these activities.a com- 
mittee composed of Charles Slater. 
Mob Cole, and Evelyn Hergstrom is 
investigating the possibilities of a 
barn dance. Should plans go through, 
it is hyped to obtain Sammy Spring 
as caller. The club also plans to ap- 
ply for booth space at the annual 
sportsmen's show, held annually in 
the cage. Teams are to be entered in 
the chopping and sawing competi- 
tions; I'ickard and Rixby already be- 
ing entered as one team. In the Out- 
ing Club booth an exhibition of camp 
equipment and camp craft will be 
held. 

Fire Brigade 
Becaaae of the now-present danger 
of a forest fire on Mt. Toby, the Out- 
ing Club is cooperating with college 
authorities in organizing a volunteer 
tire brigade of students to tight any 
fire in which the College is concerned. 
Under the guidance of Professor 
Holdsworth, head of the forestry de- 
partment, a committee has selected 
twenty-three men, some from Stock- 
ool, to act as crew cap- 
tains, each crew to consist of eight 
Are-fighters who will work with the 
captain in the event of a general 
alarm. The captains are being in- 
structed in tire-fighting methods and 



By Peter Barreca 

Not too many years ago, three or 
four to be exact, a band was swing 
nig along in grand .-tyle. Only, there 
wasn't any such thing as "swing," 
or, to he more exact once more, the 
public wasn't ready for it. liut, make 
no mistake about it, they did swing. 
And, as far as musicians go, you can 
ask any self-styled artist on this 
campus about execution. If his mem- 
ory goes back that far he'll surely 
agree that while practically any fair- 
ly good band can play the current 
Goodman and Clinton arrangements, 
Caaa Loma put out arrangements that 
most ordinary loca, outfits found too 
moat ordinary local outfits found too 
ton did some arranging for Glen 
Cray's Casa Loma in those good old 
days. Today, the band still plays stuff 
that's too intricate and tough for 
most of us. Witness . . . 

Song of India (Decca 2031 A) Glen 
Cray's Casa Loma; The disk starts 
off with trombone and muted brass 
in some weird and oriental figures 
against a sax background in similar 
vein. Typically, various intricate ob- 
ligates slide in and around the mel- 
ody, with tenor and clarinet doing 
the honors. Watch for those oboe 
licks, and don't be surprised. The ar- 
ranger for this band is making use 
of all the new effects that symphony 
instruments make possible, and the 
men double on French horn, bassoon, 
and the like. As in this tune, you 
can see the pleasing result. The re- 
cording ends with real Casa Loma 
brass figures up in the rafters some- 
place. You think (loodman's good! 
. . . (reverse) Mindin' My Business; 
There's typical power in the brass, 
precise but flexible. Slap bass stands 
out all through. Fffortless tenor anil 
trombone. Notice the sax triplets 
that used to run all through tunes 
like The Stomp, Blue Jazz, etc. . . 

Azure (Victor 25848B) Herigan; 
Runny dishes out some weird slow- 
swing with beautiful chords that are 
just close enough. There's a clear cut 
answer chorus, and some spotless 
tenor. All this, plus Herigan finagling 
around that very thin thread of mel- 
ody . . . (reverse) I Hadn't Anyone 
Till You by T. Dorsey; It isn't often 
that a record is split this way, but 
they had to get rid of this side some 
way. Just another commercial tune 
that leaves me at a loss for words 
. . . well, but one, anyway . . . 



According to Physical Examination /feports 



Women are getting taller and 
stouter while men are becoming taller 
and thinner, if figures at Massachu- 
setts State College are indicative of 
a trend. Average weights and heights 
of the 340 freshmen, compiled hy Dr. 
Ernest J. Itadclilfe, college physician. 
showed that men weigh an average of 
14T> pounds, women, 126% pounds. 
Average heights were: men, 5 feet 9 
inches; women 5 feet, 4.4 inches. 

Last year, the figures showed that 
men on the average were a pound 
and a half heavier, but three-quarters 
of an inch shorter. Women last year 
averaged a pound and a half lighter 
than they do this year, and .4 of an 
inch shorter. The average weight for 
men last year was 14<P- pounds, for 



women 125 pound.-. Height 
feet, 8 3 4 inches for men. 
inches for women. 

Heavier Men 
This year the heaviest 
weighs 214 pounds as ag 
year's heavy who was a m< 
pounder. The women, howevi 
reversed, with this year's 203 
er a shadow compared to la 
heaviest girl who tipped tl 
at a Hat 224. Both the men a ■ , ; 
en this year hit new lows in 
tarn class, with the light. • 
weighing 99 pounds as comps ■ : 
101 last year. The lightest n .>■.. 
a mere slip of a girl weig] 
compared with last year's light* 
97 Vi. 



MAH0NEY SPEAKS dairy team places 

NINTH AT CLEVELAND 



Pre-Med Club to Hear Address 

on "Radium" — Sample 

Display 



Massachusetts State College 
Products Judging Team won 



Dr. S. E. Mahoney of the Holyoke 
Memorial Clinic will speak on "Rad- 
ium" at the next Pre-Med Club meet- 
ing on Tuesday October 25, at 7:00 

p. m. In addition, he will have on dis- P lace in *"*»«* l ™ tream * « 
plav a sample of this rare element tional Dair >' Products Judging 
which is plaving so important a role | test held at Cleveland, Ohio. 0, 
in medical history and the instru- rhe Massachusetl 



Rodda Takes Second and 
Judging Milk and 
Ice Cream 



ments for handling it. This meeting 
will undoutedly prove interesting, 
not only to pre-med students but to 
all science majors. 

Dr. Mahoney is president of the 
Memorial Clinic of Holyoke. He is a 
prominent surgeon and financier. 

At the meeting of the Pre-Med Club 
on October <> it was voted that the 
club would hold bi-weekly meetings 
on Tuesdays throught the college year. 

Whether the next meeting will be 
held in the Farley 4-H clubroom or 
in some larger auditorium will be an- 
nounced when the size of the audience 
expected is known. 



in judging all products, with t\\> 
three college teams competing, 

Charles Rodda, Jr. of Sprint:- 
was second high individual in 
ing milk and third high in judf 
ice cream, and was awarded a - • 
medal and a bronze medal n 
tively. 

The team, consisting of K. \V. D 
ock of Oxford, Charles Rodda, Jr. 
Continued on P.. 



BISHOP APPLBTON 



Professor Walter Kotschnig of 
Smith College spoke last Sunday even- 
ing at Vespers in place of Dr. Kin- 
solving, who was unable to appear 
because of illness. Next Sunday even- 
ing W. Appleton Lawrence, Bishop 
of the Episcopal diocese of Western 
Massachusetts, will speak on the topic 
of "Values". 

Speaking on the international situa- 
tion. Professor Kotschnig likened the 



the handling of men at the time of a 
fire. To sub-committees have been del- 
egated the tasks of locating all avail- 
able fire-fighting tools on campus, ar- loyalties which the totalitarian state 
for a general alarm, and demands to religious fervor. He said 

that if democracy, rooted as it is in 
Christianity, is to endure, it must 
evoke in men a loyalty equal to that 
of fascism. 



ranging 

working out the transportation prob- 
lem. 

The captains are: Lawrence Rixby. 
Frederick Cole, Robert Cole, Roger 
Cole, Richard Elliot, Allan Fuller, Jr., 
William Fuller, Howard Hunter. Rob- 
ert Kennedy, Frank Kingsbury, Lin- 
coln Moody, William Nutting. Lau- 
rence Pickard, Walter Ross. Jr.. Dan- 
iel Shepardson, Wilfred Shepardson, 
Charles Slater, Morrill Vittum, Stan- 
ley Wiggin. Norman Wilkinson, Ed- 
ward Willard, John Wolfe, and Fred 
Wright. 



) 



GLOW LIGHT 
CANDLES 

Bum <>o to 76 hours, the delicate 

colors glowing through the wax 



I 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 




ETCHINGS AND LITHOGRAPHS 

Limited Signed Originals 
by 

FREDERICK 0WBNS 
JAC YOUNG 




A«as« 



TODA1 THIM SAT. 



YEAH 

It's h Swelluva 



MAN 
FuniM 1 





»c**Jv!ysiS 



A Powerful 



Co-Hit 
Drama of 

Ciivjilrv ! 



th< I 



"ARMY GIRL" 



MiiiIkc 



with 
Emm !'" 






AIho: Cartoon N«w« 



St N.-MON.-Tl KS 



The WORLDS MOST 

QUEEN ... 
Her life. ..and 
loves! 



GORDON GRANT 
GRANT WOOD 



And Others 

$5.00 



JEFFERY AMHERST 
BOOKSHOP, INC. 



a 



THE HEART 

OF 
OUR STORE 

Pharmacy is a p r o foosi oa and not 

sideline with us. It is the very 
heart of our store. Prescriptions 
receive the immediate and undmd- 
ed attention of a registered phar- 
macist, who weighs, measures and 
mixes drugs of purest quality in 
exact accordance with the physi- 
cian's specifications. He makes 
haste slowly . . . verifying, check- 
ing and re-checking each step so 
that our label will be a punitive 
guarantee of accuracy! 

WELLWORTH 
PHARMACY 





SHEARER * * 

hi MtV. / / . • . 



JOHN BARRVftOtfe 

Robert MORlfYHmtjfoOtSE' 
Joseph SCHHDKMUTy 



mow ricium am tou« Ji 



Continue 

Sundaj 

010:80 P 



f 



— Anrt 
Walt DtSW 

Wynk.-n. Hl>l 

Pathc 



III. 



Si til til MS 



,s it's more glorious to lose 

win. Last Saturday's game 

1, ,1,- Island State was just 

, for Ebb Caraway's tight- 

-ineli. 

.i team went down to de- 

. the Maroon did when they 

and outfought their strong 

nil the local gridiron. Led 

Abbruzzi, one of the best 

the east, the Rams had the 

weight and the speed to 

U |, the Maroon. Rhode Island 

. quality that State had a 

>n -fight. 
the Kams scored twice in the 

minutes it looked as if State 
■ I hit that's not the way t 
aw it. Behind 13-0, knowing 
had very little chance of 
and hut a small chance of 
it a close game, the locals 
every ounce of courage and 
: • iniied hack the mighty blue 
turn. I nt il the last few see- 
i n a intercepted pass re-u h-.J 
. yard touchdown run for the 
State had held the Rams 
thought of scoring: and had 
. best brand of football -ecu 
imni Field for many years. 
It'-, hard to express the feeling 
that State rooters experienced. 
1 hey couldn't cheer and let the 
players know they were behind 
them. It was too serious for that, 
rhe) were watching eleven men 
. \, everything they had for ■ 
|..-t cause. The atmosphere was 
like a final exam — every one >\a- 
trying to figure out a problem, 
i mild eleven stout hearts with 
little football experience, outplay 
.mil hold one of the best teams in 
f hi - section? We all know the 
answer now. They could. 

Ebb should be proud of his team. 

club that will fight like that for a 

,1 cause is just what Massachusetts 

eeds for objective Amber-t and 

t'hen the Maroon is figured to 

good chance. 



State Rated Even With Undefeated Worcester This Saturday 



CHAMPION REDMEN 
INVADE STATE LAIR 



IKON MAN 



Undefeated Springfield club Out 

For loth Win Against 

Local Hooters 



bring! 

collegi- 



The invading 
lost a single 
which should 
;■ stiff est coin- 
will he gun- 




The c m i n g Saturday 
Spring-field's undefeated intt 
Bte soccer champions to Alumni Field 
to tackle the Maroon, 
eleven, which has not 
game since 1936, and 
afford the State-men tl 
petition of the season 

ning for its 13th consecutive victory. 
On the other hand, the B> igg-adiers 
who will be at their full strength for 
the first time this year, have a better 
than evert chance of sending the na- 
tional champs down the river with 
their first defeat in many a moon. 

Coach Larry Briggs is reported as 
saying- that both teams were evenly 
matched and that the outcome would 
depend largely on the breaks of the 

game. With a dozen wins under it- 
belt, the Springfield eleven may find 
the number 13 as unlucky as the Ma- 
roon and White found it in haseball 
last spring-. 

Strengthened by the return of Cant 
Rodda, the coining tilt will find the 

State hooters in rare form and set to 

play heads-up ball. Auerback and Pod- 

lak are expected to hold down the this Saturday will he the Engineer's 
fullback posts while goalie Wilson, cross country aggregate who are 

oil to meet the Derbymen on the 



HARD BATTLE LOOMS AS MAROON HAS A 
GOOD CHANCE TO STOP TECH'S STREAK 

Captain Clif Morey May be Aide to Start at Loft End While Other 

Flank Will lie Guarded by Lou Norwood Rudge 

Slated to Start at Halfback 

JEFF -CARD BATTLE 
HEADS FOE'S SLATE 

Amherst should Topple Wesley- 

aa After Hard Battle at 
Middletown 



Walt ZajcttowaW 

HARRIERS WILL RUN 
WPI CLUB SATURDAY 



Dunklee, Strandberg, Martin are 

Strongest For Visiting 

Engineers 

Accompanying the Worcester Tech 

grid club on their Amhorsl ward trek 



who has not allowed an enemy score 
for the last two weeks will he out to 
white-wash the champs. 

This is the first time that the In 
dians and Statesmen have ever met 
on the soccer field, the Redmen tak- 
ing the place of Yale on the sched- 
ule. They come to Amherst with a 



slal 
local 
course. The finish will come between 

the halves of the football game. 

Dunklee, Strandbcrg. Martin, all 
letternieii, who finished hand in hand 
for fust place against Trinity, will 
he the ones to watch in the coming 



- 



race, with Boyd, Fernane, Bentley, 
very auspicious record, having taken ;„i<l Terkanian, who finished in the 
the National League Soccer cup last first ten in the same race, right he 

year hy virtue of having toppled Buch ,li " <l them. Strandberg managed to 

finish up front despite a severe stone 
bruise suffered the preceding Wednes- 



teams as Vale and Dartmouth. 



Abbruzzi Leads Rams To 20-0 Win Over 
Statesmen But Honors Go To Lou Norwood 



■ la 



\ . 



■ilt\ 



A newcomer to the State harriers 
will be Chester I'utney who starred 

in last year's freshman track team 

in the mile run. Reporting rather late, 

Hy Art Copson At the opening of the second half, putney was not in condition fo run 

hy their sophomore triple Rhode Island kicked with Conanl re- against M. I. T. last week, but should 

., I Hike Abbruui, the Rhode ceiving for the Statesmen and lugglnj be able to start in the coming meet 

lams downed the local grid- the hall back to the thirty-live. After w j t |, W. I'. 1. 

Alumni Field last Saturday three downs, Rudge went hack to kick 

Action was fast the first few and floated a beautiful hoisl over the 

of play with the Statesmen , head of Ahhru/zi who eras playing 

-I hy the shifty Abbruazl who safety to the twenty yard line. 'The TO 4-0 SOCCER WIN 

)Ugh holes in the Man on line hall travelled over sixty-live yards 

on that hoot. The fast charging .wa- ., . 

roon line kep, the Rhode island of Briggsmen lop Rtchburg State 
fense at hay for three down- and 
when the Rams attempted to kick. 



\i\i week's opponent. Amherst. 
heads the list of foe's games, this 

week, by traveling to Wesleyan for 
the first game of the Little Three 
series. The Cardinals should how to 

the Jeffs but only after they have giv- 
en the Purple a workout whose effects 
will last through to the Stall' game. 

Tufts, still out for win \'o. I, will 
no| jret it this week when the Jumbos 
travel to Williamstown. The Ephs are 
too si long and fast for what Coach 
Manly has to call his team. Another 
grill foe to he. R. |'. |. tackles Union 
this Saturday in a game that should 
he very close with the Schenectady 
eleven probably six points ahead u 
the final gun. Coast Guard bas no 
game scheduled for this week. 

State College rooters looking for 
ward to the Maroon-Amherst tilt next 
week should pay special attention to 

the success of the Wesleyan air at- 
tack. If the Cardinals can make 
trouble in the air, State will have a 
good chance. 

FROSH GRIDDRRS MKRT 
DEERFIELD ACADEMY 



Bullock, Daniels, Frietaa 
sharks Slated aa 
Starting Backs 



an< 



BOWEN PACKS STATE 



anions for scores. The first 

ml: as it did before the ball 

handled four times, di <•• n 

State defense, and the -•< 



Teacners m 

Contest 



• came on a similar line stalwart \.<>u Norwood, guarding the 



with the "Duke" cleverly tot- 
ball behind fast interference. 
tnd succeeded in making the 
n<3 point after with Robblee con- 
in« from placement. The play of 
'"•(j in the rig-ht end berth 
lUtotanding feature of the 
the newcomer to State 
barging in to worry the op. 
'"i punts and passes. 
the first chapter still young', 
interception by State's star 

in Johnny Blasko when fast 

nda worried the Ram pass- 

'I the tide of State's for- 

the locals to took the of- 

V few plays later, Leo San- 

r| ■ hole at left tackle, and 

'"•ugh for forty yards, 

the melon to the three yard 

State opened a new bag 

'"it after four State downs, 

■lined short of a first down 

' chea, and the first State 

ver. 

Threat 

Hand threatened again in 

quarter when an exchange 

-ve the ball to the Rams 

tote forty, and a few Ab- 

brought it to State's 

ver, sloppy ball hand- 

•dy back pave State a 






w -' 



right Rank, charged in to smother the Supplementing the array of nth- 
boot, and the bail went to State with Ictic events on Alumni Kield last Sat 
the Rhode Island goal line only a urday, the Maroon hooters took a de 
short distance away. The locals failed cisive 4-1) win from Fitchburg State 
to convert the threat, however, and Teachers' College. Taking to the of- 
there was no -coring by either team fense from the very beginning, thr- 
ill the period. speedy Brigg-adiera held the upper 
({locked Kick hand all the way. 
A blocker! State boot .-r-t the local The first quarter was sloppily-play 

hack on their heels early in the final ed.. Karl Bowen, flashy wing started 

stanza, but with their backs to the the ball rolling by rifling a long boot 

wall, the Stat. --men fought valiantly through the opposing goalie; he WU 

and prevented the score. Again, and re ponsible for another tally in the 

again the Rams threatened, but third quarter when he took ■ high 

each time the determined state De- p ;i > f'" m *e right wing and headed 

fense held strong. The Ram backs It into the corner of the goal. The 

battered the Maroon bulwark without other two markers came when Rob 

much success, but when Maas. State <'rts and Schoonmaker made good on 

got the ball on their own twenty, the two penalty shots. 

Maroon barks literally tore through Second Shutout 

the Rlue line with Irzyk leading the This is the second shutout for coach 

way on a long jaunt through center, Briggs 1 capable charges; Podolak and 
The march continued to the nine yard Auerhack, playing their usual con- 
line where State's touchdown hope a sistent game at fullback, helped goal- 
pass over center was magged by Ram i*» Wilson keep *he slat*- clean for the 
back Robblee who scampered ninet\ s e co n d consecutive game. Arkroyd 



Meeting their first opposition of the 
season, the '42 footballers play host 
to Deerfieid Academy this afternoon. 

Marie up for the most part of r-xperi 

enced high school ami prep ball play- 
ers, this year's team hits a new high 
in freshmen squads. On paper it ranks 
■' the besl in receni years; what it 
will rlo in action remains to be seen. 
Jim Bullock, brother of last year's 

Bill Bullock, along with Dobir- Dan 
iels, will probably start at halfback 
while Benny Frietas and Kd Sparks 
will hold down the fullback and quar 
terback posts, 'he line, representing 

Some r.f best in higdi school pla\. | 

is shaping up fine under the tutelage 
r.f coaches Frigard and Smith. This 
is the first of a four game schedule 

for the yearlings. 

M. L T. UPSETS STATE 
HARRIERS, SCORE 25-34 

I'ickard Breaks Tape to Give 
Maroon Pirat Place 

Position 



SAT IB 


IIAV'S 


LINEUP 


WORCESTE 


\i 


ST UK 


Stone 


le 


< apt. More] 


Lew in 


It 


Prueick 


Andreopuloos 


Ig 


Kajchowski 


Peters 


c 


Blasko 


D. Wll>nn 


rg 


Parson 


(handler 


it 


Malcolm 


Ra\ alaeay 


re 


Nora ood 


Lone; nee Iter 


qb 


Irsyck 


(iii.stafson 


Ihb 


Rudge 


I'ritch 


rbb 


Kant nee! 


I'orkey 


fh 


Conanl 



State's fourth grid battle is sched 
tiled for the home field this Satur 
day against the Engineers from Wor 

ecster Tech. Roasting an undefeated 

season to date and having rolled up 
a total of twenty seven points in three 
contests, the Tech men have a better 
record than State at this stage of the 
season. The only common foe in the 

grid pasts of the two teams was Am 

erican International College against 
whom Stair- scored twice and permit 
ted one touchdown in the season's 
opener, while the Engineers had ■ 
time, topping the Internets 

a rough, tough affair la I 



harder 

C> 2 in 

week, 

Kolir 



yards for the final Rlue tally, 
STATE 



Rudge 

Prusick 
Zajchowski 

Blasko 

Payson 



"\er a fumble, and avert Nelson 



( 't>on'mK up an offensive 

forked into scoring pos- 

'be chance was lost when 

f-nded. State still trailed 



Davis 
Irzyk 

Prandsen 
Santucci 

Conant 



le 
It 
Ig 
c 

rw 
rt 
re 
qb 
Ihb 
rbb 
ft 



started at the absent Capt. Rodda's 

It. I. center post, but was replaced by Rob> 

Whaley erts, who was shifted from bis wing 

Belispe I position, Cain takinjr his spot. Soph- 

Orlando I omore Frank Simons continued the 

Race fine brand of ball he's been playing. 

Magee while substitute "Whitey" Johnson 

l'etrn showed that he merits more action 
Fabrican j by playing a banjt up frame at the 
Robinson ; left inside spot. 



Robblee 
Abbruzzi 



Although they were in trouble at 
no time during the contest, the tussle 



Franchuck \ proved no "breather." 



Losing its fir.^t cross-country race 
in four years against Massachusetts 
Institute rd Technology, the Maroon 
team was upset last Saturday on the 

home course 26 ''.4. The Statesmen 
took first, fifth, seventh, and truth of 

the first ten places. Captain Pickard 

breaking tin- tape in the time of 24 

minutes and 4 seconds, finishing 2H 

seconds before the two Tech men, 
Captain Crosby and Toolln, who tied 

for second place. 

I'ickard l^-ads 
Karry took the lead at the junction 

of Lover's Lane and Pleasant street 

fmm the close running Tech men who 

were out Ifl front most of the w. • 
finished the last mile running •iwa\, 
and broke the tape about 20(1 yards 
ahead of the others. In fourth posl 
tlon was Recker of Tech who sprinted 
down the runway ahead of Rose of 
State who made a valiant attempt to 
catch the Engineer. C.ott r.f Tech took 
fifth and llayvard of State sixth, a 

great improvement over his previous 

attempts in hi*- fir t year on the 
varsity squad. Eighth and ninth Wen1 

to Wallace and Turnoch r.f Tech. 



I'ecb sorer against the Aces 

was Gustafson who snarled a Porkey 
toss in the end cone. These two I'ech 
nirians will be the men to watch in 
Saturday's tussel, for Forkey's ability 
as a passer and as a punter is well 
established. Many of his heaves will 
be gunned for Gustafson's capable 
receptors, ami the right halfback is 

klloW'l to hi Meet of foot. 

Reserves 

Captain Moray's appearance in the 
lineup Saturday is at present a mat 
ter of conjecture, for tin- Maroon 
leader i -lill troubled with a stomach 
injury received in practice last week. 
State will depend on the rugged will 
ingness of team fo play solid ball for 
ixty minutes when ii meets Worces 
ter. The brand of ball which held 
Rhode Island t.. tw.. one man scores 
last Saturday for three periods will 
mean victors for State if duplicated 

"II Alumni i ir-lrl thlS Wrr-K, The woe 

hit r.f precioui reserve strength an 

Covered in thr- Ram came will ' 

well again t Worce tei Norwood, fm 
one, -it mat end will in- the spear 
head of tin- Maroon Defen o while 

Captain Mon-v, if ready, will be on 
the other flank. 

From tackle to tackle, the Maroon 

forwards are a fairly ragged group 
with Prusick, Zajchowski, Blasko, Pay 
son, and Malcolm In line {••*■ the rail. 
Backs not mentioned in tin- lineup 

and likely tr. see art ion are the tal 

ented Prand en, King. Allan, .lark 
Imczyk, Harding, ami Cohen. 

Rudge's tor- will be a valuable part 
rd' the State backfleld f'« tin- State 
halfback will have to \i.- with the long 

hoi I- ,,f Tech bark Kr.rkr-y to keep 
State out of danger. 



GREEK LEAGUE 



Interfralernity spurts i-oi off to 
an inauspicious stall last week 
when Lambda Chi and A. E. I\ won 
their games, both football and soc- 
cer, through default. Lambda (hi 
wat; scheduled to play the Teps 
and A. E. I'i slated to meet a non- 
fraternity team, but the losers had 
not obtained official sanction neces- 
Mary to compete. 

(.ames this week hrinR together 
Sigma Phi Epsilon. Alpha Sigma 
Phi. and Q. i . V. against Alpha 
t.amrr.a Rho, Son- fraternity, and 
Sigma Phi Epsilon respectively. All 
football games are to start at 7:.10 
in the cage, and all soccer games 
at N:00, also in the cage. 



U. A. C. Library 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20. 1938 



• • 



NETTLETON SHOES 



• • 



A complete factory assortment of shoes will be shown here on Friday and Saturday, October 21st and 22nd. 

Come in and be measured for your correct size. 

- THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



SENIOR COMMITTEE 



Continued from Page 3 
ed for their past usefulness. What 
the report did say, however, was 
". . . that further expansion of the 
fraternities at Massachusetts State 
is undesirable. We believe that a 
highly developed fraternity system 
must be considered an evil at any col- 
lege, and especially at a state college, 
for 8 powerful fraternity system gen- 
erally results in the growth of un- 
democratic tendencies. These remarks 
should not be misinterpreted as an 
attack upon, or a crusade against, 
the fraternities at the College." 

The report closed with a plea for 
better understanding of the College by j 
the state legislators and by the cit- ' 
izenry of the state, who are in gen- 
eral ". . . ignorant of the real scope 
of the College." Comment was also 
made on efforts to raise course stan- 
dards, the committee finding, "We be- 
lieve that the quality of the work in 
a course may be improved without 
unnecessarily increasing the amount 
of studying required." 
Committee 
Appointed last May by the presi- 
dent, the committee evidences a pol- 
icy established here by Dr. Baker of 
annually naming a group of promi- 
nent seniors to study and report on 
conditions affecting student life. He- 
sides O'Donnell, the committee con- 
sisted of: 



Elinor Brown, Honor Council and 
l'hi Kappa Phi member; Jessie J. 
Chase, president of Alpha Lambda Mu 
sorority; William B. Ferguson, man- 
ager of the basketball team; Robert 
W. Cage, president of the Christian 
Federation; Julian H. Katzeff, editor- 
in-chief of the Collegian; and Fred- 
erick J. Sievers, president of the Sen- 
ate and Captain Of the football team. 

J. K. OSTRANDER 



Continued from Page 1 

Safety Commission in 1917, and a 
member of the Society of Mathematics 
Teachers of New England, Phi Kappa 
l'hi scholarship society, Holland So- 
ciety of New York, and the Society 
for the Promotion of English Educa- 
tion. 

At Amherst 

For several years he served as vis- 
iting professor of astronomy at Am- 
herst College. He leaves his widow 
Mrs. Sarah C. ostrander, and a son, 
John E., Jr.. who is commander in 
the U. S. N. air forces, and a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Milton Calvin of Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

In tribute to "Johnny" President 
Baker and Dean Machmer have is- 
sued the following statements: 

"While Professor Ostrander had not 
been active in the life of the College 
since his retirement, he maintained 
until the last a keen interest in the 



work of the Department which he 
served for so many years and in the 
many Alumni of the College who were 
inspired through his teaching to take 
up various phases of engineering. 
Through his many years at the Col- 
lege he made a very definite place for 
himself as a teacher and as a good 
citizen and he will be remembered 
not only by the teaching staff, of 
which he was a part, but by a great 
host of students who worked with him 
through the years." 

Dean Machmer 

"In the passing of John Edwin Os- 
trander, emeritus professor of Math- 
ematics at the Massachusetts State 
College, the College has lost a staunch 
friend and arresting personality. His 
work as teacher and meteorologist 
was done with devotion and effec- 
tiveness. No one has served the Col- 
lege more faithfully. His understand- 
ing, sympathetic manner made him a 
wise counsellor and teacher. The as- 
sociates with whom he worked and the 
students he taught remember him as 
a scholar, gentleman and true friend. 

HORTICULTURAL SHOW 



Club, South Amherst Fruit Growers, 
twenty garden clubs, Christmas 
Greens Association, and the State De- 
partment of Agriculture which award- 
ed all trophies. 

Prizes given to students consisted 
of money awards, certificates for seed, 
trophies, books, flower bowls, and oth- 
er suitable prizes. Trophies were 
awarded for the best formal, informal, 
and miniature exhibits. Hatters were 
given to the two students who did 
most for the Show. Last year's fea- 
ture was a colonial garden, and the 
background of the .>hu\v consisted of 
evergreens. 

Prof. R. A. Van Meter and Prof. 
C. L. Thayer, heads of the Pomology 
and Horticulture Departments, regret 
the cancellation of this year's exhibit. 



DAIRY TEAM 



COMMUNICATION 



Continued from Page 4 

Springfield, L. C. Wirtanen • 
cy, and Louis Kertzman of S 
as alternate, was accompati 

Cleveland by Assistant Profi 
J. Mack. 

Professor J. H. Frandsei . 
the department of dairy in<j ;- 
well pleased with the show 
by the team, which was i 
Assistant Professors M. J. Ma 
H. G. Lindquist. 

FINE AR'lS 



Continued from Page 1 
in the cage of the Physical Education 
building, the Show consisted of ex- 
hibits by the Horticulture Department, 
Forestry Department, Landscape Ar- 
chitecture Department. Holyoke and 
Northampton Florists' and Gardeners' 



Continued from Page 2 
ly better than such a time wasting 
splurge. 

The interfraternity Council is mere- 
ly an expression of the collective 
voices of the fraternity members at 
Mass. State. If the majority of the 
fraternity men did not wish prefer 
ential bidding and quotas, it is but 
natural that this would find expression 
in trTe council. 

However, fully appreciative of the 
present fallacies the council welcomes 
all suggestions for improvement. 
Please address all replies to Roy 
Morse, Kappa Sigma. 



The first in the series of I . u 
programs will present P 
Frank A. Waugh of the La 
Architecture Department at <j 
Pierpont of the Dean's office 
program of flute and piano n.u 
Tuesday afternoon at 4:."'.ii in I 
morial Building. Pupils of Bliss 
lahan's physical education class 
present two dances in connect 
the music 

These programs, dealing witl 
feature of the fine arts, will fcx 
each Tuesday at the same t ir- • 
now until Easter. Miss Kiddei 
Amherst usually is at the piai 
Dr. Waugh for the first proguim, 
owing to her illness Miss I'i-i • 
has offered to substitute. 



.'y.-<f :■:■■'■. 





Copyright 10^S. 

Liof.rTT & Mrsu 

Tobacco Co. 



. . Chesterfield writes it for 
everybody who smokes 9 em 

It's pleasure you smoke for . . . 
everybody knows that . . . and 
it's pleasure you gee in every 
Chesterfield you light. 

Chesterfields are milder and better- 
tasting and here's the big reason ... 

It takes good things to make a 
good product. In Chesterfield we 
use the best ingredients a cigarette 
can have. . . mild ripe tobaccos and 
pure cigarette paper. 



/ ^S witti MflPl 



Paul Whiteman 

Every Wednesday Eveninf 

Georgh gracik 
Burns Allen 

Every Friday Evrnine 
All C B. S. Stations 



Eddie Dooley 

Football Highlights 

Every Thursday and Satur Jar 

52 Leading N. B. C. Stations 



..with MORE PLEASURE 
for millions 




XLIX 



AMHKKST. MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, OCTOItKli 27. Mils Z 2«8 



so. «; 



\Football and House Parties Co-Feature 47 th Amherst Week-end 



bl9 GUESTS TO 
ISIT COLLEGE 
HIS SATURDAY 



JEFF LEADER 



Eleven Fraternities Take 
in Round-Bobbin 
iJances 



Part 



SMITH LEADS 



oeds Trail Girls From Other 
Colleges in Number 

Attending 



Hy Lloyd Copelancl 
Three hundred and nineteen couples 
be "ii hand Saturday night to 
elebrate a victory or to drown a de- 
it. Guests an- expected from nine 
states, Including Texas. 
Ihio, !'i un.. and Maryland. 
Among the guests the Massachu- 
rtts State co-eds place third with K. - !, 
ed to 97 visitors from other 
HRipuses, and 138 visitors not affili- 
ed with any college. For the second 
Bsecutive year the Smith girls rank 
-• among the other colleges with 
is, followed by 15 young ladi<-< 
I Mount Holyoke. Third place re- 
> ■ tie among Radeliffe, Rhode 

I and State, Conn. College for Wom- 
t: . and Wellesley. Thirty-one other 
ire to lie represented. 
Kound-Rohin 
II eleven fraternities are having 
thisi Amherst weekend. Sigma 
Ipha Epsilon is holding its dance 
■ Hills Memorial Cluh house, eel- 
fraternity anniversary. A * 
Continued on Pngt I 

I.O.T.C. PROMOTIONS 
[RELEASED TUESDAY 




1 



STEFF ELECTED 
BY SENIORS TO 
'39 PRESIDENCY 



lager Leads Junior Ticket and 

Burr Heads Sophomores as 

Voting Ends 



V 



Hartley Joys 



CALDWELL KNOCKS 
CHAMBERLAIN IDEA 



History Professor Holds Policy 
at Fault on Two 

Counts 



Dr. Theodore A. Caldwell, state 
College professor of history, condemn 
ed the British and French foreign pol- 
icy of recent years on two counts 

in his address at convocation today. 

Surveying the recent war scare mil 
the events leading Up to it, he ex- 
pressed the convictions th.-t Chamht r 
Iain's "stand and deliver ' policy I n 
courages further sggres i <>>. and that 
the policy offers nothing sound foi 

future international peace 

Dr. Caldwell tried to an-wer 1 1 <■ 
question "Why did Hitler feel so sur- 

Continued on Page 2 



appointments to Cadet Second 
Lieutenants, Sergeants 
Are Made 

VpjH>ii •!,,, i,t h and promotions in the 

1 unit at Massachusetts 

■ coming year were re- 

rui day by the military office. 

Lieutenants 

be Cadet Second Lieut- 

Cadet Master Sergeant 

rsen, Cadet First Ser- 

I'oster. Seaton Mendall. 

In, and Charles Griffin; 

rgeants, Robert Cole, 

r, Frank Healy, and 

udj Cadet Sergeants 
M\ Donald Cadigan, 
Donald Oslo, Donald 

't Eldridge, Emerson 

Haylon. Lawrence 

d Lippincott, George 
erett Roberta, Vincent 
I Raymond Smart. 



Howard Steff '■'!'.', Myron Hagar '40, 
and Clement burr '41, have been 
elected president of their respective 
classes, it was formally announced I). 1 . 
the Senate today. Complete election 
r suits are as follows: 

(lass of 1BS9 

President. Howard Steff; Vice 
President, Contance Fortln; Treasur- 
er, Robert Glass; Secretary, Dorothy 
Nichols; Sergeant-at-Arms, Charles 
Rodda; Captain, John Bemben. 
Class of HMO 

President, Myron Hagar; Vice 
President, Marjoiie Smith; Secretary, 
[rma Malm; Serjeant at Arms, .lames 
Payson; Captain, Lawrence Reagan. 
Robert Sheldon and George Pitts are 
tied in the office of treasurer, and 
there will be B revote in two weeks. 
( lass of 1941 

President, Clement Purr; Vice Pies 
ident, Jean Phillips; Treasurer, Ron- 
ald Streeter; Secretary, Barbara 

Critchett; Serjeant-at-Arms, Dana 

Frandsen; Captain, .John Gould. 
Steff 
Howard Steff elected president of 

the senior class, has been captain of 

his (dass for three years. He was 
elected to the Maroon Key, and is a 

three letter man basketball, football, 
and baseball. He belongs to Theta 

Chi. 

Misn lortin 
Constance Fort in has ke|>t an an 
broken record by her fourth elect inn 
Continued on I' 



STATE (ATTAIN 




JEFFS FAVORED 
IN TOWN TITLE 
TILT SATURDAY 



Amherst Undefeated to I>;it»> 
With Wins Over Tufts, Ro- 
chester, ami VVesleyan 



POOR PASS DEFENSE 



Maroon Pins Hopes on Fact That 

Purple Can'1 Stop 

Air Attacks 



Clifton Merer 



SENIORS' PICTURES 
WILL START MONDAY 



Winn 



Studios of Boston 
Photograph For 
^ earbook 



Will 



It was announced today l>.\ Charles 
Branch, business manager of the 
Index, that senior portraits will be 

taken at the Mount Pleasant Inn, be- 
ginning next week Monday Ti.< pho 
tographs will he taken by the « n\ \ 

known Winn studios of Hoston. \, j n 

the past, seniors mu.-t mnkc a depo it 
of two dollars when the picture Is 

taken. 

Instead of drape.-. . ach girl I 

quested to wear a lark swuatei 
a string of pearls. 

Since anyone who fails to keep hi 
Continued on Page 3 



le 

md 



Ity \r( Copsoii 

Heavily favored by virtue of an un- 
defeated record this season, the Lord 
.loir eleven will play host to State, 
Saturday, in the 17th annual football 
Classic. Supported by B lone win In 
five engagements this year, the Ma- 
roon hopes will be pinned on the will 
Of the team to win in the face of 
definite odds. 

Chalked up to the credit of the Am- 
herst juggernaut are \ictories ove 

Tufts, Rochester, and Wesleyan 

a tie against Springfield Slat. 
ed ahi ,ni in its opening encounter 

American International hut (osl '• 

Bowdoin, Conn. State, Rhode Island, 
and Worcester Tech, In the nejcl fouj 

vames on the card. Since the tv , 
team., have failed to meet a (..Million 

foe, there is little opportunity to pate 
comparative strength 

Watch Patteagitl 

'I lie sterling performance of Vi«- 
Pattengill In the Purple backfield 
throughout the es , will make i 

the man to watch in 



ami 



mm 
aturdav ' 



Continued 00 1'iee 6 



Japanese Schoolboy Appearance Again on Campus to 
Capture New Bug Species of Jitter For Ent Friend 



JAPS DON'T WANT TO 
FIGHT THE CHINESE 



A I 



ss 



Felton Gives Japanese 
Sid*- of Oriental 
Battle 



•Th. 



I 

| 



Apt 



J 



Sergeants 

'" the rank of Cadet Ser- 

Cadet Corporals John 

Buckley, Frank Daley, 

WilHard Poster, Harold 

' !» Hughes, Alhin Irzyk. 

George Pitts, Leroy 

" x v Ryan. Fvi Scholf, 

Edgar Slater, Arthur 

1 Talbot, George Tobey. 

'""II. Wilfrid Winter; 

Boyd, Gerald DaJley, 

' lV1 >. Charles Powers, 
aids, John Swenson, 

Tapprn, 



EDITOR'S NOTE: Stanley 

Flower, former managing editor 
of the Collegian, was asked to 

to bring his now-famous Japanese 

School hoy hack to life for the 
JelT week-end edition and Toktayo 

really comes hack to life. 

by Stanley Flower 
To Hon. Editor of CeJUaeni 

Are disgusted, In fac, as you make 
to say in America, are terring. 

Perhappens it are of some minute 
to explanation o\crhur.-t of emotion. 

But of late date. Japanese Schoolboj 

are become attack from all fronts. 
First are people say. "Jap are menac 
to World not to take notice of Univ- 
erse." Make one to feel very had. A r " 
harmless. Even when are stewdent at 
Hon. M. S. C, never make to harm 
fly. Exception for ent numbr 2fi. 

Bui international sitchyouation are 
now place behind curtain. Are ignore 
for time. 

"Softies" 

As royal alumnus of heretofore 
said Mi S. C, are look forward to 
return for big game with other-side 
-of-towners tradishionl menaces. Bui 
are unsure now that game will h. 
much, since see in Hon. Collisnn that 
stewdents of old Alms Matter are ap- 
parent to become as vnu make to say 



in America, "soffies." Bvidenl from 
lac of Razz Kite. 

\ow when Japanese Schoolboy are 
stewdent, things are make to he dif 
front. As are say in west of America. 
".Men sreif men and women glad of 
it." In fac. If at leastest seven (7) 

feshmen do not receive laceration of 

leg and have .'i sq. inchs of skins re- 
move from Hon. puss it are considered 
very poor Kan N'ite. That is what 
are happen outside of phy ed buildg. 

After, down on other side of ahrn 
field, even more worser thing make 
to take place. Here, if six (6) soph >- 
mores do not kick in stomach and 
three (8) more have entire wardrobe 
remove, it are rotisidord poor sh r.v 
by Bpectatrs. All this are mere lnc!« 



common people of Japan did 
not want war with China any more 
dent. than the people of the Cnited State 

But as have repeat, all above are would want war with Canada," 
in good old days when hash hou ■• V1, Felton In her talk ye terds 

serve meet alnio-t raw. Now, i • 
inform hy peeple in know, that inflii- 



BEAT AMHERST 

Adelphia Rally 
Friday Night 

Parade from Lambda Chi 
to Bonfire 

Speakers- Cheers- Singing 

Everyone Out to Rack the Team 



of coeducationals make men to forg d 

dllty in line of Razz N'ite. 

"tree For Everybody" 

However, are still interest in re- ' 
turn to campuss for Amhurst weak 

end. In old day, weekend begin FYI. j 

evening with rally at two colleges! 

ended by free for everybody at one. 
Have see day when stewdents go mad 

and throw everything and everybody 
into pond except maybe overlook Dean 

Hums. Relly are wild time. GhooJ 
post too usually take boating one w iv 

or nuther. 



ill" Old Chapel. "Becau e the vs I 
majority of the Janane t people w#»r< 
unorganised In then de Ire for pea, e, 

I hey Were forced h\ the upper da 

'■ Into the only alternative war!" 

The lesson we American should 

learn from the Sino-Japanese eon 

""'• •"'I Mi Felton, is that, people 

opposed to war should have | strong 
organisation capable of making known 
its will. Giving the i an • of th< 

war in China, h. flowed that the 

"fifteen famine-- of Japan and the 

army have coerced !>0' ; of the people 

Into the war. The entire Christian 

church in Japan and all the intellec 



<"ai are opposed to the war, but are 
Mien dawn Sat. afternoon when hit' trinsrlnff ilonv u/iti, .j, ., , 

1 u '"K' n K riiiing will) trie government 

o thai they may ke.p their head 

on their shoulders. 

Kiss Felton, who pent one whole 

year in Japan and who had obtained 

her authority from the hich. t and 

lowe. t J a pane se official In her tra< 
*1 • wa ponsored \>\ the rnterns 
tional Relation- Club, the Christian 
Federation, and the American Student 

I nion. 'I his was one in a series of 
talks on foreign affairs to which all 



game are progress very fast and 
twenty two (22 I men fight with might 

in attemp t<> push over bail on white 

line. Always thought most silly, be- 
cause no cooperation. Half of men try 
to stop other half. How expect are 
to produce ghools with such action? 

Between haifs of big game, always 

— that are, always in day when men 

are men tee freshmem try to grab 

green cap from other side of field. 



Continued on Pjge 4 a re invited. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. (KT'OIIEU 27, IMx 



«4 

/nba60acbus€ 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, rillKsnw OCTOBEE n. If! 



BA R T E R I N 6 
WITH JOE BABT 



* 



STOCKBRID6E 



Collegian 



Official new mi >f the MaMachuMtti Stat.. Coll 

Published everj Thuradaj l>y the itudents. 



Office; Room 8, Memorial Building 
AUTHli; A. NOYE8 l 



Telephone M02-M 



EMERY MOORE 
Managing Editor 



Kditoi -in-Chief 

MABELLE BOOTH 



Associate K<lit< 



Mil ( OKI \ I IIOAIM) 



Campus 

JOHN K. l'll.los •in. Editor 
BETTINA HALL '89, Art Edltoi 
MARY T. MKEHAN 
FRANCES S. MERRILL "39 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '40 
LORETTA KENNY 'II, s... -i-.-t.-n ■>• 
KKNNKTH ROWLAND '41 
WILLIAM T. GOODWIN 'II 
HAKdUi FORREST n 
CHESTER Kilt tLOWICZ '41 
JOHN H WES '41 

Feature 

LLOYD B. OOPBLAND 'W, Editor 
MY ICON FISHER '39 
h \ IIILKKN TULLY II 
EVERETT I! SPENCER '40 



Sports 



I). ARTHUR COPSON '40 
ALBERT YANOW '41 

Photography 
LANE <;iIM)INf;S '38 

Sturkhridge Correspondent 

.loilN KELSO 8*89 

College Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '.'in. Editor 
JANET CAMPBELL '40, Assoc. Ed. 

financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE Dickinson 

Faculty Adviser 
OR, MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



ABRAHAM ( \ IM- 



AM. K 

'88, Adv. .M- • 
GEORGE C. 



BUSINESS BOARD 

(JOVE '39, Buiineaa Manager 



E. EUGENE RENAULT '4«1 
Ro(,ER H. LINDSEY '40 
JOSEPH R. GORDON, JR. 'I! 

U \LTER R. LA LOR II 



J. HENRY WINN 'Hit, Cir. Kgr, 
BENJAMIN ':!'.'. SnbacriptioB Manager 

Business Assistants 

CHARLES A. POWERS 40 

ROBLRT RODMAN '40 
EDWARD J. O'BRIEN '41 
DAVID F. VAN METER II 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 



(i PER YEAR 



Mak<. nil orders payable to The Massacbu- 
setts Collegian. In ease of changa <>f address, 
subscribe' will please notify thi- business miin- 
afar u Boon an poasJMs). Alumni, undergrad- 
uate) mikI faculty contributions are sincerely 
encouraged. Any communications or notices 
must be received al tli«. Collegian office before 
U o'clock, Monday evening. 



SINGLE COPIES in CENTS 

IfS* 



1937 

Pfcsociafed Gb0e6icB9 Press 

Distributor of 

Gofle6iate Digest 



Entered ns second-clasa matter at the Am- 
herst Post (Wire. Accepted for mailing at 

■pedal rate "f postage provided for in Section National Advertising Service, Inc. 

1103, Act of October HUT, authorized August - „ „ .... ,/V 

2q | <ns College Publishers Representative 

„- . .... ..... ~- ■ t.. - 42 ° Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Printed by Carpenter & Morehouae. Cook PI., 
Amherst, Mass., Telephone 43 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTI9INO BY 



Chicago ' Boston ■ Los anseles - sun fun ism 



CDITCCIAL 

ALUMNI Amherst Weekend brings more alumni than any one 
SUPPORT other affair during the college year. Most of these 
graduates have been out of the fold for a relatively 
short time and have still a degree of enthusiasm for the college 
and its activities. 

The only other time when alumni come back, commencement 
and class reunion, finds the campus bare of ordinary student life, 
free from the tangle of men and women hut empty as well of the 
interest which centers about us. 

One of the weaker points about our college is the lack of 
alumni interest in common with the registered student body, an 
interest evident in many of the mid-western and some eastern 
colleges. We have no homecoming, no specific attraction which 
will bring alumni and undergraduates into a common bond of In- 
terest and endeavor for -Massachusetts State. Although Amherst 
Weekend plays an important part in alumni return to college, there 
18 no attempt made t<> organize those homecomers nor to sound 
them out and acquaint them with the problems and possibilties 
of the college. Nor does it bring back older men and women. 

A plan to make an c iciently organized alumni weekend is 
already underway. Started by an undergraduate it is still in the 
stage of development and will require a somewhat lengthy period 
of time for completion. However, the fact that the undergraduate 
body is willing to make the fust move is indicative of an interest 
on our part, an interest which can result in a fine coordination of 
undergrads and grads with the proper effort and stimulus. 

Whether Amherst weekend will be the one finally selected 
for a get-together will not be known for some time, but it has 
great possibilities for just such an event. Were alumni to see a 
football game, rather than the score alone, they would have ample 
cause for rejoicing instead of the near-tears attitude they fre- 
quently adopt. Were they to see the enthusiasm of the student 
body, they would have reason to believe in a great future for Mas- 
sachusetts State which they might have a hand in building. 

Here indeed, is the opportunity waiting to strengthen alumni 
support of the college. With the many problems which face us 
in the way of expansion, building, and reasonable increase of 
teaching staff in proportion to enrolment, the alumni can exert 
a powerful influence. Perhaps one reason why they cannot be as 
strong as we might like them to be is the fact that many of them 
Cannot see any need for expansion. The Alumni Association does 
splendid work in uniting graduates but it takes more than that, 
it takes an allied, enthusiastic body of young and old men and 
women working unitedly for the college. 

Whether a homecoming or such event will ever work remains 
to be seen. Its possibilities are great, its benefits many and un- 
limited, but it requires work and planning. 

To this gala Weekend, however, we welcome alumni and 
guests. It is our hope that they will see our problems and work 
on them, for the spirit of this one weekend is always evident win 
or lose. 



This modern uw at bicycles has 
created a serious problem. A short 
time ago proxy suggested that In 
cycle operators refrain from using 
the town sidewalks as thoroughfares. 
The question that arises now Is are 
these students to be permitted the 
use of walks on campus? Must they 
ke* |> off the walks cutting across 
campus by the pond? If so, what's 
the use of having a bike? If .lot, 
how about the poor pedestrian plod- 
ding in this peddlers pandemonia? 

The next time you're late to an 
eitfht o'clock try this excuse a student 
at Cornell used successfully, as the 
Cornell Countryman testifies. "Per- 
haps the most unusual excuse was 
that of a student who asserted that 
in pruning a large apple tree he had 
fallen and hit the ground so hard 
that it deafened him; deafening him 
so severely in fact that he could not 
hear his alarm clock the next morn- 
iiitf" 

Elementary Highway 

Construction 

Tar is a substance which is used 
in the construction of roads. It is 
generally applied during the hot 
summer months so that it will 
have a chance to penetrate into the 
material upon which it is poured. 
When autumn comes the sudden 
change of temperature from tar- 
truck to road causes tar to solidi- 
fy on the immediate surface 

Tar has a peculiar affinity for 
peoples shoes and automobile 
tires. When people walk into li- 
braries, Old Chapels, and Mem 
Buildings the gummy substance 
leaves the feet and adheres to 
the floors. From these floors it 
is next to impossible to remove 
these black marks. When fewer 
people are about fewer feet are 
trod on the terrain. In late sum- 
mer, the latter part of August 
for example, there are very few 
people around a college campus. 
This is usually considered to be 
a good time for road surface im- 
provements. 

We received a letter last week a 
very pertinent question. The condi- 
tions that prompted it were a two 
hour meditation on the Hamp-Am- 
herst road culminating in a late Sat- 
urday night or early Sunday morning 
hike, and a disappointing date at 
Smith. The question is this: would 
you consider it an unchivalrous act 
to send a Smith girl a lemon? Being 
unskilled in affairs of Smith wom- 
en, and the significance of a lemon to 
them, we pass the question on to you. 

Recently the Carnegie Collec- 
tion of classical reco.ds was mov- 
ed from the library to the Senate 
room in the Mem lluilding. The 
question arose as to who should 
assume the responsibility for the 
collection during the time when 
groups like the Senate held their 
meetings, i ne janitor did not wish 
to be responsible for it. Finally 
the professor in charge of the 
records and phonograph volun- 
teered the suggestion that the col- 
lection was quite safe for "none 
of me music here would interest 
the senate." We dare say the sen- 
ators are good men and can be 
trusted with the classics. Laugh 
now. 



At the annual class election last 
Tui -day, the senior cla.-s elected the 
following officers: President, Kugen 
P. Gieringer of the Hotel Manage- 
ment group; \ ice-President, Jack Ful- 
ler of the Wild Lafe group; Treasurer, 

I Charles Aiandell of the Horticulture 
group; and Helen Ksselen, a Floii- 
CUlture major, in the Student Coun- 

Icil, Dick Sparks and Steve Morse. 

J both of A. T. w., were elected. 

The Student Council this year is 
comprised of President, Norman Hub- 
bard, of A. T. C; Vice-President, 
Roland Aldrich; Secretary, Mary Hem- 
hen, who is also President of Tri-Sig 
Sorority; Proctor Houle, president of; 
A. T. (i. and Captain of the football 
team; Hod Abbott, president of K. K.; 
Kugen K. Gieringer, President of the 
Senior Class; William Cunningham, 
President of the breshman Class; and 
two freshman representatives, Sam 
Howard and Ray liartlett. In a week 
or two these Council members will 
appear on campus with Council hats 
— not for sartorial display, but to en- 
able members of the school to more 
easily identify their Student Council 
representatives. 

This hat business brings to my mint: 
a very serious problem on our campus 
— freshmen hats; in every college, 1 
the lowly Stockbridge school freshman 
is exposed to some form of discipline, 
acute or mild, as it is here in Stock- 
bridge. However, the reason for the 
hats, Mr. Freshman, is not one of 
punishment for being a freshman, but 
one of identification; the seniors 
would like to see who you are in 
order to make your acquaintance as 
fellow students. Remember, they had 

I to wear one last year, too; therefore 
at last week's Council meeting, action 
was taken to insure the fact that 
freshmen would wear their hats. There 

lis absolutely no reason for disobedi- 

lence to this tradition. 

Hotel Management News 
Ralph Hitz will play host to the 
Hotel group this week. On Wednes- 
day, the group will entrain for New 
York City and the Helmont Plaza 
Hotel. From this center they will at- 
tend the Annual Hotelmen's Show for 
the duration of the week. 

Horticulture Club 
The Stockbridge Horticulture Club 
held its lirst meeting on the evening 
of October 20 in Wilder Hall with 



Ralph A. Van Meter, the gut 
er, explained the subject 
ground Horticulture." Ret, 
were served ami the freshn 
introduced to the seniors, 
meeting will be he... Noven . 

A. T. G. 

The annual Hallowe'en .^ 
week-end dance will be held 
A. T. (J. house Saturday nigh 
alumni are expected to return f or ,l 
event. Dancing will be from S::j(j t nj 
11:30 with refreshments bein^ se n >ri 
The house will be open to all Sto* 
bridge students until ten 
arc cordially invited. 

The Dance Committee is as I '., 
Arthur Berry, general cha 
John Eadie, refreshments; "Chud" 
Woodfall, chaperons; Richard "Hun- 
cane" Corfield, decorations, and Em 
Taylor, music. 

Edward Tredwell and Howard Dn. 
idsoii, two alumni, were guests Ma 
day night. Mr. Tredwell is ,-,- 
at the Ellis Orchards in ,j 
Mass., while Mr. Davidson is 
horses, besides his dairy work. AL 
fred Kyle, S. S. A. '21, superinti 

■rnpanr 



tit; 



1 of the Plymouth Rock In 



Casper J. Perednia presiding. Dr. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursdny, October 27 

r'siculty Ti'ii 
Friday. October 2* 

EntefaeholMtte judging "">' 

Soccer Amhi'i'st here 

Stasia Beta Chi Dane* 

President's Reception 

M.^tiiik' Future FarmeM of Ami-nm 
Saturday, October 29 

Football Amherst there 

Fraternity Dance* 

tnteracholastlc Judging Day 
Tuendav. November 1 

Croat Country Connecticut Valley m 
Amherst 

Fine Arts Council 

Outind Club Meeting 
Wedncuday, November 2 

Party President's House 

frOO p. m. Meeting Engineering Student! 
Stockbridge Hull 
Thursday, November 3 

l:Hii p, m. Karulty Minting 

Rehearsal! for Dad's Day Bowker 

YoUftg Faculty Group -Storkbri'k" 
Houhc 



Chem Club 

The Chemistry Club will present for 
its speaker on Thursday night, Oct. 
27 from 7-S p. m. Herbert E. Tolman 
of the Hberloid division of the Mon- 
santo Chemical Corporation. The 
meeting Will be held in Coessmann 
auditorium. 

F. S. J. S. 

Will the clever person in the Quar- 
terly Competition who signs him or 
or herself P. S. J. S. please reveal 
true identity 'o the editor at earliest 
opportunity '.' 

Wesley Foundation 

Rev. Farnsworth of Westfield will 
speak on "Religious Pioneering" Sun- 
day evening. The Wesley Foundation 
invites all interested. 
lltg staff to make a definite state 

Pre- Med Club 

The Pre-Med Club will meet next 
Tuesday night, November 1, at 7 p. m. 
in the Chapel seminar room. The 
speaker will be Dr. R. Nelson Hatt. 
well known orthopedic surgeon, of 
Springfield. 



of North Arlington, was also ., 
pus during the past week. 

Kolony Klub will hold its Ha- 
lowe'en Dance Saturday Bight. 

Sports 
Stockbridge played Green Mountas 

Junior College of Poultney, Wri: ■ 
here Friday. Although Stockl 
lo t 6-0, we managed by skinful plav- 
ing, to throw a few scares into tsj 
Green Mountain boys by the tr- 
thrusts, end sweeps, ami hriliiar.: 
passing of Turnbull to Mamlfll. Cap. 
tain Proc Houle, Mandell, John- n. 
and Sparks were the heroes of ,«. 
standing line plays and their perfec- 
tion. MacDonald's kicking kept the 
Green Mountain team out of territory 
all afternoon. Congratulations, team. 
on your splendid playing . 

It is the desire of this column 
that each and every fn.-hnian f 
Stockbridge will find time to visit 
Charlie Ladd at the Dickinson Hia- 
tal in Northampton. 

* * 

Norman Hubbard '39, has linen ap- 
pointed Ring Committee chairman. 

* * 

It seems that gallantry is not lack- 
ing at Stockbridge; a chivalrous mem- 
ber of the dairy group ran to i--' 

a charming coed who had becoB 

tangled in the tar in front 
chapel. 

Why are the seniors walking ai 
in pairs? — Especially when near W 
pond — could it be the :i to 1 rtl 

Our freshman reporters, Ri 
Whidden and Charles McCred, 
serve praise for their "nose foi 
If you have important news, He ■" 
of them. 



CALDWELL KNOCKS 

Continued from Page f 



of himself?" by reviewing ihe Drft' 
and French foreign policy when Jap*"- 
I invaded Manchuria, when Italy g 1 ' 
Ibled Ethiopia, when Italy and Ger- 
many used Spain as a proving KWj 
when Austria went Nazi, and wh« 
Jajan renewed her war in Chin*-* 
listed four aims of the BritisB <> 
I servative Party, now in power. •« 
Shas caused it to retreat before t 
demands of the "have-not" na tloB 
in the face of internal opD*«W* 



(iadzooks, Hawkins, fill me my pen! I've a whimsy «<> » ,M) 
the MUSE tonight! 

The COLLEGIAN QUARTERLY again, sir? 

Right you are, Hawkins. And Wilberforce had better jret 
on the proverbial ball. MSS. are soon due! 



193 8 COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION 
PLANS OUTSTANDI NG AM HERST PROGRAMS 

. or Symphonetta, Conducted by Fiedler, is One Attraction 
of Concerts— -Subscriptions Taken 
Only During Next Week 



FROSH NOMINATE 



The frc-hman class will elect a 
nominating committee at their 
special eon vacation Thursday, this 

nominating committee will pick 
Candidates for an elect inn to be 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE DRAMA HUNG 
IN WILDER SHOW ORIENTAL DIFFERENCE 



Actors, Costumes, Stage Settings, Show Contrast t<> Those 
Occident in simplicity, Conventionality Masks 
•\ iv Works off a .» 



ol 



~ ** UeaeNeWS 



w 










v 



^m 




^ 




r-r- 

einor, Notre 
• roe'j 1937 All- 
* racMe, dem- 
$ the growling, 
ing force he u$ei 
..ish opponents. 




Senior Ducked lor Knocking Duckings 

When SenU Barbers State College sophomores resorted too frequently to ducking 
Freshmen in the campus pool, Senior DeWitt Trewhitt tried to stop them. Result: 
Trewhitt went the wey of all froth I CiMismi d.»cm «*mo by n.ii, v 






V. .. 



rimtf&it^i 



4 




%,* 





She's Breaking the Skeleton's Jinx 

Just to make sure she'll .not be frightened when Hallowe'en rolls around nest 
week, Jane Long, University of Dayton junior, it getting personally acquainted 
with the six-foot, six-inch skeleton in the anatomy laboratory. 

( ollrfi«iv Digcti Photo or Krm 



r Hall thi week 

and untie 
peal to many, 
re intere teii at 



typn il .••■ 

at lire i" the ex- 
Ft'l'eilce to an . 
cidental Dran i. 
• all the actors 
all wear masks 
nance . iml toe 
i K . and c i 
\ stereo! j ped, 
articular moan 
ing should he 

ivs, for it con- 
upon which i t 
tree; and the 
lose It • w highly 
s thai some of 
with; there not 
on the stajfe at 
isk.-^ L'ivi- all the 
reality, but the 
veritable works 
■>eht ■ a certain 
ne is finished ho 
loesn't even Ho- 
st [fiance; they 

art of the COS« 

st thing i about 
■ incongruity of 
n;' hands corn- 
j '>l the ma ks 

id th«' strain. 1 ' 1 , 
hese hands p«»r- 
iM' perhaps the 
< about the pie 
lUsnes of their 
lip i ' o n.-t liiny 
itand. It is rath- 
icture aren't in 
t he robes v\ ould 
it i- one cannot 
esijrninr and al- 

llice. 

It. II. 

<; trip 

rip to \i'H York 

intere t, which 

rical production, 

us been planned 

i oinmissioTi of 

Hon. The trip is 

the college who 

II e will lie $6.00 

it meals. Appli- 
e to .1. P. Wil 
i tor of the col 
lay, November 'A. 

ve Amherst from 

at 7:00 a. m 

will fie made at 

i|it i t i'h ii re h, 

ling Car I'ortei 
Finance. Also In 
telng trip to the 

front. Staler, I 
t ions of the slum 
Henry Street Set- 

nickerbocker v,i 
Riverside Ih uch, 
olumbia Unfvei i 

p. The par' 'ill 

. l:oi) p. m. ami 
round I I ;00 p. m. 

S 

om Page I 

it have hi picture 
* imperative that 
bulletin boards in 
lim r . Stockhridge 
and i oroi itie to 
ii appointment . 



5 



THK MASSACHTKETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1938 




/Ifrassaclwseltf* Collegian 



BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BART 



STOCKBRIDGE 



Thi3 modern age of bicycles has 
ited a gerioua problem. A short 

time ago pnxy suggested that bi- 
cycle operators refrain from u>ii«ii 



Official newspaper of the Mil 



At the annual ri,, ■ i eel 11 last Ralph A. Van Meter, 

rucsday, the senior class elecl er, explained Li •* - subject 

following officers; "resident, Eugen ground Hortii , ire," K 

the town sidewalks as thoroughfares. ''■ Gieringer of the Hotel Manage- wer< served and 

The question thai arises now is are nnent group; Vice-President, Jack Ful- introduced tn trw» . ■ , 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, nil RSI) AY, OCTOBER 27. 11 



193 8 COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION 
PLANS OUTSTANDING AMHERST PROGRAMS 

mphonetta, Conducted by Fiedler, is one Attraction 
of Concerts Subscriptions Taken 
Only During Next Week 



FKOSII \0\II\ \TK 



The fresh nan elaas will elect a 
nominating committee at their 
special convocation rhursday. I lu> 

nominating cum mi t tec will pick 

candidates for an election lu h»- 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE DRAMA HUNG 
IN WILDER SHOW ORIENTAL DIFFERENCE 



Actors, Costumes, Stage Settings, Show Contrast to ' 
Occident in Simplicity, Conventionality Mask 



IloSC <M 






Offices i.'.". 



AKI'Mll: A. MiY 



JOHN E. I II.IOS 
UKI'I IN \ HALL 
MARY J. MKK1I 

fr \ncks s. mi:: 
JOSEPH BART '« 
NANCY K. I.I i I- 
JACQUELINE L. 
LOKETTA KKNN 
KENNETH Mow I 
WILLIAM T. <;<>■ 
RABOLD loitltK: 
CHESTEB Kl'KAi 

JOHN II \YKS '41 

feature 

LLOYD li. COPE! 

MYRON I ISM Kit 
K \ IIII.KKN HI. 
EVERETT I! SP1 



ABRAHAM t.'AKI 



E. EUCENE HK> 
kcx.KK II. LINE 
JOSEPH R. (iORI 
WALTER K. LAI 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Make all ordei 

m'M. ( (illtman. I 
sub.srribi'r will p 
a^**r as mhih as 
Hat.- and faculty 
cncouiiiKwi. AltJ 
miiHt bi> iir.ivi'il 
9 o'clock. Miuiilu. 



Entered as tecoi 
heist I'oxt Offiec 
special rate of i<> 

1103, Art of Oct 
20, 1018. 

PriuU'd by Carpi' 
AmherHt, { 



ALUMM 
SUPPORT « 

short time a 
and its activi 

The only 
and class reu 
free from tin 
interest wliic 

One of* 1 
jilumni inter* 
interest evicU 
colleges. We 
will Wring: alu 
teres! and en 
Weekend play 
is no attempt 
them <>nt ant 
of the college 

A plan t 
already undei 
stage of devei 
of time for e< 
body is willin 
on our part, a 
undergrads ai 

Whether 
for a get-tog* 
great possibil 
football game, 
cause for rej< 
quently adopt 
body, they wo 
sachusetts St; 

Here indc 
support of th 
in the way C 
teaching staff 
a powerful in; 
strong as we i 
cannot see an 
splendid work 
it takes an a! 
women work it 

Whether 

to be seen. It 

limited, but it 
To this 

guests. It is C 
on them, for t 
or lose. 



f-r 



( 



\4 






**> 



~- . 



% 






fife 



* i.\ 



A New 
Science 

,n 9en.ous tests o 



ma n Enoi 



Freshmen Play Horse In Clean-Up Campaign 

Red-and-yellow capped freshmen are horsepower for garbage trucks and man-power 
for pick-up work when Oberlin College upperclassmen direct the annual campus clean- 
up crusade. Freight office baggage trucks are the chief conveyances. 



'ermine th 



Mute of 



3'neering 



$ to see 

P« r cent have K»«"l Y' W V U «'ready 
«<Wt themselves. b * en he, Ped to betted 







\ 



'** •. 



.4 



.'. .* 



'hi* subject takes tk * 




*&zx& *>" ZTzl ' ' 

■■■'>\-'.i^^t^^^^^^^_^ v ° lo determine t 



ff 



Kitchen Chores lor Grid Star 

Bill DeCorrevant, sensational Chicago high school football star and no* 
a Northwestern University freshman, finds time when not attending classes 
or playing frosh football to work in the kitchen of the Sigma Ch, house tot 
his meals 







» HI 











Fall business for col- 
legians is rushing — 
their chief business pur- 
pose being to fulfill 
pledge quotas from the 
ranks of the thousands 
of newly matriculated 
freshmen. With smile* 
and good sales talks 
Kappa Alpha's sales- 
men at Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity are here putting 
their best fronts and 
facts before prospective 
pledges. 

Collegiate Digest Photoi by Irwin 




HERE'S NO POINT IN UmNG/f^f^^/ftpgp/ 



COCKER SPANIEL 

[Spain ell family dates back ro 1386. Cocker is 
nallest of family. A very popular pure-bred dog 
l S. Standard colors range from solid blacks, 
ImJs. to shades of cream; liver red and combina- 
tions. Wrsatile, can be trained into retriever. Great 
aver of human family 




HE'S GIVING HIS 
NERVES A REST 



...AND SO IS HE 



TAVE you noticed how a dog, in the 
midst of play, suddenly Hops and 
\tus? His nerve system— as complicated 
|nd high-strung as our own— has signalled 
[hat it's time to relax! Man, unfortunately, 
less sensitive to the warnings of his 
Mrves. 1 hough nerves may need a restful 
me, we are inclined to press on in our 
ibtorbing risks— relentlessly — forgetful of 
nounting nerve strain. When we find our- 
elves tense, irritable, upset, we may not 



even realize why. Don't let tension tie vour 
nerves in a knot. Make it your pleasant 
rule to break nerve tension often through 
the day-TO LKT UP-LIGHT UP A 
CAMKL! Feel how gratefully nerves wel- 
come the mellow intermission that your 
nearby package of Camels suggests. And 
not only do smokers find Camel's costlier 
tobaccos southing to the nerves— but mild- 
er, too— ripe-rich in flavor— completely en- 
joyable from every angle! 



WSH1P pilot. Captain Walter J. Hunter of 

Intend; 

sa-, -, • '-' 

■ad •• 

t*sts 1 |, 
Dthing r. t 



mes, speaks for his profession when 
[ged nerves and flying don't mix. I 
tension by giving my nerves regular 
and light up a Camel. I find Camels 
e nerves.'' 



Pic you know: 



inown i 
IVE 



PIE C A i 
L'» • t»., 

>»C.S 



— that the grower of tobacco 
also cures it in many cases, 
in barns equipped to apply 
heat without smoke I That 
the planter works day and 
night until the curing proc- 

i^JjL ess ' s completed ? Selection 
;T»Cj of Camel's tobaccos requires 
.^ jjtj j the services of men familiar 
i~mf' with every phase of grow- 
ing, curing, and aging 
choice tobacco. It is well 
tobacco trade that Camel cigarettes 
«j blend of finer, MORE EXPE.N- 
H COS— Turkish and Domestic. 




*•"«''«•'• «re«» comic perion- 

mu«ie. and „»!. Each Monday 

'"hi. Network. 7:30 p ra E.S. T., 

« P m M. S. T.. 7:30 p ■ P. S. T. 



F# 





'illions of people who live happily 
LET UP_ LIGHT UP A CAMEL 



"RUSH ASSIGNMENTS. 

deadlines, phone calls would 
vs reck my nerves," savs New 
^'ork newspaper woman 
Kstellc Karon, "if I didn't 
pause frequently. I let up 
often — light up a Camel. 
t .nnels soothe mv nerves I 
work better get more fun." 



BENNY GOODMAN — King of Swing, and 
the world'a grcatcat awing band — each I ueaday 
evening— Columbia Network. 9:30 pm K. S. T., 
8:30 pa C.S.T.,7:30 pm M.S.T..&30 paa P.8.T. 



LIGHT UP A CAMEL! 



Tnhmt-io ' ti 



t llaii 
a n 1 1 1 : 

peal 

re mi i 



typii al «c»'i ■ 

i 

11 ure In 1 1 • 

1 1 i I'licc In an . 

: i d t • n t a I I » i ; 1 1 1 a . 
■ ill tin- sctofs 
all wear masks 
naiii'i- . mil the 
i i ij 

> tereotyped, 

art H iilac nn<aii 
Inn hould be 
r*'.--, Imi' it roil- 
upon which in 
\ ree ; and t he 
in -!• few highly 
g that some of 
wiili; t here not 
nil the stage at 
i ik kiu' all i he 
reality, l»ui the 
\ iTii able work 
■seiil a certain 

in ,,| ,, 

loe n'l even Ho- 
st glance; they 
art of the C08- 

t thing about 

■ Incongruit : 
ne hand 

\ of the masks 
i<l t he -i range, 

in . -•■ Ii.iihI | n i r 
il'c |M'ilia |i t lie 
: al it Hi I thf i iii" 

mi. an' nf theii 
iip i ..iiinct h 
itand. It i rath 
irtnii' aren't in 

t in- i obe w unlit 

i i i nne ca 
i li'iiiiic and al- 

t PHI 

B. II. 
3 TRIP 

rip to New York 

mt i 1 1 I , which 

rical production, 
i been planned 

coin in i H ill of 

tion. The trip Si 
thf college who 

n c will be ••..on 
•t meal A pph 

I to .) P. Wll 

etor of tl ol 

lay. N'ovi'iiihi > 

wt A n i in 'i t from 

at 7:00 a. in 

will be made at 
ipt i t c h ii r c h, 

ihiK < ';ir I'ortci" 
rmance. Also in- 

•••ini' trip to the 
front , St ati'ii I 
t ion-, of thi' linn 

Henry Streel 3* I 

nickei bot k*r t il 
Riverside Ih 11 ch, 

ohinihia 1'fiiv'i i 

p. The pai' 

, 4:00 |i. in. and 

round 1 1 :00 p. nti 



'jm Page I 



,i 



liiilh't iii li 
tinr. Stoi I bl '!;■• 
and ororit ies to 
ii appointment. 



S 



Smokers find Camel's Costlier Tobaccos are SOOTHING TO THE NERVES 



A13JVS oaD 






THE \1\>»\("III SETTS COLLEGIAN, I HI RSDAY, OCTOHKW 27, 1938 




/HbassacbuselW Collegian 



BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BABT 



STOCKBRIDGE 



.[ bic 
iblem. 



A 



[liliri.il II 



.f tile Ml 



class election last Ralph A. Van Meter, the g\ 

,;,,„. agg p | ,, thai hi Tuesday, the senior class elected the er, explained the Bubject i 

cycle ,, from using following officers: President, Ku ound Horticulture 

the town dewa ■ thoroughfares. ''■ < "' 1 ''' li "' ll " 1 '' 1 Ma] ' served and th 

The question that arisen now is aw ment group; Vice-President. Jack Pnl intmri I .. i 



K« 



IHK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, PHI RSDAY, OCTOBER 27. I 1 



193 8 COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION 
PLANS OUTSTANDI NG AM HERST PROGRAMS 

Symphonetta, Conducted by Fiedler, is One Attraction 
of Concerts -Subscriptions Taken 
Only During Next Week 



FKOSI1 NOMINATE 



The freahman claaa will elecl a 
iioinin.it in^ committee at then 
special convocation rhursday, This 
nominating committee will pick 
candidates for an election lo he 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE DRAMA HUNG 
IN WILDER SHOW ORIENTAL DIFFERENCE 

Utors, Costumes, Stage Settings, Show Contrast to Those of 
Occident in Simplicity, Conventionality Ma 
Are Works of \ H 



Ottii • : Roon 



AH I III I: \. Ni>N 









Campus 

J i ) 1 1 n i ; i ■ 1 1 , 1 < 
BET! IN A HAL 
M \i;v T. mk I 
FRANCES S. 
JOSEPH BAR 
NAM V I- 
JACQUEI. 
LORET1 \ 
KENNETH IH> 
WILLIAM T. ' 
HAROLD FORI 
CHESTER Kl I 
JOHN II VYES 



I.I 
N E 

Kl:: 



)S 

t, 
:h 

IE 

1 I 
L. 
IN 
Wl 

,ii 

!■:: 
IAI 
Ml 



Feature 

LLOYD n COPE! 
HYSON FISHER 
KATHLEEN TUL 
EVERETT I! Sl*i 



AHI! All \M ( AKI 



B. EUCENE HK> 
KOCER II. I. INI 
JOSEPH R. i, in;: 
w VLTER R. LAI 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 



Make all orde 
setts Collegian, 
ttsbeerlber will p 
Bger bi -.ihiii as 

iiiilc anil f.u'iilt; 
chrourn^rcj. An j 
must In. received 
'.i o'clock. Honda; 



Entered ns aeeo 
heist Port Ofltci 
special rate uf iki 

L108, Art of on, 
20, 1918, 

Printed l» Carpi 

Amherst, I 



ALUMNI 
SUPPORT 

short time a 
and its activi 

The only 

and class reu 
free from tlu 
interest whic 

One of 
alumni inter* 
interest evidt 
colleges. We 
will bring ak 
terest and er 
Weekend plaj 
is no attemp 
them out an< 
of the college 

A plan t 
already unde 
stage of deve 
of time for ct 
body is willin 
on our part. ; 
undergrads a 

Whether 
for a get-tog 
great possibil 
football game 
cause for rej 
quently adopt 
body, they wo 
sachusetts st: 

1 [ere indH 
.support of th 
in the way t 
teaching stall 
a powerful in 
st roup- as we 

t annot see an 

splendid woiii 
it takes an a 
women workii 
Whether 

to be seen. It 

limited, but it 

To this 
guests. It is < 
on them, for t 

or lose. 





Speed and Accuracy 

. . . are needed in the usher corps when crowds 
of more than 50,000 must be seated in less than 
a hall hour. Many universities use Boy Scouts 
for the job 



.' 



The Crowd Eats 

while the players rest 
between halves. Fighting 
the crowd develops spec- 
tators appetites, too. 





tl (IIMI 



Free Lunches and Lots of Service 

... are provided the sports writers who "cover" the games. 
They're usually seated in heated press boxes, too, never far from 
the 50-yard line. 



After the Final Whistle 

. . . the team's seamster begins to repair the damage done 
during the game. It's an endless job while the season 
lasts 



Harvard's coach has developed this mirror system to give 
players an idea of their own technique in action and to enable 
them to correct errors. 





Clean-up Squad Works Overtime 

... to collect all the rubbish left in the stands, thereby providing a lot of 
part-time work for many needy students. Rubbish is bailed and hauled 
away 



1 appeal 






lM> .11'' Hltl 

t. Tl i i 


rc> t< 




ipatii •■-(• hi 

t nu', tj pi< 

;n '1 




"- 


K feal in i 


o th. 




1' lIlili'li-IM 


■ in , 


ui . 


»f i'1'i'nlciil; 


1 Hi: 


n li, 


itage all t 


ic at 




el, ail We 


If Ml 




mask . 


and 


i i 


letch 1, 


reotj 


pcd. 


a partii'til 


ar ni 




set t ill J.' 


in uii! 


he 


lift lire.-,, |'i 


i h 


'OH 


up Uptili 


whic] 




pine tree; 


and 


the 


e those f. 


W hi) 




iiiiii'- that 


:-» • > 1 1 H 


of 


i\vii with; 


here 


not 


WO (III th'- 


-lac 


! at 


• ma ki r i 


W all 


i he 


illii'calil\ 


hill 


the 


arc venial 
cplc-chl 

•h one i; li 


lie w ( 

a ccr 

HI lie 


• i k 
tain 

1 so 


ic doe n't 


even 


iKi- 


til 1 t' lance; t 




tl pail of 


the 


i "( i 


iitfc- ( thin 


B 


lull! 


. t he ilicoh 


_• I nit ; 


of 


culme hand c 


.ni 


icai'j of '1 


I c 1 : 1 ,' 




, and the 


i ra 


. 


li these hi 


ml 


m >r 


are per 


lap 


* i H f 


injj ahuiii 


the 


pic 


•C_i nil !.i 


of I 


K'll 


( 1 1 : - 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 

lei land 1 


imetl 


itli 


e pi< ture 


a icii' 


1 in 


a ,t i 




iiiui 


c (Ic ijMllhJ 


! and 


al- 


CcaiM c. 








15 


ii 


WE TRI1 


> 




y I rip ti( N* 


cw V 


oik 


<(f i 1 1 1 • 1 1 


1. W] 


nh 


tatrical pr 


»Iiii t 


on, 


ha been 


planned 


ion < (iiiiini 


: ion 


of 


'ration. Th 


' lnl 


( i 


>iii the coll 


( ;■( .. 


sin. 


,p('ll c will 


!., | 


i.OO 


ccpl mi a 1 


M> 


pli- 


iai|e til .1. 


P. VVil 


iriitor of 


the 


<(l 


i day, Novembe 


■ "■. 


cave Anihe 


1 1 fl 


din 


,11 at 7:<m 


> a 


li' 


i will be 


made 


at 


Bapti t C 


h D r 


' h. 


epinsr Car 


1'i.rt. 


i - . 


formam e. 


Also 


m 


tnceinK tri| 


i td 


the 


front , St 


i ten 


I 


iill'tidllS <(f 




nm 


" Henry St 




( t 


Knickci Iiik 


( 

ft c ' 


v 1 1 


i. Riverside 


•h 11 


i h, 


Columbia 1 






rip. The pi 


1 1 




tl 1:00 p. 


in. | 




around i 1 i 


0*i p, 


m. 


KS 






from Page 


1 











not i . .. hi 


pict 


'ire 


i n perat 


i\e t 


I ial 


t bulletin h 

hliri" 


1 1 a t . 1 




and ore 






his app .it 







55 



I fTH 



THE WASSACHl'SETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1938 




/^^a86acbu8e1!^ , Collegian 



BA R T E R I N G 
Willi JOE BART 



STOCKBRIDGE 



i 01 uroblen \ '^ ! t '' t " a ' inU; «' class electiu 

time ago pn xy bi ! l " ,la >' 

cycle operators n i from using following ; '- • 

the town sidewalks as thoroughfares. ''■ Gieringer of the Hotel Manai 



ast Ralph A. Van Meti 
■ r. explained the sub 



[HE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I'lliicsnw OCTOBER 27. M 



193 S COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION 
PLANS OUTSTANDI NG AM HERST PROGRAMS 

;vmphonetta, Conducted by Fiedler, is One Attraction 
of Concerts Subscriptions Taken 
Only During Next Week 



FKOSII NOMINATE 



oin 



The freshman class will elect ,i 
nominating committee at their 
special convocation Thursday, This 
nominating committee Mill pick 
candidate* for an election t«> be 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE DRAMA HUNG 
IN WILDER SHOW ORIENTAL DIFFERENCE 

Actors, Costumes, Stage Settings, Show Contrast t«> Those of 

Occident in Simplicity, Conventionality Masks 

Are Works of Art 



Office: Row 



AH 1 III K A. NOV 






( 



a m (lit" 



JOHN i: I II in. - 
1SKTI IN \ HALL 
MARY I MKKH 
FR VNCES S ME 
JOSEPH BART i 
N \N'< Y B. II ( I- 
JACQ1 K.I. P. I I. 
LOKETTA KENN 
KENNETH limvi 
WILLIAM T. «.<) 

II MMM.Ii FORREi 
CHESTER Kl R \i 

JOHN II \YK.S II 

Feature 

LLOYD B. ( 0PBI 
MYRON FISHER 
KATHLEEN TUL 
EVERETT R. SI- 1 



aim: \h \m CARl 



E. EUCENE i;k~- 
ROWER II LINI 
JOSEPH K IJORl 

^ \Li Kl; i;. LAI 

SUBSCRIPT H)NS 



Make all Ditle 
setts t nllt'Kian. 

icriber will p 
airer as h«hi us 
iiuti- and facult; 
encouraged, Anj 
must be received 
U o'clock, Mmiila 



Entered ns seco 
hirst 1'nst Ollict 
special rali' of t«i 

1103. Art <«f Oct. 
20. 1918, 

Printed by Carpi 
Amherst, ! 



ALUMNI 
SUPPORT 

short time a 
and its activi 

The only 
and class reu 
free from tin 
interest whit 

One of 
alumni inter* 
interest evidi 
colleges. We 
will bring ah 
terest and »'i 
Weekend plaj 
is no attemp 
tli em out ari( 
of tin 1 collegt 

A plan t 
already uncle. 
stage of deve 
of time for c< 
body is willin 
<:n our part, ; 
undergrads a 

Whether 
for a get-tog 
great possibil 
football game 
canst' for rej 
quently adopl 
body, they wo 
sachusetts Sto 

I lere ind« 
support of t\: 
in the way i 
teaching staff 
a powerful in 
strong as we 
< an not see an 
splendid work 
it takes an a 
v omen workii 

Whether 
to be seen. It 
limited, but it 

To this 
guests. It is t 
on them, for i 
or lose. 



PICTURES TELL THE 



h' ^ 




Yes, pictures do tell the story — thousands of pictures for hundreds 
of stories — when the staffs of college and university yearbooks set 
out to permanently record the work of their faculty and student col- 
leagues for the year. From the latest editions of outstanding year- 
books, Collegiate Digest here features outstanding photos of na- 
tional interest because of their excellence of story or technique. 




f 



Between Classes — On Any Campus 

From Ohio University's Athena, top-notch picture yearbook, comes 
this scene so typical of so many U. S. college campuses. 



Swing and Sway 

The swingy slides of the trombone 
were combined with the swaying 
movements of the dancers to pro- 
vide this introduction to the social 
life section of the Metate of Po- 
mona College. Photo by Midori 



* - 





Artful Photo of Art Building 

One of the most unusual buildings on a U. S. college campus is the new University of Oregon Art 
building. One of the most unusual of yearbook photos is this picture from Oregon's Oregana. 

Copyright 



■5jfea3rA **w 



»«»»teo» 7> Tl y *t WZlF* of 9tu a 



4»' 




V 




Close Call! 

Gene Blackwell, Alabama end, lunges to 
evade a threatening University of South- 
ern California halfback and grab an end- 
zone pass to add to the Crimson Tide's 19 
to 7 victory score. 



*r) t 




'A erica's Ideal College Girl 



// 



CARBURETOR 

I) S Pu Nu I.M'.IO* 

KAYW00DIE 





Ifbcu4 ymu eye 

on that \jvwu/teiot 

Sec that little metal inlet > It'i called a 
< ,v burefoi became it leta a tiny geyser of 
air come into the bowl, »o the harder you 
pufT away at your pipe, the more air come* 
in. Thu keeps it cool all the time. The 
tobacco burns more evenly, you get a 
tweeter, drier smoke. Add a Carburetor 
Kaywoodic to your collection. 

Shape pictured Nn 19 (Slim Billiard 
KAYWOODIf COMPANY 

Rocktfethr Center, nfw vo*k and LONDON 



I 




CHUBBINS. I CAN SCARCELY 
BELIEVE MY EYES, BUT THIS 

LOOKS LIKE PROFESSOR WILSEV 

FROM HOME 



IT 15 THE PROFESSOR, 
DADDY-AND THAT'S LADDIE 
WITH HIM! WHAT DO YOU 
SUPPOSE THEY'RE DOING 
DOWN HERE ? 





WHY I'M JUST VISITING AN OLD 
NEIGHBOR, JUDGE. IMAGINE 
MEETING YOU HERE ! I jm\ 



AND IMAGINE OLD 
ADDIE BEING ALONG 
TOO 



WELL, CHUBBINS, IF WE K " T ; 
THE PROFESSOR IN ALASKA, i 
l BET HE'D HAVE HIS PlPF \ 

IN HIS MOUTH AND LADDIF 

Rv HIS SIDE 



VOU MUST ADMIT 
JUDGE, THAT A DOG 

AND A PIPE ARI 
TWO MIGHTY GOOD 
r- COMPANIONS 

La 



ESPECIALLY WHEN THE PIPE IS 

FILLED WITH A MILD, FRIENDLY 

TOBACCO-EH, PROFESSOR 7 




I KNOW WHA T YOU MEAN 
JUDGE - PRINCE ALBERT 
AND YOU I AN B4 SURE THA 
IT'S THE ONLY TOBACCO 

TOR Ml TOO! r 



' *« the t 
*c«nt N| ey , 



given to Mary Grabhorn of Blue Ridge College in 
^ City competition among 1,000 co-eds 




PRINCE ALBERT! THERE'S NOTHING 
LIKE IT FOR FRAGRANCE, MELLOW- 
NESS, RICH TASTE, AND ALL- 
AROUND PIPE-JOY 



SMOKE ?0 FRAGRANT PIPE F III S of Prince Albert. If 
you don't find it the mellowest, tastiest pipe to- 
hurro you ever smoked, return the pocket tin 
with the rest of the tobacco in it to us at any 
time within a month from this date, and we will 
refund full purchase price, plus postage- 

t Siqntd ) R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, 
Winston-Salem. North Carolina 

CoarHaM, ism H. J KrrnnM" Tsbarrn O 



Prince Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



50 



pipefuli of fragrant tobacco in 
•very 2-or tin of Prince Albert 



Vlld. r II | 




>ual and i 




(1 appeal lu n 




Ihi art, 1 i n 1 1 1 1 1 1 
rt. II is collect 


if 


spam i" i ' t ■ - s 1 1 1 .* i 

itii • | il -i- 
actoi 


i 


IK ii-a! ure in the 


i'x- 


•r ili ili'i i n<*e in ,- 


in. 


• I" oecidental Dn 


ma. 


plage all the ac 


tors 


ei .ill wear m. 




rformanet' . iml 


■ 


, masks, and 




.ili'ti'U -i ercot \ 


l".l. 


; a pari ifular mt 


•an- 


Betting -In mi I* 1 


li.. 


pictures, foi it 


■n!l- 


Irop upon whit 1 


i i -; 


pilte t iii- ; ami 


the 


re those few highly 


tiling thai .hiiiiu 


■ uf 


own with; there 


not 


two nil the .^tan 


■ at 


i- ma k i-i si' all 


the 


f unreality, l>ut 


th.- 


aii' veritable \s< 


ii. 


represent u cer 


tain 


nil one i- iiiii -hi'i 


l ao 


me doesn't even 


lln- 


■i first glance; i 


hey 


■;tl pari of il"- 


Jos- 


ali)_'i , 1 1 h : n;' a 1 


tout 


S till' illi-uli;- Mill; 


III' 


isculine hands <■ 


mi- 


lieacj "1 ' In' in: 




-, and the strange, 


cli these handi i 


ll 'i 


es aii- perhaps 


thr 


lint' about the 


in 


Tgeou t f t 


iml 


anship i lomet I 


iniC 


iiiii i and. It is ri 


ith 


it- (in I in "■ a i in' 


in 


\ ill i In 1 robes wi 


iiild 


i a - ill-' 'Hi' rai 


not 


1 r ili' ic n I iij" a ml 


al- 


deganee. 




B. 


II. 


'ICE TRIP 




\y t rip In NVw V 


• i k 


s iif interest, \%l 


icli 


leatrical product 


nil, 


i, ha been planned 


tiuii com mi ion 


.,r 


ieration. Tin- trij 


1 


•iiiii the college \ 


irho 


•x pin e will In- :*( 


,00 


jtcept meals. Ap 


pli- 


made in .1. P. \V'ii 


director <if tin* < 


sol 


Ui day, Novembe 


■ '■',. 


leave Amherst fi 


nlll 


all at 7:00 ,,. 


III. 


■ I* will be made 


at 


Baptist Ch n r 


i h, 


he piii i' Car I'urti 


i 


rformance, Al n 


in 


; it eelng trip t" 


the 


■r front, Staten 


i 


jiori ions of the si 


urn 


be Henry Street Set- 


ts nickerbocker 


ril- 


ri, Riverside !h u 


en, 


1 Columbia Uni' • 




trip. Tin part; 




at 4:00 p, m, t 


iml 


t around 1 1 :'»<» p, 


m. 


RES 




from Page I 




rioi have In pirf 


ire 


Imperative that 


ili bulletin boards 


in 


lildinj'. Stockbrit 


Ige 


1, and ' irori ties 


to 


f In app'iint mi nt 





$5 









THE M\<^\<m SETTS COLLEGIAN, 1 11 1 RSDAY, <>< fOBER 27. 1938 






/nbaesacbiise 




BA R T E R I N G 
HUM JOE BART 



STOCKBRIDGE 



(Collegian 



I ! ; I leri Igi 1 DM I 

eated i eriou [>i oblem \ hv 
time ago pri'xy suggested t! 
cycle operators refrain from us i 
the town sidewalks as thoroughfari 



Al the animal cl ectiun la.-t Ralph A. Van Meter, 

Pucsday, thi elected the er, explained the su 

following officers: President, Eugen ground Horticulture .-; 

P. Gieringei o£ the Hotel Manage- m ■ served and the fre 



Offl 



Ofl ■ i: 



ARTHUR \ NO\ 



JOHN K. PILIOS 
BETTINA HALL 

m \i;v i mkkii 

FRANCES S. MK 
JOSEPH BART i 

NANCY K. 1.1 

.J V Q1 KI.INK L, 
LOKETTA KKNN 
KENNETH HOW I 

Will. 1AM i. <;o 

li M.'oi.n PORRE: 
CHESTER Ki i: \. 
JOHN H VYES Ml 

Feature 

LLOYD I! i 0PE1 
MYRON FISHER 
KATHLEEN III. 
EVERETT R Sl'i 



aim: \h \m i aim 



E. KI'MAK \<F.> 
l;o<,l-.K H. I. INI 
JOSEPH I: UORl 
U M.I'KK R, LAJ 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 

Make all orde 
setts i ulli'Ki.iii. 
subscribe? will p 

:il:i'i' aa BOOH an 

uate and facult; 
encouraged. An\ 
must be received 
B o'clock, Morula 



Enteral as hpco 
herat Po«t Otfici 
■peciaJ rate uf |«> 

1103, Act of Oct 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpi 
Amherst, ) 



AM MM 
SUPPORT 

short time a 
and its activi 

The only 
and class reu 
free from tin 
interest whk 

One of 
alumni inten 
interest evidi 
colleges. We 
will bring ah 
terest and er, 
Weekend pla> 
is no at temp 
them out an< 
of the college 

A plan t 
already unde 
stage of deve 
of time for c( 
body is will in 
on our part, i 
undergrads a 

Whether 
for a get-tog 
great possibil 
football game 

cause for rej 

quently adopt 
body, they wo 
sachusetts St.- 
Here indt 
support of tl 
in the way ( 
teaching stafl 

a powerful in 
strong as we 
cannot see an 
splendid worl 
it takes an a 
women workii 

Whether 
to be seen. It 
limited, but it 

To this 

guests, It is ( 
on them, for 1 
or lo 




He'll Tell All Before College Journalists 

Raymond Clapper, famed newspaper and radio commentator on people and 
events in the nation's capital, will give the "Confessions of a Washington 
Columnist" at the Associated Collegiate Press convention in Cincinnati. 
November 3, 4 and 5. The president of the famed "Gridiron Club", a Uni- 
versity of Kansas graduate will tell the assembled college journalists all 
about what goes on behind-the-scenes in Washington. 




Cheering with a Schwing 

It's Betty Belle Schwing adding a highland fling to hri 
rousing repertoire for the University of Tulsa grid sm 
She's acknowledged to be one of the southwest* leal 
feminine cheerleaders. 



Every Pocket Had a Silver Lining 

. . when Drake University students used silver instead of paper money in making all their purchases 
Stunt was used to prove to merchants how students and faculty members of the Des Moines school 
added to the sales volume of the city's stores. 




World's Longest Pend 

Swinging nine stories in *n unused elevator shaft ■ 
lein College in Chicago, this pendulum for m>- 
e*rth on its axis is the longest of its kind in •UtlM 



m 



,f* 



■apm9 ' 
rotation * 



193 8 COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION 
PLANS OUTSTANDI NG AM HERST PROGRAMS 

mphonetta. Conducted by Fiedler, is One Attraction 

of Concerts Subscriptions Taken 
Only During- Next Week 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, rHURSDAY. OCTOBER 27. I! 



I 



PKOSII NOMINATE 



MSC INFORM LETTER 



m outstanding season for 
Amherst Community Con- 

,, , -; ;'. '; WRITTEN BY FROSH 

ncerts will be tin' boston ■—-—■-» 

a conducted by Arthur 



Lloyd Hanson Introduces Clever 

ation, which played Form Letter For 

ocial union last year, la Student Use 

,; members of the world- . 

Symphony Orchestra; A clever and entertaining "Mass. 

well-known as the con- State Informaletter" has been origi- 

, "Pops" concerts in Sym- nated by an enterprising Stockbridge 

.,,i the Esplanade Con- freshman. Designed along the lines 

ol those familiar summer resort post- 
Subscription cards, the writer need only check the 
,ti.in membership to the items he wishes to be conveyed, 
i ill be accepted during next 

\. in the past , State stu- 

have the privilege of sub- 

I half th*' BSU8J price; stu- 

be contacted by a group of 



riie fie-iiman elasa will elect a 
nominating, committee at their 
•.pecial convocation rhuraday, This 
nominating committee will pick 
candidates for an election lo ta- 
in Id at a later date. 

the temporary officers are: Pres- 
ident. Charles Knox, East Long* 
meadow; Vice-President. Helen 
Janis, Turners Palls; tcrasurcr, 
Robert Perry, PitUSeU; secretary. 
Jean Carlisle. Saugus. 

This is the last time that a nom- 
inating committee will work under 
the present system. The new set of 

rules governing nominating com- 
mittees and elections will j>o into 
effect next vear. according to a 
%ote of the Student Senate. 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE DRAMA HUNG 
IN WILDER SHOW ORIENTAL DIFFERENCE 

Actors. Costumes, Stage Settings, show Contrast t<> Those of 
Occident in Simplicity, Conventionality Mask-, 

Are Works of Art 

LIBRARIAN TO LEAD ,., , „ . . — 

i he exhibit in \\ ilder Hall tin . w. ek 

DISCUSSION GROUP , " h ^ h " ; :f ' , "" 

one winch rtnould appeal tn ii: any, 

especially those who are interested at 

Sophomore Cabinet <>l Christian all in Japanese art. This collect ii i i 

Federation Hears Basil photographs of Japanese Drama i 

Wood Tonight fine <<nv. representing typii il ..-. 

of Japan's tines! actors. 



Basil I!. Wood, College Librarian, 
will lead members of Sophomore Cab 
inet of the Christian Federation, In 

an informal discussion at their first 
meeting tonight at 7:00 in the of 
tice of the Student Religious Council 



DR. SU SPEAKER OA 7 ; " ' " 



In' introduction has check boxes 

ORIENTAL QUESTION 



ire will be no individual 
any concerts. 
eople who join on Mon- 
privileged to go to the 



friends. Statements follow which cov 

er the weather, faculty, classes, extra- ■> i , ,~~ I .. 

curricula.- activities, sports, eats, M ,'"!.. I \ a . k 1 ' 1 ,'. s P°nsor 

Btudies, comment- mi coed,-, and fel- 
lows, needs, ami a financial statement. 

A typical example Is the series >' 



devoted to business. 

The work of the Sophomore Cab I 



China Aid Council 
Show War Scenes 



President Hugh P. Raker has ac- 
id Community that eve- possibilities concerning co-eds, where cepted an invitation to be i sponsoi 
,ist will be Bartlett and u "' writer can check any of th' I of the China Aid CoUW i said Dr, 

famous piano>duo. Cam- lowing: clever, rare, brainy, beautiful, Frank Kal-Ming Su niter his telk 

dquarters will be in the east useless, weak, frtaks, stupid, harm- "China Today," last Fridu> at th. 

mes Library -Teleph i ''- • ; ""' () - K - 

eM0 T Goding, in Room 10, Lloyd Hanson, Stockbridge *4«, oria 



. |o|l. 



an also he contacted for [nated the letter, and it will he on 

ale at the College Store. 
REVEREND RIGGS 



The most striking feature to the ex- 
hibition i.- its utter difference to unj 
thing in the tield of occidental Dran a, 

<>n the Japanese stage all the a< tor- 
are men, the players all wear masks 
throughout the performance . ind the 
lines, movements, mask.-, and c • 
tumes are complete!) stereotyped, 
each detail having a particular mean- 
ing. The stage setting should be 
noticed in these picture.-,, f,>p it con- 
sists of a backdrop upon which is 
painted a single pine tree; and the 
only properties an- those few highly 
conventionalized things that some of 

the actors are shown with; there not 

The Sophomore Cabinet is uniaue bete g „„,,.,. t | i;ill , Wu ,,„ ,|„. , t .,^, at 
among campus organisations for Its the same time. Tha masks give all the 

Bex |bl k'.uiizatioii and purpose, pictures an air of unreal. tv, hut the 

i " (,|l « l masks themselves are veritable works 

rt. Each one represent a certain 

xpression, and each one i.- lini.shed so 



net this year will be ■ continuation 
Freshman < !abinet act < v 
ity. Meetings will be held monthly In- 
stead of weekly. Evelyn Bergstrom 
'11 is serving as temporary chairman 
for the first meeting. 



Memorial Building. Dr. -u. who , <e ,.,, ..•,-,„. ,;„.:,„., „,- |. mtrn .,. s " •• Thl . T" 

.•>f Basis of Ethics "Ctilitarianisn.," 

Jesus." Hi 



DADS' DAY FEATURES 

MIDDIE GAME, SKITS Reverend T, Lawrason Riggs from 8Uch m «"' »■ Presided Neilso 
Vale University at New Haven will Smith College, Bishop Franci 



l Hosing Attraction 
in Evening 



rairs, was sponsored bj the Massachu- am | -The Personal^ 
etts Slate Chapter of tic Americai 

1 1 ud<'iit Union, 

oers oi tne tacuity le.i discussions become an integral part of tne coh 
In addition to President Baker, the a did members themselves. 
China Aid Councils are hacked l>\ The outstanding achievement of 

ii of last year was the Easter Sunrise Sen <),n ' " f ""' stra "^' sl things about 
J. ice, with nn attendance of nore than the photographs is the Incongruity of 

tin obviously masculine hands com- 
bined with the delicacy of the masks 

rt range, 



beautifully that one doesn't even no« 
Goldberg, Dr. Click, and other mem- ti( . (> Ull . m .,,-,„,. „ lir ^ u i :ill( .,. ; t |„. v 

hers of the faculty 

tuine. 

Ont 



Baker to rVddress v i"' ; 'k nexl Sundaj evening at vei WcCennell, Rev. Shelton Hale Bishop, fifty. 

per, on the topic "All Round Re Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, Sherwood An All sophomores are invitei to thi 

ligion." He has been a popular speak- derson, and many others. Dr. Su, a (ll ,. t meeting to take part in a ;,m- ;,M,| r ,h " '" '""I" ! *™ " 

er at vespers here in former years, graduate of Tsinghua University, bating informal discussion " K esturoa ul,irl1 tl "' s, • ,la, " l: - I""'- 

. , . ,, .... . „ , . G Peiping, is field organizer for the ' trav - Th * costumes are perhaps the 

' China Aid council. He has also taken FARMERS MEET »-i appealing things about the pic 

tllle,, for the gorgeOUSne Of their 1 

tional agriculture fabric and workmanship is something 

M,, :r l ' Kl ; r :: ^ '::;; l, :::: ch n »f of ****** ^-\ ^ t ;;u;;n;ae'a,i; l ;/nnn;T;;d;;;::n;M;;;' ^ ^ vocational u»t we an can understand, n 

i. m. I he address win toiiow W ell-known question "Whats in a . , , . .. • 

ay Of activity for visiting name? « „e said it is essential thai ^'"^ ^ '" *" '""^^ S ^ V 



the 



November B, President day evening, Bishop W. Appleton \ZZZ.V T if ^ tm * m 4 *««««« 

will give an address LawlV|u ,. J the Protestant Episcopal ™^*f /"T" SST"! 0* N arlv SOO T^n 

i Stockbridge Auditorium <-,,,,,,, „,- Springfield explored L ^r' 1 ^^Z'. 2**»« •«*»■ "*** ** V «S 



-Indent-- from high and vocational 'hat we all can understand. It i- rath 

schools in all parts of the state will er too had that the picture aren't in 

ing before various Brrouns and oriran arrive al M tssachusetts state Col color so the beaut) of the robes would 

are scheduled to make a ,,„.,, ,„„. „,- „ do his , )( , sl t „ „, lk ,. .^.^ ' Tg« 1 ,,^. tomi „.,, , %% , ,,„. t|H . ,,,,, nmit)rtI tVN<> 1; „ v . „,,, ,,,„ ..„.„.,,,, , ,„„„„ 

inspection ol npus, his own name stand for the highe* ,,. 1V ;„,,.,. ^.i,,,!,,^;,. i,,.i, r ;„, r ...,„ ,1 mi,« their exquisite designing and el- 



day inter scholastic judging compel 
lions. In addition, the annual conve 



n 



li phases of college life, in- kind f value. Bishop Lawrence con Mohile Medicine 

Ktra-curricular activity, with tinued with illustration.- drawn from China Aid Councils provide for mo 

iti.m of the social. the great men of history to prove that bile medical units which are equipped Farmers will be in session Friday. 



i m i 



most incredible eleganc 



P. II. 



Fn 



Memorial Building starting to their values 
a. m. Under the direction of 
A. Davis '41. Following the 

. in which Seniors. Juniors, 

ophomores will participate with 

nan classes demonstrating dis- 

• 'I drill. Inspection of class 

labs, and other campus 

UCh as the Phys Ed build- 
■ 'I Memorial Building, will be 



Judging events include contests in 
poultry, dairy products, fruit live 



AK.V1ISTK l«: TRIP 



■i -' annual "<lay in col- humble circumstances do not noces- with a doctor, two nurses, and medi 
egin early, with registra- sarily obscure names hut often lead eal supplies. There is a great short 

age of hospitals and doctors in China 
and a great number of needy civilians ' 

„ .injured and diseased. 



REMEMBER// 

This week-end, that we are pre- 
pared to take care of your 
friends and relatives whether it 

is 

LUNCHEONS 
DINNERS 

or 

REFRESHMENTS 

Br 'nt, r them in or recommend us. 
*•"< Candy and Salted Nuts 

College 
Ccrndy Kitchen Inc. 

With the Best of Food 




plants. Members of the faculty of the and nearby places of Interest, which 

State College, Specialists in the Vari will include | theatrical production, 

Alter giving an interpretation of „ U s fields, will conduct the separate ,.,ns and Needles, ha- I ,, planned 

• the Mno-Japanese hosit.l.ties, Dr. Su contests. Prizes, hoth to inidividuals by ,|,e social action commission of 

i presented the actual etrect of the Ori- an ,| ., r „ools. will he awarded Satur the Christian Federation. The trip is 

■ ental war on the United States, the (|ay :ift( . rlloon . ,„ illiv , )|1( . fr , im lh( . ,,,1,,,,,, uh „ 

steps that Americans are to take "to .... . , ., ., , , ,,,, ,, , 

,, ., ... I he Association of the Future rares to go. I lie expense will be .'jIi.iki 

stop another world war," and the les- L . ,, ,, „ . ,. , ,, , , . ,• 

.. ... ... rarniers will meet with Kohert (. tor everything except meals. Appli- 

Bon that ( hamherlain shou d have ,- , r v ., .x .■ .. , ,. „. , 

Kennedy <>f North Dartmouth, State cation must be made to J. P. Wil 






THE HEART 

OF 
OUR STORE 



Pharmacy is a profession and not 
[• sideline with us. It is the very 
heart of our store. Prescriptions' 
receive the immediate and undivid- 
ed attention of a registered phar- 
[macist, who weighs, measures and' 
{ mixes drugs of purest quality in 
exact accordance with the physi- j 
cian's specifications. He make* 
haste slowly . . . verifying, check- 
ing and re-rherking each step so 
'that our label will bfl a posithe 
Vjuaranlec of accuracy! 

WELLWORTH 
PHARMACY 



EXHIBITS 



learned from China in his dealings ,. ,, 
with Hitler. 

United States and the rest of the 

world will be involved in another 

world war which China is attempting 
to stop indirectly by stopping Japan. 
"The fate rrf China is the fate of the 
United States," said Dr. Su "War is | 
like fire. If not stopped in a small 
place like Manchuria, it will spread 
to the rest of the world. As President 
Roosevelt said. 'Agression must be 
Cnniinutd nn Past *> 



I. Memorial Ituilding 
(Jodey Prints 

II. (ioodell Library 
Photographs from the Cam 
era Craft competition 

III. Wilder Hall 
Photographs of Japanese 
Drama 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 

HALLOWEEN PARTY (H)()1)S 



Masks 

Nut Cups 
Lanterns 
Hats 



Noise-Makers 
Tallies 
Candles 



Greeting Cards 



Decorations 
Place Cards 
Skeletons 
Stickers 



liams, religious director of the col- 
lege, not after Thursday, November ■'. 

Tin busses will lease Amher -t from 
the Memorial Hall at 7:<M) a. m. 
November II. Stops will be made at 
the Abyssinian Baptist Church, 
Brotherhood of sleeping Car Porter 
the theatrical performance. Also in 
eluded are a sightseeing trip to the 
Mattery, the river front, Staten Is- 
land, and certain portions of the slum 
district through the Henry Street Set 
tlement. 

A visit to the Knickerbocker Ul- 
lage, to Chinatown, Riverside 'hiich, 
(Grant's Tomb and Columbia Univ i 
ty complete, the trip. The party will 
have New York at 4:00 p. m. and 
arrive in Amherst around 11:00 p. m. 



SENIOR PICTURES 

Continued from Page 1 



appointment, will not have hi picture 

in the Index, it. is imperative that 
each senior consult bulletin board in 

the "Mem" Building, Stockbridge 

Hall, fraternities, and sororities to 
learn the time of hi- appointment. 



TRY AN 0AKES' SWEATER 

Light weights in all colors $2.95 and $3.50 Heavy Shaker Knit $7.50 Other makes at $2 to $5 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, OCTOHKK 27. 1988 



THE MASSAC 



COED NOTES 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



319 (.1 ESTS 

Continued from l\ige i 



On Tuesday afternoon they were 
still trying to clear up the Drill Hall 
after tin- old clothes party held last 
Saturday evening, it's wonderful to 
Bee some of our girls letting their 
hair down and having ■ bang-up time. 
I m ..n turned reports inform us 
that there is something K«»inn on 
about havinK k'w\ cheerleaders. 
There might possibly be more co- 
operation on cheers if this plan 
were put into effect. What about 
it. Mr. Alviani? 

Several representatives from Mas- 
sachusetts State went tn the New 

England Home Economics meeting 

held in Northtield, Mass. last week- 
end. Evidently, they profited greatly 
by this experience. 

The Junior Foods classes are hold- 
ing teas for the H. Kc. sophomores 

and freshmen on Tuesday and Thurs- 
day afternoons. The object is tO ac- 
quaint the girls with the Foods lab- 
oratory. On Wednesday afternoon the 
Christian Federation will hold a cocoa 
party at the Abhey. 

Flash! The third round of the tennis 
tournament has been played off. A 
Combined team of juniors and seniors 



has been the custom 
couples are invited to 
ternities ii 



in th< 
visit a 

a Uound-Uobin alf'aii 



past, 

fra- 
in 



Harvard In '17 — Amherst In '38 Create Same Rhyme-Reason-Rhythm 
Demand For An Increased Student Enthusiasm 



HUSETTS COLLEGIAN. Till KSDAY, OCTOBER 27. Lies 



H> Peter Bar reca 



H> Everett It. Spencer. Jr. 

In the fall of 1!H7 a plucky Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College foot- 
ball team lined up against a strong 
Harvard squad. Only the week be- 



team. There was no doubt as to the 
outcome of the Harvard game. The 
Agricultural College men were the 
underdogs. They had no chance of 
winning. The student body rallied loy- 



the earlier part of the evening. Clos< d 

House begins at ten-thirty, at whi< h 
time couples are asked to return ' 
their fraternities. Fraternities and 
their guests are as follows: 

Alpha Kpsilon I'i: Cabot Cloud and 
his Rain Makers of Springfield, Chap 
erones, Df. and litre* Fraker and Mr. 
and Mrs. Varley. Hades Decoration.. 
Informal. 

\ I Cftrp, Miiiy Lou (joldbsrR of Austin, 

Texas ; Saul Kiumun. Kuth Stein of Portia 

Liberal Arts: 
Smith ; l>i. k H 

Gaby Auerbach, Jean Lawia of Smith: Edwin 
Rossman, (Jloria Aronaon of Springfield: Dana 

Malias. ChartoUa Roasnbers of B. f. ; Man ^^ their team was facing teams 
Silverman, lima Paarlmutter of B. u. : Jason every Saturday which far outclassed 
I... tow, Bell* Goldberg of Brighton; Harvey 
1'ian. Mai ion Newman of Brookline , Sum- 
ner Kaplan. Bertha Goldberg of Brookline; 
Dave Sawyer, Ethyl Cohen of BpringSahi S 
Sid Back. Helen Alport ; Lew Kertzmaii, 
Rhoda Bergen of Smith ; J. Henry Winn, 
• 'lain- Betlnkolt of Smith; Hob Kixlman. Ar- 
line Lewis of Adelphia College. I,. 1. ; Henry 
Schrelber, Louise Vernon of Dorihester ; Mau- 



placement bureau, does not believe 
that the present students have lost 
any of the old college spirit. And 
"Km" should know. In referring to 
the Harvard-M. A. C. game, the 1918 



fore the "Aggies" had met defeat at I Index says, "Captain Gray SOU was 
the hands of a well-trained Dartmouth the individual If. A. C. star, his con- 



sistent work on the defense doing 
much to keejj down the score." "Km" 
was captain of the plucky 1!M7 foot- 
ball squad that faced Dartmouth, Har- 
vard, Tufts, Williams, Cornell, and 



ally to the cause, however. The stu- | Springfield. He was captain of a foot 



The slow, gradual birth 
"Blues" has been hotly dispi. 
since W. C. Handy for the I 
meandered uncertainly, and 
way through the "St. Louif 
There have been cries of 
Some said he lifted it bodil) 
minstrel revue. However, if % 
this theory, we concede ti 
"Blues" were born on a i 
scarred and beer-stained 
down in New Orleans. 

"lilues", like Topsy, "just j 
from the inescapable union 



ball team that needed spirit, received ; anc * wh 'te musical cultures. 



rice I'.atli.i man. I'hyllis Harpell of Smith 

David Frank. Minnie Van Sihmiilt of Raw* College students Wel't 

ley's Finishing School. 

Alpha Sigma Phi: "Springfield Don 



Will battle against a combined team Chaperones, Mr. ami Mrs. Karle Cai 



Paul KeMer, Gloria Simon of dents knew that their school wa: 

ri, son. Ala Goldstein of Smith : playing the heaviest schedule in the j it, and appreciated it. And the fact 

history of the institution; they knew j that he has no criticism of the present 

spirit of the students does more than 
smother the remarks of cynics who 

the State 
College has no college spirit. 

Behind Team 
"The spirit has been exceptionally 
good this year," states the 1017 foot- 
ball captain. "The students realize 
that the team is having t<>ugh compe- 
tion, and they realize that the State 
College team lacks the material of 
other colleges; yet they are behind 
the team all the way. And there is 
no question about it. When the stu- 
dent body is behind the team, it cer- 
tainly helps the players." 

"Km" has been assisting Kbb with 
the coaching this year. He knows the 
team and what they can do. "If our 
team gives everything they've got this 
Saturday," he says, "we ought to give 
Amherst a pretty good game." 

The State College team is going to 
line up with undaunted courage 
against a strong Amherst eleven, and 
the State College students are going 
to rally to the cause with a rich, 
whole-hearted college spirit. 



them in experience and material. Yet, continually complain that 
when Harvard romped off with a 47-lt 
victory, there was no grumbling; there 
were no bitter remarks as to the 
caliber of the team; instead there 
were cheers for the team's gallant 
fight, for the Aggie's undaunted spir- 
it. The Massachusetts Agricultural 

rich in college 
spirit. 

Saturday a plucky Massachusetts 
State College football team is to line 
up against a strong Amherst squad. 
The State College men, as were the 
Aggie men of 1!)17, are meeting a 
team far more experienced and with 
far better material than they. The 



pouter and friends. Le Motif Macabre. 
In formal. 

Harvey Hark.-. Virginia I 'ease i Uay I'ai- 
menter. Hetty Roth of Ka.hlitTe , Evl S.-holz, 
Judy Kills of StorMiridtfe. Mass.: Wm. Hen- 

drickaon, Dorothy McBrida of Quincy; Henry 

Parsych, Wanda Kiatel of A. 1. C. i John Statesmen are definitely the under- 

Townaend, Barbara Wagner of Holyoke; Bob- (fogs. Hut now the questions arise: 

,,t Moshe,. Nancy Harper of Northfietd Sam- „ A| . (> Uu> stal( , (Allege students rally- 

I nary ; Wm. McCowan, «.mn Sturrup ol Vvor-I ' 

ceater; Donald Mayo. Mary Dwlne of Pram- >"K to the teams cause. Are the 

Ingham State Teachers; Ralph B I. Kaih- students behind their team whole 

erine l'ayson of Northtield: Richard Haywanl, heartedlv '.' Have the Massachusetts 

l-riseilla Lane: Um. H;u,ni,an Marjoria gtate Co „ stu dents the same rich 

Crothera of Winchester; Kichard laft. Helen , , . . , * , • 

Short of R. I. state: Edward Stoddard. Plor- school spirit that was manifested in 

ence O'Neil ; Mired I'rilsirk. Kllen Davis of tile (la.VS of "good old Aggie?" 

Greenfield; mum. Fran*, Joyce Erlchaon of \ Spirit Lost 

Herlden, Conn.; Georgia Tobey, Jr.. Joyce 
HhrKins of Kingston; llomar Stranger, Anita 



"Km" Grayson, head of the college 



comb and Orchestra of Worcester. 



Stegamuir of Kingston; Mr. ami Mrs. David 

Peterson of Springfield ; Stanley Seed, Eleanor 

Mavis of Brockton; Robert Bregiio, K.-t.-ile Chaperones, Dr. and Mrs. Helming 

Fairbanks of N. Y. C. s Lee Shipman. Dorothy an( j jyi r- aI1( j ftfrs. DuHois. 



of sophomores ami freshmen in the 

lady-like game of Held hockey. This 

match will undoubtedly be very inter- 
esting. We're hotting on the under- 
classmen. 

Suzy Coed is Koing to Am- 
herst week-end. From Mount Hol- 
yoke we learn that a date bureau 
has been started. We lind in the 
Mount Holyoke News an adver- 
tisement of this Comstock Date 
Itureau. With Amherst week-end 
arriving on the scene, it will he 
interesting to note just how ef- 
ficient this organization will he. 
The Women's Glee Club has been 

excellently supported this year. In 

fait it has been so well supported 

that it must be cut. Concert plans 

are in the making, with a church 

program, and a concert in Cummiuu- 

ton, Mass., included in the plans. 

Two sororities ate having their an- 
nual week-end Amherst Week-end. At 

Lambda Delt, Marjorie Johnson is in 

charge of the coffee party to be held 

after the game at the sorority house. 

Dorothj Morley is in charge of the 

tea to be held at Phi Zeta after the 

game. 

Millicent Carpenter and Patricia 

Bobbins will have their names in- 

. ... . ,. . ., . i _ i • . A i , , ,. ,,,, , i),. f ..,,,1 vf,. c of Smith: John Hayes. Virginia Little: frank 

ser bed on the hi /eta Sch«>larshin Orchestra. ( haperones, I rol. ami .Mis. "* 

bgiiimtu "ii no Simons, Boaalia tmilm of Worcester; Fletcher 

Plaque for last year. Beatrice Wood Thayer and Prof, and Mrs. Smart ,.„, lltv iviscilla Durland; Malcomb Trees, 
is in charge of the Dad's D.i\ Com- Walloon Motif. Informal. Barbara Tot man, Georga Kimi.all. Dorothy 

mittee from Phi Zeta. Kenneth Benson, Helen Holt of Amherst: Jones of Smith: Harare] Sparks, Elizabeth 

John Manlx. Silvia Holmes of Smith: John MouUon . Ken KIggina, Hett.na Hall: Donald 

Smith. Ruth Thomas of Amherst; Chartee Tucker. Mabeile Booth : Norman Btake. Janice 

Edward <;n><leii< k. Meeaer of R. L State: Richard Towle. Louise 

I Washburn, Mar- Ruttor; James Dow of Harvard. Barbara 

Virginia Gale; Draw of Wheaton : Rohert McWitllams of 

Holyoka ; I'hila.lelphia. Molly Maddo.ks of Katharine 

Muller of Darian, Conn.. 



Harris of Worcester: Carl Nastri. Ruth Mer- 
rick of N. Y. ('. : Wm. Walsh, Mary Cam- 
pion of Springfield ; Paul Adams, Ruth Can. 

held of Suffleid, Conn. : John Sullivan, 'I'her- 

aaa LaPorta of Chalsea; Robert Mullanay. 
Kill. hi, Mullina of Hatfield; Joseph atcLeod, 

Mary Hayes of New Bedford, James <;ilman, 

Dorothy Keenan of Roalindate: Frederick 
Whiting, Esther Herllhag of Roslindale; John 
Morgan, Hetty Stoddard of Smith ; David Mor- 
rell. Anne McN< rim-y of Worcester; Rohert 

Triggs, Lillian Martin of Worcester; Donald 

Tripil, Elaine Russell of Holyoke: Howard 

Norwood. Dorothy McLaughlin of Holyoke. 



Donald Cow les. I.oi* Macomher : Rohert 

Sheldon, Barbara Critehatt; Francis Keville. gram to be presented Tuesday, Nov 

Kuth Helyar ; John Swenson. Kay Rice ; Rich- 
aid Howler. Lorraine Blag of West field ; Paul 

rerritcr. Marjorie Johnson ; Richard Lee, 

Gayle Campbell of Garmantown, Pa.; George 
Hay ton, Katharine Lownay or R. I. Stat.- : 

Roh.-rt Dunn. Il.lva Sinclair: William 1-Vdey. 
Betty Mates: Charles Griffin, Dorothy Nichols: 

Vincent Barnard, Mary Kennedy of Mount 

, . ... . M .„ , , lf specializing in po vchroined figures of 
Holyoke; Richard Umhtr, BUlna Milkey of ' a • 

Montague City: John Heyman. Kli/aheJh R.y- birds. 

nolds; Aldan Blodgett, Lucille Ooomba of 

Smith; William Richards, Francs Bracket! 



of course, was colored.) Tin. 
certainly made the "blues" | 
ly American; a type of fol 
But, despite this reasoning, Jul 
Mills, music publisher and < 
ator with writers like Duke El 
where the union is personified, 
"There is no such thing as ,, ^ 

erican folk song." His arguti 
jthat upon analysis our musica 
! are a melting pot of inherited \ 
politan airs, Knglish ballad . G«i 
man folk songs, and Hebrew 
all dressed in a new and commoi 
tim. 

The best argument for either i 
lis the music itself, and exhibit 
should be "Blues" by Art SI .,, 
(Vocation B-21462). Here [g -,, m , ■ .... 
spontaneous indigo that the ba 
shouldn't oe ashamed of. It 
little bit of all that's nice; dixit 
or shuffle rhythm, barrel-house 
all easily, effortlessly, almost , 
I lessly done, 'l nere is very little 
tion or discretion, and you , 
that the stuff isn't cut and dried 
alive. Watch for some lazy-liki 
pet making it up as he Roes al . 
Then, some fuzzy-toned tenor m rd 
down south manner. A piano • : 
chorus is followed by some flight ,f 
the bumble-bee clarinet runs, pi 
ly executed . . . Reverse. "Bluet" • 
a continuation of the other side, and 
a trombone steals the act In real ride 
show fashion. Watch for B rhythm 
shift here behind some casual clari- 
ing. Professor Clatfelter will speak "<-tmg by Shaw, all tucked m by 
on the Art of Wood Carving, illus- 
trating his speech with examples of 
work in this medium. He has done 
some excellent work in this field. 



FINE AIMS 



Professor (iuy dlatfelter will ap- 
pear on the Fine Arts Council pro- 



Pa>t Alpha Lambda Mu held B 
tea last Sunday afternoon for one of 
the members of the faculty. Future 
Sigma Beta's annual Hallowe'en par- 
ty will be held Friday evening. En 
trance will be through the ftr es- 
cape. 

the party held by the Ameri- 
can Student Inion was >er\ n - 
eeaefuL Representatives of Smith. 
Mounl Holyoke. and Amherst 
were present. A goodly Sprink- 
ling of the feminine conlinnenl 
of this college were also present. 
Possibly the best feature of the 
nesting was the short talk given 
by the president of the associa- 
tion. GesfgC Curran *I0. 
The advanced Modern Dance group 
presented two types of minuets at 
the Fine Arts Council held last Tin- 



Margaret Hale of Wakefield : Edward Cochran 
, of Wakefield, Eleanor Sheridan of Wakefield . 

Alpha Camma Kho: Hotel Weldon U Smith: J^rt^^^^^"^^ ..enjamin Hadh,, Na,„, ai„, : cha,,,. Blah- 

op, Virginia Koran: Karl Kneeland. Jr. of 
\mher-t. Helen Moore of Sharon : William 

Caaasaa. Kathleen Dunn of West Newbury; 

Cnsirnir Zielins.,.. Betty Hathelt of Holyoke; 

Clifford Moray, Eleanor Nevery of Dorcheatar ; 
Allen CJove, Barbara Baker of Walpole; Boxer 

Cole. Ruth Hutchinson of the Parry School. 

T. V. The Sophisticated Swing- 



weird piano chords that an 
dently on purpose . . . 

1 have been requested t, 
little something about Eddie Du 
"Ole Man M«»se." There's very little 
1 can add to what already bus beat 
said! Bttt, Ole Man Muse i- 
kicked the bucket. Or, if you 
felled by the fickle Rnger of fate. 

( • till tun. i 



JAP SCHOOLBOY 

Continued from 



r, 



Styler, Vivian Vanl tii ■ 
Miriam Mac Neil I ; Wend* 
Karel fiale : Wilfred \\ inter. 

Jam, Lee, .lane! Brown of Mount 



Q. 



Sters. Chaperones, Prof, ami Mrs. 
Click, and Prof, and Mis. Vondell. 

ItMha.d l..,„,a,d. No, ma llai.dl' Orth ; OagOod <■>"-■ WtllhtW Muller ol Dar.an. <on„.. <,,.„,„ ,„<• 

Mary Clark- of West|K>,t. Conn, j Kenwood Modified Halloween Scheme. Infor- 



Villaume. Betty Christian of Mount Holyoke: 

Rennet!) FarreH. Arl Ubbj of Brookline; 

Roger l»ecker. Frances Clark: Gilbert Arnold, 

Patricia Mud, \ of Southwick ; Stanley Wik'u'in. 
Ethel Winter of \V rentham : Vein.- Cillmore, 
Helen Tyre of BrookfteM ; Larry Rhine*, Jean 
U' Brian of WestfteW: Taleotl Bdmlntster, Ed- 
na UreenfteM ol Ware: FDtiip Trufant, Battj 
Truran : Stanley Flower, Etoanor Morla of 
Amherst i Robert Tetro, hilith Wriahl of SkW- 

niore : A i tier llat'.l-O in. Marv..',y Nichols. 

Kappa Sigma: Chaperones, Mr. and 
Mrs. Glatfelter and friends. Lord Jeff 
Jesters. Kappa Sigma Motif. Informal. 

Charles Towers, Barbara Lathrop of Smith: 

.John Stewart, Kuth Batarberg of Worcester: 
T. Waldo II, rrick. Plied* Hall: Rohert Hall. 

Jean Taylor: Dean Beytes, Rosalie Baaubien i 
Charlei Hleaaon. Pettwy Flynn ; John Osfflun, 



Usually big battle and copa 
three (S) men and seventeen il" 
Amhurst stewdents out of [rate. Vef! 
much Impressive, although ,-ii|'|' ■ ■** 
this year Amhurst boys wave > ap- ' 
Front <>f faces but freshmen- will 
Elizaheth Lolliver of ia|.|>M because coe.lucat ioiials BW in • 
mont : Raymond I'.i.iatT. Hope Howhtt of Then, as are said in Amer: 
Sprlmrfteld : Edgar Diraoek. Mary Tourtel- l,jjr sudden flat tire in evening at f" 1 

house. Japanese Schoolbo] al 



day afternoon. The first minuet was Dorothy Morley; Herbari Howaa, Jean l>asis: 
a' court affair and was taught to the He, w. click, 
girls by Bettina Hall. The group was 

composed of Kli/abeth Clapp. Fiances 
Merrill, Mabeile P.ooth, Julia Lynch, 

Betty ESaton, OHve Norwood, Betty 

Jasper, and liettina Hall. The second 
minuet was in a more light vein « n- 
titled the Peasant Minuet. Joan San 
nella joined the group to participate 
in this. Olive Norwood was in charge 
of making the costumes. Miss Calla- 
han directed these dances. 



ert Creswell, Bee Wood; Seaton Mendall, Peu- 

!-s Rohiii-on . Roy Mors,,. Patience Sander- 
son : Howard McCallum, Helen Riehason of 

Smith. Charles Knox. Mini"' Smith; Will 

Coodwin. Bertha Lobaet; Jarry Baterbrook, 
Eleanor Ongerland of New York; Arthur 
Broad font, Emily Banney of New York: Bah* 

,ii Cain. Julia Lynch: Lawrence Johnson, 
iiricia Ryan of Smith; Eric Stahlhern. Con- 
nie Sanderson ; Kduard Walkey, Muriel Sher- 
man : John Bishop, Hetty Finkle of Long 



f irant, 
Island ; Harold Scollins, Marcel Crisse J Charles Kraniis Saunders, Carolyn Arnr)ld of South- 

MeLaaghUn. Anna Harringtani Ray Taylor. I brMea ! Ooatray Davanport. Dorothy Perkins 



Bo - of Si-rini-'lield. Simone Murphy ol __j 
S|,rini.'li,ld : Rohert Lyons of Springfield: Het- 
ty Banger of Balthnare; Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Moseley ol Mea Bedford t Franklin Soothwiek, 

Rita Anderson ; Charles Rodda. Kh-annr Hul- 

loek: James Kim.c. Plaabetb Oaakell of Dear- 

ti. Id : IHimtld Sullivan. Mntjori,- M.-nill. 

Phi Sigma Kappa: Ned Parry and 
His Orchestra. Chaperons, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hauck, and Mr. and Mrs. Creek. 
Formal. 

Arthur Copaott, Kleanor Cillclt.-: Donald 

Lawaon, Virginia St. John of Auburn. N. Y. ; 

Donald CaJo, Marjorie Irwin : Qaorga Henja- 
min. Alma Crillm of LeCi Kmery Moore. 

Nancy Parks: Clifford Upplnoott, Jane 

Heaphy of I ; William Heaphy, Mary Kelly 

of Lea; Frank Datton, Barbara Farnaworthi 

Ralph Hill. Marian Load of Colhy Junior 

College: Parker Liehtenatain, Maybella Dmry; 

Robert Murphy. Katharine Spalaht of Waal 

,. ,. .. ., , ,. mi,,,,,., ink. t ns l.ani . Chaperones, Dr. and Mrs. 

Spi inirtield : CiKiiire Atwater, All>eita Jonn- ■ 

son: Ban Harding, Louiae Otaae of Wastfleld; Meet, and Dr. and Mrs. Woodaide, 

Richard Vincent. I'.vuy Mnllitom of Hoi- Informal. 
yoke; Charles Manslielil. Virginia Can of Pem- 
hroke Collevre: Dana Keil. Anna Chase: Rich- 
ard Knight. Batty A. .rams: Edward Baltaer, 

Maureen O'ltrien of Smith: Joseph Hoherty. 
Rosalind Bhtlul of Mount Holyoke j Kmerson 

Conetaaoe Underhoa of BararthiBore ; 



lottos of Boaton i Stanley Rettoney, Myrtle 
Raymond of Beverly ; Casty Ajauskas, Mary 
O'Neill ot Fnuningham States Teachers: John 

J. Brack, Rita MacDonaM of Boaton Teachers; 
l). Houghton Shaw, Mildred Osmond of Wat- 
ertown ; Everett Robe rta , Nancy lane ; Frank 
Daly, Virginia Clark of WeetSaW Btata Taaeh 

an : Rohert Couhig, Pi iscilla III 
Aubumdale; Frederick Whittemoie. 

Craweil of Brockton; Larry Fulktrton, Eleanor 
Stone of Needham ; Medrio Beioin, I'na La* 

perls of Mount Holyoka : R- James McCart- 
ney, Itrenda Wentworth of Vassal : Harold alumilUSSeS oil hack atu 

McCarthy, Jeanetta Adrian of Badcltffei F>l- at one nuther and then k r " 

mini, I Stawteckl, Phyllis McKwati of Mount 
Holyoke, 



Sigma Alpha Kpsilon. Johnny New- 



SHINDIG HELD 



A group of about all attended the 

Chem. <'lub Shindig held last Thurs- 
day evening in (loessmann Labora- 
tory. All were entertained with skits 

by members of the Chemistry depart 



Sidv I, uio of Chelsea; Tracey Par/e, Ruth 

Huntress of Springfield ; Everett Spencer, Ruth 

Wood of Spriiurheld ; John Nye, Mary Har- 
n of Newton; Frank flattery, Annie Port 

,,1 Boaton, 

Lambda Chi Alpha: Kemie New- 



el Upton . ft, c.odi, ei Anderson, Helen Rallls 

of Newton : A. Hamilton Gardner of liel- 
mont. Edith. Thayer; Harry Bfajadetl of Omen 
Held, Evelyn Could; Charles Hranch. Alic, 
• oaves of Tuft* Fufaythj Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Rurgesai Mr. and Km. Nelson Julian; Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilfred Patton : Kverett RobarU, 

md Parrott rendering their version of ISaliy Wilcox ; Wentworth Quaurf of Nati.k. 
'rush checking in apparatus, and Pay Virginia Harris of whenton ; Baxtof Hoyaa, 



ment and students, Messrs, Pessenden & Co. presenting their usual. 



Arleen Cooper 



if Smith; William Kimhall. 



l'onaid Brown, Mary Judge; Richard Giles, 

Jean I^mjr : I'oi, I:, Milne. Barbara Miller; 

Ellsworth Phelps, Irene Wtllard of Conn. <<>i- 

haga for Women; Vincent Schmidt. Marian 
Lovetl of Cambridge! Morrill Vlttum, Wini- 
fred filhm; Bdrward WUiard, KlMaatb Bar- 
on of Conn. College for Wometi : James Buck- 
ley, Hilda Jar! sen of Springfield 
o'Conneii. Uene v l e ve Clran of Chicoi 
Powers. Dorothy Merrill of tin- Boston ScIuhiI 

of Occupational Therapy; Edward Anderson. 

Ann darken of Mount Holyoke; Henry Barney, 
Lucille Laroee of South Radley ; (ieorge Felker, 
Eleanor \\,,od of Springfield; Harold format, 

Mary Phillips of Mt. Holyoke Tlnsidore Sh. p- 

ardaon, Margarai Ronton ol ,\th<d ; Klliot 

Wilson. Lola Kldrich of Mount Holyoke; Nor- 
man Clark. F.lvina Stanwood of watertown: 
\it Wannlund, Mildr.d Shaddock of Mt. Hol- 

( itttliriHcJ om Putt *) 



times always willing to t' 

deuce and take Lotus Blosi m '■ 

shindigging. 

Also reason why are plan to Cvf 
iford of back on this year is to mt why •'t' uni ' 
Btolta misses ack so funny. While -t> 

have ofen look at alumni:--'"- a™ 
wonder why shout and slap 
back and whj 

to 

room and come out wiping Hon. 
Then shout louder. Ahv.i 
Now find out is hope. 
Jitter B«g 
However, one big reasol 
pearance again on campu- 
entoniologist fiend. If H 
keep secret, will tell. Have 
report of strange insect b 
one. Think if catch one - 

frond as surprise. Perhap 

Daniel «'an give hint as to type 
John f () , capture of strange in- 

ies of jitter'.' Understand 

in presence of slush pumi 
jiving out like gate. Bus 
flocking around jam. Ai- 
ried. 

Hoping you are sanu. 
I remaining. 



d 



mi l» 



The Japai 



Neighborly Attitude Nets Suzy Coed Three 
Dates and Headaches for Amherst Weekend 

|{y Kathleen Tally 

,,-; week-end may be a noble I That made two up on the wall Pine 
itjon on this campus for most 'thing. 

: if for Suzy Dimwit Coed, it 

~> disastrous, She has a new lanu ' No - :1 

.., a new Garbo attitude, an only Cow< Tuesday and who should 

shopworn line, and a positive- I f Uxy m,, »-t- -as if y,,u didn't know— 

dress. BUT there is one ■ Bt • notn e> ! ' 5^»» an interesting Older 

in the ointment Susy has I ' MiU1, } ho romantic type with whom 

three— yes. 1 said tliret — I Suzy feel8 ■*■ ,a "' :it long last, really 

I - to the same house, and if j '^ S(Uss Life, Love, ami Communism. 

p improving, the Abbey is , ** «ankl\ . he should either g.t a hair- 

l.e awfully crowded by the CUt or m,,ve llis ( ' ais down, but Su/.y, 

" • S. G. (Royal Society of likt ' m " st <,elu, l* , <l Kreshmen, is blind 

- Goons to you )at 8::{n Satur- in '""' t ' yt ' aiul l "' iU ' { ■•* (, ut of the 

t. And that's No lie. : other wherever the light ,,f her life is 

just too neighborly, that's C<mCWn * d ' Another invitation. Suzy 

cannot be cruel — so she said Yes 

1 M» 



INSECT COLLECTOR 



While many college uraduales 
are tainly looking for job*, Dean 

I.. Hound* of Reading, a gradaate 

Jast June. ha> made his own. And 
it's no "white collar" position 

either. 

Rounds has turned professional 
insect collector. He left this week 
for the Talamanca section in south- 
em Costs Rica, Central America. 
This district, which contains some 
of the highest mountains in Cen- 
tral America, is virtually unex- 
plored. 



FINE ARTS COUNCIL PRESENTS OPENING 
PROGRAM AS ANNUAL SERIES COMMENCES 

Professor Frank A. Waugh, Miss Mildred Pierpont, and Advance 

Student Dance Group Ciw Varied Program <•!' 

Flute, Piano and Dancing 



lUrte Freddy asked her first 
a kind face, too, (the kirn a ^ ain 

irds have) but his dates an 
il and he's a constant looker 



Down lo a Shadow 

So here is Susy— all dressed up and 

while dancing. Not a thrill in 1 worrying herself down to a shadow 
ad of Freddys but -V least all Too bad she can't worry herself into 

until Monday night. I hen :> shadows. "What will I EVER do - 

nernity brother, ^ all ex- h, her one and only topic „f conver- 

bout Su/.y. Monday night num-jsation. Franklv, what in heck will she 

•J was almost worn out-- a ever do? What w„uld You do? Will 

recracker with a line that re- Suzy be forced to shoot two of them' 

I rope persuaded Suzy that | Will she divide the evening into three 

the answer to all her desires shifts'- Won't three suckers be s„r- 

Susy— who la no mantel power- prised Saturday night at 8:30! Can 

had time even to think about y,,u wait till next week to find out " 

S'o. Besides, he has a car and Isn't Amherst week-end humorous? 
• i could walk on high heels. NITS wails Suzy. 



DR. si SPEAKS 

Continued from Page 3 



WE DARE YOU 

To See Both 
Of Them Together! 

MAMMOTH HORROR SHOW!! 

The 2 Super-Shockers of (he Century! 

FRANKENSTEIN 

STARRING 

BORIS KARLOFF 

— And— 

While His Victims Sleep! . . . 

Dracula ... a grand master of the 
undead creatures of darkness . . . 
Comes to drink his till of living blood! 

"DRACULA" 

WITH BELA LUGOSI 

(Uemember: There Keallv AKK Such Things!) 

2 gjJS FRI. - SAT. 




SUN.-MON.-TFKS., OCT. 30-NOV. 1 
A STORY as GREAT As ITS STARS! 



CLARK 



GABLE 



MYRNA 

LOY 



in 



h 



1.(11)1 



00 HOT TO HANDLE' 

K«>bt. Uenchley. "How To Watch A Po s tb aH t.ame" 
Color Cartoon — Pathe MeWS 



Btopped.' You should not Dull down the 
window shades when the house 00X1 
door is on fire. China's 4000-year iso- 
lation proves that isolation is futile. 
Isolation never did work in similar 
cases, and United States should not 
!>'■ Up in the clouds should not be 
idealistic." 

Boycott 

Dr. Su's suggested methods of war 

prevention by the American people 
re: <l) Boycott Japanese goods do 

not wear silk stockings, and (2) write 
your congressman or state depart' 

ment to (dace an embargo on war 
materials Japan buys 7<i', ,,f her 

»rap Iron and [OOfl of her oil m n,,. 
United State.-. 

".Mi. Chamberlain could have taken 
a lesson from the Sfno-Japanese sit- 
uation in the present Czech crisis," 
sai,i Dr. Su. t hina did not resist 
when Japan seized Manchuria because 
China ndied , m the Nino Power 
Treaty, on the League of Nations, and 
on the fart that she thought Japan 
would he satisfied with Manchuria. 
Hut now Japan wants all of China. 
Capitulation does not bring peace. Mr. 

Chamberlain should have realized that 
fart in respect ;,, Ids dealings with 
Hitler the .Munich peace will not 
bring peace." 

Democratic unity of china, mobil- 
ization of all Chinese civilians in self- 
preservation corps, transport corps, 

and emergency corps, and guerrilla 
warfare like George Washington's in 
tin American Revolution all these 

factors tend to defeat Japan and thus 
save the world from another world 

war. 

Suppression in Japan 
"Student unions and trade unions 
■re suppressed In Japan; there is ab- 
solutely in. freedom of speech or ,,c 

press," ;uL\,;l J),. s u . "Conditions in 
Japan are very had, for the burden 
of the Chinese War is weighing Jap j 
anese people down. After the conquest 
of Manchuria production in Japan 
increased from ,v , to i-v, but the 
Japanese standard of living dropped 

26%. At this time the Japanese war- 
lords, seeing that they Wen sitting 
on a Volcano of pe, .pie's discontent, 

diverted threatening revolution by 
"raging war in china. The Fascist mil 

itary clique of Japan at present is < 

fighting a losing battle, both in china ' 

and at home." 



STEFF ELECTED 

Cuniinind ftom I'.ige I 



The Fine Arts Council opened Its 
season on Tuesday, October 25, with 

a program of music and dances, pi,. 

as vice-president. Connie i> the tented at 4 :80, In the Memorial Build 

president of Phi Zeta, and a member Ing, 

of the Student Religious Council, the Th , pi , lKram ^ ^ , n ^ 

Newman lun the Intersorontx CoWl- ||J Wwd iVrp.mt. pianoj Prof. Frank 

al, and the Roister Do sters a u i .. . . ..' 

A. Waugh, lluti'; and Miss Callahan'.. 

"lase dance class, including liettina Hall, 

Robert Class, of Arlington, will also Mahelle Booth, John Sannella. Kh/.a 

serve a fourth year as .Mass Ireas- heth Jasper, Julie Lynch. Elizabeth 

urer. He is an entomology major, head Baton, Frances Merrill, Elizabeth 

cheer leader, and a member of Theta Clapp, and Olive Norwood Mrs. M, , 

( ' 11 - rick, piano, accompanied the Dance 

Dorothy Nichols, ,,f Westfield, will group, 

serve as secretary, and is a member The program was as follows: 

of Lambda Delta Mu. \ 

Charles Rodda, l.amhda Chi Alpha. I. J. II. Loeillet, Sonata in F 

as sergeant, and John liemben, (Cap- I Grave 

pa Sigma, as captain, complete the 
roster of senior officers. 

Hsger 

A> the head of the junior class. 

Myron Hagar, a Pre mod major from 

South Deertield, serves as a meinhei 
of the Honor Council, and was presi- 
dent of his class last year also. He is 

a member of Kappa Sigma. 
Smith 

Marjorie Smith will enter her third 

years as vice-president, she is a home 

ec major, and a member of l.amhda 
Delta Mu. 

Tie 

George PIttS and Rohert Sheldon, 

tied for treasurer, were both Maroon 
Key men. Pitts is a member of Theta 
Chi, ami Sheldon ,,f l.amhda Chi Al- 
pha. 

Irma Malm, secretary, is a member 

of i'hi /eta. Larry Reagen, Alpha JI9 GUESTS 

Sigma I'hi, and James Dayson, Theta 
Chi, serve respectively as sergeant 
and captain. 

Kurt 

t lenient Burr, sopiioniore president 

is a member of Theta Chi, and a soc 

• or player. Jean Phillips will nerve 

a second year as vice president she 

is a I'hi /eta. 

St reel er 

Ronald Streeter, Theta Chi, start 
a second year as treasurer. Barbara 
Critchett, I'hi /eta. contiuues a 
cretary. 



Allegro 

Adagio 

< iavotte 

Ana Cantahile 

(iavotte 

Allegro 
2. a. Mendelssohn, Madrigal 

b. Mendelssohn, Flowers of May 
•'>. a. Bach, Arioso 

b. Martini, Gavotte 

Miss Pierpont ami Professor Waugh 

II 
1. Three Minuets 

a. Handel. Minuet in F major 
With dance 

b. Beethoven, Minuet in E Hat 

major 

c. Mo/art, Peasant Minuet with 

dance 

Mrs. Merrick. Professor Waugh, 
and Dance ( ifoup 



Conlinnrd from /' 



yoke. 

Sigma I'hi Kpsilon. Dick Hamilton 

and llis Orchestra. Chaperones. Mr. 
and Mrs. I'arsons, and Mr. and Mi 
Larry Briggs. The Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Heart. Informal, 

I.'mIi.h.I I'iih.h, K.illi.iin,- I'imO i,I \\ 

'■I Dmva J..lii,s..ii. "Pot*" Malgral ..i ii,-,,i- 

I'.i.l . Phil llmriiii. .|:,„j... gooal .,( N..illi,,i,,|, 
'on; .I.nv TlJfcot Sh.li.rli C'..,wley: (..,.,,... 

Flanagan, DoroUii Clifford "i . ,.n, r riui 

l.«.l.v ..f the Klm.s ; It,, i,. ii Otstonan. Rha 
Suprvnantof I'l.o. n. . . t.i.n.i ( ,,,„ i„,,,i, |^,, M ,. 

Sllll.. II ..f VV..r.este. ; |j,,|, M,,|(, N„,,, j Wl(l . 

'>■•""' Frandsen, Kappa Sigma, and n'„ r!L ". ' «n * ! "' 

■ . ,. ,. „,. „ .' K ' ' '"' •.'"irii.iii. June Klliiui ,; Driftrcllff 

John Gould, Iheta Chi, complete the m n. v. , .,„, i ,,. m ; „ v K " r iMot 

sophomore list as sergeant and cap ! '""'"«ii ; Hurry Kucb, .!..>,. i < .,n, ,„,.„,„„, „, 
tain. Si.iineiiei.i ; Kim. i M:iii.i».n. .inn.- fisrrand 

1 of Ca.enliel.l. 

Theta chi. Jack Carton of Holyoke. 

Chaperones, Mr. and Mrs. Riley, and 



Elections for the carnival ball com 
mittee will be held ;,t the same time. 
by the juniors, that the tie for 194(1 
class treasurer is revoted. 



Mr. ami Mrs. Swenson. Formal, 

Kv.i.ll Ll,|,„|... m„, ,..,,,,, ,..,,,, j 

Wilton ■ rra.nl lin Dnvl , n,,,,, Main Ronald 
"•""'. laanna Phillip : John Kirsrh, Nancj 



Dr. Su's last plea was "D., not 

hate the Japanese people; Japanese '""'" -f sm , „,■!,, i,i \, l)llir N , ni . AllM . i 

Fascist warlords are responsible for n '"" v "' ■>»•>■■<• Coifc ,-. . u,n„,,i i, ., 

the atrocities in China" \ movie of , ''' '"•" f ,llivi '" "' '"""" ' W •'"" ** 

,, ,„. , ' |,,M - ryrinn: Clifford Luce, Viralnia Pes 

the war m chma concluded the talk 

As a SUb-title put it. the rn-.vie ,, 



vealed the effects of "sadistic w»l 

erased invaders." 



COLLEGE STORE 

Everything for the Student 



I Wore, t., : Maraharl All. ,.. ii.h-.iI.a i,,„, 
"' Ifforeeatai . Mr. and Hi William John 

''■"""' I!"". J./,,,,,.. MeCready ,,r 

Continned on /';:. h 



RHYME REASON in him 
Conttnutd from I'nc i 



Luncheons 

S«»da Fountain 

Student Supplies 
ON TBI CAMPUS 



Banners and Souvenirs 
Hooks and 

Magazine* 
NORTH COLLBGB 



RAD/OS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 



ROOM ACCESSORIES 



RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL E£& CO 



63 So. Pleasant St. 



Amherst, Mass. 



"' '• m ren'1 for Walter Wlehell'a 
medllne;, nothing probably would have 
happened. Rut, all th- unsold and un- 

iino records in that Issue have been 
recalii d, and ■ n< w mors discreel II ■ 
"•• been made. So, when y MU .-.■ .-,,, 
"Ole Man afoae," don't get excited; 
you're probably not getting ;ni> „,,,,,. 

than sou payed for. 

I QO bell, \e (he,,. || ,,,„■ Ii- .( ( ..|,. 

tion in a house ,,n this rsmpti , so . . 
,: "'' th< m iral is, don't talk with yoar 
mouth full. 

STREET BAGS 

in 

Sturdy UetJtem 

N^ell Lined and Fitted 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, TIU'KSDAY, OCTOBKK 27. 1936 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. I III RSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1938 



Statesmen Pin Hopes On Wide-Open Offense In Gamble For A Win Over Jeft I State- Amherst Soccer Teams Battle Tomorrow As Week-end Activities Start 




MAROON MENTOR 



Every year with the coming of the Amherst game, State 
College freshmen get all steamed up over the idea of tearing down 
the Amherst goal posts on the Friday night before the game, bash- 
ing in a "Willie" head or two, or (for sissies) scribbling "M.S.C." 
on the sidewalk in front of the Amherst fraternity houses. 

What an asinine way to show loyalty to a college! 
It is understandable how some freshmen, just a year out 
of high school, might think that riots are rallys; but the 
sad part of the picture, here at State, is that too many of 
our upperclassmen never grow up. If for one year the 
upperclassmen refrained from the annual uptown brawl, 
on the Friday night before the Jell game, the whole silly 
tradition of going up to the Amherst rally would be brok- 
en. Frosh have to be lead and would never think of going 
up alone. 

The average State College student should not be blamed for 
the annual trouble tip-town. He knows that maroon paint on the 
front steps of the Amherst library will never win a football game 
and that "M.S.C," on the Psi U. sidewalk never stopped a Sabrina 
back. There is a minority here, however, that can't understand 
these things. They think breaking up the Amherst rally is fun 
and that property damage and general disorder should be for- 
given on the grounds that it is just "fun." 

The Amherst College nose is none to clean in this respect, 
either. Much of the trouble last year was caused by Jetfs who 
played C. 1. O. as far as rioting and disorder went. Amherst, 
howt-ver, does not have a tradition of dropping down on the State 
campus in swarms to break up our rally or paint our buildings. 
At times, Amherst students, have damaged college property but 
it has always been the work of only a few — not a mob. 

Our college should not suffer because scatter-brained stu- 
dents riot. It is up to the average State College student to see 
that the minority is curbed and that the freshmen learn the dif- 
ference between college and mob spirit Tomorrow night, after 
the local rally, some one of OUT campus dim-wits will cry out "on 
to Amherst" as if he were sounding a battle charge. It is at this 
point that the student body should show its real spirit— not by 
jumping on the poor fellow, but by ignoring him. 

The Senate and the Adelphia, who have the best in- 
terests of the college at heart, should make it known that 
attendance at Amherst football rallys is great stuff for 
Amherst students, but not the proper place for State Col- 
lege men. It shouldn't be necessary for them to enforce 
this as a law — merely asking students not to make fools 
out of themselves, should be enough. 

Massachusetts State is the underdog this Saturday, but can't 
be counted out of the picture. Any team with the spirit and fight 
of Ebb Caraway's 1938 grid machine has to be considered. Win 
or lose. Saturday, the football team will be a credit to the college. 
Whether the students will be a credit, also, depends on Friday 
niglit. 




MAROON LINE PRIMED TO STOP AMHERST 
RUNNING ATTACK PACED BY PATTENG1LL 

Spirit of State Team is Biggest Factor in Favor of Local* 
to Win Gives Ebb Caraway's Club a Fighting 
Chance For an Upset 

JEFFS PLAN A WARM 
RECEPTION FOR MSC 



Sabrina Club (Jetting Better 

Every Game Says Amherst 

"Student" Scribe 



Coach Kbb Caraway 



FROSH DEFEATJWEAK 
DEERF1ELD ACADEMY 

Bullock Counts Twice, Evans, 

Frietas Once, in 

26-0 Rout 



liiding high in their first game of 
the season, a fast moving freshman 
football team trounced a light Dei r- 
fieltl Academy to the tune of 2<i-() 
at Alumni Field last Thursday. 



By Jerry Dougan 
(Amherst Student Sports Reporter) 

Undefeated with the season half 
over, and aiming to stay that way, the 
1938 edition of the Amherst jugger- 
naut is hoping to provide an extreme- 
ly warm reception for Massachusetts 
State when the Jeffs play host 013 
Pratt field Saturday. Coach Jordan 
can point to results for his facts, the 
Sabrina squad has been getting more 
impressive every time out, and with 
most of the early season injuries back 
in playing shape, seems to he in the 
best form of the year. 

At the beginning of the season, the 
squad shaped up to be topheavy with 
good backs, with a nucleus of sen- 
iors. Captain Joys at quarterback, 
Rebel Al Furman at full and Vic l'at- 
tengill at right half were foregone 



SATURDAY'S 


LINEUP 


STATE 




AMHERsi 


Morey 


le 


< niilno 


Prusii-k 


It 


( nan 


Xajchowski 


lK 


> v kittq 


Blasko 


c 


PilUhun 


Pay son 


rg 


Hubbard 


Malcolm 


rt 


""rtnth,. 


Norwood 


re 


Hilling 


Irzyk 


qb 


Jin, 


Santucci 


rhh 


PatteapJ] 


Rudge 


Ihb 


Robertj 


( on. ml 


fb 


1 urnun 



Continued from Page 



Forkey-Gustafson Pass Combination Give; 

|^ Worcester 6-0 Win Over Statesmen Saturday 



The frosh received the kick-of. and barters before they put on pads. Then 

aft.-r three plays punted back to Ernie Lawton was put out of action 

Deerfteld. Dewey, playing safety for f,, r the season, leaving the left half 

Deerfleld, caught the kick, but a berth an uncertainty. Stu Robert*, 145 

smashing tackle by "Woody" Bloom 



forced him to fumble. Dick Coffin 
pounced on the ball to recover for 
the frosh on I>eerlield*s 20. Jim Bui 
lock scored through the line on the 
next play. 

EvaM Scores 
The KCOnd score of the game was 
turned in as a result of fine broken 

field running by "Bud" Evans, shifty 
freshman back, on a jaunt around 
right. Two points from placement 
were converted by Clark. 

The '42 footballers gave a fine ex 



pound speedster, and sophomore 
Frank Sweeny, a brilliant passing 
find, have been dividing most of the 
work at the odd backfield post. 
The Line 
The line was distinctly more of a 
question mark since the entire center 
of the forward wall was vacant via 
graduation. Doug Pillsbury, outstand- 
ing junior candidate for the center 
assignment, was injured early in prac- 
tice, and Nicky Tufts, blond second 
stringer, was put out of service 
against Springfield. Thus Jordan was 



hibition of blocking and running, but left with only sophomores Skeel and 



it was the blocking that highlighted 
the game. The best blocks of the af 
ternoon were turned in by Dick Cof> 
fin and Carl Wei me to pave the way 
to another yearling score as Bullock 
iHced off tackle and romped 60 yard 



Rosenberry for heavy duty at the piv- 
ot post. At the guards, juniors Hollis 
Wliitten and Stan Whittemore were 
slated for starting action, only to see 
the latter suffer an arm injury in 
the Springfield fracas. So far the 



\a 
m 



Unable to uncover the trick needed 
to score against a hard-fighting Wor- 
cester outfit, the Caraway eleven lost 
a close vrdict last Saturday when 
a forward pass, Custafs.m from For- 
key, broke a scoreless game and al- 
lowed the visiting Techmen to emerge 
OB top. With the ball on the »- 
yard line, in the final period. Forkey, 
big Tech iron man, faded back and 
slanted a short pass into the waiting 
arms of Custafson, his mite sized 
team-mat.- who easily eluded two 
tacklers and crossed the goalline far 
the lone score. 

Eaiiy in the opener, an exchange 
of kicks gave State the ball on its 
twenty. Slamming off the left side of 
the line, Santucci went for thirty 
yard,, and a pass to Irzyk brought 
the ball to the Tech forty yard line. 
]\,)t- the drive ended, with Rudge 
lifting a beautiful boot down to off- 
side on the twenty. Worcester re- 
turned the kick, and State imrmdi 
Btely 'ook to thfl air with a Rudge to 
Irzyk fling netting thirty-four yards. 
Aerial Attack 

Tin Engineers unleashed a fast 

aerial attack to start off the WCOttd 

period and repeatedly threatened the 

Stai. i|i fee • -. When Forkey faded 
way bach and began slinging long 
Da , to Tech ends and backs it 
. . m. i) that State would succumb to 
thi Attack, but with Al Irzyk doing 

me ch ver covering and two crash 
ing . nd con ver gi ng on the passer, 
State managed to hold its own. Not 
wood and Rudge wen- the ends, Rudge 



having b« 



i! ' ailed 



hi- back 



field poet to guard the right flank. 
Time after time, Norwood and he 
charged in, untouched, to worry For- 
key until the Tech passer looked hope- 
fully toward the bench for aid. 

Allan and Jackimczyk entered the 
fray at this point for Santucci and 
Frandsen, and the two newcomers 
rammed through the Tech line for 
good gains. 

Blocked Punt 

No serious threats developed in 
the third quarter and the fleet-footed 
Gustafson was the leading claimant 
for ground gaining honors. Late in 
the chukker, Tech captain Carl I^ewin 
forged in to smother a Skogsberg punt 
and recover on the State 24. The 
threat petered out however in the 
face of strong defensive work by the 
State line. 

With the ball in State's possession, 
a fateful Skogsberg toss wandereil in- 
to Gustafson's hands and the wee one 
scampered for seven yards. A few 
playi later. Forkey's heave made the 
score 6-0. 

The line -up: 

STATE 

Norwood le 

Prtudck It 

Zajchowski lg 

Blacko c 

Geoffrion rg 

Malcolm rt 

Morey re 

Irzyk qb 

Santucci rhh 

Frandsen Ihb 

Conant fb 



to the goal line for his second touch- tackles have been handled by big Pres 
down. Coan and Wimpy Smythe, a sopho- 

Only Few Men more replacement who came along 

Another freshman "hope" in the just in time to fill the shoes of the 
person «>f Ben Frietas lived up to all injured Harry Ward. Pop Seeley, first 
expectations by turning in a fast 'string end, is out for the season with 



WORCESTER 

Bellos 
Lewifl 

Andreopoulis 

Peters 

Wilson 

( 'handler 

Rasbivsky 

Longnecker 

Fritch 

Gustafson 

Forkey 



game. His ball-carrying was hard and 
tricky, and his lone score came with 
not a Deerfteld man getting p hand 
on him. Dave Bradley and Lane star- 
red for the visitors, but poor block- 
CnnlimnJ on P.t£<. " 



a shoulder dislocation, so it is evident 
that Jordan has had his share of wor- 
ries. 



HARRIERS BEAT W.P.I 
RUNNERS HERE, 19-41 

Pickard Again Leads Field With 

31 Second Advantage 

Over Dunklee 



STATE RANKS SIXTH 
IN LEAGUE STANDINGS 



tussel. Pies Coan who tit- 
left tackle slot of the Sale 
and his mate on the port sidi , ii 
Ward will make the Jefl i 
quite formidable. Holly \\ 
guard makes the Amherst spinnei 
offensive threat. Al Furman, 
fullback does the booting ami I 
Jack Joys is the signal callei 
Pillsbury, end over end arl ■• 
perform at center. 

Past Saturday against a • 
able opponent ( "Little Three" \\... 
leyan, Amherst called out the 
plays to score twice and elim 
of its triangle contenders. If 
stout-hearted forwards can shew • 
same ability that enabled them to - 
Duke Abbruzzi, the Rhode I 
flash, and Frank Gustafson, W 
ter speed artist by stopping Patl 
gill, the locals may upset the 
Amherst showed up weak bef 
Cardinals air attack last Saturn.. 
were often in danger from col 
forwards. On this basis, Stat 
pin its touchdown hope.- on a I 
tricky aerial campaign. 

Chief offensive weapon al thi 
men is the clever assort it n I oi 
ner thrusts which are run i ' 
to the line of scrimmage ami i ••■'.. 
careful defense tactics. Kiirni:m 
be the man in the saddle on i 
these plays. 

Open Offense 

Coach Caraway has been p 
his squad for a wide open 
aimed for the Amherst weak 
The spirit of the game for SI 
be to gamble for a win rather t 
be over cautious. Practice BgsiBfl ' 
single and double wing back fa* 
tions has occupied the Statesmen 
week in preparation for tin- S*W 
offense. 

The spirit of the Stat. 
though touchdown shy ami defir. 
underdogs, is strong SAOttgfc tr) n 
the town title anything but 



Harvard, Dartmouth Lead Soc- 
cer Loop — Rodda, Bowen 
in Scoring Race 

According to the present records 
the Maroon hooters are holding sixth 
position in the New England Inter- 
collegiate Soccer League. The States- 
men to date have won 1, lost 1, and 
tied 1, the Fitchburg game not count- 



Th<> Massachusetts State cross- 
country team bounced back into the 
winning stride that teams of earlier 

years have shown when it defeated ing since the State Teachers are not 

the Worcester Polvtech harriers last in the league. 

Saturday on the home course by a Although they have no chance at 

score of 1!»-41. Parry Pickard, as yet the league lead, the Prigg-adiers are 

undefeated this v.-ar— at home, won making a very fine showing against 

the race handily in the time of 24 such stiff competition. Only a half <-f 

minutes 11 seconds, several second- a game behind Springfield they have 



slower than his time of the previous 
week. 

Dunklee Oi lech was the next man 

to finish! 81 seconds later than < ap- 

tain Pickard, and was followed by 
Harold Rose a few seconds after 
Wards. Ending in a triple tie for 
fourth place were three Slate men, 

Kennedy, Raywmrd, and Putney, the 

latter being sophomores. In order af 
feel these ©•»« Strandbcrg of Tech, 
ScholtS of State, Fernane of Tech, 
and Charlie Slater of State to coin 
plete the first ten. 



an excellent chance to pass last year's 
champs, for the Indians this week are 
up against the league -leading liar 
vard team. In scoring Karl P.ovveu 
ami Hud Rodda rank among the had 
ers with two goals each. 

The standings: 

Won l-ont Tied 

Harvard ■■ 3 " 

Dartmouth 4 I " 

Wttteyitn * I • 

Williams •'* I ° 

BprlngfoM I I ' 

Maw BUt* ' ' ' 

Yatt i i I 

I Amhertt ' 2 " 



COACHES WONT TALK 
ABOUT PURPLE GAME 

Amherst Captain and 
Both Look For Touprh GaW 
Saturday 



(Jetting anyone on tl 
ing staff to make a defl 
ment about possible n 
day's grid battle with Amhtttt 
near Impossible task 
and his assistants were snylhU* 
certain of State's chat- 
Coach Caraway— "I ' 

say." 

Hon Hush- "It's up to 
can win if they will." 

Captain Morey— "We 

ter physical shape thai 
time this season ami H 
play the kind of I" 
they are capable, I b 
can take Amherst." 

Captain Captain H 
Amherst -"No State r- 
the bag." 

Coach Jordan of -^ " 
be a tough ball ir.ni" 
herst games are." 



MAROON GIVEN SLIGHT EDGE OVER JEFF 
BOOTERS ON STRENGTH OF THE RECORDS 

Club Has Three Outstanding Threats in Willis. All-New 
■ land Wing; Coleman. Left Outside; and Right Half 
Ray— Home Field Gives Locals Advantage 



SOCCER CAPTAIN 



i. 



f ,- festivities of the Wirk- 

ite soccer team plays host 

■ Friday afternoon. The two 

evenly matched it's a toss 

o which will come out on top. 

■ , really depends on the 

whichever team puts in 
:,1 will have the edge, Af- 
| al marker is scored, the 

will have a tough time 
,;, k. According to the pres- 

the I'rigg-adiers should 
Lord Jeffs, for Amherst hss 

I game and lost 2. while 

men have '- wins, only l 

i i Me. 

eek's moral victory over 
: eld has given the Maroon Club 
' nee that will make it B 
team to beat. The fact that 
playing on their home field 
factor against the possibil- 
Amherst victory. The South- 
rank two berths below the 
in the intercollegiate 
but that's no criterion since 

| JeffS' loSSeS have heell to 

■ ail and Wesleyan, two of the 
. (jest outfits in the league. 

• re State team will be in 

i .ndition and raring to 

i -• a~t year's defeat. If Wilson 

to guard the goal the way 

been doing, tin liriggsmen can 

i • ate on scoring goals and need 

rears about the defense. The 

forwards are going to have 

if 'rouble when they try to 

by Stan Podolak and Milt Auer- 

Speaking about forwards, the 

man to watch in the Amherst 

- Willis, an all New Kngland 

I ien; Burr will probably have 

• job of watching Mr. Willi-, who 

tbifi year has scored only one 

u( who has been the mainstay 

Amherst forward line. Cole- 

ther member of the Purple 

! " hears watching will be 
Podolak, Bttt the big gun 

■ -t attack will be right 
ck Ray. Coach liriggs had the 



STAR 






WESLEYAN AND CONN. STATE ARE PICKED 
TO PACE CONN. VALLEY CHAMPIONSHIPS 

Captain Larry Pickard of Maroon and Captain Phil Moyer of 

Amherst t<> Run in Rubber Battle as state and Jeffs 
Score Race as Dual Meet 



Hud Ko.hla 

MAROON TIES CHAMP 
INDIAN BOOTERS 1-1 






Tommy Lyman 

YEARLINGS TROUNCE 
MOUNT HERMON 19-7 



Rodda, Podolak, Lyman and Wil- 
son Star as State Holds 
Springfield 

Accomplishing what Harvard, Vale 
ami Dartmouth failed to do, the State 

boo ter 8 covered themselves with glory 
last Saturday by fighting the inter 
collegiate champion Springfield eleven 
to a 11 deadlock. Combining a pow- 
erful defense and an aggressive of- 
fense, the llriggadiers were able to 
stave off the persistent Indian at- 

tacks, and at the same time had 

Displaying power that completely enough punch to put the hall through 
Stopped the opposition, the Maroon the enemy goal. 
yearlings swept their way to a 1!»-T 
victory over Mount Mormon School 




Competing for the Connecticut \ al 
lev cross country championship, nine 

>'" M track .ho,.., ten gold medals 

and tlu- perpetual trophj which ,, j lt .;,| 

'> the winning college, 

institutions 

one together 

ihei it College 

1 and Massa- 

• l; ' ■' year's runners up. 

Springfield and Coast 

Guard from Massachusetts, ami < onn 

Trinity, ami Wesleyan, last 

victor, from Com ticut. 

There will he an Innovation In this 
year's affah when the i' n . " 

all the entrant; 
will he 



I o i o 1 1 e y e a I 

seven ( 'oiinectii in \ :ij j, 

of higher lea i ning u ill , 

ttext Tuesdaj on the Am 
course. Besides Amhei 

eliu 

•here uil |„. 
,1 

State, 

year's 



mien f nun 

excepi Coast Guard 
featured In a special race. 

, " <••''>"•"<•» of Coast Guard are 
eligible for the varsitj 

therefore, ma\ not 



team, and 
enter as n team 

lor t|„. freshman race. 
\\i 



Buddy Evans Runs Through 

Prep School Line For Two 

Scores 



in a bin -ix contested battle, yestei 
• lav at N'orthlield. 

Halfback Buddy Evans scored twice 



i.'oihi.i Scores 
Every minute of the contest was s 
nip and luck battle with the Indian 
having a slight edge. The State tall) 

came late in the first quarter when 
tor the Statesmen „n long runs while LymWl ht . :i( |,,] tll( , , (;( || Ul r . 1|(t ,.,„, 
the third State sere came when ,.,„,,)., w|lM ,„„,,,.,, It ,„ ,-,„. ,,,„ (i ,. st 
Brady, frosh .enter, fell on a punt .,,„,, „,- tl „. ^, lll( , ,,,,„„ t|)) . n ((I) f|]( . 
blocked ... the end zone by Woody advantage seesawed bach and forth 
Bloom who had rushed in fast from until Springfield broke the ice in the 



(apt. Larrj Pickard 

STUDENTS URGED TO 
LEARN M.S.C. CHEERS 



Bob Glass, Senior Cheer Leader 

Lists Yells Fol- 
ded (lame 



right tackle. lioth Hvans touch 



third period with the tying marker. 



once again the Massachusetts State 

Students are requested to learn the 
State cheers for use at the Amherst 

game. Bob Glass, senior cheer leader, 
.!.-k> that the students co operate, snd 

be able to out shout, out yell, out 
cheer, and out light the Amherst 
lands next week end. 
Laos, w.i 

Mums.. Mh \ i . ,,i. 

Rah, Rah, Rah, Rah 
Ma i hui rtti 
Mas'chuaetta 

Mi ' < h i 'tin 

I KAMI I i: \M ! I RAM ! 



nal 



(. 



«iejan, with rour veterans of t|„. 
io finished for the Cardl 



oepend on, Is favored to ,,. 

Peat 'next week, state, ii„i, | ,,,,„„, 

'•' VVe leyan, has hut tw of last 
Jeer's first live, and i a n.,t expected 

'" Come so close in the race. I',,,,,,,,. 

("'"I State will he the (,.;,„, ,„ „,„,.,, 

"' "'•• "we* and may even win the 
fray, ami thin will ,,..) 
keen mentors. 



surprise tl 



le 



' Tommy Lyman looked 
American against the Sol- 

• King and the Jetf> are 
' their defense to bottle 

• State player. 
able lineup: 

FT ATI 



| 

1 



AMHKKST 



(i 

RF 
I.F 
RH 
CH 
LH 
RO 
HI 
' P 
I.I 
L0 



down were the ,e-ult of beautiful The final whirt j e fottnd l(nth „ ;it;i 

open t.el.l running. The dusky hack fighting it out without any change ,,, Rah, 

pranced :vi yards to the second mark- M ,„ ( , Thl , v lhi . (Uy cMei t)l(> vvnoh , 

f l,;i " thing oiv after two overtime periods 
Dac k resulted in no further scoring al- 
though both team.- threatened con- 
tinually. 



Slum i.ii 



yesterday on bow to stop carrying put on bj a Marooi 
he can be subdued, the j nc€ Louie Hush. 

m will he stopped. Ray, 

le hall to Willis and Cole- 
enter of the Amber t at 



FROSH ELECTED 

( MIlHtH ..' '' ". I' ' . 



state Freshmen 



Stott Coffin 



Hunt 

Otis 

Hitchcock 

Ray 



Johanson Bloom 
Olena IWolk 
Wood* I-"' let I - 
Willi., Bullock 
< \ lei -.n i).i 
Roberts Spark.- 



ing spoiled any chain f their get- 
ting RWay to score. Call it what you 
want, the frosh played the last fen 

minute- of the game with only ten 
men on the field. 
The line-up: 

Deerield Academj 

LE 

I.T 

La 

c 
RG 

i:i 

RE 

FB 

RHB 

I. Ill: 
QB 



Werille 

Clark 
Brady 

Pierce 



Dates 

Egan 
Kelson 

Meat 

Howe 

Miller 

Brown 

Lane 

McRes 

Bradley 

I lewev 



Wilson Outstanding 

Mot of tin Maroon eleven gave 

pli ndid pel formancei . ami in the 

midst of the combat a tar was horn. 

Eliot Wilson, whose potentialities 
wen practit-ali) unknown at the start 
if the season, das blossomed forth 

into the craftiest goalie State has 
seen in recent year-. Time after time 
the strong Springfield forward wall 
brought the ball to within easy scor- 
ing position only to lie thwarted by 

goalie Wilson. Playing the same brand 

of hall as Wilson, Stan Podolak, the 

Ma-oon"- all American prospect, was hall game will have to ..Men. I 

another big factor in the State-men' DeMolay 

line showing. A fallback in name only, \ T "' n ' wiI1 '»•' ■ " ting of the he 

Molay members on Campos In room 



I K.\ M : on plaj ii ' • nami I 

Maaaarhaaettt ^ ■ II 
\ < H i 
-K-l-l-S 

ch !•'! 
KmIi. rak, Rah, rah, Rah, 
i k \ vi i rSAM I . i ; \ m • 

M(M 1 ill 

I \TK! 

i tit team 

Kk'M i. 

I' It'll! ! 

Stalo Yill 
Ma Btati Ma . State. Kaaa, Btat 
mil. mil. mh. Mil,, mil. rail 

•S-T-A-T-K 
S-T-A-T-K 
S-T-\ l-K 



nil. Rah, miIi. 



Bead 

The regular weekly rehearsal oi the 

hand will be held tonight at 7:80 in 
the Memorial Building, All member 
win. wish to play at the Amherst foot* 



Stan was not only the wrench in the 
Indian machine, hut also figured in 
the State offer, 



102 Stockbridge, tonighl at 7:00. Any- 
body who is Interested in DeMolaj 

will he welcome. 



Beermaas Hack 

The win,,,,,- f ,|,e i:r,7 „ ,, l( . n .,. y 

Heermanaof Wesleyans, will be out to 

''•peal. I.a.-t week against Tufts at 

Medford, Heermans broae the record 
for the course which was held by 

Steve Starr of Tufts. Others on .he 

fa\..re,| Cardinal team a.,. Gurnsey 
who finished behind Lucsai of < •,„„,'. 
;; ' ;,lr '" ,;, k'' third, stone Mid Mc 
' U Ick, who took twelfth and thir 
'""ii. respectively, to give Wesleyan 

an unusually low score of ::i. The one 

man Lome is See, who came In fifth 

Stale's score m that race WS I 67, and 

" •' followed by Amhei t with 'M and 

'onn. State with !»<;. 

This do COUntr) meet will he, 
B a lidS issue, the rul,|„.| , ,,,.,.) |„. 

tween Captain Harr) Pickard of the 
Maroon and Captain I'hil Moyer of 
tmherst. Two year ago Pickard de 
feated Moyer, hut the table were re 
versed la t year when Moyer took 
fourth in the Connecticut Valley meet 
and Pickard eventh, state, however, 
defeated Amher I a .. team in that 
meet by the .-,-,,,.. ,,r 28 36, ami n 
'' , 'l"'••' , ■ This i chalked up .. B duel 

meet between Stale ami A mh. r t ;l | 

lll ""t- , li run a. part of the Conn 

Cat Valley meet. 

The gold trees le,, \ in ; ,,, i,, the 

• sen men of t (■•- winning team, the 
manager and the coach, and the t, ,, 

gold medals will he given to the i,, t 

ten men to finish. The trophy ami 

champion hip go to the winning col 
lege. Profi or Warren E. Green of 
Amhen I will he chief 'ore, .,,,.1 
' oai h l.lewe||\ n Berb) nf State win 

he tile leferee -mce t Ii.- lie it \< a | , nil 

Is t year on the local 



SKVEN STATESMEN WHO WILL SE E ACTION THIS SAT URDAY AGAINST THE SOLDIERS OE THE KING 



campu . 




Rewle KndRo 



Al Pru-dck 



Stan Jarkimtzvk 



Itrud Malcolm 



Chet < on. mi 



M Ir/vck 



Don Mien 



M K 



BASIL B . 



WOOD 



L I BRARY 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, (KTOBKK 27. 193«t 



ATTENTION MILITARY MAJORS!!! 

NETTLETON RIDING BOOTS— Now is the time to place your orders for Riding Boots. 
They will be made up to your measurements as in previous years. Consult us at your earliest convenience. 



^■^ 



THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



Secrets of Past and Coming Amherst Weekend Bared as Inquirer and 
Questions Get Strange Results From Frosh and Upperclass Students 



Hy Myron \\ . Fisher 

There comes a time in th<' fall of 
every year when t!i«' football schedule 
announces t hut Amherst and Massa- 
chusetts State Colleges will meet to 
play football. This has, in the past, 
been a good excuse for much excite- 
ment and whatnot. l'pperelas>meii are 
driven frantic thinking about what 
girl they will take to the dance and 
how they will get her here: those who 
d<> not take girls spend most of their 
time thinking about which table they 
will slide under when their beer ca- 
pacity has been filled. Those who live 
in Amherst dread the eve of the 
game, since «.n this night the placid 
Amherst air is filled with horrible 
barabarotts cries, parts of goalposts, 
and such gory matter. The freshmen 
don't know the difference. 

A Difference? 

With all this in mind, we cherished 
the idea that perhaps this year things 
would be different. Hence, we set out 
to discover if this would be true. We 
also made it a point to ask frehmen 
what they thought of this "Amherst 
Weekend" (whether it was a time, 
place, or thing). Yoici: 

Q — (To upperclassmen) 

What are you going to do this Am- 



herst Weekend that you did not do 
last year*.' 

C, F. '41: 

"I plan not to do what 1 did last 
year, i. e. nothing." 
J. S. '40: 

"I'm not going with the same boj 
— and no hard drinks, such as tea 
with cake chasers." 

K. B. G. '39: 

"This year I'm not betting at all. 
Also, 1 am not taking any fraternity 
brothers' girls, but my own — my best 
gal." 

M. F. '39: 

"This year I shall not serve punch 
and entertain the chaperones; instead 
I think I'll go to Bo8ton and see the 
Harvard-Princeton game, and enjoy 
a good football game — for a change." 

M. K. 41 : 

"I'll conduct a secret raid and paint 
the town maroon with green trim- 
mings. Also, I shall use the Amherst 
goalposts for toothpicks instead if 
firewood and bats, as I did last year." 

H. S. '40: 

"Last year I took a swell girl from 
Boston, but since then we have dis- 
agreed. It has left such a void in my 
life that nothing can possibly fill it. 



In other words, I shall not have a 
date this year- --even after trying hard 
for two Weeks." 

A. C. '40: 

"Different brand this year, if you 
know what I mean, and I don't think 
you do." 
E. M. '39: 

"This year I shall need a chaufeur 
for my car." 
S. 14. '39: 

"Last year at this time, I met my 
wife on a blind date. It's only the mar- 
riage ties that will keep me away 
from the taproom." 
C. K. '41s 

"This year 1 shall grind — study my 
economics." 

K. H. '41: 

"I refuse to commit myself: my 
girl friend reads this paper." 

B. G. '40: (after a terrific battle of 

wits) 

"I'm afraid I'm going to do the 
same this year, but I'm going down 
fighting." 

Q_(To Freshmen) 

What is Amherst Weekend? 
A. R.: 

"That without which we wouldn't 
have Friday, Saturday, or Sunday." 
R. K.: 



"My impression is that it is the 

time when fraternity houses are clean 
for two days." 
B. ft H.: 

"A week of riot, which is all I've 
heard about it." 
A. N.: 

"A period <>f time followed hy a 

dense alcoholic fog." 



319 GUESTS 

Continued fi><>'/ Pag* 5 



Smith ; John Parker, Rebecca Elliott of Bos- 
ton ; Frank Wing, Louiss Huwman ; Janus 
Jamison, Susan Libby of Vassal- ; Walter 
Wakefield. Virginia Kiihurdson ; Robert toll- 
man, Harriet Downs of Smith; Richard Ore- 
tie, Phyllis Gladden of Smith ; John Retal- 
liik, Mary MacCarthy of PittsfUM ; Hub.it 
Packard, Catherine Leete ; Courtney StetBon, 
Harriet Depinat of Bradford Junior Colege ; 
Robert Peters, Janet James of Conn. College 
for Women ; Richard Curtis, Mildred McClel- 
lan of Chestnut Hill ; Walter Rockwood, 
Gladys Fish: William Cox, Garnet Cadwell ; 
Robert (Mass. Janet Payson of La sell Junior 
College ; Howard Stiff, Janice Munson of Phil- 
adelphia ; John Gould, Winifred Todey of Wil- 
lesley ; Richard Marks, Muriel Parmenter of 
Stamford, Conn. ; James Walker, Betty Stand- 
wich of Bridgeport : Paul White, Jean Cnr- 
tisle; Donald Thayer, Marjorie Damon; Court- 
ney Foagate, Betty Viekers of Westfield ; Louis 
l.ont.'. Florence Hall of Worcester ; David Bur- 
bank, Jean Fuller of Worcester ; Winthrop 

Avery, Betty LsjSpOT ; Harold Straube, Max- 
Ine Graves of Gr een field ; James Payson, Jane 
Robinson of Lasell Junior College; Allan Full- 
er, Anna Forbes of Smith ; Irving Bsj RV sr, 
Annetta Ball ; Walter Irvine, Shirley Bur- 
dens : Ronald Chimin, Edna Johnson of Smith : 
David Hornbaker, Annetta Sedgewick of 
Springfield ; Robert Hornbaker, Eleanor Fos- 



ter of Badcliffe i William Sfl • 
Helen Mm < Did : Dav.u Tappan I 
son i/i Smith; George Pitt-. En 
Walter Mil"., Evelyn Ofantan of Si 

• it Ewing, Barbara Teller '.I Hi 
Frederick Goode, Sonla Chan 
pence College : I b ester Coa&nti Eta 
ball of Colby Junior College; ifa.ru 

Helen Janice ; Stuart Hubbard, N 
wood of Walpols. 

Tau 1-lp-iliMi I'll i : "The 

paters." Chaperones, Dr. , 

Warfel, and Dr. Bakietan and 

Swing Motif. Informal. 

Melvin hall'.n, Lucille B.in.M. 
Holyoke ; Harry (iilman. Bobby V, 
Sylvan Lind, Kstella Halpern of Si 
ett Shapiro. Shirley Solin of ( [, 
nest Schwartz, Dotty Goodman oi 
Monis Bloom, Louise Tucker of So 
Cohen. Florence Goldberg ; Irving M 
Abbott of Wellasley; Barnard Hei >. 
Temple of Bryn Hawr; lz Corn 
of Keuka College ; Melvin I;, p 
man of Springfield; Irving Blush. ■.. 
Berga of N. Y. C. ; ('..l.Tiian Kalz, II ., 
of Smith; Samuel (iolub, Sylvia Gold 
Click, Florence Rice of Smith ; Sid ' 
Maltida Jones of Duxbury ; Sidl ■ 
Eileen Coorve of Springfield; Danili |. 
Susie Treni of Greenfield; A. Bu I 

Aaron of Smith ; A. Collier, Myrtle 
man of A. I. C. ; A. Mezi.fr, '':. 
Keuka College; R. Nottenberg, Bettj - 
of Mount Holyoke; R. Raddinv. Estelli 
of Smith; H. Weiiur. Mary Jinn " 
Smith; J. lioldman. Ruth Karlcua ol 
W. Bablnowits, Shirley Smith of G 
A. Rosenbloom, Mildred Tuttle of Smith.-. 

ney Rosen, Dotty Schack of Mount do 

1. BOyOSa, Mamie Rourke of So, Bs 

Kagan, Tbelraa Wolf of Boston . N 

Sally Shrivel of Charleston ; A. I' 
Bloom of Mount Holyoke ; H. Steinboi 
Keller of Boston ; M. Burakoff, Ids \\ 
Chelsea. 




1,1)1)11. DOOI I ¥ 

Football Highlight* 

/ | • i m I hur\ila\ mil/ Saturday 
U I ending A'. It. ( Station 



You 9 ll find smokers 

rywherc keeping Ghester- 

vvith them all day long. 

add to your pleasure when 

re on the job and when you 

a night off. 

takes good things to make a good 
oduct. That's why we use the best 
edients a cigarette can har< 
ild ripe tobaccos and pnr>' 
cigarette paper — to make Chest- 
erfield the cigarette that smokct 
say is milder and better-tasting 



.with MORE PLEASURE 
for millions 




Vol. XLIX 



VMHF.Ksr. MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER :\, 1938 



NO. 7 



MOORE, GOVE VISIT ■ co-chairmen of dads' day committee 
CINCINNATI CONFAB 



'sterchiy For Convention 
Associate Collegiate 
Press 



< 'LAPPER TO SPEAK 



[Students From 250 Colleges to 

Take Part in News 

Discussions 



Moore and Allan Gove, ed- 
. I and business manager ol 
. < ollegisa, left yesterday fur Cin- 
Ohio, tu attend the annual 
it< d Collegiate Press convert- 
three day affair) for college 
. a -paper editors, managers, and 
earbook editors. 

Among representatives from 250 

r colleges, the two local journal- 

•viii hear addresses by prominent 

[national newspapermen and take part 

in round table discussions on specific 

jiiulil ' of newspaper operation. 

|The University of Cincinnati is the 

[convention host, and its vice-presi- j 

Daniel Laurence, will give the 

address of welcome. 

Clapper to Speak 
Radio commentator and columnist 
j Raymond Clapper is scheduled to give 
|'!' address of principal interest "Con* 

of a Washington Columnist." 
important addresses will include 
The Rise of Pictorial Journalism" 




500 FATHERS WILL TAKE PART 
IN DADS' DAY HERE SATURDAY 

Parents Will Attend Class kooins; See It. (). T. C. Hone Show, 

Football Game With Coast Guard; Watch Skits 

Staged by Fraternities 



HINDU WILL APPEAR cadeis at game 

AS VESPER SPEAKER Entire Student Body of Academy 

Will Visit Amherst For 



Mahanam Urate Brachmaehari 

to Also Address Religious 
Classes 



A genuine Hindu 
costume, Mahanam 
chart, noted philosopl 



monk in native 
Brata Brahma- 
er, Rpeaker, and 



lower of the non-vin- 
<>f -M . 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 . i Gandl 



Robert Sheldon 



Lawrence Reagan 



BAKER WILL ATTEND 
TUFTS CEREMONIES 



President One of Dignitaries 

to Attend Inauguration 

of Carmichael 



President Hugh P. Baser, among 

other dignitaries of New England col- 
leges, will attend the ceremonies at 
Tufts College tomorrow for the In- 
duction of Dr. Leonard Carmichael -i- 
Md "Twenty Years of Public Itela- the seventh president of that institu- 
' the latter hy E. Ross Bartly, tion. Returning to his films mater si 
\ ociated Tress White House tei a brilliant (etching and adminls- 
' Powfcnt trative record, Dr. Carmichael sue- 

ceeds the late Dr. A. Cousens. 
A young man «.f about 40, Dr. Cat 
iit'all game between Ohio Wesleyan mu 'hael Is already s ! oil d pBycholo 

gist who has edited ever*! books. 
written a few of his own, and taught 

t Tufts, Harvard, Clark, Brown, ind 
Princeton. H< cornea t. Tufl f ."> th< 
University <•!' Rochester, where he was 

dean of th • College of arts and set 
ences. 

Besides Dr. Carmichael. speakers at 

the induction will include: Dr. James 

Continued on Page 3 



interest will be provided by 
' mi. >n banquet, dance, and a 
«tbal] game hetween Ohio W 
• University of Cincinnati. 

Room-mates 

Moore and Gove have served 

I "llii;ian stair for four years, 

are room-mates and mem* 

f Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 

making the 2000 mile trip 

the interests] <>f better student 

' ns. 



HALL COMMITTKK 

Nine members of the juinor 
class were nominated for posi 
lions on the Winter Carnival Ball 
committee meeting held Tuesday 
night. I'mm these candidates Un 
men and one woman will he elec- 
ted a week from today. Those 
nominated are as follows: John 
Osmun, Roger Brown, Kd Ross- 
ii.. !, Larry Reagan, H a t old I . 
uhe. George Atwater, Hetty Hales 
Irma Malm, and Kay Rice. 

This years hall committee will 
be the first to be under the su- 
pervision of the carnival commit 
ee, instead of operating a> a 
separate Unit as in the past. My- 
ron Beger, '10 social chairman 
of the carnival committee, will 
he chairman of the carnival ball. 



II 



GLEE CLUB CONCERT 
SCHEDULED TONIGHT 



Student Drivers More Law Abiding 
Than Average Motorist Moran Finds 



First Concert of* Season \Vj|| be 

in Northampton at 

7:80 



who drive automobiles on 
"lore law-abiding than 
motorist, if figures tell 

■ has its own registry 

dea and not one person 

• ">nd warning for any 

B *i»ring the past twelve months. 

■ I 

<<">'d. considering the 
9W Police Officer Tom 
registration numbers 
Wcari of faculty and stu- 
little green filing case. 

Registry 

"regristry" was started 
ago when cars began 

ampua and endangered 

!| f students walking be- 

1 1 en, too, the parking 
"tie acuti ; facilities, wars 

handle cars driven by 

one classroom building 

Hi who drives his cat 
makei t! e acquaintance 
■II early in his college 

given a copy v( the 

" filiations and a 
B what la expected of 

'"fist. 



No- Fix 

Officer Moran carrii- Special "no 
fix" ticket.- with him and his author! 
ty is hacked up by the administration Men's Glee Clttb 



The combined men's and women's 
glee clubs will present their first con 
cert of the season tonight at 7:30 
p, m. at the First < 'lunch in North- 
ampton, under the leadership of Di 
rector Doric Alviani. Twenty members 
Of each Club are to participate in th. 
program, which will be p reced ed by a 

dinner. 

The program is as follows: 



editor, and a l<> 
lent movement 

will be a guest speaker at Massachu 
setts Stale College next Sunday eve- 
ning at Vespers in the Memorial build- 
ing at 6:00 p. m. This monk of the 
Vaishnava Order, well-versed in the 
conditions of western civilization, will 

address sine of the reUgfon rlenn 

on campus. His purpose in giving 
these lectures is to help in creating | 
more friendly understanding and ap- 
preciation between eastern and west- 
ern civilisation. 

Editor 
Dr. Brahmaehart, while in India, 

was editor Of the Bengali Relig on* 
Quarterly, and has rince contributed 
to various magazines both Indian and 
American. 

While in his native country. Dr. 
Brahmacheri studied for four year In 
the Indian Ashram school where he 
specialised in Sanskrit literature. 

grammar, and logic. He received his *" 

Bachelor of An degi with Honor •'' 

from Calcutta University, and later 
received his M.A. degree In Sanskrit 

and in western philosophy from the 

■ one university. He completed his 

atudiea at the Meadville Theological 
Seminary and at the University •» 
Chicago where he received his Ph.D. 
deg no in philosophy. 

Fellowship 
Dr. Brahmacari wai sent to Chi 
• ago as a delegate to represent hit 

Ofdei in the First International Con 
gresa of the World Fellowship ..f 

Faitha held during the Century of 
Progress Exposition. The World Fel 
lowshlp has arranged for him to stay 

in the Bast for a while to speak In 
New York and other cities as well a 
at colleges, On his way home he will 

apeak in England, France. r.,i,. t,„ ., 

and India. 



Game 

By John Hayes 

Student registration will take a 

temporary rise and ■ new freshman 
class, sans caps, will be eeii about 
campus next Saturday a an antt< 

pated group Of more than live hitn 

died fathers are scheduled to con 

vene from all points in central .V v 

England to attend Massachus. tt-i 

Slate College's annual Dads' Day. i'o 

give them a better understanding of 

meaning of college life rtUilcm* 



will entertain fathers for the .•:, 
day in a program packed with ac 

livity. Co Chairman of the event are 

Robert Sheldon and Lawrence Reagan 
both '40. 

The horse show, gridiron battle, 
anil student show are the highlights 

of the program planned entirely un 
der student supervision, in the form 
i M rl«' Day committee. *-, im- 
portant as anything planned, is the 
opportunity dads will have to 
Classrooms and labs while classes are 
in ession. Said President Baker in 

a recent letter of invitation to falli 

ers, "I hope that many of you will 
avail yourselves of tin opportunity 



tall' 



see members of oui teaching 

work with our tudenl ," 

\H ivity will begin early, with reg 

Cmitniuid OS AfM 2 



MASQUERS FEATURE 
'HIGH TOR' TONIGHT 



Amherst College Play is Sold 

Otti so Extra Performance 

is Planned 



I'hi 






' 



I I rcr.rrr A< Mvm". ToSM < Co. 



of the college. The students have 
learned that he means what he says. 

Students don't drive between class- 
es any more. Each student car, and 
most faculty cars, for that matter, 
are assigned a particular Dancing 

area for permanent use. The commut- 
ing student drives his car into that 
parking place in the morning and 
leaves it there until he is ready to 
go homo at night. 

Punishments do not involve being 
hauled into a police court, nor are 
any tines 'mposed by judges. I'un'sh- 
ment i- Imposed by the Dean of the 
college and involves suspension of tlii 
■ ight to drive the car on campus. It 
Works. At hast, there weren't any 

serious offenders last year. 
Strangely enough. Officer Moran 

(ays, absent-minded faculty members 
cause the most of what little confu 
there is, They are slwsys parking 

their car Deride m< road "Just fi r a 
minute," and then forgettin to come 

hack and move it until I couple of 
hours inter. 



TUFTS PLANS DANCE 
FOR MSC STUDENTS 

— — — . 

Big Week-end For State Game 
Features Blue Harron's 

Orchestra 



Dear Land of Home Sibelius 

Battle of Jericho .... Negro Spiritual 

Morning Speaks 

Wilfred Hathaway. SCCOmpsnist 
Women's Glee Club: 

My Johnny Was a Shoemaker 

English Folksong (arr. by Taylor) 

Prayer from "Hansel and Crch I" 

Humperdinch \ "Ms . state Weekend* 1 at Tufts 
Csechoslovakian Dance .... Folksong College, November ih and H>, as a 

Marion Millett, accompanist feature of the Tufts-M. S. ('.'game, 

The member making the (rip are \g being planned in Medford by the 

M f"llo ' fraternities and sororities under the 

Men'- Glee Club: First tenors: Os- supervision r,f William Ward, chair- 

nnm, Griffin, Klevens, Hager, Prouty; man of the Tufts College Interfra 

second tenors: Martin, Cleason, I'errv, lernity hall committee. 

Smith. McGuri; iii~i baasesi Burbank, Blue Barron'a orchestra; making Its 
ay, Reymsn, Cohen, <;. Auer- first New England appearance, will 
bach; second bessesi Ferriter, Tur'ker, 
Idon, M. Auerbach, Hubbard. 
Women's Che Clubi Sopranos: 
Mothes, Herring. Plumb, BaiTus, Dav- 
is, Clapp, Barthiaume; s ec onds ! Little, 
Khols, Sannella, Giles, Critchett. G 
Archibald, Pushes; altos: Arslanian, 
T. Goldman, Sedoff, Pitts, .1. Archl 
bald, Drury, Bowman. 



evening the Masquers, Am 
i" ' i College group, will pre 

"High T..,," b] Maxwell Anderson In 

the recently complete. i Kirb) Memori 

al Theater. The play, which is al 

scheduled for Friday and Saturda 
evenings, Is completely old out an en 
additional performance i planned for 
Monday, November 7, 1938. 
The Kirby Memorial Theater (a con- 

id- i.d b0 be one of ||,e ,,,il laiidmr 
Little Theaters in the country. It ha 

U excellent taee an.j complete facil 

Itle for dramatic production*. The 

auditorium seats 41%. 

One of Five 

"High T-.r" la th,. {,, t ,,r ., ,. M1 

'•f Rve Maxwell Anderson play which 

the Masquer plan to pre snl tin 

ee on. The complete erie will In 

'hide "What Price Cloiy." "Mary of 
Scotland," "Both Your Houses." and 

"Winter:-,)." 



DADS' DAY PROGRAM 



open the weekend at a formal dance 
Friday evening to which all State 
Students are invited. Tickets are pi ,. 
ed at 98JQ a couple. Informal hou - 
dances will follow the game on Sat 
urday evening. Further information 
and tickets d<r the Friday nlghl dan.. 



may r»e 

Theta ci 



obt ained 



Mill 



Art N* 



ove 



t)nly those students whose Dads' 
(or Mothers) will he guests on 
campus on Saturday, November i, 
ran he admitted to the show on 
Saturday ev e ni ng, because of the 
limits in seating eapacft) »f Itow. 

ker Auditorium. 

Dads will receive tickets for 
their sons or daughters at the Keg- 
is» ration Desk in Memorial Hall. 



j 






THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3. 1938 




mi 



/IfcaseacbusenP Collegian 



BARTERING 

WITH JOE HART 



STOCKBRIDGE 



By John Kelso 



Official iivwH|iaiier of the MaH.sachiiHi'ttH State College. 
Published every Thursday by the students. 



Office: Room B, Memorial Building 

KMKKY tfOGBE 'ai*. 

AKTHL'K A. NO YES '40, Managing Editor 



Telephone 1102-M 



riiitor-in-Chief 
UABCXiLS BOOTH 



Associate Editor 



I !>l lultl \l KOAKI) 



Catnpw 

JOHN E. CILIOS in. Editor 
BKTTINA HALL '», Art Editor 
MARY T. MEEHAN '89 
FRANCES S. MERRILL '89 
JOSEPH PART '40 
NANCY E. LICE '48 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART '4H 
LORETTA KENNY '41. Secretary 
KENNETH HOWLANIl II 
WILLIAM T. GOODWIN *4J 
HAROLH FORREST Ml 
CHESTER KURALOWICZ '41 
JOHN HAYES II 

Feature 
LLOYD B. COPELAND '89, Editor 
MYRON FISHER '39 
KATHLEEN TL'LLY '41 
EVERETT R. SPENCER '40 



Sports 



I). ARTHUR COPSON '40 
ALBERT YANOW '41 



Photography 

LANE CIDDINtJS 



'38 



Storkhridge Correspondent 
JOHN KELSO S39 

College Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '39. Editor 
JANET CAMPBELL '40, Assoc. 



Ed. 



Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL H. COLDRERC, 



BUSINESS BOARD 
ALLEN OOVE '39, BusImm Manager 



ABRAHAM CARP '». Adv. Mgr. J. HENRY WINN '39. Cii 

GEORGE C. BENJAMIN '39. Subscription Manager 

Business Assistants 
E. EL'CENE RENAULT '40 



Mgr 



in 



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II 



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subscriber will please notify the business man- 
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encouraged. Any communications or notices 
must be received at the Collegian office before 
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1997 Mtabs l*5i 

associated Gbflegcfe Press 

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GctIe6icfeDi6ed 



Entered as second-class matter at the Am- 
herst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at 
•pecial rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103, Act of October 1917. authorized August 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter & MorehouBe, Cook PL, 
Amherst, Mass., Telephone . ; 



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420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Chicago - Bo»ios ■ Loi ansilis - San Fhahcijco 



I I I I C I t \ I 



STOP THE 
SENATE 



In an honest attempt to do away with fraternity 
politics in State College elections, the Senate has 
taken the wrong course. They have decided on a plan 
of fraternity representation that, instead of less fraternal influ- 
ence on the ballot, will result in a marked increase. Honest as the 
Senate plan is, it is up to the student body to stop this faulty re- 
form before it gives the whole system of elections over to the 
fraternities. 

As long as there are fraternities the cry of politics will al- 
ways follow elections. The recent elections were no exception 
and in two classes the "have-nots" are carrying on a campaign 
against two houses suspected of combinations. In spite of the 
fact that no combine can be proven (for the good reason that 
there wasn't one) the Senate is forced to take some action to curl) 
the hue and cry. While the Senate aims are comendable, the 
means are far from that. The plan would give each fraternity one 
representative on a nominating committee ballot along with each 
sorority and three from the non-fraternity group. From these, 
the students would he asked to pick eleven for the nominating 
committee. 



The last issue of the Collegian 

headlined the story that :ii!) couple* 

would be on hand Saturday night "to 
celebrate a victory of to drown a de- 
feat." As you all know, the score was 
;'.. r >-ll with us on the short end. Once 
again events have pi oven that the 
Collegian is unerring in the accura- 
cy of its predictions. 

Girl cheerleaders'.' What is this 
place coming to? When things evolve 
to the point, where the football team 
ceases to be the main attraction at 
a football game it's time to draw that 
line. Can't you imagine girl cheer- 
leaders competing with the varsity 
basketball team in showmanship, 
sportsmanship and exhibition of tech- 
nique. 

One day last week the college 
chime artiste "swinged out" with 
an arrangement of "A Tisket, A 
Tasket" for a chime. Monday the 
somber tones of "I Ain't Got No 
I'se For the Women" peeled from 
the bells. Herein may lie the story 
of disillusion, despondency, shat- 
tered dreams and despair. It 
may not be that bad. so don't 
write a letter to your congress- 
man about it, but coming before 
and after Amherst week-e^r' 
what else would one think of that 
song series. 

The Roister Diistcr.-, Msssachusctt • 
State College dramatic society has 
taken up the production of citrus 
fruits. They should be informed that 
this is not a good latitude for lemon 
culture. "Stage Door," the choice of 
the organization for its Winter play, 
is a story of life behind the foot- 
lights. There is a sprinkling of coun- 
try girl in the city motif, and drop 
or two (note pun) of the moth and 
the flame idea. In the line of co 
structive criticism we would like to 
suggest "Broadway Meloday of 1986 M 
for the commencement play. Then by 
next year we could produce a full- 
fledged chorus with not a single male 

role. 

♦ * 

The Laugh of the Week was 
found in the section on Sorority 
Rushing rules in the freshman 
handbook. » ormal Rushing Per- 
iod: The season shall start on 
Wednesday. November 30, 1938, 
and shall end on December 4. 
1938." And all the time we 
thought the upper class sorority 
girls were just "good fellows" 
who wanted to be helpful and 
friendly with the poor little fresh- 
men girls. What did Little Red 
Riding Hood say to the wolf? 
"The better to pledge you. my 
dear." 



Last Saturday afternoon the Stock- were the fast runners in thi 



bridge "ram-rods" defeated Williston 
Academy at Kasthampton by a score 
of 7-2. 

In the first period, Stockbridge 
scored early, with Steve Kosakowsky 
in a trick center plunge; the point 
was registered by the same ball car- 
rier in an off-tackle attack. 

In the second period an entirely dif- 
ferent Williston team played, start- 
ing out with a fast, lever aerial at- 
tack and succeeded in registering two 
points on a "safety." 



run- 

tM am 
*ith 



Wednesday, November 8, th 
will go to Gardner for a me. 

Gardner High School. 

The Stockbiidge Horticulture 
will hold a meeting on Thureda] 
vember 4, in Wilder Hall at 7:ou 
* • 

Kolony Klub 

The committee for the annual \„, 
beret week-end Hallowe'en dance >on 
of David Treadway, nm,„ 



Club 

, N - 

P-m. 



sisted 

the iter, Stockbridge Raymond Potter, refreshments, a 

rallied and threatened to score again, BmmU Worcester, decorations. The 

but the hun prevented their doing so. ,!ante was a tfreat success; all of the 

The outstanding playing of the day fraternity members of the das- „>; 

was done by Steve Kosakowsky "Big >S8 and a la, 'K e »um»er of older alum- 

Mac" McDonald and the heavy kick- m as far bat 'k as 'HO attended. The 

ler, "Hurricane" Corfield. The playing chaperon* for tne dance were Mr. and 

positions were as follows: Mrs - Donald E. Ross and Mr. and 

Mandell, right end; Sparks, left Mrs - Kmi1 «f- Tramposch. Bob 1:,^,, 
tackle; Houle, left guard; Johnson, and his Swing Masters, of Spring^ 
right guard; Sullivan, center; Lawton, famished the music. Punch, ice, creair 
right tacKle; Chartier, leit end. i and CooWea were served. 

Ilackiield: Turnbull, MacDonald, Kos- ' * * 

akowski, and l'erednia. Charles E. Warren, Jr., S.S.A. 1 

Subs: Corfield, Cleveland, Gamach, ! is to start Skiing Exhibitions \ ( ,v em . 
and Bodwell. her 9 in New Haven, Conn. He will 

The Stockbridge second team de- • " ki in m,,st ()f the large cities in the 
feated Arms Academy varsity at Shel- Kast and wil1 n °t get through until 
burne Falls last Friday with a score | the end ,)f December so he can take 
of 20-7. 

The Stockbridge cross-country team 
traveled to Springfield last Wednes- 
day, where they won a meet with the 
Springfield College freshmen by a 
score of 25-.T2 (low score wins). "An- 
dy" Devine, Mai Clark, Charlie Chung- 
lo, Bill Spear, and George Hibbard 



part in the outside meets. He will 
ticipate in eight shows this winter as 
a member of the Eastern Profession- 
al Ski Jumpers Association. 

* * 

Reporters: Please have your weekly 
news in the Collegian office not later 
than Monday afternoon each week. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Hand Rehearsal 

The regular weekly rehearsal of 
the band will be held tonight at 1:'M\ 
in the Memorial Building. Marching 
practice, in preparation for the Coast 
Guard game, will be held tomorrow. 



On first glance this looks like a great idea. It will stop any 
house or group of houses from controlling the committee. But Mday, November 4, at 4:80 on the 
look behind the plan. The whole idea is based on distrust of the ^^Jy^ 
students and of fraternities. There is nothing democratic about ^ rehearsa i s ." 
it. It is an act of misunderstanding, not planned to settle the; 

... . f* * j • .Ylt'norttn 

question OI politics, but designed to stop criticism ol elections. Thpre wj „ bt , a rejru i ar meeting of 

Let's see how the Senate's plan would work. When a name ! tne Menorah Club study groups this 
would be brought up in the committee for consideration on a afternoon at 4:45 in room B of the 
class ballot, the members of different fraternities would not old Chapel. 
vote as individuals because they were not elected as individuals. ' Dancing 

Thev would vote as fraternity representatives and knife any I The next meeting of the Social 
strong member of another house. (Some people think this is just J^^^tta^ MtaW 
what happened in the Senate nominations, last year, that were toniRnt in the Dr ni Hall at 7:80. 
held under this plan.) As a result those on the ballot for election Tickets for the series may still be ob- 
to class offices would not be the best men in the class but, merely, tained at the Treasurer's office- 
products of a process of elimination. There would be no honor in 
the position of class president — it would mean strongest weak- 
ling. 

It's up to the students to act now. The senators were elected Continued from Page l 

by the students and, to a certain extent, should be controlled j istration starting at 9:00 a 
by them. If State College students still want to pick their own Memorial Ha., under Jean A. Davis 

'41. At that time dads will given 



Class Open 

All classrooms and labs will be 
open for parental inspection from 
9:00 to 11:00 a. m. Fathers will be 
able to see classes in session and the 
performance of the teaching staff. 
The library, Memorial Hall, Stock- 
bridge Hall, Thacher Hall, the Adams 
House, and Draper Hall will also be 
open at this time. Members of the 
Maroon Key Society under President 
John Crimmins '41 will be available 
to show dads around the campus. 

The Junior and Senior advanced 
military classes will ride in a Horse 
Show at 11:00 a. m. as will eighteen 
members of the Sophomore class. The 
freshmen will not demonstrate dis- 
mounted drill. 

Luncheon for dads will be held in 
sororities, fraternities and 
Hall Cafeteria from 12:00 until 1:00 
p. m. 

Members of the Sophomores who 
will participate in the Show are: Al- 
bert W. Aynroyd, Edward W. Ash- 
ley, Robert T. Babbitt, Courtland A. 
Bassett, Edward Brcderick, Allan T. 
Fuller, Jr., Stephen P. Gooch, George 
P. Hoxie, James Y. Jamison, David 
H. Searle, Walter C. Rockwood, Jr., 
Robert C. Tillson, Walter R. Lalor, 
Albert Yanow, and Sullivan, Slack, 
Rojko and Thornton. 

Game 

At 2:00 p. m., State's eleven will 
meet the gridiron aggregation from 
Coast Guard Academy on Alumni 
Field. The speedy team from New- 
London will be cheered on by the en- 
tire student body from the Academy 
who will also present a military re- 
view during the half led by the Mid- 
die band. The Maroon and White band 
will also appear in musical military 
drill. 

Dads will again be entertained at 
fraternities, sororities and Draper 
Hall cafeteria for supper from 5:45 
*<» 7:00 p. m. 

The evening show, consisting of a 



series of interfraternity skits and a 
combined intersorority skit will be 
presented in Stockbridge Hall Audi- 
torium in the evening. The program 
will begin at 7:15 with President 
Hugh P. Baker welcoming fathers in 
a short address. Winners will be 
picked and points will be awarded 
toward the Interfraternity (.up award- 
ed annually. 

Skits 

Tonight at 7:M0 elimination compe- 
tition will be held in Stockbridge 
Hall. Six skits will be picked to be 
presented Saturday to fathers. Judg- 
es for the elimination will be: Prof. 
Rollin H. Barrett, Charles N. Dubois, 
and George Emory, alumni secretary. 
Skits will be judged on direction, in- 
cluding timing and ensemble, the skill 
Draper j an d effectivenss of individual actors. 
appropriateness of costumes, origin- 
ality, and value as entertainment. 

Only students accompanied by par- 
ents or visitors will be allowed to 
attend the Saturday perforate* 
while the eliminations are open 
Thursday to all students. Judges M 
the Saturday performance are: Dr. 
Charles F. Fraker, Dr. Charhl * 
Rohr, and Prof. Harold E. Smart 
Continued on ft* j 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



for women, $2.00 for men. 



500 FATHERS 



Thursday, November 3 

Rehearsals for Dad's Day I ""* Wt * 
YouiM Faculty Croup (Stock, mm 
Faculty Meeting 4 (00 
Parly President's House 

Friday, November 4 

Inauguration Tufts 
Saturday, November I 

Football — Coast Cunrd her.' - : '" >'' 
Dad's Day vinrinti 

N. E. Regional Unit So*. M"*' rlor 

Monday, November 7 

Cross Country New Enirl;'! ,l<-Bo* 
Tuesday, November 8 

Klfction 

Fine Arts 
Wednesday, November 9 

Smith College Concert 

OpM Data Somritic- 
Thursday, November 10 

Freshman Instructors I 

Open Date Sororities 



,■1 3 :*5 




m. in 



passes to the football game and the 



class officers, instead of letting fraternity presidents do it — then 

demand a student referendum on the Senate plan and defeat it. pveninK sm >w. K OK j s tration will close 

A. A. N. at 2:80 p. m. 



Come and hear our mother yell, 
Little Willie's in the well — 

— Shakespeare Apocrypha 

Was Willie trying to get a drink? The truth of the W ,,<r ' 
don't breathe a word — Willie was gazing at astronomical 
hoping for an inspiration for a story, poem, essay, or ar 
versatile, Willie!)— since the COLLEGIAN QUARTERLY 
Hurry please, and get the MSS. in. 

Deadline: Nov. 14, 1938 



lection's 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. Till RSDAY, NOVEMBER <. !9Sd 



COLLEGE CHOIR WILL SING SUNDAY AT 



COLLEGE CHOIR 



Rhyme - Reason - Rhythm 



2rc° ue r 



News 







Paddle Run 

Wh«n Southern Illinois 
State Teachers College 
freshmen refused to 
weer the green ties pre- 
scribed for them by up- 
pcrcUssmen, they were 
forced to run between 
two lines of swinging 
peddles. This freshmen 
is doing his best to 
evede the stinging 
whacks. 

CoHcgitte Di^rit Photo 
by Hamilton 



Millionaire Studies Labor Problem 

David Rockefeller, 22, hes iust enrolled *t the University of 
Chicago, the institution to which his family hes contributed ap- 
proximately $70,000,000. Hell study what he calls America s 
major problem, idle machines and idle labor. 



Bandsman Officially Crowned Own 

fcjj *J P.„| Whitemen was officially made "Dean of Modem Music" 
,2** *< University school of commerce freshmen voted him the honor at 
fc,n « t m. The new title left Whitemen pop-eyed with pride. 

Collect &9*« ***o by ltp»c« 




G "'d sTTl^^^^^fc^BlBBss— 

^°'*y> fof th. b£f ft « «*ow„' u 7.; • tre.|. 



t. M. muM'rauA & SUi^ 



terrace 

>me "A" indents 
he gradual I lend 

from tin- .d i, 

Vt'le. Th" e naive 

! ta ted like the 
at u rated i up of 

the smie. writers 
public, thai has 

I't know hut 
ed shouting from 
• > on. I love you, 

u-rt'eitly sat isfied. 
T siniplv a lieees- 

to he endured, 

■ i i ime somebod) 

nil and wrote a 

. before he could 

ake a chance on 

if those potential 

ii croon and drib- 

i a platunic scale 

ies. So, the tune 

open a rhyming 

ouslj make eight 

consecutive pei 

is iii the books, 

se nf rhyme and 

reason. 
vever are sophis- 

e.\ are short stor- 
es. This all start- 
where the lone 
(layer half talked 
tallied bj a frail 
lords. I hope the 
y clear. 

lead < Decca itk.'s 
is a guild example 
h an interesting 
geant to sing in 
i opportunity f>>v 

its versatility hy 
lerfei-tiiin; Sweet 

I as soul. Watch 

t ba.SS, and sniiie 

. . . Reverse . ■ . 

■r "srnewth" tune 
ieal before some 

I muted brass. Hi- 
nted violin at the 

1) Jimmy Done) ; 
that is just a hi* 
I by short tenor 

ainst sharp hrass. 

oud trumpet ride, 

Vhich is of course 

hand alone. The 

heavy solid 
stained long note 
wonderful oppor 
I work . . . |{e 
rtners; Too mm h 
the words are 
• . once . . . Some 
Iiim makes it a 
i thi. <li i . 

\( i:s 

DV. .i, at X |i. in., 

of the American 
Ith, Mi Efolyoke, 

llur i Chapter 
no Dance al the 

ii, Smith College, 

folk dancing, led 
iheret, and mn 

rs. Refreshment 

will he no adml 

dance i fn-i- and 

entl are Will ullie 

hem elve 



IX 



tration 



-r- 



i rn- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER S, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I M t Usnu, NOVEMBER '. IBS* 






/Tlbaesa 



Olliri 



Oili.. : Room 8, Memoria 



AKTHL'K A. NOYES "40, 



Campus 

JOHN E. FIT.IOS Hi, B 
BETTINA HALL "39. At 
MARY T. MEKHAN '89 
PRANCES S. MEKIMI.l. 
JOSEPH BART "40 
NANCY E. LUCE '1" 
JACQUELINE L. STEW 
LOR ETTA KENNY 11. 
KENNETH HOWLAND 
WILLIAM T. COODWl!" 

HAUOLD FORREST 11 
CHESTER KlUALOWIC 
John HAYES 11 

Feature 
LLOYD H. COP ELAND ' 
MYRON FISHER "39 
KATHLEEN TILLY '4! 
EVERETT R. SPENCER 



ABRAHAM CARP 'M, 
GEC 

E. EUGENE RENAl I.I 
SOGER H LINDSEY 
JOSEPH R. CORDON. 
WALTER R. LALOR ' 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 



Miikt- all unli-is pitval 
aetts Collegian. In rase i 
subscriber will please not 
ager as Boon as iHissible 
uate and faculty contri 
encouraged. Any romm 
must be received at the 
9 o'clock. Monday evenir 



Entered as second-cIaBS 
herat Post Office. Acce 
special rate of postage p 
1103. Act of October 19 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter & 
Amherst, Mass., 



I. 



BARTERING 



CTOrk'DDin/cr 



STOP THE In 
SENATE poti 

tak 
of fraternity rep 
ence on the hallo 
Senate plan is, it 
form before it g 
fraternities. 

As long as i 
ways follow ele( 
and in two class 
against two hou 
fact that no cor 
there wasn't one] 
the hue and cr 
means are far fr» 
representative 01 
sorority and tin 
the students wo 
committee. 

On first gla 
house or group 
look behind the 
students and of 
it. It is an act 
question of polit 

Let's see Ik 
would be broug 
class ballot, the 
vote as individu 
They would vol 
strong member « 

what happened 
held under this 
to class offices w 
products of a pi 
the position of 
ling. 

It's up to tl 
by the students 
by them. If Sta 
class officers, in 
demand a student 




'tec «,,, 
'<ecj. 



They're Figuring Out Their Travel Record 



Utilizing plane, ship and automobile. Bruce Brown and Mitchcl Daniloff have 
completed a 6,200-mile trek from Alaska to the University of Alabama, where 
they enrolled •• freshmen. Center is another Alaskan, Elaine Housel, who made 
the ship and automobile trip, but missed out on the plane flight. Photo by F«w« 




They're Cheering Return of the Beret 

Something new and different in causes for collegiate capers was the reason for this parade of Paris uni- 
versity students. They are marching because the velvet beret with various colored ribbons has again 
been proclaimed their traditional headdress. Acmt 



referendum on the Senate plan and defeat it. p Ven j nR s how. Registration will close 

A. A. N. at 2:80 p. m. 



Hands Across the C 

It's apple-cider time in the orch 
trict around Pennsylvania's West 
College, and a customary sight at 
gatherings is a table loaded with ck 
doughnuts. 



* Ja 



ster 
eni 

■d 



COLLEGE CHOIR WILL SING SUNDAY AT 



COLLEGE CHOIR 



Rhyme - Reason -Rhythm 




Masked Protest 

New York City collegians 
paraded in gas masks and 
mortar boards during the 
the recent war crisis to tell 
Broadway's crowds they 
don't want to be cannon 

fodder. Acme 

> 



Loyal Fan 

Cinemactor Joe E. Brown 
really proved his loyalty 
to the U. C. L. A. Bruins 
when he attended their 
game with the Iowa Hawk- 
eyes even though ill. 




our tired nerves need frequent relief 



SCOTTIE 

Known variously in early Scottish history as 
Skye terrier, Highland, Cairn, and Scots ter- 
rier, although that dog bore no resemblance 
to Skyes and Cairns of today. Nicknamed 
the "die-hard" for stout heart and unquench- 
able love for sport. Extremely independent. 




HE'S GIVING HIS 
NERVES A REST... 



[IKK humans, dogs have a compli- 
cated set of nerves. But dogs are 
hnder to their nerves than we. They 
pst when they need rest . . . while 
fe plunge ahead with hurry and 
lorry- framing our nerves to keep 
lp with the fast pace. We can't turn 
back to the natural paces of life like 



an animal, but we can protect, soothe, 
and calm our nerves. Smoking aCamel 
can beyour pleasant method for break- 
ing nerve tension. Camels are mild, 
with the flavor of a matchless blend 
of costlier tobaccos. Smokers find 
Camel's mild tobaccos delightfully 
soothing — soothing — to the nerves. 



SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE ADVISE 

\Let up light up a Camel 



pjp you know: 



i 



\£ 



>FE( 

Nr-M. 
1 pm ( 

'NY f 
M tarns 
ft.. I 



Sr 



■>5 



— that tobacco plants are "topped" 
when they put out their seed-head ? 
That this improves the quality of 
leaf tobacco? That most cigarette 
tobacco is harvested by "priming" — 
removing each leaf by hand? Camel 
buyers know where choice grades of 
tobacco are — those that cure nicely 

- the mild, ripe, fragrant tobaccos. 
Camels are a matchless blend of 
finer. MORE EXPENSIVE TO- 
BACCOS.. .Turkish and Domestic 



'OR — America's outstanding* comic personality ol 
"dav evening Columbia Network. 7:30 pm E.S.T., 
* 30 pm M.S.T., 7:30 pm P.S.T. 

»I>MAN — Kind of Swing, and the world's greatest 
c h Tuesday evening— Columbia Network. 9:30 pm 
C.S.T., 7:30 pm M.S.T., 6:30 pm P.S.T. 




"HOUSEWORK, shopping, and social 
affairs." says busy Mrs. V. G. Weaver, 
"would Ret me strained and tense if I 
didn't rest my nerves every now and 
then. I let up and light up a Camel fre- 
quently. Camels are so soothing." 



R 1 fUrmMa 



Wtaflo. Sam. 



-/ TUP- LIGHT UP A CAMEL! 

Smokers find Camel's Costlier Tobaccos are SOOTHING TO THE NERVES 



Deadline: Nov. 14, l!i:ls 



P. J! 



I/tiUJIl'SUI* Ar SUXN 



'tan'rci 

'Hit- "A" indents 
he gradual trend 
from tin- Moon, 

vi'Ic. 'III.. . n.iiN e 
» ta ted liki 

at in ,il i'i| i u| i 

the Bong 

public, thai baa 

it know Inn as 

imI shouting from 

■ you, I love j mi, 

•••I I'i'rt ly sal l In il. 

i simply a neees- 

i" be endured. 

a i ime somebody 

no and wrote i 

, before he could 

.' i k i • a i ■ 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 ■ i ■ 1 1 n 

■ i those potential 
ii croon and < 1 c i I > - 
i a platonic scale 

les. So, the tlllle 

open a rhyming 

mi.-ly make eight 

consecul ive per- 
is ill the honks, 
se nf rhyme and 

reason, 
vever are soph! 
ey are short stoi 
>ts. This all start- 

whi'iv the lone 
dayer half talked 
lanied by a frail 
lords. I hope the 
y clear, 
lead ( Decca its:: 

' l V'ihhI example 

.h an interesting 
geant to sing to 
i opportunity for 

its versatility by 
•erfection; Sweet 

I a:. : mil. Watiit 
t baas, and some 

. . . Reverse . . . 
■r "smewth" tune 

nal before some 
I muted brass, Be 
uted violin at the 

I) Jimmy Dorsey; 

that is just a hi* 

I by short tenor 

a in I . hai p In . 

ood i rum pel ride, 
i huh is nf course 

hand alone. The 
<• Im,i\ y solid 

'.lined long note 
wonderful oppor 
I work . . . Re 
it tiers; Too fflttch 

the words are 
■ . once . . . Some 

hni makes it a 
i tlii. di C. 

VIS 

ov. 5, .ii 8 p. m., 

"I t he A lnel Iran 

ith, Mi Holyoki 
iIm i i < lhaptri 
tin Dance at the 

It, Sunt h ( 'nlli i'i , 

fulk dancing, led 
iherf t and mu 
i Refreshment 

will be rio adml 
dance i free and 
• ii' are welcome 
hem -elves. 



I 



AM A 



I ration 



Ill K MASSACHI SETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVK.MHKK :J. 1938 






BARTERING 



CTOPk'DDin^ir 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBEH 3, IfM 



COLLEGE CHOIR WILL SING SUNDAY AT 



college: choir 



Rhyme - Reason - Rhythm 



Barreca 



/Hbassa 



Offlcl 



Office: Roon 



Memorifi 



AIM Mil: A. NOYKS ' \<> 



( ampus 

JOHN E. FILIOS in, E 
BKTTINA II \I.L •,'i'J, A» 
MAItY T. MKKHAN '89 
FRANCES S. M KI{1< ILL 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY K. LUCE '•I" 
JACQUELINE L. STEW 
LORETTA KENNY '41. 
KENNETH llowi.\Nl> 
WILLIAM l. GOODWI1 
HAROLD FORREST '41 
CHESTED Kl RALOWIC 
JOHN HAYES ii 

Feature 
LLOYD B. coi'KLAND ' 
MYUON FISHER '38 
KATHLEEN Tl'I.I.Y "4! 
EVERETT R. SPENCER 



abraham carp '#», 

<;k< 



K. EUGENE KKNAt I.I 
KOCKK H. LINDSEY 
JOSEPH K. CORDON, 
WALTER R. KALOR ' 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2.00 



Make all ordi-rs lutyal 
setts Collegian. In MM 
subscriber will ptnwfl BO 
ager an noon as iiossible 
unt<- and faculty contri 
enroiiraifed. Any romm 
must he received at the 
9 o'clock, Monday evenll 



Entered as second-clasf 
herst Post Office. Acce 
■pecial rate of postage p 
1103. Act of October 19 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter & 
Amherst, Mass., 



i 



STOP THE In 
SENATE pol 

tar, 
of fraternity pep 
ence on the ballo 
Senate plan is, it 
form before it j> 
fraternities. 

As long - as 
ways follow ele( 
and in two (lass 
against two hou 
fact that no cor 
there wasn't one 
the hue and cr; 
means are far 1" r 
representative 01 
sorority and tin 
the students wo 
committee. 

On first gla 
house or group 
look behind the 
students and of 
it. It is an act 
question of polit 
Let's see In 
would be broug 
class ballot, the 
vote as individu 
They would vol 
strong member 1 
what happened 
held under this 
to class offices w 
products of a pi 
the position of 
ling. 

It's up to tl 
by the students 
by them. If Sts 
class officers, in 
demand a student 





IT 1 — 





Forced Stop! 

Stellar halfback Pelle- 
grini of the Sugar Bowl- 
bound Santa Clara grid- 
sters it neatly tackled 
by Stanford's Stocko- 
vich, during Santa 
Clara's rout of the Reds, 
82 to 0. Ac, 



f ^o 




Study Time is Pipe Time 



Many fraternities and dormitories are real pipe 
clubs during study time, with scenes like this at the 
University of Minnesota duplicated on campuses 

from COaSt tO COaSt. Collesiwe D.9*«t Photo by Gold*te.n 



Higher Education lid Childhood 



Teething rings and large name-plates i 
hair ribbons are the style for first-clam 



hmen at Adelphi College, where 
ly college days. Acme 




■J 



*ir\ 



Top Honors for This Freshman 

Shellie Patterson. Chi Omega, was elected freshman queen at the 
University of Arkansas in a poll conducted by the Razorback, uni- 
versity yearbook. 




A Jinx was Jinxed 

Even though aided by such gains as this 10-yard run by 
Nelson, Michigan State was unable to keep its jinx against 
the University of Michigan, the Wolverines blanking them 

14to0. Wide World 





mm 


»l 






V 




"'"SMfVAi^S 


1 

_ 




r yknmS(^'^' 


':% 




wmmsami 



Activities 

... of many kinds 
are portrayed in this 
interesting mural be- 
ing painted by Betty 
Lou Hardin at Brad- 
Icy College. 




referendum on the Senate plan and defeat it. ; iVoninR s h„ w . Registration will close 

A. A. N. at 2:30 p. m. 



Deadline: Nov. 14, 19.18 



t: 



I'tltMiraUN »v Mir\ 



omc "A 1 udenta 
tin' gradual ikikI 
from the aIi 

\cle. Those naive 
ta ted like 1 1 1 < ■ 

ill a! iii CUp "f 
I hi- i 'lie WI • I 

• public, that haa 
In't know t > 1 1 1 ea 

petl hout iii-.' fi'iiin 
i- j "ii. I love j mi, 
perl i fled. 

i in p| J ,i ;,. > . 

c. to be endured. 
a time Homebody 

.'in*) and wrote a 
it, before he could 
take a chance on 
of those potential 
tn croon and drib- 

ii a plat cililt m a le 

fii-s. So, the tuna 

• open a rhyming 
ioufdy make eight 

consecul i\ e per- 
ils in the books. 
i i of rhyme ami 
v reason, 
iwever are sophis- 
hey are short Btor- 
lots. Tin all start 

where the lone 

player half talked 

panied b) a frail 
chords. I hope the 

l\ clear. 

Head (Deira 17k:', 
is a good example 

ith an interesting 
rgeanl to sing to 
ti opportunity fur 
■ its versatility by 
perfection; Sweet 
II as soul. Watch 
lit ha. s, and Borne 
; . . . Reverse . . 
ier "stnewt h" tune 
'ocal before some 
<l muted brass. Be 

nuted violin at the 

B) J immy Dorsey; 

that i just a hi* 
■<l by short tenoi 
rainsl sharp bra 
good trumpet ride. 
Which is of course 

I hand atone. The 

ire heavy olid 

i tained lone note 

wonderful oppor 

a I work . . . He 
ait Her ; Too much 

i the word are 

• . once . . . Some 

tlim makes it a 
I lit; die. 

kNCES 

f O V. • ' i , . 1 1 8 | . , Hi., 

I of t he A merit n n 

lith, Ml. Holyoke. 

'iiIh i i < lhapl < i 

la I n I lance at I I i 

III, Smit h ( 'ol|e;o 

I folk dancing, led 

mher t, and mu ii 

at . Refre hmenl 
<■ will be rio admi 
■ dance i I Ye, and 

hut are w< l< nmi 

thetll el\ i 



II 



•Id 



Bl ration 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Till KSDAY, NOVEMHER 3, 1938 






BA R T E R I N G 



IHE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, 111 I KSDAY, NOVEMBER 3. I93H 



CTork'BDin/cc 



COLLEGE CHOIR WILL SING SUNDAY AT 



COLLEGE CHOIR 



Rhyme - Reason - Rhythm 



I '.a i 















/Hbase 



()! 



Office! Room 8, Memo 



AliTllll: \. NOYES 



Campus 

J OHN K. I ll.ios '40, 
BKT'l IN A HALL ''('.', 
MAKY T. MKKII \N 
FRANCES S. MKKItll 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY E. LUCE "40 
JACQUELINE L. ST1 
LOR ETTA KENNY '4 
KENNETH HOWI.AN 
WILLIAM T. (JOODV 
HAROLD FORREST ' 
CHESTER KlKAI.oW 
JOHN HAYES U 

Feature 
LLOYD It. COPELAN 
MYRON FISHER '89 
KATHLEEN TULLY 
EVERETT R, SPENC 



AllkAHAM CARP 



K. EUGENE RENAl 

KtNiKK II. I-INDSK 
JOSEPH K. CiORDOI 
U AI.TKH K. LALOI 



SUUSCRIPTIONS |2.< 



Make all order* pa 
setts Collegian. In vat 
subscriber will please 
ager ng soon as iiosai 
uate and faculty eon 
encouratfed. Any eon 
must be received at tt 
9 o'clock, Monday eve 



Entered as second-ct 
herst Post Office. A> 
special rate of postage 
1103. Act of October 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter 
Amherst, Mas 







ll^ 



It 



P.. 



♦• *♦ 













STOP THE I r 
SENATE p« 

t; 
of fraternity r« 
ence on the ball 

Senate plan is, 
form before it 
fraternities. 

As long 1 al- 
ways follow el 
and in two cla 
against two h< 
fact that no & 
there wasn't or 
the hue and c 
means arc far 1 

representative 
sorority and ti 

the students v 
committee. 

On ftrst g) 
house or grou] 

look behind th- 
students and < 
it. It is an ac 
question of pol 

Let's see , 
would be brou 
class ballot, t 
vote as individ 
They would v 
strong membei 
what happenec 
held under thil 
to class f)flices 
products of a i 
the position CA 
ling. 

It's up to 
by the studen 
by them. If S 
class officers, i 

demand a student reterendum on the .Senate plan and deteat it. ,'. vpn j n(r 

A. A. N. at 2:30 





News 
Wanted 

Alice Hirsch, mod- 
ernly attired in her 
new jitterbug jacket, 
searches hopefully 
in her mailbox at 
Grinnell College for 
news from home — 
a daily chore for 
more than a million 
collegians. 

Collegiate Digest Photo 

by Cogswell 




Winning Smiles 

Final contestants in the annual 
Bortd Walk freshman beauty 
contest at Indiana University 
smile for the photographer while 
they wait the final decision of 
the judges. Contestants are: (left 
to right) Delorcs Miller, Chi 
Omega; Janet Graham, Delta 
Gamma,- Mary Bachclder, Pi 
Beta Phi; Joan Barr, Kappa Al- 
pha Theta; Margery Stewart, 
Kappa Kappa Gamma,- Dolores 
Small, Aljpha Omicron Pi, Mar- 
jorie McGaw, Zeta Tau Alpha. 



KAYW00DIE 



r* 




litis J.Joe6nh 



Free Ride! 

Minnesota's Larry Buhler 
gives two Nebraska men a 
pick-a-back ride during the 
Gophers' rout of the Corn- 
huskers. Acm„ 



The beautiful graining of this Kaywooilie 
pipe ■« what our briar -men call Super 
Grain. Notice how the grain runs in uni- 
form, parallel lines over moat, but not all, 
of the surface. All this tells you that it 
came from a oijt. mature briar burl. Such 
pipes are rare. Take a five dollar bill in 
hand, and get one now. 

Shape pictured: No. 04 (BILLIARD), 
KAYWOOOIE COMPANY 

Rachfil/er Cmttr, npw yukk eW London 



f the damned to p«t 



Study Mountain Weather to improve Forecasting 

. lew York University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute scientists have wtoblw* 
this station almost 5,000 feet above sea level in the Adirondacks, where winter 
observers are literally sealed in because of blocked trails and roads. 




1^ 




TRAILER 
TRIP 



r f\ 



*2*3P 




^ 



OVER TO THE 
CURB WITH 
VOU. VOU* RE 
JUST THE MAN 

I'M tOOKIN' for! 

'TIS A SERIOUS 



DADDV, 

WHAT 

HAVE 

WE 
PONE 

NOW? 



7 



I CAN'T 
IMAGINE, 
CHUBBINS, 
BUT WE'LL 

SOON 
FINP OUT 




<^ NOW, 
OFFICER, 
WHATEVER 
IT IS... I'M 
SURE, AH... 
WE, AH . . . 
PIPN'T 
INTENP. 



f 3 'TWASN'T FIVE *->. 
MINUTES I WAS ON 
PUTV THIS MORNING 
WHEN VOU WENT 
BY ANP I THOUGHT, 
THERE'S THE MAN 
I'M AFTER 



a3fii 



r /*5j 


THIS IS ^ 




AWFUL, 


/_ ""*"*■> 


PAPPV . 


t-w^ 


HE THINKS 


U 1 *^ 


YOU'RE A 


l n* 


CRIMINAL j 







r, TIS PRINCE ALBERT^ 
VOU SAY THAT HAS 

NO BITE . THEN 
HERE'S ONE MAN 
WHO'LL BE SMILING 



PONT MENTION 

IT. I'LL BE 

THINKING OF 

VOU WHEN I 

SETTLE BACK 

THIS EVENING 

FOR MY OWN 

>E- PLEASURE 

WITH P. A 




laj^i a 



.**'! 



•>»«• 








No Crew Practice: Tee Much W tcrl 

That was the unusual notice for Rutgers University 
men when the Raritan river went on a rampage • 
the crew's barge boathousc onto the bank. Stud 
excused from morning classes to help repair the 8 9^ 



3BM 



show. 
p. m. 



Registration will close 




'bury C 

P*i *it« « 
P*rs 



ates for the Dateless 

e socialites have classified all students according 
vonality to provide a ready reference for date 



PRINCE ALBERT ASSURES A 
COOLER SMOKE AND A DRIER 

PIPE! AND THE SPECIAL CUT 
BRINGS OUT ITS FULL RIPE 
TASTIWESS-vVITH HO BITE! 






50 



pipef uls of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-oi. tin of Prince Albert 



SMOKE ?• f MCftAKf MTCFUtS of Prince Albert If you 
don't find it the mellowed, tastiest pipe tobacco you 
ever smoked, return the pocket tin with the rest of 
the tobacco in it to us at any timf within a month 
from this date, and we will refund full purchase price, 
plus p os ta ge. (Signed) R J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.. 
Winston-Salem, North (arolins 

c™»,rl«M. ISM. R. J. IUrn«lsa Tsfesre* Cm. 



Prince Albert 



» 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



Deadline: Nov. 14, 19.JS 



r. 3 



ItlllMl'SUlX *Y SMJ* 



.unit' "A" xtudanti 

the gradual trend 

from the afotm, 

cycle. Those naive 

ia ted like the 

Bat in alril i up of 
thi' <<i\y \\ i i : 

r public, thai has 
In'i know Inn aa 
ped shouting from 
vi' j nil, I love j <<u, 
perfect ly satisfied. 

,il' . ■ i 1 1 1 1 ) I \ a IUH'fS- 

l; to be endured. 
a time somebody 

.aim ami wrote ■ 

It, before he couid 
take a chance on 
tit' those potential 
tu croon and tlrib- 
in a platonic scale 
ens. So, the tunc 
■) (i|M>n a rhyming 
•ioui | j make eight 
consecutive per- 
d in the honk*-, 

I e of rhyme and 

y reason. 

iwever are sophis- 

licy arc short stui- 
lots. This all start- 
; where the lone 
player half talked 
ipanied by a frail 
chords. I hope the 
ly clear. 

Head (Decca 17k:'> 
l is a good example 
ith an interesting 
rgeanl t<> sing to 
in opportunity f<n - 
c its versatility by 
perfection; Sweet 
■II as soul. Watch 
'nt bass, and some 
I . . , Reverse . . . 
her "stnewth" tune 
vocal before some 
id muted brass. Be 
nuted violin at the 

* 1 1 ( ,1 nnmv I rorsej ; 
I thai ifl just a lii* 

ed by hurt tenor 
gains! sharp brass. 
K""d trumpet ride, 

which is of course 

band alone. The 

Hi heavy solid 

ii t sined long note 

wonderful oppoi 
■.-ii wort . . . Re 

'art nets; Too much 

h the words ate 
. . . mice . . . Some 
'thin make,, it a 
(-. this disc. 

AM KS 

Nov, 5, at is p, in,, 
d uf the American 
nith, Mt. Hoiyoke, 

mhi r i Chaptci 
lam Dance at tin- 
im. Smith College, 

tl tuik dancing, l< <l 

mhel t . and mu it 

I.'' fresh men 1 

"e will he riri adlm 

" dance i free and 
idenf arc welcome 

t lictll i I '. ' 



l.L 



old 



utt ration 



15 






THE MASS U -||| SETTS COLLEGIAN, Till RSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1938 



I 









rllbase 



Ol 



Office: HiKini 8, Mi-nin 



AlMHi i: \. NOVES 



('a iiipus 

john e, pilios '40, 

BETTINA HA 1,1. ':«t. 
MAKY T. MKKHAN 
FRANCES S. M KICK II 
JOSKI'H BART '4u 
NANCY' E. LUCE '41 
JACQUELINE L, ST I 
LORETTA KKNNY 1 
KKNNfri'H HOWLAN 
WII.MAM T. GOODV 
II \ i: 1 1 i.i i FORREST ' 
CHESTER KURALOW 
JOHN HAYES 'ii 

Feature 
LLOYD II. OOPELAN 
MYRON FISHER '.'ID 
KATHLEEN TULLY 
EVERETT U. SFENC 



ABRAHAM CARP '81 
Q 

K. EUC.ENE KKNAL 
KOi IKK H. LINDSE 
JOSKI'H K. <;oKI)Ot 
WALTER K. LALOI 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2. 



Make all o r da n pa 
sett* Collegian. In cai 

subscriber will please 
»kit aa mm us poaaj 
uate and faculty con 
encouraged. Any con 
must be received at U 
9 o'clock, Monday eve 



Entered as necond-cl 
herat Post Office. A- 
special rate of postage 
1103. Act of October 
20. 1918. 



Printed b.v Carpenter 
Amherst, Mas 



STOP THE 
SENATE 



Ii 
t; 






BA R T E R I N G 



CTork'QDin^i- 



Century of Co-eds 



A Picture Story of Style Changes 



From the first U S college co-ed (left) to to- 
day's modern undergraduate women {right), 
feminine fashions have changed so markedly 
that the 1938 college student would believe 
himself in a foreign land if he were to en- 
counter a classroom of students dressed in the 
styles of more than a decade ago To graphi- 
cally portray the decade-by-decade evolution 
of the modern co-ed, Collegiate Digest here 
presents a camera record of a century of co-eds 
as found in the files of Oberlin College, first 
U S co-educational institution. 



1830-1840 







1930-1940 



1840-1850 



1850-1860 



1860-1870 



1870-1880 



1880-1890 




1890-1900 



of fraternity n 

ence on the ball 
Senate plan is, 
form before it 
fraternities. 

As long- af 
ways follow e) 
and in two cla 
against two In 
fact that no © 
there wasn't or 
the hue and t 
means are far 
representative 
sorority and t 
the students v 
committee. 

On first g 
house or grou 
look behind th 
students and ( 
it. It is an ac 
question of |>ol 

Let's see . 
would he hrou 
class ballot, t 
vote as individ 
They would v 
strong membei 
what happened 
held under thii 
to class oflices 
products of a ) 
the position o 
ling. 

It's up to 
b.v the studen 
by them. If S 
class officers, i 

demand a student rererenmum on tne senate plan and deteat it. 

A. A. N. 







1900-1910 



1910-1920 



1920-1930 




Double 

Name 

Trouble 

When twins * ft,c 

college, classroom 

sternatiOO ■ * e ^ 
tax the *•!'«"« c ' 
mstruct*'- But' 
three Stfo unri' 
student! with the 

name CO*' »° r: 
iitrar* 'Mi ^° y! 



an s v. 

ofNo 

are r 

pent 
Smith 



l. Un'» { 



evening show. Registration will 
at 2:30 p. m. 



Deadline: Nov. 14, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER S. I 1 



COLLEGE CHOIR WILL SING SUNDAY AT 
, EVENING SERVICES IN H0LY0KE CHURCH 

itside Appearance of Student Organization Scheduled for 
7:00 in Grace Church — Director Roland Verbeck of 
Short Course Ollice Will Speak 



76 ARE PICKED FOR 
VARSITY GLEE CLUB 



-: outside appearance of tin 

student choir will b< 

ining service this Sunday at 

a.- a part of Maaaachu- 

College Night at Grace 

Holyoke, when twenty-seven Fj na i Selections Made for Botl 
will take part m a program The Women's and .Men's 

music. Roland H. Verbeck, Organizations 

. ■ th»- short course at the 



COLLEGE CHOIR 



Rhyme - Reason -Rhythm 



hj IVt»T It. HI. ..l 




fcf** ******* 



M 



be the speaker of the Final selections for the me 



>e- 



mens and 

women's varsity glee clubs, a total 

igement marks the Brat '.'' '" ,t - v men un ' 1 thirty-six women 

be college c 



•h.iir has an- nave l,, ' , ' ll completed, according to 



i >ther appearances ai i 



announcements mail 



liv Fli't. 



It 



Proutj 

., been made as yet. K*™ " f tllfl clubs. This first selection 

*ma made from many applicants, and 
I rogram |nay |)(i . lltt , 1V( | al , iny Ume fco jn( . lu( , ( , 

, program which the choir will better voices <>r to replace those who 

pve Sunday night is as follows: do n ,, t maintain varsity requirements, 

• "islnp The qualifications of the other appli- 

li„ Lord is in His Holy Temple" rants are on file to be used as a wait- 
ing list. 

I , ,.,; me l-<<rd — Wesley 

i Holy Father 



d. but no definite arrange ' |,,ul > aml Virginia Pushee, mana- 



!..« i ii 



J*hrite$ 



South College Renovations Progress Under 

Supervision Of "Bud" Ross, 1917 Graduate '"^y""" " R " """""" ""' 



I hope there are some "A" students 
who haven't missed the gradual trend 
uf -uti^ lyrics awaj from the stoon, 
June, tune, spoon" cycle. Those naive 
and short lived sonnet* ts ted like the 
dregs of a super saturated cup "f 

Coffee. Whether it's the mie, writers 

themselves, or their public, thai has 
grown up, I wouldn't know but aa 
long as they've stopped shouting from 
the housetops, "1 love you, 1 love you, 
I love you . . .", I'm perfectly satisfied. 
Lyrics are no longer simply a neces- 
sary evil, something in be endured. 
\ ou see, once upon a time somebody 

walked up tu a piano and wrote a 

fairly good song, but , before he could 
i^et a publisher to take a chance on 

il he had to think of those potential 

thousands who like to croon and drib- 
hie sweet nothings in a platonic -rale 
with minor deficiencies. So, the tune 
smith was forced to open a rhyming 
dictionary and laboriously make eight 



hymed words En the hooks. 
This was a good ease of rhyme and 
rhythm without any reason. 

Current lyrics, however are soph is- 



Ity Cheater Karalowicas 
Rebuilding South College when- he the Old chapel 

arrangements for a concert by the Iterations to the Administration Build 

men's duh at Concord, Mass.. \o\em 



leavens are Telling Beethoven 
i Amen 



her 16, have been completed. 
Accompanist 



||i nt' the choir are: P. Rob- 

loins, E. Jewell, M. Kozak, G. Gold- The accompanist for the men's duh 
[man, E. Fox, M. Drury, M. MacNeill, will be Wilfred Hathaway '11; the 
\. Politella, P. Dnnkwater, M. Berth- women's accompanist will be Marion 
iaume, B. Moulton, D. Plumb, V. I Millet '41. Rehearsals for the men are 
[Little, N. llandforth, P. Archibald, 1). to be Monday afternoons at 4:30, and 



faSsuuley, L. Potter, M. Millett, 1 
jCousins, R. Dunn, R. Andrew, M. 
. .1. Osmun, S. Hubbard, W. 
JRabiiKivitz. R. Sheldon, V. Barnard, 
jK. I/nkir, L. Reagan, b. Smith, R. 
■Carpenter, R. McCartney, A. Cole, W. 
Retcher. 



EXHIBITS 



I. Memorial Building 

Exhibition of Original Tex- 
tile Designs 

II. i.himIcII Library 

Camera Craft Exhibition of 
Photographs 

III. Wilder Hall 

Photographs of Houses 

IV. Physical Education Building 

Photographs by Whitney 



Tuesday evenings at 8:00. The wom- 
en's rehearsals are to be Thursday 
evenings at 8:00. 

Selected 

Those selected for the men's varsity 
club are as follows: First tenors: Os- 
mun, Dunn, Griftm, Kalaznik, elev- 
ens, I'ickard, Hager, Cole, Prouty; 
Second tenors: Barnard, Martin, An- 



inn, South College. 

Progressing excellently in rebuild- 
ing and rearranging parts of South 
College, the contractor will have the 
building reads' for Occupancy early 
in Feburary, l!i;'.!» if weather condi- 
tions remain relatively favorable, an- 
nounces Mr. Gordon Kunz, Clerk of 
Works, or architect's representative. 

Kunz estimates the total cost of re- 
building as about $63,000. The average 
number of wreckers, plumbers, carp- 
enters, and other workers employed 
is about twenty, varying' as work ad 

ranees, 

In l!M7 Ross, who starred in Varsi- 
ty hockey, had the Hon. Leveretl Sal 



draws, Glcason. Perry, Smith. Power-, t, install, present Republican candidal.- 

McGurl, Decker; first basses: Pur f„ r governor, as an apponent. Salton- 

i.ank, Nye. Lidsay, Richardson, Car -tall was a member of the Harvard 

penter, Rabinovits, Pox, Heyman, hockej team which, at that time, had 

O'Goman, Cohen, G. Auerbach; second annual hockey tilts with M. A. C. 

basses: Esterbrook, Ferriter, Sunden, Ross, s member of Phi Sigma Kappa 

Tucker. Sheldon, Pierce, MacCartney, was also class captian in sophomore' 

Cousins, M. Auerbach. Hubbard, year aiid, according to the 1017 Indei 

Greenberg. «very popular." 

Those selected for the women's r, , ; . . ,■ , 

.... ... Ill ,-pite ot the apparent disorder 

varsity duh are as follows: .sopranos: „. ... ■ , ■ rr ■ ■ ., 

., ,. ... ... ' , , «"lk Is gOtng OH efficiently with util- 

Moulton, Mothes, Herring, I 'lumb. ':,.,,.■ .„ ,.,,,. ,. ,, , ., .. 

,, _ _. , _, , it. man rather than a«--thetic consid- 

Barrus, J. Davis, ( lapp. Pert liaume, ,..,,; ., ,, , ,, 

.. ... ,,.. . . . '' ' ' 'orations governing the changes. For 

Merrill, Gilchrist. Oertal, Van Buren; ,i,; , . .- ,i ,. ,, .,, 

this reason South < ollege Alteration 
will not resemble the renovation of 



sons are revising and replacing win- '<■* with Bellinger plots. This all start- 
dow and door openings and building ,' M ' '" SBMUl Clttbs where the lone 

ihw entrances. There is absolutely 1 1*' 11 " ' :l< eordiau player half talked 

DO structural weakness in South Col- r^dcy verses accompanied by a frail 
lege but all parts of the building are thread of melodic chords. I hope the 

being strengthened as needed. ontogeny is perfectly clear. 

The most important work on the in- ^ " ll *'" '" ^V Head (Decca 178.'$ 
side la the removal of superfluous J A) Caaa I.oma; this la a good example 

fireplaces and the revising of par ,"' ■ SW1,11 t«We with an interesting 
titions to provide more rooms. South ta ' ( ' '" r Eenny Saryeant to sing to 
College was a dormitory some time!- v " u - This is also an opportunity for 
ago, housing about B0 students. Parti Caaa Loma to prove Its versatility by 
tions are also being erected to create Paying sweet to perfection; Sweet 



new oflices; and new heating, plumb 
ing, ventilating, ami lighting are be- 
ing installed. 



with a body as well as soul. Watch 

for that deep vibrant bass, and some 

lulling, muted brass . . . Reverse 
Daddy's Boy; Anoth 



THIS SATURDAY 
IS 

Dad's Day 

|0Uf dad would be pleased to 

taneh in our Restaurant. 

rood! Service! Atmosphere! 
The P.est in Town 

For your mother we have an 
feellent line of chocolate pack- 
will enjoy them great- 



College Candy 
Kitchen 



second sopranos: Harris. Ma chin, 
Little, Kohls, Sannella, Giles, Critch- 
ett. G. Archibald. MacDougall, Tel 
man. I. Davis. Booth; altos: Arslan- 



Because of good weather the past y s y ' AM w« r «newth M tune 

few week,, Wor K on th«. outside ofl^'"' " S » r «» n * < Vo, ' al befoW SOUM 

the building, such as wracking and r" 1 *"* " 6 ******** «d mated brass. Be 
brick work, haa progressed rapidly In sur '' to ral( ' 11 that mut< " 1 vi,,,in at 1| '" 
side worn, such as framing, pUuiter- ret * rded " n,lin ^ 
ing, plumbing, etc. continues."Shoring" I Yam < ,, " ,,, "« 8008B) Jimmy Doraey; 

of the seem 1 .story ,,f ()|,| South has !""' n '' s ■ lri< ' Vu<:i1 •hat If just a hp 
been installed to support the upper Commercial, followed by short ten-n 
story while a brick firewall is removed ''""' '''■'"i""' licks aeain-t sharp brass, 
from tin first story. The highlight is a good trumpet ride. 

South Collage was erected in 1867 a '"' . It0 BM '"' l ' 1 '' vvh "' h is " r '■•'»*•>" 
as a dormitory at a total cost ..f $30 , "' , ' u,l '' u ' '" -"""''.c band alone. The 

000. In 1886 part of it burned and was I ^ '' l """ s ,Va,,i '" '"' : 'cv solid 
rebuilt. Kor many years the building ,I,Um " 1 ' •"" , ,lia * sustained long noU 
has bee,, used almost exclusively for '" " H ' ,, "' l '" lv is ■ wetHferfoJ oppor- 

administrative and executive purpose "" lil f " r i " ,livi,lu; ' 1 WOW . . . Re- 
am! it I 



provide more suitable and 



eis< . . . Change Partners; Too much 



PRIZE WINN Kit 



efficient working space that the alter i * al ,' ,!' v, ' n . •'""'Kh «!«• word 
at ions have beet) undertaken. 

GOESSMANN DRAINED 



s are 
Si 



Worth listening to, . . . once , 

heavy offbeat rhythm makes it 1 

pleasure to dance to this disc. 



ian, Goldman, Drury, Sedoff, .J. Archi- Harlan A. Howard ':jt, ha been 

bald. Richardson, Truran. Kelleher, announced $100 prise winner |n 1 Although short handed, the ground 

Pitts, Buckley, Johnson, Pangborn. thesis contest sponsored bj the New department ha laid out a drainagr 

York Coca Exchange, Inc. The sub | >-'«'*»' '"•• !i "' parking area north , >; "" |,|;,> u,u ' l,i - Nov - •'■ ;it * I'- '»•. 

ft Drape,- Hall, which system .1 t>X ' reKlonal •■""" , ' il <»' the Ameri. 



BAKER WILL ATTEND 

ject for the theses was "New I e 

Continued from A;. ? e / f,, r Cocoabeans or Products of Cocoa 

B. Conant, president of Harvard: Dr. beans," and the contest was open to 



Harold W. Dodds, president of Prune 
ton; and the president of Wellesley, 

Miss Mildred H. McAfee. 



any graduate or undergraduate an 

rolled in any school, college, or uni- 
versity in the ' fnited State 



i>e.i to complete this fall. Urgi S "" 1 ""' '"'"" Smith, Mt. Holyok 
pipes, about two feet in diameter, wi»] "*' SUt *' ; " mI A '" Im ' ' r,,:, i'" ' 




are sponsoring ■ Barn Dane- at the 

Alumnae Gymnasium, Smith College, 

Northampton. 



Just Published 

THIS WAS A POET 

A CRITICAL BIOGRAPHY OF 

EMILY DICKJNSON 

BY 

PROF. GEORGE WH1CHER 

A NOTABLE ADDITION TO YOUR SHELF OF 
WORKS OF AMHERST AUTHORS 

JEFFERY AMHERST BOOKSHOP, Inc. 



ran •«'"— the side lawn of Guess 
marm Laborator) to meet the brook 
Redraining this area was show,, to b. 
neceesar) several times ,,, the pa I ' n "'"' will be real folk dancing, led 

year when water seeped Into the base ,,v '' ;li "•*■* oi Amherst, arid mu ii 

merit of the chemistry building. Be ,,y ragula* old timers. Refreshment 

sides th. drainage, the parking si **" *" ■ ervea *' Thera will be no adml 

will see more cinder urfaei,,,, before """ f "" *? ,, S! ** ***** ' **** *** 

unnacing Derore „,„.„ :iM ,| a ii Htudents are welcome 

" is pronounced cornnlete < . i • .. 

'"/'ii u . ),, come and enjoy themselves. 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



SHEET MUSIC 

All the Popular Hits 

The only place in lown whvw it's sold 

THE NORMA 
The unusual mechanical pencil 

lour coloi s in one pencil Ask for a D« 
GUARANTEED *:i..->o 



mon.slration 



TRY AN 0AKES' SWEATER 

Light weights in all colors $2.95 and $3.50 Heavy Shaker Knit $7.50 Other makes at $2 to $5 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER S, 1938 



CCCD NCTE5 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



The coed's vote for the best bands 
Amherst week-end in order are Theta 
Chi's, I'hi Sig's, and Ka|)pa Big's. 
Also, Q. T. V., S. A. K. and Alpha 
Gamma Rho's bands were right up 
there. 

We hear that the girl's glee club is 
journeying to Northampton this week. 

Hallowe'en left trails of de- 
bris at the various sorority hous- 
es. The Amherst police force in- 
vaded Sigma Beta and really got 
their goat. The poor animal had 
been left in the back entrance, 
and it took the cops fully twenty 
minutes to remove the balky ani- 
mal. The Abbey also was visited 
by a sheep. A pin was stuck in 
the door-hell and the girls couldn't 
locate where the darn thing was. 

Dad's Day will find all the sorori- 
ties holding luncheons, dinners, and 
coffee parties for their fathers. 

Autumn bride — Christine Stewart 
'37 was married Saturday evening to 
Mr. Joseph Armstrong in Springfield. 
In the same vein, we wish to announce 
the engagement of I'riscilla W. Tay- 
lor »89 to Alfred S. Page '38. 

Members of Lambda Delt attended 
various games last week-end. Beryl 
BriggS, and Betty Jasper attended the 
Yale-Dartmouth game; Betty Eaton 
attended the Cornell-Columbia game. 
The following Alumni returned for 
Amherst week-end: Dorothy Joyce 
Donnelly, Dorothy Donnelly, Esther 
Smith, Mildred Hovey, Zoe White, 
Ruth Scott, Dorothy Cook Warner, 
Lois Crabtree Noomen, Ruth Wood, 
Betty Frigard, Marge Whitney, Kay 
Spaight, Sally Wilcox, Alfreda Ord- 
way, Dorothy Nurmi Monroe, and 
Louise Rutter. At Sigma Beta Lois 
Barnes, Stella Crowell, and Priscilla 
Bradford, were back for the week-end 

Helen Smith '41 and Anna Ban- 
uzkewic '40 became members of Al- 
pha Lambda Mu last Monday evening 
at the formal initiation ceremony. 

Fr >m Wheaton we get a new slant 
on the shaving cream-tnothpaste mis- 
take. A freshman started washing her 
hair late one night, and after rubbing 
for five minutes and getting no lath- 
er, she looked at the bottle — it was 
mouth wash. 

Word has come through from 
our managing editor, himself a 
Tufts man, that Tufts is planning 
a week-end up there similar to 
our Amherst week-end. They are 
urging all Massachusetts State to 
attend, and they furthermore 
guarantee that they will fix up 
the State boys if they come up 
without dates. We may be pre- 
judiced but we can't see any ex- 
cuse for this date business. 

Don't look now, but Smith is hold- 
ing a barn dance next Saturday eve- 
ning at the alumnae gym under the 
auspices of the regional council of 
the American Student Union. State 
students are welcome, and that means 
the Coedj ti">. 



Suzy Coed Finds\Amherst Weekend Is Jhree 
Times As Exciting With Three Men At Hand 



ASU PLANS PROGRAM 
AS MEETINGS START 



By Kathleen Tully 

Never again. Suzy Coed is a wiser 
girl now. Such a weekend. Everything 
went wrong. Three men were exactly 
three too many for Suzy Coed. Of 
course they all came — nobody died, 
darn it. Suzy is no centipede, and 
dancing with three fellows at the 
same time proved a trifle difficult. It 
looked sort of odd, too. Besides, con- 
versation was awfully nerve-racking. 
Older Romantic Man monopolized her 
left ear and kept muttering with a 
pseudo Russian dialect, "I loff you" 
"I loff you" "I loff you"; Guy With 
Line said half-heartedly, "When are 
you going to marry me, sweet?"; and 
Freddy was all for worrying about 
when Chem. Experiment No. 36 was 
due. Suzy yelled "Monday" in Fred- 
dy's general direction, but Guy With 
Line jumped to conclusion*, and began 
to get worried. Girls are not supposed 
to believe Amherst weekend lines. The 
three continued to out-shriek each 
other until Suzy had a headache, hys- 
teria, and visions of herself really 
being married in Goessmann Lab at 
high noon on Monday, so she dragged 
the three stooges out into the fresh 
air and hoped they would improve 

They went to a dance place on the 
Notch road. Older Romantic Man de- 
cided that since life was but an in- 
significant relapse and a few other 
Shakespearey-sounding metapnors, he 



might as well drown his melancholy 
then and there. They left him — with 
the check — singing the Star Spangled 
Banner while balancing a glass of 
water on a broomstick against the 
ceiling. Last reports had it that 
Russian accent had vanished — but oh 
boy! What a U. S. vocabulary he ha 1 
inherited! 

On the way back to Amherst, Guy 
With Line celebrated nothing by get- 
ting 88 m.p.h. out of his car-with- 
quotation-marks. He wasn't driving 
too fast — he was just flying too low. 
A tree came rushing toward them, and 
Guy With Line is now practising 
aforesaid line on one of Northamp- 
ton's prettier nurses. Poor Suzy. Her 
feet hurt. She took off her shoes 
and they wouldn't go back on again. 
She had hysterics and and cried all 
her make-up off. Masterful Freddy 
ignored her and started hiking for 
Amherst. Suzy came, too, the horrible 
shoes in hand, and groaned over every 
pebble for three miles. 

Three miles is an awfully long way. 
Ask Suzy. She never spent such a 
thoroughly abominable evening in all 
her eighteen years. 

Which is all — except for Ye Moral 
and Ye Point to Ye Tale: Amherst 
weekend is three times as much fun 
with three men as with one. Suzy 
will tell ya. Wow! 



Policy and Action Discussed 
Debates, Socials, 
Planned 



At its business meeting Tuesday 
evening, the American Student Union 
the I discussed its future program, and the 
floor was thrown open to all the mem- 
bers in an effort to allow them to 
decide the policy and action of the 
ASU. 

The activities of the four-coll. g<. 
Council of the ASU, including Smith 
Mount Hoi yoke, State, and Amherst 



wire also discussed. Georgi 
'40, Sidney Rosen. "A\>, Mahe 
'.'*!>, and Irving Rabinowitz. 
elected as representative 
Massachusetts State Chant. 
Council. Joan Sannella '89, 
ted as sixth member of the 1 
Board. It was derided that tl, 
meetings would be held on 
day* instead oi Thursdays, 
meeting to be held next \\ 
November 9, and others to 
alt I- mat i Wednesdays. 

Arnold Glashow, '40, wa 
charge of a Peace Commits ■• 
in cooperation with the Chris 
oration. 0-her types of cointi 

Continued < 



■ 






n P. 



'(<!, 



Average Freshman Eats Half a Ton of Food } 
During The Year, Dining Hall Figures Show 



"Country air creates good appetite- 
among freshmen" according to Allan 
W. Chadwick, manager of the college 
dining hall, who today released figures 
showing that the average freshmar 
last year ate more than half a ton 
of food during the school year. 

Were this amount to be concentrat- 
ed in one meal, the freshman would 
sit down to a table bearing 470 pounds 
of milk, 212 pounds of potatoes, 184 
pounds of meat, poultry, and fish, 
21 heads of lettuce, 48 pounds of 
flour made into bread, and a varied 
assortment of other foods. He would 
butter and sweeten his food and bever- 
butter his bread with 17 pounds of 
ages with 'A8 pounds of sugar. To top 
otf his meal he would eat more than 
four gallons of ice cream as well as 
an assortment of other desserts in les- 
ser qualifies. 

lilt, Pounds 

In all, the meal Would weigh 1116 
pounds. And this figure doesn't in- 
clude sandwiched and «oda ronsun <•■■' 



in the college store or the late even- 
ing hamburgers at the local lunch 
wagon. 

At entrance a year ago the fresh- 
man class weighed an average of 140 
pounds per student. Today the same 
class averages 145 pounds. The aver- 
age student ate m.>re than eight times 
his own weight to make five pounds 
but most of them seem to think it was 
worth it. 



STREET BAGS 

in 
Sturdy Leathers 

Well Lined and Fitted 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



BROADCAST 



Tomorrow radio listeners from Coast- 
to-Coast might a< well expeel to be 
carried awaj In ecstasies over an 
original musical play of love and 
romance by Gra<ie Allen. Grade has 
named her tuneful production "Three 
Love., Has Gracie of 1988." She says 
it will combine the lyric oeauty of "I 

Mail ied An Angel," the keenness of 
"Pins and Needles,' 1 the breathless 

comedy of "H 's a Poppin," and, 

as far as her own performance goes, 
the combined appeal of "Victoria Re 
gina" (Helen Hayes) and "Madam 

Capet" (Lva Le GallicniK ) And, Oh 
yes, (the also adds that there will oe 
a little bit of "You Never Know." 
but not a sign of Clifton Webb or 

Lupe Velez. 



COLLEGE STORE 

Everything for the Student 



Luncheons 

Soda Fountain 

Student Supplies 
ON THE CAMPUS 



Banners and Souvenirs 
Books and 

Magazines 
NORTH COLLEGE 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 

ROOM ACCESSORIES RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL 

63 So. Pleasant St. 



Plumbing 
& Heating 

Amherst, Mass. 



CO. 



Eddie M. Switzer 




TODAY, THURS., NOV. 3 




jmDEREWSKI 

III In HisOnjySereQn Appearance ^ 





CHARLES FARRELL-MARIE TEMPEST 

A Delightful Romance. Beautifully Told 



Hear Paderewski play: 

PolonaUe. A Flat Major. Op. 53 

Second Hunirarian Rhapsody 

Moonlight Sonata 

Minnet in G Major 

FRI.-SAT., NOV. 4-5 



Chopin 

Liszt 

Beethoven 
Beethoven 



2 BIG HITS! 

7 




Rocking the Scree 
with the unledshi 
fury of dramatic 



JWNAMITE 



. 



en A . 



mm tUWAHU U. 

RoBinson 




am Tmi^ 



*jL 



i.hWENDY 
BARBIE 

Barbara 

O'NEIL 

Jchn'rJEAl 
tto K'ugt' 



■**©*** 



*& 







Nl'WS 



Plus 
Color Cartoon 

KXTKA! EXTRA 1 

The picture every American should aeel 
■ DKCI.AK ATION OK INUKPKNIiKNCK" 



SI N.-MON.-TUES.. NOV. 6-8 

Continuous Sunday 2-10:3(1 P. M. 

Daring Action in Untamed Alaska! 




Wm 

George 
L RAFTj 



EXTRA 

A Film SCOOP of the FIRST Magnitude! 
Nothing Like it Ever Before <>n the Screen 
The All-N'r-w MARCH OF TIME Present 

"INSIDE THE MAGINOT LINE' 

thi- mns! powerful system of frontier fortlncntlona tin- world hi 



Also: Donald Duck Cartoon 



I 'at he New.« 



Clothing and 

Haberdashery 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER ft, imk 



UirCMCNTS 



. 






Ill' 



ile too broadly when read- 

■ w the freshmen won their 
ffht football game yester- 

the frosh won easily 

-tiong team and showed 

promise for next season, 

makes you think they are 

„■ here next season? 

football players are in 
spot at State College. Not 
they have to get passing 

. ,i earn their expenses like 
. i student hut thej have to 
. ood deal of their time to 
first few months of col- 
hardest from the point 
getting into the swing of 
rj it is during this period 
freshman grid star is spend- 
.,t deal of his time on the 
, hi. If the members of the 
team had the same amount 
-tudy as the average frosh, 
irks and chances of staying 
add be up with the aver- 
is not the ease, however, 
f them are forced to spend 
hours a day working to 
iin thi room and hoard before they ' 

, gbli attack the books. Add this 

the hours spent at football, 
the right amount of time 
;.. the football player would 
ivc to give up sleep. 

This i> no argument for the fac- 
ii 1 1 > to ta*e it easy on the ath- 
Ifti -. No college can allow this and 
keep up its academic standing. 
The college should, however, help 
tin student-athlete with his finan- 
ces to repay him for some of the 
time he is putting in for the col- 
lege on the football field. This 
holds true also, of course, for the 
members of the varsity team who 
hate managed to stay in college 
despite the fact all the odds have 
been against them. 

Its the old question of counting 
he chickens a little too early when 
tat.' students say "wait till next 

■ it ■" There is a chance that most of 
In- year's freshmen club will weather 
In 1 st'ittn and stay on to bolster the 
araity next season; but if it does, 
t'.> in spite of the present set-up of 



States menF ace Coas t Guard In Revenge Battle On Saturday 



CONNECTICUT WINS 
CONN. VALLEY TITLE 



Wesleyan, Amherst, Mass. state 

Trail in Championship 

Meet Monday 



DEFENSIVE ACE 



H»"rt indifference. 



Taking five of the first nine places. 
Connecticut Suite College won the 
second annual Connecticut Valley 
( roas Country championship last 
Tuesday 01 the Amherrt coutrc, heat 

ing out Wesleyan with a score of 26 
to oj for the Cardinals. Mass. State 
finished fourth with b score of 100, 
coming in behind Amherst College 
which finished third with 86, ...u 

losing the dual meet to Amherst by 

tin score tf 26-30, The scores of the 
othei con • petitory are Coast Guard 
Acad my 120, Springfield 12K, and 
Trinity 161. 

Repeating his 1987 victor-. Hart} 
Heermans of Wer.leyan Again won the 
Valley race, oeing pushed, however, 
by Wheaton of Conn. State who put 
on a terrific sprint a short way from 
the finish line. Heenoans hsfced out 
the remaining distance and won by a 
scant 2u yards. His time for the 
course was 19:204, which was very 
good. Pickard of Mass. State was in 
the race all the v.-ay, losing out at the 
end, but defeating Captain .Mover of 
Amh srst in their rubber meet, thus 
giving Larry two wins to one for 
Mover. 

Mass. Si ate also took fourth place 
in the freshman race with 82 points, 
losing out to Conn. State with 2!), 
Wesleyan with 78, and Springfield 
with !>4. Trinity and Amherst finish- 




Jim I'avson 



HARRIERS WILL RUN 
IN N. E. TITLE MEET 



MAROON SEEKS TO ATONE FOR '37 WIN OF 
CADETS BEFORE LARGE DADS' DAY CROWD 

Guardsmen Won Last Week as Backs Thompson and Goerecki 

Outsped li. P. I. State Hopes are Based OH Don Allen's 
Passing and Leo Santueei's Running 



B00TERS FAVORITES 
TO DEFEAT TRINITY 



Ability 



of State to Score 
be Crux of Battle 

at Hartford 



Will 



p 


ickard 


to 


L 


sad 


State 


Forces 




as Mi 


tint 


•. ( 


onn 


. Stalt 


art 










V; 


tvored 








I'ravelli 


>g 


to 


:!osti 


m Mom 


ay, 


tile 


M 


anion h 


i friers 


will 


eoiiipcti 


in 


the 



ed fifth and sixth with !>7 and 127 
respectively. Morrill was the first 
freshman to finish, placing eighth, 
Kimball, (ireenlield, Shepardson, and 
sfacDoUgall bein^ the other point 
scorers. 

Individual standings for the varsi- 
ty: 

H.-.-rmarm 1W1: M, Wheaton K'S): 3d. 
LuCMl (CS) ; 4th. Mice (CS) ; . r .th. Pick;m! 

(M8C) i 6th. Kojrar (A); 7th. (hm (fipfld) ; 

Mth, Johnson (OS); !«th. Olson (CS) i 10, R«S 

(Cta : II, (iuerntM-y 1W1; 12. 1'iiiWU (All 

IS, Wis.- (Ai: 11. Rom (MSC) ; tS, StoM 

Continued on Page 6 



Santucci Lone Light As Lord Jeffs Paste 

Statesmen 35-0 in Town Title Grid Battle 



|he x • 



I5y Art Copson 

Struggling vainly against a fast 

picky offense which seemed to find 

difficulty penetrating the'r de- 

Itses, the Statesmen lost their town 

«!«• bid last Saturday on Pratt field 

to I), The Lord Jeffs tallied In 

» : ' four periods with left half Vic 

1 ding the gait with two 

MKndowns. State's lone scoring ges- 

l Ur " *« Leo Santueei's long dash 

bwn thi sidelines. While the plucky 

was getting his wind, the 

d a conference and after 

ration, decided to call San- 

' ' of hounds on the Amherst 

I*. 

Hold 

U hack for the Opening 

I handed the hall to Irzyk 

'• to open what seemed to 

Hi State offense, but a fumble 

1 ' ""d play gave the ball to 

Held back for a time, Am- 

foroed to kick, and the 

forged through for a first 

1 • more downs, and Allan 

to Joys. Here the Purple 

dase the State line with 

pinners. Furman, the 

dlback, would receive the 

' in Someone else's middle, 

ough another part of the 

State men would proceed 

OH the spot while the 
' hack was logging the 
"I State's pay turf. The 
ante when Joys took the 
urman and spun throuph 
'"' of the line and then 
secondaries to cross for 

• t'ri";ht spot in the per- 

: yk's interception of the 

Serial attempt. Follow- 

ate toss — Allan to Con- 

! for 8ft vards, brinj?inc 

'he Amherst 22 yard 

unities early in the sec- 



New England Intercollegiate i in which 

they placed sixt.i last year in a field 
ol thirteen. The.e will be other com- 
petitors in this race besides those .vli. 
competed in the Connecticut Valley 
meet of last week, bringing such 

strong competition as will be exhibit- 
ed by the University of Maine and 
by Bates, albeit the latter was de- 
feated by the U. of Maine in a previ- 
ous meet. Last year's winner, Rhode 
Island, will not be favored to repeat 
The winner this year will protmblv 
be U. of Maine or Conn. State. 

Sev>n varsity men and seven fresh- 
men will make the trip this year, in 
contrast to the one freshman who 
went last year. Since Dick Hayward 
broke his leg la tin last meet, a 
seventh man is lacking to the present 
lineup. Captain Pickard, Harold Rose. 
Chet Putney, Kennedy, Scholz, and 
Slater are the ones likely to make 
the trip fi t the varsity. Representing 
•he froth will probably be those who 
ran well in the Connecticut Valley 
race for freshmen, Kimball, Morrill 
Greenfield, Shepardson, and MacDong 
all. 



41 TOPS WILLISTON 
AS FRIETAS SHINES 



Frosh Hack Figures in Every 

Touchdown as I'lHx's 
Win Again 






ond quarter set the locals back, and 
a weak State boot, followed by a good 
return from the toe of Al Furman put 
Amherst in scoring position once 
apain. Furman took two bucks at the 
line, and on the second plunged 
through left ^oard for the score. 
Cordner added the extra point, kick- 
ing from placement* 

State neatly stopped the Amherst 
powerhouse in the third period as 
Johnny Blaako pulled Joe Finnan 
down when the latter bail left the 
State line .12 yards behind. On the 

next play Lee Norwood charged in The Maroon yearlings smashed their 

to scoop up I Firman fumble on WKjf to a victory over Williston Acad 

State's ill ' "ii yard mark. State tried erny at Kasthampton yesterday by 

a pass at this point hfWever, and the a score of 18-0, 

hall had the bad luck to fall into the ' Williston kicked off, and after an 

Amherst center's hands after being exchange of punts Buitocb tore 

Juggled about for several seconds, through tackle for 18 yards, and then 

The interception was grounds for an- Bvani raced 2<l yards for the first 

other score as Pi ttengill 8 few plays freshman touchdown, 

later romped around lift end for ih« FVietas Intercepted s Williston pass, 

third Amherst tally. Cordner's kick and Intended to Zeitler who carried 

was good and the score stood 2\ to D, it 16 vards. Another pass by Frietas 

]",u Maroon stock jumped at this gave the frosh a first down. Dick Cof- 

point, as the offense clicked, and the fin CUOghl Frietas' next toss and 

mighty SantUCCi sped down the held went over for ■ score, 

for what I lemed to be the first break- , In the third quarter Brady recov- 

Itlg of State's touchdown jinx. Fate vn-ii a fumble for the frosh. Frietas 

ruled otherwise, and the ha., came let K" another long 45 yard he.-r 



Recovering from their second dc 

feat if tin season, the Brigg-adiers 
journey down to Hartford ?aturJaj 
to tackle the much I eaten Trinity 
eleven Compared to some of the re 

cent Maioiii opponents, the Hill top 
pers KhoUld fall before the State at- 
tack. 

icsording to the present records 
tin Statesmen have two victories: and 
two defeats compared with Trinity's 
three losses. Rut these lecords are 
no criterion of the blue and gold's 
itrength, since all thre • setbacks were 
at the hands of topnotch clubs, and 
were by close scores. The boys from 

Hartford held Yale to one goal end 

Amherst to two, which gives some 
idea of the strength of the Trinity 

defense. A good offense being the 
best defense, the State fullbacks anil 
goalie should have little trouble stop 
piliK theii weak attack. So, if the 

Maroon forward line can seme at 
least mice they should leave the en- 
cotint.'r victorious. 

Coach BriggS said that Trinity hjis 
only a fair club, but with a few 

break* might turn the tables on the 

Statesmen. At any rate the BriggS- 

Trinity goal in an attempt to get 

men will carry the attack to the 
Trinity goal in an attempt to jjet back 
into the win column after their Am- 

her.st defeat 

Auerbach will be back at the full- 
hack post after being on the sick 
list for the last few days, while Wil- 
son will carry on at K<>al. 

JEFFS HAND MAROON 
2-0 SOCCER BEATING 



COAST (J I 


ARD 


STATE 


Crock 


le 


Merey 


McClelland 


It 


Prnstek 


Miller 


Ik 


Kajchowski 


O'Neil 


c 


Itlasko 


Masters 


r« 


Payees 


Aide., 


rl 


Malcolm 


Weal 


re 


Norwood 


Goreckl 


Mb 


Ir/vk 


Scrader 


rhb 


Santucci 


Thompson 


II. b 


Skogsberg 


\\ instead 


fb 


Harding 



Willis Leads Amherst Attack 

After Scoreless First 

Half 



I 



back to the State 48. 

The Lord Jeffs tallied two more in 
the final period with Pattengill get- 
ting one on a lon^ run, and Mat- 
berger going -uoend rijrht end for 

the scon.'. Hon Allan, Leo SnntUfH, 

ann Skogsberg '" the backfleM, and 

Blasko, Peyton, and Norwood in the 
line were top Mamon performers. 

Harding'! play at fullback when he Doyle 
rrlieved Ccnnn! vm worthy of note 
The chubby junior will see mere ac- 
tion this season. Few men huj,"reC 
the nench during the eame as Cara- 
way used reserves plentifully in a. 
atten,nt to halt the Purple wave. 



to Lou Wolk who downed the ball on 
the 12 yard line. FVietas passed once 
more, this time to Kvans who went 
over avram for the third frosh score. 



STATE 


FROSH 


WILLISTON 


Wolk 


re 


Berry 


i Bloom 


re 


Tisdale 


Pierce 


TK 


Washington 


Brady 


c 


Smith 


Doyle 


Ig 


Kingsbury 


Werme 


It 


Birnie 


Coffin 


le 


Murphy 


Zeitler 


qb 


Mathews 


Kvans 


rhb 


Ksbjornson 


1 Bullock 


Ihb 


Watson 


Frietas 


fb 


flaylor 



Dropping their first home game of 
the season, the State hooters were 
-it back Saturday by a strong Am- 
herst eleven. Although the breaks 
were evenly distributed, the States- 
men failed to capitalize on their op- 
portunities; the Sabrinas, on the oth- 
er hand, took advantage of the fav 
on of the fates and scored twice in 
the last half. 

Outplay Jeffs 
Although they completely outplayed 
their opponent.- in the first half the 

Brigg-adiers were unable to penetrate 
the purple defense. Even though the 
greater part of the half was played 

>n the Amherst side of the field, no 
-i. .ie resulted. This first half attack 
was really a defensive offense for the 
Maroon since there were few shots a. 

the goal. The third quarter found the 

entire setup changed with the States- 
men forced to take the defense be- 
for the sudden attack of the enemy, 
in the midst of the purple barrage 
came the Initial score of the game, 
which spelled victory for the Am- 
herst team. In the final act the 
Briggsmen tried hard to even it up, 
but a se c on d purple tally drowned 
their hope. 

Podolak 
Stan Podolak, mentioned for all 

New England honors, was the power 

in the Maroon machine while Willis 
led the enemy attack. The whole State 
eleven turned in excellent perform 
ancs, but the zest that was manifest 
in the Springfield game was some- 
what lacking. 

This defeat sends the Statesmen to 
eighth position in the New England 
Intercollegiate Soccer League. 



Still hoping to break the win jinx 
which has dogged them since the op- 
ening i^anie, the State grid tone 
will meet Coast Cuard Saturday on 

the local turf before a large Dad's 
Day crowd. Revenge will be the key 

note of the battle for the Statesmen 
this year, for last season, the cadets 
eked out a shad) victory down at 
New London to upset the Caraway 
in. 'ti 26-20. 

Having come out of the Amherst 
scrap with few serious injuries, the 

Maroon machine will be ready to field 

Its best strength against the cadets. 
On the basis of their pl.-.y in the Am 
herst game, Skogsberg and Harding 
will be potential starting backs for 
State. 

Building their offense around a pair 
of da. i.y back>, Thompson and Goer 

ecki, and placing their defense in the 
hands of seven capable linemen, the 

Guardsmen went to ■ i'.» 8 victory 

over Rensselaer last Saturday while 
the Statesmen were being defeated 
by Amherst. The cadets have come out 
ahead In only one other game how 
ever, downing Norwich l.'t-O, and 'os 
Ing to Trinity 2«;-0, Worcester 9-0, 
and Middh l.ury 7-0. 

Watch Santucci 
Ace passer Allan will be a main 
spring in the State attack Saturday 
with Santucci the man to watch on 
foot. The right flank will be in charge 
of lanky Lou Norwood whose defen- 
sive work since his debut in the 

Rhode Island game has been outstnnd 

ing. State can look for a hard battle 
Winn they 'iioet the inv:deis S.-.tur 
day bet revenge will be sweet and the 
win column sweeter if State comes 
out on top. 

THETA CHI DEFEATS 
KAPPA SIGMA 36- 19 



Crescent and Star A i ones 

Loss with 1-0 Soccer 
Victory 



Grid 



Kappa Sigma tasted the bitter of 

defeat at the hands of Theta Chi 
Tuesday night in the Cage, The tune 

was :'.(;. i!) after a battle in which the 
Red men emerged victors in a last 
period splurge. Hampered from the 

first period by the fast charging line 
of the Kappas, the attack of the \l<i{ 
men was long delayed. However it 
loosened up late in the game with 
long passes of the Story Kldredgo 
combine. This two some figured prom 
ently in the victory. 

Tallying for Theta (hi was by 
Retallik and Bldredge, with two each, 
and also by Chapin and I'llman. Don- 
nelly, Walke\ and Coffin stored for 
the losers. 



Theta Chi bow e d in soccer to the 
Kappa Sigma hooters in a long, 
whistle-torn battle which ended in the 
score of 1 (). Thetas in the battle were 

Steff, Eaton, Pearson, Parker, Wing, 

and Marsh with Wakefield, Morse, 
Jameson and Packard as reserves. 
Winning for Kappa Sig were Oailey, 
Bemben, chapmen, G reen field, Morse. 
Reserve, were llerrick, McCormack, 

Peirce and Paige, 

Tomorrow I'hi Sig takes on TKI' 
in football and soccer. They are fav- 
ond in both. 



i 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER :i, UM 



ATTENTION MILITARY MAJORS!!! 

NETTLETON RIDING BOOTS— Now is the time to place your orders for Riding Boots. 
They will be made up to your measurements as in previous years. Consult us at your earliest convenience. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



Kirsten Flagstad 

Famous Wagnerian Soprano is 

Included in Concert 

Schedule 



Kirsten Flagstad, world famous 
Wagnerian soprano is one of the out- 
standing concerts of the I'ittsfield 
Community concerts which may he 
heard by Amheist members without 
any further cost. Others in the series 
include the Westminster Choir, just 
returned from a tour of Europe where 
it was acclaimed one of the finest 
choral groups in the world. Piatigor- 
sky, 'cellUt and Kullman, the great 
tenor of the Metropolitan Opera will 
give a joint recital. 

By special arrangement, members 
of the Amherst association may also 
attend the nearby concerts of the 
Greenfield association. The Barren 
Little Symphony which was so well 
received in Amherst recently is in- 
eluded in this series. The duo-pianists 
most in demand in the concert world 
today are Bartlett and Robertson who 
will play in Greenfield on Dec. 5. All 
these concerts are in addition to the 
four or more conceits to be held here. 

Best Yet 

Mrs. Charles F. Fraker, campaign 
manager, reports that the Amherst 
campaign gives every indication that 
the series this season should exceed 
in interest any series yet given here. 



The campaign for new memberships 

will close this Saturday after which 
time the books will be closed until 
next year. There will be no single ad- 
missions to any concert. 
Committee 
The Program committee of the as 
sedation is comprised of Prof. Wil- 
liam 1'. Bigelow, I'i'of. Vincent Mor- 
gan, Mrs. Nina Soller, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Fraker, Mrs. John Rogers, 
Frank Nestle, Miss Ruth Pushee, .diss 
Ida Bridgman, Mrs. Florence rawcett, 
Doric Alviani, Miss Mildred I'ierpont, 
and Stowell Coding. 

DADS* DAY 

Continued from Page 2 

Members of the Dads' Day Com- 
mittee are: Donald I'. Allen *41, Alma 
S. Alvord '40, entertainment, George 
L. Atwater '40, Mabelle Booth *o9, 
.lean A. Davis '41, liettina Hall '.'lit. 
invitations, George Haylon f&, mili- I 
tary, James Y. Jamison '41, Charles [ 
Rodda 'M'J, Jay H. Winn '41, publicity,) 
and Nellie M. Wozniak '41. 



BYERLEY TEXTILE DESIGNS ON EXHIBITION 
FOR FEW WEEKS IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 



Although Executed in Paris, Work Was Colored and Adapted 

to the Requirement of American Looms — Collection 

as a Whole is Considered Exceptional 



ASO PLANS PROG 

Continued from Page 4 
De organized were also discussed; it 
was pointed out that every ASU mem- 
ber was kept vitally interested in 
the democratic organization by being 
placed on an active committee. Plans 
for debates, moving pictures, socials. 
and the solution of campus problems 
were discussed for the rest of the 
evening. 



By liettina Hall 

The exhibition in the Memorial 
Building for the next few weeks is an 
unusual collection of original textile 
designs, executed in Paris, and as- 
Berobled by Blanche A. Byerley of 
New York. 

Although the designs were origin- 
ally executed in Paris, they were col- 
ored and adapted to the requirements 
id' American looms by artists in this 
country, and later printed on silk. The 
colors are broad and bold, even start- 
ling at times, hut the underlying 
designs in all the prints are funda- 
mentally sound. These colors are un- 
usual chiefly for the trick combina- 
tion.-., and for the variety of shades 
used, producing vivid and exquisite 
effects. Autumn Apples is an out 
standing example of the use of bril- 
liant colors, while Jewels, Tapestry 
Flowers, and Checks show varieties 
of traditional color treatment. Most 
unusual are the prints Summer, War 
and Peace and Vacation, which have 
loose large designs which show a bit 
I of the surrealist influence, and 



strange, clear striking colors handled 
in a most unusual way. 
Many Types 

For form value there are many 
types represented in the collection. 
Waves, is perhaps the outstanding one 
with its subtle and unusual shadings 
and the powerful sweep of lines. The 
design here is linear rather than all- 
over, and, as such, is very satisfactory. 
There are, also, some excellent geo- 
metric designs with inexhaustible 
sources ot variety, as Ovals and 
Squares, Polka Dots, Black and White 
Geometric, and Circles. It is inter- 
esting to trace in these prints the in- 
fluence of surrealism, for some of the 
designs are completely impressionis- 
tic, as Dissonances, some are only 
slightly so as the aforementioned 
Summer, while other prints are as 
traditional as old New England wall- 
paper, though in most cases more : 
tractive. Such are Leaf Scroll, and 
Hydrangeas, both beautifully done 
flower designs. 

The collection as a whole is excep- 
tional, and one which grows more in 
teresting with study. 



Special Notice to Students 

A limited number of Wtb-i, 
abridged Dictionaries will 1,« 
oil a ^i»t-t ial aduCAtlon&l off,-. 

A Webster's Unabridged Diet 
an absolute necessity to intt-lli^, 
niK'. writing and talking. 

'lln- effort of over 200 oi i: ■, 
(iivati-st Sin'cialists were combine* 
eriiiK every technical subject ,. 
Chemistry. Civil Engineering. V 
Engineering, Etymology, MedJcii ■ !, 
tion. Law, Physics, and Phoneti 
inn absolute accuracy yet ;it 
time clearness and simplicity si. 
one can easily understand 
specifically matters of interest 
elans. 

r'ur i uiiiplfteness, precision, and 
it> when writing a report oi U 
must go to a dictionary that i- i 
In addition to its large cl< ;• 
it contains y. tepa.ra.te featu i 

Mr. t'hasin is aaning thi ■ 
fraternities in reference '. | 

Watch your bulletin boanl- 
information. 



CONNECTICUT WINS 

Continued from I'.igc 5 

(W); 16. Minnick (A); 17, Jarvlm 
18, McKusick (W) ; 19, Thompaoi i - 

McCubbin (CO) i 21. Charles i'l , 

lenberg (Spfid) i 'i'A, Kennedy (MSI 
Manner (CO) J 25, Putney (]CSC) ; M 
kratz |T) ; 27, Powell (W); 2H, Coffert> | 
29, Bing (MSC); 30. Christy (SpfUl;, 
GUllfl (W) ; 32. Starr (CO) ; 33, S!a!e 
(MSC): 34, Crouch (CO) i IS, Riley (Tl:St, 
Scholz (MSC): 37. Barber (C(, 
(S) : 39, Tobey (A); 40, Bayward (Kg 
41. Bennet (T) ; 42, Lohrman <W) : 41, I 
(CC) ; 44, Norling (S) , 45. Morm | \ 
Roderus (A) ; 47, Crockett (T). 



■ 




fj****, a., N* *a*I 






Paul whi mman 

Ev*rj H'ednrsday Evt*lUt\ 
GBOMGB OKACIG 

Burns aiabn 

Every I riday Eptni»t 

Ml C. />'. S. Stations 






EDDIE DOOLBY 
I ootbuli Highlights 

Evtry Thursday and Saturday 
$2 /.,<;<///;? A', li. C Stations 



Cnpvriglit 19)8, LJOOITT* Mvirs TOSM 



. . . how fast that 
says it for smokers . . . refresh- 
ing mildness . . . better taste 
. . . more pleasing aroma . . . 
everything you con /J ask for in 
a cigarette 



Chesterfield 



. . more pleasure 
for millions 



* R BA SIL fi. W00D 

LIBRARY 





V..1. XLIX 



Mpn 




AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10. !«»<* Z -288 



ANNUAL RED CROSS 
DRIVE BEGINS TODAY 

ign is Headed by Charles 
liodda, President of 
Adelphia 



MANY NEEDY 



Ml. H 



PRESIDENT STARTS RED CROSS DRIVE 



lit Hurricane Damage Has 
Resulted in Need For 
Larger Fund 



■ annual drive for funds for the 

. ,ui Red Cross begins today 

campus under the direction of 

president of Adelphia, Charles 

ih. Because of the extensive dam- 

aused by the recent flood and 

ine, fundi are needed this year 

it is hoped that the drive on cam- 

.-. [| exceed last year's quota. Sor- 

.iiiil fraternities are urged to 

ast among their members and 

ibute to help the attainment of 

aim. The drive will continue until 

iksgiving. 

Red doss, since its organi- 

• in 1**1 increased its member- 

i,i a score to five and a half 

in :'.,7ir> chapters. Its work 

ists of disaster relief, First Aid 

Saving instruction, genera] 

irk, war service and Junior 

During the fiscal year 

ed the Red Cross helped 

120,000 victims of dis- 

• • United States, spending 

than six and a half million of 

i to rehabilitate sufferers. Red 

made 1,000,00 visits to 

sick in communities where nurs- 
md medical aid were not readily 
able. 




Dr. Baker Receiving the First Membership Slicker from Charles Rodda, 



Adelphia President 



KEATING'S BAND TO 
PLAY AT R0TC BALL 



ARMISTICE PLAY 



Popular Murray's Orchestra is 

Ticked for Military 

Dance 



RhI 



rst aid instructors qua!- 

" persons to give emer- 
i ' following accident.-, since 

re have been established 
gency highway first aid 

and 2,068 mobile first aid 
e help to victims of motor 



Music for the L938 edition of the 
Militarj Bail will be furnished by 
Ray Keating and his orchestra, fa- 
mous for Its featured music in Mui 
ray's at Tuckahoe, New York, it was 
announced today by George Benja 
min "39, chairman of the Military Ball 
Committee. Keating's asrarrefration is 
a leading New England College oi 
cliestra. 

Tickets, listed at $3,60 per couple, 

for the dance three weeks a\\a\ are 
limited in number, and the < Ion fctet 

urges students to make their rea i 
vations soon. Ticket salt an not lim- 
ited to military majors or even . 
students, but are open to anyone, 

Tickets may he secured from the 
members of the Committee. 



"The Silence of Cod." a pla> 
which has met with a great deal 
.»f success in recent eagagements, 

will be one of the features of the 
' lnistian Federation progress to 
be presented in Bowker Audtteriusn 
at 7:30 p. n; on Armistice Day. 

In addition to tin- p| a > the cast 
f which include* John Relcom, 
Harold Scoliin, William Conaat, 
Keerge Toby, and Edward Inder- 
,,,; ■ -pe.cb on "Propaganda" 
will be given by the eo-presideni 
»f the Ktndent (lnistian Federa- 
tion, Miss Kli/abeth Obrin '.{<). 



REFERENDUM VOTE ASKED 
ON SENATE ELECTION PLAN 

students are Urged to Register Sentiment About Present Nomin- 
ating Committee Plan— Not a Rebuke Bui an 

Attempt to Settle the Problem 

GOLDBERG OUTLINES "*»* oftonai plans 
A.B. DEGREE COURSE """"', ."". x .."''!' "'- "^ ta 

tioodeii Library For 

— Votes 
Wants Basic Vear Course in the 

Humanistic Masterpieces To enable students to express their 

Started opinions with greater facility t,, re 

sponsible student leaders, and to ob- 

l)r. Maxwell h. Goldberg addres ed tain a better appraisal of the general 
the Young Facultj Discussion Group student sentiment regarding the re 

last Thursday in a proposal for the cent revision of the election of class 

establishment of a basic year .•...use nominating committees by the Sen 

in the humanistic masterpieces. It [ 8 ate, the Collegian has included in the 

Intended as a ground-breaker for the editorial column of thii issue. a "Ref 

transformation of the present , ,■ erendum blank." This blank should be 

,, ' a,|l,,K l " :1 B ' A.B. degree into used by students who wi:h t„ indl 

'""' l,,; " lll| v '" ■• superior degree. cate to the Senate their desire for ■ 

The course as proposed would be ^ , ''' a, '' , ' consideration of the election 

compulsory to those taking the LB. i"'« ,,,l «' m - This is not ■ rebuke to the 

derive and would be similar to the S*"** 8 ! ,,,,, merely an attempt to 

Dartmouth course called "Earning Our rl, ' ;i,| . v measure student feeling re 

Heritage," to the Humanities Orienta K»rding this important problem. 

tion course offered at the Unlversitj The Senate ha. considered, some 

"I Chicago, an<l to the recentlj adopt what, several different methods of 

"' Humanltie Course at Columbia, it electing membet of the nominating 

would run i i rough the masterpiece committees, Including thf> Town Han, 

l '»'" 1 " ,l "' Ancient Greek and the lie 'he preferential plan, and the system 

brews u, Goethe and other great which has now been in effect for the 

l "" (| ''" P«St two week-. Th, ,,,etl,,„| |,ont 

•ho repre entation at each frai. rnity 
111 :,,| \ nominating committee to one 

lllelliliei . 



MUSIC COMMITTEE 
LISTS 800 MEMBERS 



Other ujfge I oi made by Dt 
Goldbers foi "Implementing the A B. 
1 •■ ■•• foe" con< erne. | the continued de 
:, "i''ii! . on our campu . of a loi ■ 
of intellectual urbanitj and of an at 
tendant dislike of intellectual provin 
' ialism : the prevention at a prot 



\t (ioodcll 

Thi • s . .i udent refi n ndum, and 
" " ! '" i ' srily, If ii i i to be of any 
hie, he con idered . urefulh by 

. A 



tousl) granted, tnsigniflcant degree; B veryone in all of the foui cl 
id the outlawing of an A.B. degree ,,; ' 11 " 1 bos will be placed at th< 
ated largelj with "butterfly di culation desk of Coodeii Library t 



lettantJ in" and "ivory tov er e thetic 
i m.' 



Gov. Saltonstall Is Well Fitted To 
Understand Needs Of The College 



Community Concert Program is 
Announced For Tins 

Season 



reive opinion registered on these 
referendunm blank . Balloting will 
close Saturda) niaht, 



ile of Massachusetts went 

. Tuesday, and elected 

mstall us President of 

uf Tin tees of Massachu- 

College. This election also 

n the position of gover- 

■ commonwealth; but from 

it view of the state College 

Konstall's election is im- 
nlj as it concerns the col- 

Increased Service 

fortunate In Salton- 

H. A scholar, statesman. 

athlete, the new governor 

'' '1 to understand the needs 
tts State. Talking about 



^UMNI GET-TOGETHER 



\nr 



'UncemeiH has come from 
li " t '"» \lumni that therp will 
k !**sachu*etta state Get-Te- 

B«*th t . r . 

" graduates and under- 
bid their friends in the 
•t th , U ical K d«<-ation Building 
r mural K ym on Satur- 
"iher 19th. 

"dl be served and there 

in nnR. This is evidently 

name, so if the weather 

•<l skip down to the gym 

! he mob. 



i .... 
"ill !. 

after 
fcj too 

and 



the state College on the eve of his 
election, Saltonstall gave some indi- 
cation as to what his policies might 
be. "Go v ern me nt," he said, "should do 
the basic things, preserve peace and 
order, but in addition we must pro 
vide educational advantages for ti 
of all mean.-. You can rest assured 
that my aims for the State College 
are for Its development and increased 
service." 

Scholar 
\ a scholar, Saltonstall apprt 
the high standards of Massachusetts 
state: as a statesman he will be able 

to carry his ambitions for develop. 
ment of the college Into reality; s ■ 

farmer he will be able to understand 

the basic foundation of this and all 
landgrant colleges; as e former Har- 
vard University snorts great he still 
has the youthful zest that gripe every 
college campus. 

"I can't promise anything to the 
College," Saltonstall said. "I can only 

assure those Interested in the college 

of my own faith in Massachusetts 
State's place in the educational field." 
No politician. Saltonstall will take no 
action on development of the State 
College until he understands its many 
phases and problems. No miracle man. 
Saltonstall promises no Harvard in 
Amherst. 



The Amherst I kunmunit) I .>.■ . i ■ 
\ ociation announce - one of it mo I 
brilliant serie for the 1988 1939 . 
son, with a total membership of ovi i 

sun. 



Rujrene List, noted pianist will open 
the season on Nov. Lis, and one res oi 
for including Mr. List before his 
twentieth birthday in ■ ■ lit that 
embraced tome of the greate I pian 
ists of hi- time, is well expre ed by 
Samuel Chotzinoff, critic of the ' 
York Post," in his review of I 

Town Hall recital: "Thi, young pian 

1st is already a first-rate artist, yet 
there i that in his playing which 
guarantee continued and consistent 
development." At Thirteen Eugene 
i ■ trekked aero the continent from 

his native California by bus and ar- 
rived in Philadelphia Just In time ■ 
enter a competition for a scholarship 

with OlgS Samaroif Stowoski. He won 

but Mine. Samaroff made the condi 
tion that if he studied with her he was 
not to be exploited. His parents con- 
sented and special arrangements were 
made En s progressive high school, 
providing a schedule that allowed fur 
the Intensive study of music and at 
the same time enabled Kugene to 
graduate In June, 1935, second in ■ 

class of BOO. Hi- career began when 

he entered the yearly competition for 

an appearance as soloist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra under Stokow 
ski. winning the Contest by unanimous 
vote. 



I'act and Logic 

' : .:;;";:;:;;:::,;:„;";:"„;:;':• poster exhibition 

"' i ■• hs in I ted up i- thi dl ■*« 

ripline of fact and logic, the discipline BY ASU IN IRRARY 

»f Judgment, the discipline of ocial laUmillU 

"■ I""' ihilh; . a well a upon , l„. , ,,,,., . ', 

cultivation of one- capacities r«ii Loca, 1 , "JjXhibil »« t Part of Five 

more or le refined pies ore.- College Armistice Day 

Program 



RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 
PLANS PARLIAMENT 

William Foley, I 'resident of s. R. 
C, Formulates Parley on 

World A Hairs 



l'h"i for an Intercollegiate reli- 
gious parley to di en inter faith 
relatloni In the world today, to be 
held December 3, on the Ma echu 

iettS Slate College campu . are hen,,. 

formulated by William Foley, '40, 
pre ident of the student Religious' 
Council, Favorable replies have been 
received from Smith, Williams, Brown, 

Mount Holyoke. and Amherst signi 
fying their intention of sending repre 

entatives to the conference, 
The program Is to last from 1 1 rOO 

a. m. on Saturday until 6:00 p. m., 
and will consist in several large group 
meetings and many smaller informal 
discussion groups. Dr. James Thnburn 
Legg of New- V,>rk win be among the 
leaders f.f the large (Usi -u-sion groups; 
there will be three other lr-aders not 
yet decided upon. 



' ©operating .• ith five other regional 
college chaptei nt the American 
dent Union, th< M i ichu etl Statn 
Al i is exhibiting ome ir\ n.-, 

P° tej in the Goodell Library. 

Thi i". tei i ampaign, di cidb d aj 
•'' ,l "' l;i ' nieeime ,,c the regional 
council of the ASU, at which Smith, 
Mt. Holyoke, Ma a< hu etl Stab 
Amh. ,■ t, and William were repre 
nented, I merel) an effort to bi 
l,; " I »ftei twenty year , the ten 
"" morie of the Is I -■ ai i pi iallj 
ince the world again facet the ame 
dilemna s it -ii<| ,,, 191s 



FKOSH COMMITTEE 



A nominating committee has 
been chosen by the freshmen con- 
"iHting of Don Thayer. John Do\ I. . 
< onstance Bea ur e ga rd, Phyllis He. 

Inerny, Milford \twood. Hetty 

Mouiton, Robert Pearsea, Charles 

Bisbep, Howard Hunter. Dick 
Marwh. Rsjaaei (lark. 

this committee will meet Novem- 
ber U at 6:1.-, in the Memorial 
Huilding to nominate for rla*«« of- 

fiC'H. 



. 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, TH I RSD AY, NOVEMBER 10. 1918 




BARTERING 
WITH JOE BART 



STOCKBRID6E 

K\ Juhn Kelso 



6 



)t the 



things clear 
.f 



/TftaeeaclntselfP Collegian 



al nowapEpof of the Mammon usi'tts State Collage. 
Published <vi-ry Thursday by the students. 



Ollk 



Mi'Kiii: i.-il liuiliiing 



AIM'Uri! \. NOYKS '40, 



KMKKY MooitK '8S, 
Managing Editor 



Editor-in-Chief 
MABBLLE BOOTH 



Telaphona 1102-M 



Associate Eiditor 



I Itllultl \|, HOAIMI 



Campus 

JOHN K. I'lI.IOS 'in. Editor 
BKT'IINA H M.I, '.i'.i. Art Editor 
MAUY T. MKKHAN '39 
FRANCES S. MERRILL 'S9 
JOSEPH HAKT '40 
NANCY K. LICE '40 
JACQUELINE L, STEWART '40 
LORETTA KENNY '11. Secretary 
KENNKTH ROWLAND II 
WILLIAM T. GOODWIN '11 
HAKOI.I) FORREST '41 
CHESTER KURALOWICZ '41 
JOHN HAYES ii 

Feature 
LLOYD B. COPELAND :i'.i. BdHoi 
MYRON FISH EH '39 
KATHLEEN TULLY '41 
EVERETT R. SPENCER '40 



Sports 



Ii. ARTHUR COPSON 
ALBERT YANOW '41 



•40 



LA] 



Photography 

IE MhlilNCS "38 



>iin kin iili;r Correspondent 
JOHN KELSO S*SI 

College (Juarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN "39. Editor 
JANET CAMPBELL '40, Assoc. Ed. 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 
Faculty Adviser 

DK. MAXWELL II. GOLDBERG 



This year one 
to tlie hearts of former students oi 
Massachusetts Stale College is ffOIMt. 

N'o longer will the students of our 
Alma Mater gather together for tht 
laudable common purpose of joyou 

laughter. The I Say State Revue i 
dead, LaW away in the tomb of de- 
ceased Tradition and Passed (.randeur, 
the Hay State Revue shivers in her 
shroud and cries for reincarnation, 
while in her place stalks an imposter. 

* * 

on the bulletin board second from 
the left in the vestibule of the library 
is the following clipping from a news- 
paper which we offer with the com- 
ment, "Good choice of material, Mr. 
Librarian!" "It's an awful thintf to be 
talked to death," according to an old 
saying. Rut the trouble is, talk doesn't 
kill you. You just live on and sutler 

and suffer." 

<■■ * 

The following bulletin is included 
for the attention of the Amherst Col- 
lege Yacht Club: "Last week's light- 
house changes included the installa- 
tion of flashing lights on the north 



• urn. 
■<? and 

• km 



I i.e. il.. ill News to the National Farm school 

The Stockbridge team got up early number, as usual, were from 
Friday morning and traveled to the The following members a 
National Farm School at Doyeatown, trip: (' a| *r .i irr "Proe" Hon 
Pennsylvania, where they lost a Houle, l)ick Sparks. Ed 
"freak" Kame by a score of <>- , i to "Hurricane" Corfield, "Berni 
National Farm School. tier, Bob (iamache, "Powerhi 

Despite the fact that Stockbridge Donough, and Ray Taylor. J 
was otttweighted twenty pounds to hull, another member of the 1 
the man and suffered a loss of three one of our ace backfield i 
players in the first quarter, our boys unable to make the trip, 
played the best football of the season; pick Sparks was appointed chair 
one irreparable loss was Captain ma ,| f "hell week," which v 1| ^u 
"Iron Man" Houle, who was out of place in the near future, 
the game with three cracked ribs. The New furniture for the house «a 
Stockbridge "Ram-Rods" outplayed donated by John Oinenen, an am, 
the Pennsylvanians throughout the nus and ex-officer of A. T. C. The > p j r . 
panic. it shown thus far this year by fresh. 

Stockbridge out-rushed the oppon- rmM1i seniors, and alumni ma 
ents by 300 yards and also made tif- v ,. ar onp () f the most successfai ir 
teen first down to their one; but just a. T. G. history, 
before the end of the first half, Na- Kolony Club 

tional Farm completed a 45-yard pass Albert Davenport, S'W, (Fl.ni.mai 
which brought them to our 2-yan' 
line and, after three tries, succeeded man s'.Ti ( Flori. 

in scoring. 

In the second half. Stockbridge 
threatened to score twice and in this 
period, Ray Taylor made a (55-yard 



and west breakwaters at Duck Island j)unt when ' hfi ' replaced "Hurricane" 
Roads, the resumption of Sandy Point < ', , ,-f i «»ld. the "Interstate" booter. 



BUSINESS BOAKU 
ALLEN GOVE '», Bwrineu 



Manager 



ABRAHAM CARP 



'». Adv. Misr. J - HENKY WINN ':)9. Cir. Mgr 

GEORGE C. BENJAMIN '39. Subscription Manager 

Business Assistants 
E. EUGENE RENAULT '49 
KOCER H. LINIiSKY in 
JOSEPH K. CORDON. JK. II 
• fER It. LA LOR '41 



CHARLES A. BOWERS '40 
ROBERT RODMAN '40 
EDWARD J. O'BRIEN 'II 
DAVID F. VAN METER '41 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 18.00 PER YEAR 



SINCLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



Make all order! |iav:il>lc to The Massachu- 
setts Collegian. In CAW of cbftnc* of address, 
subscriber will please notify Um business man- 
ager as soon as |iossible. Alumni, underj?nul- 
uate and faculty contributions are sincerely 
encouraged. Any communications or notic.ee 
must be received at the Collegian office before 
9 o'clock, Monday evening. 



»«37 Meabtr 193« 

i^sociafed CbflerSkte Press 

Distributor of 

Go0e6iate Di6es» 



breakwater foK signal in New Haven 
Harbor and an interrupted quick- 
flashing light on Nova Scotia liar in 
Jamaica Ray." What? You never 
heartl of the Amherst College Yacht 
Club? It's an organization which holds 
weekly meetings in (iiandonico's for 
the explicit purpose of discussing the 
possibilities of buying a yacht. 
* * 

Flashes from Points About 



"Jim" Turnbu 
the infirmary 



who was sick at 



or) from Watertown and ('. s, >•,,,. 
major 1, who is wurk- 
in°; for a New York florist conctfg 
were K. K. alumni who returned fa 
the Mower show. 

William Whelan and David Tread- 
way-, both Hotel seniors, spent the 
week-end at the Parker House r 
ton as guest of Mr. Sherrad, presi- 



with throat complica- ,i,. nt ,,f the hotel. The purpose ..f the 



visit was to study marketing, They 
visited Faneuil Hall Market and other 
points of interest. 

S.S.A. Alumni News 
Forrest W. Haffermehl S'24, Pns> 
1 -lit of the Stockbridge School Alum- 
ni Association, is working on plans 



Entered as second-class matter at the Am- 
herst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1101). Act of October 1917. authorized August 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter & Morehouse, Cook PI., 
Amherst, Mass.. Telephone 48 



KIPKISINTIO FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Chicago ■ Boston ' Los Ansclis - Sam Francisco 



lions, could not make the trip. 
Here is the starting line-up: 
Chartier, left end; Lawton, left 
tackle; Konscekski, left guard; Sulli- 
van, center; Capt. Houle, right guard; 
Sparks, right tackle; Gamache, right 
end; MacDonald, right halfback; Kos- 

akowski, fullback; Cleveland, quarter- f,„- ( , ne f the largest Storkliridjre 
back; Corfield, left halfback. Other alumni reunions. This reunion will be 
Construction of a $260,000 auditor - 1 players: Taylor, Perednia, Lavoi, Mc- | 1e ]<i November 19 at Carey Menmrial 
ium will be started on the Tulane Donough, Russo, Howard, liodwell, Hall in Lexington. For the past four 
University campus soon, Dr. Rufus Lambert, Frappier, Reilly, Hasenjag- years it has been held directly after 
C. Harris, president, has announced. er> Mandell, and "Rennie" Wentworth, the Tufts game, which, this year, was 
Funds for the erection of Silliman manager. played in Medford. All Stockbridge 

! College, the tenth at Yale University Don't forget the game at Pittstield alumni in the Greater Boston area 
under the college plan for under- Saturday. are urged to make some effort 

graduate residence adopted 15 years, In spite of valiant efforts, our Cross to attend; there will be a dinner at 
ago, have been provided by a bequest Country team lost to Gardner High 7;0Q p. m., with a speaking program 
of Frederick W. Vanderbilt, who died j i as t Wednesday by the close score of following and dancing from 10 to 12 
| recently. 26-29. This was made up in part when p. m. An invitation to attend the re- 

•f Texas will 



ADELPHIA 
DRIVE 



The University of Texas will con- ()Ur team, this time made up of Spear, union is being extended to College 

Striving to ollttlo former years in its contribution struct a tea room to be used as a pollock, Brown, (Hazier, and Siegal, 

to the Red CrOSa Drive, Adelphia faces a task which laboratory by students of home eco- beat the Vocational Agriculture boys 

needs the Whole-hearted cooperation of every stl.- Bomica wh " a,V ***** U » titttti ° 11 - »* ^'cst Springfield High last Satur- 



day by a score of 18-.S7. 
A. T. 6, 

Of the football team. 



which went 



morning. However, if one desires he 
may leave earlier. Those planning 
go may get further particulars fro. 

the officers of the club. 

* * 



There will be 



al management. 
dent and faculty mender 01 the College. Hluefield College in West Virginia 

This is its one evident task; a task made harder than before has obtained a 148,863 grant and a 
by the difficulty of reaching many seniors who may be willing to $68,000 loan from the Public Wort 
give but not so situated that the opportunity reaches out to them. 
Whether someone places an open hand in front of you or not, 
seniors, jro out of your way to help a little in this most needful 
campaign. 

It is often a bit hard to think of parting with even a small 
sum, hut this year, with its New England hurricane, has put a 
decided strain on the Red Cross. For those of us who have not 
been materially disturbed by these things, it should be a pleasure 
to push the Adelphia fund along with our own contribution. Let 
this be an effort, not of the Adelphia alone, but of the combined 
student body to push the fund to the limit set. 

TUFTS News from the front at Tufts, is encouraging for a week- * e * man Mo , iimoii rl . „. o , 

A meeting of the Newman Club was 

PLANS end of interest to Massachusetts men and women over he](1 last p^iday evening at which a 

the 19th, In an effort to be good hosts, Tufts has gone program was drawn up for the com- 

to Considerable effort in providing Open house, a Pan-Hellenic ing month. Committees were appoint- K"'*t«''- DaJatan 

1 1 .li 1. *i ill- Ai-41 i..l fur -l soci-d which will be held All sophomore candidates lor Busi- 

dance, and the Boston Alumni are holding a get-to-gether in the Ml ,,,r a s<Hlal vvm,n *' ' ne nem L_ ! „ „,.,„.,„.„„ „ f tha » ,• 

sometime before vacation. Those mem- ness and »***« manager of the Rois- 



Administration for the construction of 
new dormitories. 

Massachusetts State College still 
Aits and hopes for a new women's dor- 
mitory, and Physics building. In the 
meantime coeds sleep in sorority house 
attics and the Physics department Chemistry Club 
holds classes temporarily in a discard* Nov. ](), at 7:0( 
ed stable and carriage shed. 




a meeting of the 

Thursday evening, 

p. m. The speaker 
of the evening will be P. C. Forren 
Chief Metallurgist of the Greenfield 
Tap and Die Corp., who will give a 
lecture illustrated with slides. There 
will also be a display of tools and 
defective steel. 

The meeting will be held in Goess- 
mann Auditorium. 

* * 



trustees, as well as to administrative 
officers of the College. President and 
Mrs. Hugh Potter Baker expect to 
attend, and Professor Harold % 
Smart will be the toastmaster. 
A large number of S.S.A. a 
i i* e I A.T.G. and K.K. on Amlur-: 
Weekend. Maynard W. Marsh S*$ 
probably broke the record for distwm 
traveled to see the Amherst Stt* 
game, with a trip of two hundr") 
miles each way, returning al' 
name. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 



tii-i. 



Tufts gym after the game. With all this effort, some representa- 



bers wishing to join in the fun watch t( ' r blisters will meet Thursday. No 



tives from Massachusetts State should undoubtedly enjoy the f ,„. details later. Also, within the next ' vember 10, 1!W8 at five o'clock in tht 
reception planned. Let's all go! 



few weeks an interesting program 



Academic Managers Room in the M< 



NOMINEE PLAN Because there has been some questioning of wi " bo lltll(1 consisting of speakers m "nal Building.^ 

rannnnn%.trkvt«a i- jil-o * • i i „ i„ from Huston College. Connie Fortin 

REFERENDUM current action of the Senate m changing elec- ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^^ ^ Yt . s , 

tion rules regarding nominating committees, 

and because the Senate is willing to accept constructive and help- 
ful criticism, the Collegian is taking upon itself the job of initiat- 
ing a referendum of student opinion. 

This action has no bit of criticism for the Senate nor of re- 
buke, but as a representative of student feeling, we wish to make 

sure that the student body likes the new plan or if it does not seiner will have to report at rehearsal 
rare for it, that an opportunity is given for them to say so. promptly. Any member who fails to 

t j 1 ii t* 11 iot 1, ~ ~ 4- ..:«.., appear at rehearsal will be automatic 

In order to give both ( ollegian and Senate a chance to view JJ ^^ ^ mUm thp Wp 

your feelings on the subject will you please fill out the following m Saturday. 

form and leave it at the circulation desk of the Library before * * 



the invitation committee. 

* • 

I '..ind Rehearsal 

The regular weekly rehearsal of the 
Hand will be held tonight at 7 :W in 
the Memorial Building. All members 
wishing to make the trip to Reus 



Classes 

Classes this Saturday will follow the 
regular schedule. 

Wm. L. Machmer 

Dean, 

Pre -Med 

There will be a Pre-Med Club meet- 
Cnniinued on Page 4 



Thursday. Nox-inher Id 
Open Data Ssworitkn 
r'nda>. November 11 

Holidiiy 

Socet'i' \\ isli'yan 

Snturday. November 12 

Football — R. P. I. 

Cross Country K. P. '■ 

Closiil Date Sororities 
Monday. November II 

I,an(l Ornnt Ansoc. 
Tuesday. November 15 

Fine Arts 

Land Grant Assn<\ 
Wednesday, November 16 

Poultry DimJiCI School 

Land Grant Ahhoc. 

Annual Faculty \\h\>< 
Sik'ma Kappa 
Thursday. November 17 

Patterson Players 

Women's Advisory Com I 
Meet inn 
November U 

Glee Club. t:4(, Mem. 1 
STOCKHKIIIC! 
November 16 

Convocation, n '■"'* 
November 16 

Tri-Siu Meeting 



there 



r 



fall 



Saturday: 



REFERENDUM BLANK 



Do you prefer the plan for nominations recently set up by 
the Senate? 

Would you like to see other plans considered? 



A. V. H. OutiiiR Cluh Hike 

Taking advantage of the Armistice 
Day holiday the Outing Club is hold- 
ing a bike hike to the N'orthlield 
Youth Hostel. We will plan to leave 
Friday morning at U» o'clock and stay 
at the hostel that night. Saturday a 
trip will be held to some nearby point. 
We will return to Amherst Sunday 



wlCO. 



Rutherford Abercrombie's Automatic barked 

"Arf! Arf!" 

Leaning over the late deceased Editor's body. h« t00 ' i 
the folded Manuscripts. 

"At last! Now to forge mv Name to these and send 
them to the COLLEGIAN QUARTERLY! O. Etetw 
fame!" 

"Cut the Gat, Abercrombie!" There stood the I«" e 
Ranger. In the Nick of Time, Rangy, old boy! But ><»u f 
have till Nov. 14 to get those manuscripts in! 

Hi-ho, Si-i-ilver! 



inly 



IHK M \ss\CUl SKITS COLLBGI W. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10 " 



EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPH STUDIES ARE 
INCLUDED IN CAMERA CLUB'S EXHIBITION 

tion of Photos From Portland Camera Cluh Now on Exhibit 



HANI) LEADER 




1 



PLACEMENT OFFICERS ATTEND EASTERN 
CONFERENCE OF PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 



Emorv fJravaon I'mwdioni »»f a..-^.... ;..i;,. : > i. . .in,i;.,o- All New El 

ierics 



»g- 



ACoUeqeNeWS 










1 











1 



Y 






Jittering tht Jitterbugs 

While other U. S. colleflians art swaying 
to swing, William and Mary collegians 
•re swinging back to the walti, end they 
hive engaged Danccmsster Lcroy Thayer 
(fignt) to show them the stately steps. 

Collesistt D.jcii Photo by G*nt tt 



A Fsir Queen of Fair Revelries 

Blonde Marilyn Miller, Pomona Junior College honor student, presided over 
the court of eight princesses who ruled the "court of agriculture" of the Los 
Angeles county fair. ■.-.,„ 



^ ■ - 



w 






Flying 1>* e 



bet ot , 

t stand ^i f 
\ phot 



, *. 



Acos; 



Up with the trend 

lance and student 

placement officers 

Macement Service 

and Sal in <la\ the 

EUistern College 

\ lociation at 

nectady. The State 

ending were Mr. 

Director of Place 

Glatfelter, Place- 

n, and Miss Mai ,• 

'iiit'iit Officer tor 

is president of 
h includes person- 

II New England's 

eges. Also repres- 
collegeH of New 
anil New Jersey. 
itions 
n of the broad> 

progress here at 
series of "fresh- 
for men students. 
dch consisted of 
MUl .Machmer, I)i- 

I Prof. Glatfelter, 

x'ations" as they 

w ii were estab< 

f weekly lectures 
Life Series" con- 
>.\ President Bak- 
', and Professor 
j these three in- 
Pro fe.s.sor (ilat- 
aekly lecture pro- 
throughoul tlie 

imlin 

•at ion" for State 

rresponds to the 

• ipport unit ies for 

.' Miss Hamlin in 

of the freshman 

IS of lectures giv- 

e.shnieii h\ Direc- 

second semeMter. 

Placement Ser\ - 
.vc student real 

tie abilit) i of 

'ill in college and 
industrial world. 

use scholarship, 

.', and culture of 

•■ Him' in obtain 
VIOVIES 

Amphitryon," s 
the antics of a 

' of t he five < iei 

presented at the 
•ing t he next two 

, pine. | ai t,J3fl, 

ion to five per 
I, Zigeunebaron; 
li Nov. 28, ||, , 
de Jngend; Dei 
. Singende .Jur 
Dec. B, includes 
ber bj the fa- 
ll 



I 



■ ■ j 



EK 

FOSTERS 

-MS 

IWi "ii - l ,60 

Pei dinand 

s UP :»o< 

I'lAl.l INs 

■vater tl.Bfl 

TORT-LOG 

s 



lire 



.00 



i $1.85 
$12.50 



■* >.^3jvs oaDiw i rnd 



/Hbase 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Till RSDAY, NOVK.MHKIt 10. 1918 




BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOE BART 



STOCKBRIDGE 

My John Kelso 



This year one of the things deai 
tu the hearts of former students of 



1 nut ball NfW> 



to the National Farm schcx 



Massachusetts Stat, College is gone. ™ e Stockbridge team got up earl) number, as usual, were from 



ME MASS AC HI SETTS COLLEGIAN, llll RSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, "•: 



EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPH STUDIES ARE 
INCLUDED IN CAMERA CLUB'S EXHIBITION 

OB of Photos From Portland Camera Club Now on Exhibit 



BAND I.KADKK 




PLACEMENT OFFICERS ATTEND EASTERN 
CONFERENCE OF PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 

Km* irv ( Jr.'i vsiin I* 



i<I.M>1 .,»' A 



' ...m I.. .|,,.i; 



n All New I'ng- 
leries 



o 






i 
i 






Office: limini g, M.iti 



AUTIIl li A. NtlYKS 



< Hill |, II- 

JOIIN E. FII.IOS |i' 
BKTI IN A HALL '39 
MAUV T. MEEHAN 
FRANCES S. KERR] 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NAM'Y E. LUCE i 
JACQUELINE L. BT 
LORETT V KKNNY - 
KENNETH HOWLAr 
WILLIAM T. GOOD 
HAItni.n FORREST 
CHESTER kckaum 
John HAYES it 

Feature 
LLOYD H. OOPELAI 
MYRON FISHER '39 
KATHLEEN TULLY 
EVERETT It. SPEN' 



AHKAHAM CARP 



K. EUGENE REN A 

IttXJER H. LINDS1 

JOSEPH K OORDO 

.l'ER It. LALO 



SUHSCKH'TIONS $^ 



Mnkp nil cullers p 
-■ lis Collegian. In r. 

subscriber will pleaw 

:i^«'r :ih soon as |kis. 
uati' and faculty cc 
enrourajo-d. Any <-o 
mu-' be received at 

9 o'clock, Miiiulay r\ 



Entered as Heconil-i 
heist Post Office. / 
special rate of postat 
1103. Act of Octobei 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpente: 
Amherst, Ma 



ADELPHIA ; 
DRIVE 

dent and facull 
This is its 
by the difficult 
give but not so 
Whether some 
seniors, go ou1 
campaign. 

It is oftei 
sum, but this 
decided strain 
been materially 
to push the At 
this be an effo 
student body t 

TUFTS New 

PLAN'S end • 

the 
to considerabl 
dance, and the 
Tufts gym aft 
tives from M; 
reception plani 
NOMINEE PI 
REFERENDA 

and because th 

ful criticism, t 
ing a referend 

This actio 
buke, but as a 
sure that the 
care for it, llui 
In order to 
your feelings < 
form and leav 
Saturday: 



Do you |)i« 
the Senat« 

Would vol 




%,*«. * 



*? 



$**' 



\ 



1& 










\ 



J 



Deaf Gridder Reads Lips for Signals 

Ed Woodruff, 190-pound Iowa State College guard, plays football even though 
deaf. He lip-reads the signals of the quarterback, and is believed to be the only 
deaf player in college football. Acme 



'( 



Contests Pay College Expenses 

Henry Shull, Northwestern University junior, has a 
way of working his way through college — he com; 
in prize contests. Averaging one win out of five itteni 
in the last five years he has earned $3,500. i ■ >~ 



Dormitories Rival Ultra- Modern Hotel* 

Completely modernistic are the Carnegie Institute 
Technology's dormitories, with appointments in the i 
up-to-date mode. At left is the lounge room of Hende 
Hall. 




Leather Suit for Campus Wear 

An important item decreed by fashion stylists for fashionable to 
eds is this novel model of warm brown suede. It features a drawstrm^ 
blouse and baby bonnet. 



■ 



Drum Majorette 

Tiny Joan Strictling, daughter 
of Case School of Applied 
Science's music director, 
claims the record of being 
the youngest drum major of a 
U. S. college band. 

Colli 4 ate Digest Pho'o by Council 




Attendance Champ 

Dr. Harry Waldo Norris, 
Grinnell College research 
professor, has been absent 
from classes only one day 
during the 49 years he has 
taught at the Iowa institution. 

Collesiate Digest Photo by Cogswell 



OUR BUSY LIFE 




LETS DOWN THE BARS 
TO NERVE STRAIN 



[ BOSTON TERRIER- A cross between the English bulldog 
jnd while English terrier, but this gentle, lovable house 
I pet is strictly an American product. First bred in Boston 
home 60 years ago. Once called the "Roundhead," today 
I he is known as the "American Gentleman" of dogdom. 




HE'S GIVING HIS 

NERVES A REST 



IRE these busy, trying days for you? 
Do you find yourself, at day's 
Ind, irritable, nerve-weary? Take a 
jiomeni — study the dog above. He's 
jstmg his nerves. Even in the midst 

fstrenuous action he will stop, relax. 
Ihe dog does that instinctively, though 
Is nerves are complex, high-keyed 
pte our own. 

I We, trained for the intense contest 
■ modern life, are likely to ignore 



the distress signals of our nerves — 
the instinctive urge to rest. So often, 
we let our will-power drive us on at 
a task, hour after hour, heedless of 
nerve tension. 

You don't want your nervous system 
to be a drag. See what a difference it 
makes when you rest your nerves regu- 
larly—when you LET UP- LIGHT UP 
A CAMEL. Enjoy the matchless mild- 
ness of Camel's rich, ripe tobaccos. 



Break Nerve Tension as Millions do — 

"Let up Light up a Camel 



» 





nil ( 

Pm (. .. 



^ 'OR — America's great comic personality in 
music, and popular songs. Each Monday eve- 
( olumbia Network. 7:30 pm E. ST., 9:30 
* 30 p m M. S.T., 7:30 pm P. S.T. 



DENNY GOODMAN-Hear the King of Swing, and the 
world's greatest swing band — each Tuesday evening over 
the Columbia Network. 9=30 pm E. S.T, 8:30 pm C. S.T, 
7:30 pm M. ST., 6:30 pm P. S.T. 



pip you know: 

— that if a roll of ugarette 
paper were not cut as it 
runs through the machine, 
it would make a cigarette a 
mile long? That modern 
cigarette machines turnout 
N00 to 1000 finished ciga- 
rettes per minute .' That the 
output of every machine is 
continuously under inspec- 
tion and test to make sure 
each and every Camel is per- 
feet.'Camels are I matchless 
blend of finer, MORI- EXPENSIVE 
TOBACCOS— Turkish and Domestic. 





LIGHT UP A CAMEL I 



Soothing 




up with the trend 
dance and student 
placemen! officers 
'lacement Service 
and Sal ui da) the 

Kastern Collect; 

\ ociation at 

nectady. The State 

ending were Mr. 

Director <>f Place 

Glatfetter, Place 

a, ami Miss Mai g 

imenl Officer for 

is president of 
h includes person* 
II New England's 
eges. Also reprea 
colleges of New 
and New Jersey. 

ttions 

ii of the broad- 
progress here at 
series of "fresh- 
fm men students. 

licit consisted <»f 
tan Machmer, l»i- 

I Prof, (ilatfeltel, 

stations" as they 
wn were estab* 

f week I j lectures 

Life Series" riiii- 

>.v President Hak- 
■, and Professor 

f these three in- 

Professor Glat 
eekiy lecture pro- 
throughout the 

imlin 

•aiii'ii" for State 

rresponds to the 

< >pportunities f.n- 

.■ Miss Hamlin in 

of the freshman 
is of lectures j-'i\ 
eshnieii by Direc- 

econd emester. 

"lacement Serv- 
ive Btudenti real 
tic ability is of 
ilh in college and 
industrial world. 
.i/.e scholarship, 
.', and culture <>f 
pairing i<< obtain 

MOVIES 

"Amphitryon," a 
the untie >•! a 
I of I he five < lei 

presented at the 

■Ing the next two 

, priced at ! 54 
Ion tii ii\i |.i 
I. Zigc unebaron; 
ii Nov. 28, id i 
«le Jugend; Dec 
. Singende Juh 
Dec. 5, include 

llel b) the f;i 

■ , 



I 



< ■ A 



EK 

FOSTERS 

J, IS 

rw on | [.60 
Ferdinand 

sip :,o, 

PENGUINS 

vatej |1.60 

rORY-LOG 

ursp [,oo 

> $1.85 
$12.50 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I II I RSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 19 



fUbaes 



Office: Hi 



Men 



Alillll I; A. NOYKS 



Campus 

JOHN E. 1'II.IOS |i 
BKTTINA MALI. ',!'.» 
MAIiY T. MKKHAN 
FRANCES S. MKKKI 
JOSEPH MAItT *40 
NANCY K. LUCE 'I 
JACQUELINE L. 8T 
LORETTA KKNNY " 
KENNhTH HOW I. At 
WILLIAM T. GOOD 
HAROLD I'OKUKST 
CHESTER KIKALO' 
JOHN HAYES 11 

Feature 

LLOYD H. GOPELA1 

MYRON FISHER >M 
KATHLEEN TILLY 

EVERETT R. SPEN 



AHRAHAM C VRP 



E. EUGENE REN \ 
KOCER H. LI NHS I 
JOSEPH B. <;ollli[ 
,TEH It. LALO 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $L 



Make all oiiIits i 
-•ir. Collegian. In r. 
Htibsorihfr will pl.-as. 
a(f«»r aa aoOB as |k»h 
uat*' and faculty c< 
encoura^til. Any co 
miiHt be received nt 
» o'clock, Monday m 



BntOffld as Hpruml-i 
heist Post OHire. 
special rate of ix>stai 
1103. Act of Octobei 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpmta 

Amherst, Mi 



A DELPHI A 
DRIVE 

dent and facul 

This is its 
by the difficult 

jrive hut not em 
Whether souk 
seniors, go oir 
campaign. 

It is oftei 
sum, I nit this 
decided strain 
been materiall; 
to push the A 
this l>e an effo 
student body 

TUFTS New 
PLANS end 

the 
i<> considerabl 
dance, and tin 
Tufts gym aft 
tives from M. 
reception plain 
NOMINEE PI 
REFERENDU 

and because th 

ful criticism, t 
injf a referend 
This actio 
I Hike, but as a 
sure that the 
care for it, the 
In order to 
your feelings < 
form and leav 
Saturday: 



Do you pr 

the Senat 

Would yo 




BARTERING 
WITH JOE BART 



INK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, 111 I KSUAY, NOVEMBER 10 "• 



STOCKBRIDGE 



\i\ John KtUo 



This year line of the things deal 

to tlif hearts of former students ol 
Massachusetts State College Is gone 



Football News to the National Farm school 

The Stockbridge team got up early number, as usual, were from 



Gridiron Close- 



ups: 



•$.%' < 







From Two Sides 

. came these Am, 
tacklers to put a stop:: 
this run by Seidel : 
Columbia's Lions. Nc 
ticc how Seidel hurdlec 
his own interference 



Aerial Encounter 

A Purdue Bodermikei 
caught Fordham's Pete 
Holovak in mid-air tostopl 
him in the second quirted 
of the six-all battle on 
New York City's Polo | 
Grounds. 



# f 

Celebrate Anniversary 

Catholic dignitaries from throughout the 
U. S. headed the procession that pro- 
ceeded the golden jubilee convocation 
at Catholic University 



Tom-tom Bests Wake College Spirit 

To raise student pep for a coming football game, Daniel Baker College pepsttrs 
maintained a steady beat on a drum atop a college building for 24 hours. They 
struck 40,124 beats during the around-the-clock vigil. 




Photo by HoNofd 



First Lady Dedicates New Dormitory 

Mrs. Franklin Delano Roosevelt is shown chatting with other state 
national dignitaries who attended the dedication ceremonies for the d 
mitory on the Rhode Island State College campus named in her honor 



W.MtO.1 

modelltii 
*nd flow I 



EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPH STUDIES ARE 
INCLUDED IN CAMERA CLUB'S EXHIBITION 



HANI) LEADER 



in < 



it Photos From Portland Camera Club Now on Exhibit 




PLACEMENT OFFICERS ATTEND EASTERN 
CONFERENCE OF PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 



Emorv Grayson President of Association Irwiuding All New \] 

Series 



up- 



Camera's Eye 



at the Ball 

in of many tacklers, and here 
Virginia player effectively 
order in stopping Clifford 




up with the trend 
[dance and student 

placemen! officers 
Placement Service 
v and Saturdaj I he 
Eastern College 
Association at 
mectady. The State 
tending were Mr. 

Director of Place 
. Glatfelter, Place- 
in, and M is Mai r 
ement Officer for 

n is president of 
eh includes person* 
ill New England's 
(leges. Also repres- 
colleges of New 
, and New Jemej . 
atioiis 

on of the broad- 
progress here at 
e series of "fresh- 
for men students, 
hich consisted of 
'ean Machmer, Di- 
li Prof. Glatfelter, 
"cations" a- tin y 
own wen- estab* 

of weekly lectures 
Life Series" < un- 
ity President Bak- 

i r, and Professor 

IR these three in- 

.. Professor <;iat- 

Veekly lecture pl'o- 

throughoul the 

ainlin 

ication" ("v stair 
orreHponds t<» the 
I Opportunil ies for 
i> Mi Hamlin in 
t oi the freshman 

Ies Of lecture-, eji\ 

reshmen by Direr 
■ second semester. 
e Placement Serv- 
ave Btudente real 

Btic ability is of 
•nth in college and 
I industrial world. 
isi/.e scholarship, 

'.y, and culture of 
desiring to obtain 

MOVIES 

"A in |iini ryon," a 

the antic., of a 

ie of t he fi\ i < ii i 
presented at the 

nine the |»ex( tWO 

. priced a( $.60 
ion to Rve per 
1. Zifceunebaron ; 
m; Nov. 28, llei 
nde Jugend; Dec. 
n. Singende Jug 
I H<< . I. include 
nbei bj the fa 
Bos 



i;k 

FOSTERS 

LLIS 

Awson $1.60 
Pei dinand 

fS II' r,0c 

PENGUINS 

Water $1.60 

STORY- LOG 

J iin )••• - .: no 

o $1.85 
$12.50 



/IDass 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, VIVK.MBKH 10. 19*18 




BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BABT 



Tliis year one of the things dear 
to the hearts of forrm I idents of 
Massachusetts State College is gone. 



STOCKBRID6E 

l>> John Kelso 



Football News t<> the National Farm schoo 

"he Stockbridge team got up early number, as usual, were fron 



[HE MASSACHI SETTS COLLEGIAN, It! I RSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 



EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPH STUDIES ARE 
INCLUDED IN CAMERA CLUB'S EXHIBITION 

on of Photos From Portland Camera Club Now pn Exhibit 



HAM) U:\DKK 




PLACEMENT OFFICERS ATTEND EASTERN 
CONFERENCE OF PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 



Emory Grayson, President of Association Including All Wu E 

Series 



ng- 



OlTice: lloo 



M.-n 



Aitriiri; \. noyes 



CampuK 

JOHN K. 1'II.IOS n 
HKT'I IN A HALL "M 
MAKY T. MEEHAN 
FRANCES S. MEKIi 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY E. LUCE '4 
JACQUELINE L, SI 
LORETTA KENNY ' 
KENNETH HOWLAI 
WILLIAM T. cool) 
HAROLD FORREST 
CHESTER KURALO' 

JOHN H \YKS II 

Feature 
LLOYD It. COPELAI 
MYRON FISHER ':« 
KATHLEEN TOLLY 
EVERETT Ft. SPEN 



AHKAHAM CARP 



E. EUGENE REN A 

itouEK h. Linus] 

JOSEPH R. <;oKI)( 
,TEH li. LALO 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $1 



Mak*' all orderi i 
setts ( ollt'gian. In e 

■ubscriber will plaaw 

aif«»r as goon a.s ikih 
unte anil faculty c< 
••iicourR^riHl. Any ir 
must be ri-civi-d at 
'J o'clock, Monday m 



Entered B8 Meondt 
heist I'OHt Officp. . 
■peeia] rate of postal 
1103, Act of Octobii 
20. 1918. 

Prinlwl by t'arpente 
AmhiTHt, Mt 



A DELPHI A 
DRIVE 

dent and facul 
This is it> 
by the difficult 
give hut not s< 
Whether some 
seniors, go oil 
campaign. 

It is oftei 
sum, hut this 
decided strain 
been materiall; 
to push the A 
this be an efft 
student body 
TUFTS New: 
PLANS end 

the 

to considerabl 

dance, and tin 
Tufts gym a ft 
tives from M. 
reception plan! 

NOMINEE PI 
REFERENDA 

and because tl 
ful criticism, t 
ing a referend 
This actic 
buke, but as a 
sure that the 
rare for it, the 
In order to 
your feelings < 
form and leav 
Saturday : 



Do you pr 
the Senat 

Would vo 




A Mascot from South American Jungles 

Lafayette College has a new live leopard to give life to the nickname 
of its athletic teams. "Chequita" attends all football games, and is 
housed in the Phi Kappa Psi house, where in addition to other food 
she's given cod liver oil deily so she'll stey healthy. Photo by i«nd 



Begin New Airplane Research Project 



A new wind tunnel producing air speeds up to 1 40 miles an hour has just been completed e* the 
Harvard University for research and student laboratory work in aerodynamics. The machine sot- 
signer, Dr. William Bollay, holds a model plane in the observation space. In actual operation, 
the model will be held by struts while observers watch through glass windows. * i!)t **" 




* !A 



k j 



\ **• 






Relaxation Time is Tea Time 

Rockford College faculty members forget lectures and laboratories during the daily tea hour on 
their attractive Faculty Porch. This laughing quartet is composed of Dr. Donna Price, Dr. Dorothy 
Richardson, Mrs. R. S DeGolyer and Dr Evelyn Fernald. Star 






Beauty Brings Increased Sales 

At least it did for the Michigan State College yearbo ™' ^J 
fftt, which boasted this staff of 23 star salesgirls. They lold V ^1 
the first week of the sales drive, almost fifty per cent of the enti 
body 



I'f. , 



-v 



y? . 



Shoes (or Date with 720 Cadets 

then Cinemactress Priscilla Lane, star of the film version of Brother 
it, agreed to dance with each Virginia Military Institute student 
ler the premier of the picture based on life at the institute, she 
ced < big problem of selecting shoes for the dance marathon. Acm 





^ Sling in' Star 
•ttle Davey O'Brien is 
the new pass-heaving 
star of Teaes Christian 
University's famed grid- 
iron aerial cjreus. -The 
.1 50-po4ipder % p,rov«d 
his 'prowess irt a recent 
game by siingin' touch- 
dsrwrr passes if>l4f, Wl 
and 65 yards each. 



4jtwe/ft>um%ffye? 

There '» much more to it than mere "col 
lecting." Each pipe ■• a new eminence — 
every one hai a certain tatte. a feel in the 
hand, ill own balance anil weight, it* own 
color and graining and "draw." See the 
new Kaywoodie* at your dealer'*. Mint 
imoker* *ay they're the *weete*t amoking 
pipe* of all. Pictured a new style called 
YACHT (the stem i* ovad No. 01. 

KAYWOODIf COMPANY 
KockefiHtr Cmttr, ni-vc yohk </«./ i.ondon 



77* 



• 



Contrast of Youth and Fall 

Hew" ""boliied '" this photo of Betty Smith, Cortland 
»«» lo'si V Co ! le 9 e *ophomore, posing against a background of 



leaves 



Co'IfS'S'*- &»#•« P*i°'o b " Ha-dw «* 




RcpresanU- 
Service, 



fe I )|| VOsf National AoWii 

r , OI- "-VrV^JS, Wv€ . Na, ioM | Adv<... 

•Mtiom C .*f ic .. i,» r . hw., New yorlt, Chicago, Borton, San 



Prince Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



50 



pipeful* of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2- oz. tin of Prince Albert 



uii with tin- trend 
[dance ami tudenl 

placement officers 
Placement Service 
y and Sat unlay the 
Eastern College 
> Association at 
mectady. The State 
tending were Mr. 

Director of Place 
. Glatfelter, Place 
mi, ami .\1is s M :i i - 
I'lni'Mt Officer for 

ti is president of 
cti Includes person- 
til New England's 
lieges. Also repres- 
colleges of New 
., and New Jersej . 
'at ions 

on of tin' broad- 
progress here at 
r aeries "f "fresh- 
fof men students. 
li ith consisted of 
•can Machnaer, Di- 
d Prof, Glatfelter, 
vocations" as they 
own were estab- 

of weekly lectures 

Life Series" con- 
by President Mak- 
!i\ and Professor 
iK these three in- 
;. Professor <;iat- 
veekly lecture pro- 
i throughout the 

tainlin 

Kation" for State 
orresponds to the 
I Opportunities for 

jy Mi Hamlin m 

r of the freshman 
les of led ares giv- 
reshmen by Direr 
1 ii >iii | emei ter, 
e Placement Serv- 
a\i itudents real 
stic ability is of 
»oth in college and 
I industrial world, 
isi/.e scholarship, 

ty, and culture uf 

desiring tn obtain 
MOVIES 

"Amphitryon," a 
the antic of a 

ie of t he five ' Jer 
presented at the 
•ring th*' next two 

la, priced at $.50 
■sions to five per 
14, Zigeunebaron; 

.n ; \.,v. 28, I lei 

tide Jugend; Dee. 
n. Singende Jus 
d Dec, 5, include 
nberi b) the fa 
Bos 



J. 



;ek 

FOSTERS 

ILUS 

Awson $1.50 
Ferdinand 

IS II' :,0c 

PENGUINS 

twater |1.50 

•tory-log 

s's 

Bun 'no 



«.. 



o $1.85 
$12.50 



THE M l.SSACHl SETTS COLLEGIAN, I HI "ICSli V\. NOVEWHKK 10. I91J 



/Bbass 



Office: Room 8, ifan 



AKTIII I! A. NOYES 



( Hinpun 

JOHN K. riLIOS li 
HKT'I 1NA MALI. '88 
MAKY T. MKKHAN 
FH VNCES S. MKIilt' 
JOSEPH BART '1" 
NANCY K. LUCE I 
J \OQUEUNE I.. SI 
LORETTA KENNY ' 
KENNK'I'll HOWLA1 
WILLIAM T. (JOOIJ 

BABOLD PORBEBT 

CHESTER KURALO 1 

JOHN HAYES n 

I til I llU- 
II.! ) vi i is COPELA1 
MYRON FISHER 'M 
KATHLEEN ITI.I.Y 
EVERETT K. SI'HN 



AllliAHAM CARP ' 



E. EUGENE KEN A 

1-COtiER H LINDS) 

JOSEPH R. i;oR1m 

,n:n u. eaeo 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $1 



Maki- all order* i 
•in- Collegian. In 

subscriber will pleat*. 
atj.T a.i H<>on as poa 
< j ;it •- and faculty <•< 
encourRK'Hd. Any oc 
must be receivi-d at 
S o'clock. Monday m 



Knt<'re<l as second- 
heist I'ost Otlic.-. 
■pacial rate of jiostai 
1103. Act of Octobei 
20, 1918. 

Printed by Carpente 
Amherst, Mi 



ADELPH1A 
DRIVE 

dent and facul 

This is it.- 
by the dillicull 
give i)iit not s< 
Whether some 
seniors, <*•<) ou 

campaign. 

It is oftei 
sum, but this 
decided strain 
been material!. 
to push the A 
this be an effi 
student body 
TUFTS XCVV; 

PLANS end 

the 
to considerabl 
dance, and tlu 
Tufts gym aft 
Uvea from M 

reception plan: 

NOMINEE PI 
REFERENDA 

and because tl 
ful criticism, t 
nig- a referen< 

This acti< 
buke, bill as a 
sure that the 
• are for it, tlu 
In order to 
your feelings < 
form and leav 
Saturday: 



h<- you pr 
the Senat 

Would yo 




BA R T E R I N 6 
WITH JOE BART 



■ HE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 10, 19 



STOCKBRIDGE 



Ity John Kelso 



Thig •.. ,, , the things dear 

to the hearts of former students of 
Massachusetts State College is gone. 



I nothall News tu the National Farm school 

The Stockbridge team got up earl) number, as usual, were front 





Machine Substitute for Heart and Ling 

This complicated maze of machinery is an artificial heart and lunu 
which can work outside an animal's body to keep it alive Devei-I 
oped by Dr. J. H. Gibbon, University of Pennsylvania, it may >o«l 
day be used to save human lives threatened by damage to the lm*)| 
heart or its artery to the lung. 

Acme 



... Mid -Game Parade 

U. S. Military Academy cadets 
give the spectators an added thrill 
when they parade with the famed 
West Point precision during the 
halves of football games 

Wide World 



i Sw 



Rep* 




«*i 



V 



\'-i'r. 



if : 






KM?- 



Thousands ol dollars of damage was caused to the campuses and buildings of 
eastern seaboard colleges when the havoc-causing hurricane swept in from the 
sea Collegians came to the rescue to work hard and long repairing the damage 
cleaning up the refuse, aiding hard-hit families At Brown University (above 
left) student volunteers aided the Red Cross in distributing food, clothing and 
medical supplies At Wesleyan University (.ibove, ngfif) collegians cut up 
and removed the many fallen trees, and at Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
(nqht, below) the football team kept in training by sawing and chopping 
wrecked trees 




EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPH STUDIES ARE 
INCLUDED IN CAMERA CLUB'S EXHIBITION 

ii of Photos From Portland Camera Club N„u on Exhibit 
in the Goodell Library—Not One of Outstanding 
Exhibits But Contains Fine Work 



HAM) LEADER 



\m 






Tl 




such 




dred 




tare 


' /f« 


Crw 



■ lamera Club exhibit fur the 

k is a collection of photo- 

from the Portland Camera 

, d, although not one of the 

ng exhibits we have had, it 
-nine excellent work, 
rst picture in the collection, 
The Stairway, by McCracken, has been 
placed; for line value and 
ion makes it outstanding. The 
ind lighting is not as perfect 
,,. might wish, but the curve of 

way is well placed and the 
lighting on the handrail adds a great 
the picture. Sunlight, by Henry 
the next important picture 
oliection, for it has life and 
sparkle and tine action in the treat- 
ment of the water. The Smash by 
en has a powerful theme, and 
tngrapher has handled the 
I of black and white very ef- 
y. Some may think Rhode's 
Morning Fog the best in the col- 
and indeed it is an excellent 
iph. with carefully blended 
and a simple and direct com- 
.'ti. 

Still Lifes 

m ate several still lifes in the 
tinti which are worth mention. 
U The Kitchen Table, by Mil- 
Boyden, a simple, forceful pie. 

and Pleasant Hours, by Mc- 
rn. which is noticeable for its 
\. Also character studies are 
le, Betty, by .Jordan, is especial- 
pealing, and 'Routing' of an En- 
r by Salie. shows a fine sense of 
- and good technique. 

B.H. 



McC 

the 



BARRON WILL SWING 
STATE-TUFTS SONGS 

Band Leader For Jumbo-Maroon 

Dance Has Arranged 

Specialty 

Blue Barron, orchestra leader se- 
lected for the Mass. State-Tufts dance 
at Medford November 18 on the era 

Of the traditional Jumbo-Statesmen 
football game, has arranged a swing 
melody f state and Tufts BOngS to 
play as a speciality number at the 
ball. 

Plans for the dance are now com- 
pleted and William Ward, chairman 
of the event, promises many outstand- 
ing surprises. Decorations and favors 
will he of a type never attempted 
before by a New England college 
dance. As a great many State (',,) 
lege students live in greater Boston 
and :is it is a custom for hundreds 
"f the students to travel to the Tufts 
game, a large number of State stu- 
dent.- are sure to support the dance. 
On Saturday following the game 
the State College Alumni will hob) 
an informal dance in the Tufts gym 
and the Tufts fraternities will have 
open-house round-robin dances till 
midnight. Tickets for the Friday nighl 
dance ma\ be obtained from Art 
Noyes, Theta Chi. Subscription is 
$3.30. 




I ■ 



* .... 




PLACEMENT OFFICERS ATTEND EASTERN 
CONFERENCE OF PERSONNEL DIRECTORS 

Emory Grayson, President of Association Including All Now Kng- 

land Colleges Freshman Convocation Series 

is Started Here 



BLUE BARROB 



CCED Mils 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



ART WORK SHOWN ' ' k ■ > ' 

111 '"'"I'ational guidance ami student 

IN WILDER EXHIBIT * ' l . i t »»„ 

of state College Placement Service 

., . . ... „ T attended >ast Friday and Saturda) the 

Model Pioneer Woman Depicted fall conference of Eastern College 

in Series of Photographs Personnel Officers Association at 

of Statues Union College, Schenectady. The State 

„,. . College officers attending were Mr. 

Ilu- photographs in Wilder Hall are Emory E. Grayson, Director of Place 

unusual ,n that they are not a deli- ment, 1'rof. Cuv V. ClatlVlter Place 

nite exhibition, but rather a compari- ment Officer for Men, and Miss ftfarg- 

son of different techniques ami ideas a.et Hamlin. Placement Officer for 

m sculpture, Under the patronage of Women. 

Fines. Ma.laml, twelve leading Am- Director Grayson ,s president of 
enean sculptors fashioned int., bronze the association which includes person. 
their ideas of a pioneer woman, for „el officers from all New England's 
a statue to be erected in Ponca City, men ami women colleges. Also repres- 
Oklahoma. After the statues were fin- ented were some colleges of \Vw 
.shed they were sent all over the York, Pennsylvania, and \ew Jersey. 
country for criticism and the most Convocations 
popular statue was user). The photo- Another indication of the broad- 
graphs are of the models ami make ening educational progress here at 

Cresting "tody, state College is the series ,.f 'fresh- 

The twelve sculptors are: H. A. '"an convocations" for men students. 



FINE ARTS 



PI DELTA (HI 



Oil hotel management group, which 
r organized as a society nam- 
! I' Delta Chi, for the key letters 
of Pantlochios (innkeeper), recently 
ir its first formal meeting of 
the year at the Lord Jeffery Inn. 
of the evening Were 

George Jones ami Charles 

KJraham. 

!- for the society were elected 

ws: president, David Tread- 

a - V; ' • ident. Hill Hoe; secre- 

Gieringer; treasurer. Bill 

IWaelan; librarian, Paul Kalacznik. 

1 embers are Professor Dick- 

d Alan Chadwick. 



SODAS — CANDIES 
PASTRIES 

Tasty Meals 
service— 

Prompt and duteous 

Serve to Please" 



"Ghostly Drama of the Rockies" 

will be the subject of Prof. Frank 
P. Rand's talk at the next Fine Arts 
program, on Tuesday, November 16, 
in the Memorial Building. Professor 
Hand, summering last year in Colors 
do, discovered some surprising, and 

entertaining data pertaining to early 
theatrical enterprises in the Rocky 
Mountain region, and his accounl of 
them is delightful. The public is cor 
diallj invited. 



Editor's Note: Joe Hart, Collegian 
wit. pinch hitting for Miss 
Stewart this week 

It came to pass that in her jour- 
ney to the west Lucinda paused to 
took at the valley that stretched be- 
neath her feet. And she saw count- 
less houses. Some of them were red. 

■ *■ * * II It W C*ri* " »»■»• g«w* as Mil-. tl. f\ , >••»*.. vwti f wveibivill) mi (tH"ll NlUIH'Ill.S. 

neither red nor blue but built of gray] MacNell, Malborni Voting, Wheeler) At a meeting which consisted of 
and scarlet stone. And she took up Williams, Lynn Jenkins, Mario Kobe!, President Maker. Dean Machine.-, J)i- 

ber stall again in he,- hand and des Maurice sterne, Bryant Baker, John weter Grayson, and Prof. Glatfelter, 

'■ended into the valley. "Here | shall Gregory, Sterling Calder, .1.. David the "freshman convocations" as they 

spend a few years," she said, "for s "". -'"mes Eraser, and Arthur Lee. are popularly known were e.tab- 

the men creatures in the red houses Each ""«' Da. a different technique , Hshed. 

do appeal to my eyes, ami those in the ■ l, "i although all the statues are some- The first group of weekly lectures 

blue houses are females like myself, what al ike, each differs in general at - call "The College Life Series" con- 

There I may lodge. Ami from the mosphere, as well as in detail. dated of addresses by President Mak- 

buildmgs of fray and scarlet stone 'I''"' collection is indeed interesting, <•"'. Dean Ma.hmer, ami Professor 

«om ( . men who are learned, ami they and one which offers information on '"'"I'liear. F wing these three in- 

t,,;,( ' h " , «'- the trends and ideas of modern sculp troductory lectures. Professor Clat- 
When Lucinda entered through the ,l " v - |:. p f'dter organized a weekly lecture pro- 
gates the Valley City she was ac »ni,i,. ,..,.,..„., , gram to continue throughout the 
COSted by one Learned Woman. Lu REPRESENTS STATE freshman year. 
cinda made known her wishes to stay Miss Hamlin 
in the city and become a lodger in om """aid Alexander, graduate of "Freshman convocation" for State 

Of the blue house,, that she might M ; '> s ach iiset t , State, and a resident College students corresponds to the 

become a little learned, and also thai of 0maha « Nebraska, has been a p course on Vocational Opportunities for 

she might live near the red hoUsef of l'" ,uU,i »" represent Massachusetts Women presented by Miss Hamlin in 



lie men. 



iin -lie failed t,, t,.|| the lasl 



Stat. 



PRE-MEI) 



Di. Bradley, of the Bacteriology De- 
partment will address the meeting of 

the Pre Med Club in the Farley 111 
Club House next Tuesday at 7:00. Dr. 
Bradley, recognised authority and con- 
tributor to his science, will diSCUSS the 

relations of bacteriology to the medi 
eal problems of a community. 

All pre-medical and pre dental stu- 
dent., ate urged to attend the meeting. 

Kappa Sig Pledges 



at the University of Omaha's Hie second semester of the freshman 

of her desire* to the Accoster Woman, ,|, '' I|<:1, "»" ceremonies ami educational year, ami to the series of lectures giv 

Thereupon the Accoster Woman told ''•''''"''■'"■'■- en to Stockbridge freshmen by Dire.- 

Lucinda that it was forbidden to enter ""' ""' I;,x conference will be tor Grayson in the second semester 

the blue houses, and she told her that he * ded '■> the a. hires, of United A point which the Placement Serv- 

she must lodge in an Abbey Place ^ !,u - Senator Edward Burke, and '<e would like to have student* real 

of scarlet stone and white. This wa I'; 1 "" 1 B j nder ' r, "' ,,i ^ 11 editor of the i*e is that scholastic ability is of 

prime importance, both in college and 

in the business and industrial world. 
Employers emphasize scholarship. 



not to he, pleasure for Lucinda yearn ,||M ■'"-'" Bally News. 



ed for till' blue houses that were eh, , 
to the fed one- 



And it came ,,, paM thai a Big Sit III I ' " "^ ** 

U-r Of whom L,n. a had <„Ue , "„ ^ ,^7 ,' l" " f 

no knowledge entered her lodging , ,' , ^"7 ,, , '"""^ "' 

r: ;;-• ^ pfiedging ,/hate tx: z :r l^z :;:::'',;:::; 

you flown so Ions;? I an your Big s.,uih \,„e,-, rv , , 

... .. *" • " 1IM| Mnefieaii ( ounfries '" 

ster. ^iiii are a pretty girl. Put my I 



I. R. C. MEETING 

i... r ., ""' .iiu F i.;jii.> enipiiasize scholarshin 

I rofessor Carev of tb,. \t.. ■ '"'i 1 ' 

istorv ,1..,.,..,...!..* •...,, , ' "'' '"■;-"-'">• M.aturity, and culture of 

oiiege graduates desiring to obtain 

i position. 

GERMAN MOVIES 



Jack Reed '41 of Chicago, III., has 
been pledged to the Kappa Sigma fra- 
ternity. 



blue hottSe where live the I 'h y ,-ett ies 
will add to your beauty and make you 
more polished. You will be taught 
how to place your tongue when you 

peak so you may sound leai ne. i. oh, 

but you mustn't know of the lovely 
house in which . live, I OHUSl not tell 

you that my blue house has all the 
important females of the Valley City 



EXHIBITS 




College Candy 
Kitchen 

With the Good Things 



Just Published 

THIS WAS A POET 

A CRITICAL BIOGRAPHY OF 

EMILY DICKINSON 

i:v 

PROF. GEORGE WHICHER 

A NOTABLE ADDITION TO vol l; SHELF OP 
WORKS OF AMHERST AUTHORS 

JEFFERY AMHERST BOOKSHOP, Inc. 



L Memorial Hiiilding 

Designs for lYaliles 

II. Coodcll Library 

Pertlaad Camera club 

Exhibition 

III. Wilder Hall 

Photographs of Hron/.e 
Statues 

IV. Physical Education Ktijlding 

Photographs by Whitney 



Moliere's comedy "Amphitryon," a 
musical portraying the antic.-, of a 

generous host, is one ,,f t|„. f, V( . <,,., 
man movies to be presented at the 

Amherst Theatre daring Die next two 
months. 

The series tickets, priced at | ■' 
each, Include admissions to Ave pe, 
formancea: Nov. 14, Zigeunebaron; 
Nov. 21, Amphitryon; Nov. 28, Hei 
mat; Dec. B, Singende Jugend; Dec, 
12, Walserprinsessin. Singende Jug 
end, to be presented Dec. B, includes 

Several musical number by the fa- 
mous Vienna «'h..ir Hoys. 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



NKXT WEEK IS BOOK WEEK 



FOR GROWN UPS 

GONE WITH THE WIND S TOO 

NOW $Mfl 

TUB CITADEL ,S2.. r iO 

NOW $1.39 

LISTEN! THE WIND 

by A ntie Morrow Lindbergh 12.60 

ALONE 

by Richard F. Pyrd $2.60 

wiih malice toward some 

by Margaret Halsej S2.0Q 
Funny book 



FOR YOUNGSTERS 

WEE GILUS 

by Leaf and Lawson |J,60 

originators of FVrdlnand 
HEIDI GROWS LP -,o. 

MR. POPPER'S PENGUINS 

'O R. & F. At water $L60 

while THE STORY-LOG 
HI RNfl 

! by Thornton W. |{ U r t ;e,-., |2.00 



'M RW0VEN: The Sock That Can Take It. See the new shades in silks, lisles and wools 35c to $1 85 
^h patterns in Botany Ties Hold their shape and do not wrinkle, $1 Suede Blouses $5 to $12*50 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10. io:*k 



Rhyme - Reason -Rhythm 

by Peter Barreca 



You dost have to make a blood 
test to find out who fathered "Jazz," 
alias, "Swing," alias "Shan." It's 
right there in black and white, and 
it's mostly black. It's black as Cab 
Calloway, Duke Ellington, Chick 
Webb, Jimmie Lunceford, Fats Waller, 
and Louis Armstrong. This thing 
seems to belong to them, like freckles 
to the Irish. When one of the "Whites" 
tries to play this stuff, it sounds like 
a high school girl in Waukheegan 
trying to speak in French. 

Negro bands have an inherent knack 
of giving out in a glib, spontaneous 
flow that makes most white bands 
sound like a sophomore grinding out 
a sonnet for public speaking class. 
Tins may sound over-harsh, but prac- 
tically every innovation that has 
spurred name bands to the top has 
been begged, borrowed, or stolen from 
some colored virtuoso. Blues, jazz, 
swing, shag; name your poison. It's 
all jet black. 

A fairly new black star on the hor- 
izon is Count Basie, who proves that 
blood is thicker than the ink which 
tries to capture for once and ever 
musical ideas in a printed manu- 
script. 

"Mulberry Bush" (Decca 2004-B) 
Count Basie; A new interpretation by 
sax section, all using fuzzy, hollow- 
tone that everybody else borrowed and 
which is now called "New York" tone. 
A vocal by Jim Rushing, and by the 
time the old needle has pushed in this 
far, you'll recognize the record as the 
one A. E. Pi pantomimed in the inter- 
fraternity skits. A short trombone 
phrase introduces some real, black 
tenor, a beautiful series of one-fin- 
der, parlor-piano tricks . . . Reverse, 
••London Bridges" . . . features typi- 
cal negro sax style, whine or glide at- 
tack. The trombone is four stars and 
there's more than enough tenor to 
satisfy the most gluttonous. The last 
chorus has sharp brass figures against 
a background of solid rhythm. 

"Swinging The Blues" (Decca 
1880-B) Basie; uses all the tricks; 
piano, high brass, and clean answer 
hack. There's some novel auto-horn 
tenor tone, hitting BO many notes, a 
few are bound to be right ... A beau- 
tiful open modulation takes them out 
of a trumpet ride into some goosey 
tenor work. Boogie brass figures wail 
and sob in real "Chloe" fashion, re- 
tarding in spasmodic drum breaks . .. 
Reverse. "Send For You Yesterday"; 
is typical Basie as above, plus a bed- 
lam of brass and drums tailing it out. 



Five-sixths Of Last Year's Class Is 
Employed Finds Placement Service 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Continued from Page 2 



Ulg "ii Tuesday evening. Nov. 15, at 
7:oii p. m. in the Farley 4-H Club- 
house. 

Dr. Bradley of the Bacteriology 
Dept. will speak. 

* * 

Senate 

The following members of the fresh- 
man nominating committee are re- 
quested to meet Tuesday, November 
16 at C.:4. r ) p. m. in the Mem Build- 
ing! Thayer, Doyle, Miss Beauregard, 

Mi>> Mclnerny, Atwood, Miss Moul- 

ton. Pearson, Clark, Bishop, Hunt... 
and Marsh. 



Only one-sixth of the men students 
of the class of '38 are unemployed at 
present in spite of this summer's bus- 
iness recession according to records 
compiled by Prof. Guy Glatfelter of 
the Placement Service. Forty-two oth- 
ers are attending graduate schools or 
colleges. Fifty-five are in business; 
nine are teaching; and thirty-eight are 
not heard from yet. The number of 
unemployed is twenty-eight. 

Those in Graduate Schools 
Allaire, R. P., University of Notre 

Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 
Beaumont, E. S., Kansas State Col- 
lege, Kansas City 
Belgrade, H. L., University of Iowa, 

Iowa City 
Bergman, W. E., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Benson, K. E., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Bokina, C. J., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Bozek, S.M., Mass. State College, Am- 
herst 
Clapp, E. T., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Couper, H., Mass. State College, Am- 
herst 
Coutu, V. F., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Eliopoulas, N. D., Pennsylvania State 

College 
Elliott, C. E., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Evans, R. S., Mass. State College, Am- 
herst 
Farrell, K. T., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Finkel, Jack, Tufts College, Medford, 

Mass. 
t.iass, E. H.. Virginia Agric. Exper. 

Station, Blacksburg, Virginia 
Gleason, R. P., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Gruner, S. G., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Hemond, Harold, Mass. State College, 

Amherst. 
Judd, Kirtley, Yale Graduate School, 

New Haven, Conn. 
Kelley, T. F., University of Califor- 
nia, Berkeley, Calif. 
Klayman, M. I., Iowa State College, 

Ames, Iowa 
Lavrakas, John, Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
MacCurdy, Robert, Michigan State 

College, East Lansing, Mich. 
Moore, E. L., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 

Nolan, K. G., University of New 
Hampshire, Durham. N. H. 

Pyenson, Maxwell, Mass. State Col- 
lege, Amherst 



Sherman, Chester, Cornell University, 

Ithaca, N. Y. 
Sievers, F. J., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Slesinksi, F. A., Mass. State College, 

Amherst 
Theriault, Frederick, Mass. State 
College, Amherst 

Those in Colleges 
Adams, C. W., School of Medicine, 

Boston University 
Binder, Irving, Dental School, Tufts 

College, Boston 
Goldman, A. B., Dental School, Tufts 

College, Boston 
Gage, R. W., Harvard Medical Col- 
lege, Boston 
NeJame, M. F., Harvard School of 

Business, Boston 
Perkins, R. C, Yale College of For- 
estry, New Haven, Conn. 
Rice, T. A., Harvard Business School, 

Boston 
Rosenbloom, School of Applied Social 
Sciences, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, Cleveland, Ohio 
Smith, R. F., Veteranarian Medical 
School, University of Pa., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Silverman, S. I., Harvard School of 

Education, Boston 
Slocomb, Jack, Yale School of For- 
estry, New Haven, Conn. 
Swiren, Al. M., University of Michi- 
gan, Law School, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Those Teaching 
Anderson, P. B., teacher in grammar 

, school, Worthington, Mass. 
Beaumont, D. W., Teaching Fellow- 
ship, M. I. T., Cambridge, Mass. 
Bristol, G. D., Jr., Teacher and As- 
sistant Principal, Sanderson Acade- 
my, Ashfield, Mass. 
Fitzpatrick, R. J., Apprentice Teach- 
er, Essex County Agric. School, 
Hawthorne, Mass. 
French, Cyrus, Instruction in Animal 

Nutrition, State College, Pa. 
Golub, Samuel, Assistant in Botany, 

Mass. State College 
Lee, James, Laboratory Assistant in 
Agric. Econ. and Farm Manage- 
ment, Mass. State College 
Moult, R. H., Assistantship in Chem- 
istry, Boston University Graduate 
School 
Riel, F. C, Teacher-coach, South 
Deerfield High School, So. Deerfield 
Those in Business 
Avery, B. H., Sales Training, Shell 

Union Oil Corp., Boston, Mass. 

Avery, W. B., Assistant Director, 

Kurn Hattin Home, Westminster, 

Vt. 

Beloin, M. H., Jr., Salesman in Conn. 

Mutual Life Ins. Co., Holyoke, Mass. 

Continued on Page 6 



COED NOTES 

( onlinued from P*fi I 

within its portals. Nor must you hear 
that we are kindred spirts with cer- 
tain of the red houses in which live the I 
men. So forget that I have spoken of j 
my blue house. S'long." 

When Lucinda found herself alone 
she raised up her arms and cried, 
"Oh, that I might know of what my 
Big Sister speaks, that I might be 
made more beautiful and polished than 
I am. And that I might enter into 
those portals where dwell the Re- 
nowned Women who have nought to 
do save be renowned, that I might 
come to possess a corner on the date 
market with one of the red houses in 
which live the men." 

Then there came a knock on her 
door. And another woman entered in' 
saying, "My dear, my charge! You, 
have come! I am your Big Sister. My J 
blue house is where the Zighbaytes 
liVM, and all the prominent women 
in the Valley City live, for they are all j 
Gighbaytes, and we live together. But 
enough of such talk for it is for- 
bidden. Be pleasing to me and hear 
this though. If you wish a man from 
one of the red houses name him and 
I shall get him for you, for such is 
the power of my house, and no other 
blue house is equal to it." 

After a time passed Lucinda came 
to know that she had many similar 
kin, all Big Sisters. They were from 
the blue houses. Some were Deity- 
Iambs and some were Alphylambs, 
but all were her Big Sisters. 

Then came the time when Lucinda 
learned that she could enter into the 
blue house. Her heart thrilled at the 
thought, and she dreamed of how 
great would be her happiness to live 
with renowned women, and get a 
man who lived in one of the red houses 
to take her to Vic parties just by the 
mention of his name. She thrilled to 
think that hers was the choice of 
blue houses, and that she was the 
dearest, sweetest girl in the Valley 
City, for the girls in the blue houses 
told her this. And it came to the 
day when Lucinda was to make her 
choice. She tossed a sheckel into the 
air and said, "How the coin shall 
fall, so will I choose." 

Came to pass one of the men who 
live in the red houses. And being 
broke, and seeing the sheckel in the 
air with no owner attached, he grasp- 
ed it. But Lucinda fixed her grasp 
on him, and they lived happily ever 
after. 



fWS«*S 



THIRS.. NOV. In 



GALA 

MID NITE SHOW 

ARMISTICE EVE 

Thurs.. Nov. Ill at lu :■!.-, p s , 



Tyrone POWER * 
iLoretta YOUNG _ 
ANNABELLA 



a 




»? J» 



Also: Selected Short Bubji 
All Seats 35c 

KK1.-SAT.. NOV. 1MJ 

Gala Holiday Program! 




COLLEGE STORE 

Everything for the Student 



Luncheons 

Soda Fountain 

Student Supplies 
ON THE CAMPUS 



Banners and Souvenirs 
Books and 

Magazines 
NORTH COLLEGE 



Phi Sig, Lambda Chi, 
Kappa Sig, Win Skits 

Burlesque of Fashions Takes 

Prize as Fraternities 

Plav for Dads 



—Fine Co-Hit- 

A thrilling drama "f two chiklrt-ti "f It 
New York slums . . . 







t 



i.-AVRES ■ H.I.-MACK 




This: Color Cm toon Newi 
Sat. Mat. Only. Ctapti I '- 
"Flash Gordon'i Trip to M 



SIN.-MON.-Tl KS.. NOV. 13-1-. 
<ont. Son. 2-10:30 P. M. 



The much-advertised 

Ice Box Flowers 

Fascinating 
Glass Animals 



Fine Leather 

Purses and Bill Folds 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 

ROOM ACCESSORIES RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL Sffift CO 



63 So. Pleasant St. 



Amherst, Mass. 



In tho first interfraternity event of 
tlic academic' season, Phi Sigma Kap- 
pa. Kappa Sigma, and Lanihda Chi 
Alpha placed first, second and third 

respectively with their skits. Played 

befon ■ large audience of mothers 
and dads at the Dads' Day perform- 
ance the six fraternities left from 
eliminations last Thursday more than 
amused the crowd. 
A burlesque of newsreel fashion 

shows, Phi Sig's skit paraded a group 
of campus heauties never before seen, 
with appropriate remarks by com- 
mentator and gallery. Kappa Sigma, 
with their take-off of the hand, and 
pantomime of the college medley were 
second in judges choice, followed by 
Lambda Chi whose baby act won third 

honors. The skits presented by Thets 
Chi, Q. T. V. and Alpha Kpsilon Pi 
and Intersorority Council also added 
to the evening's entertainment. 

ENGINEERING CLUB 

At a meeting of students interest c<l 
in engineering held last Wednesday 

evening, a committee was appointed 

to organize an engineering club. All 
students Interested In engineering are 
invited to join. 




ixmrnmy 




Ire 

—And Tin-' 
Jimmi.' Ikms.v 
Sportl. "I'hiimi'i"" A 

Popryr Cartoon 



NOTICE- 



HfrHsiU' ■*> mimy 
unahl. Ic, M P*A 
SiiM;it;i" at tll< Tt ' 
h:i\. Mil niinnn'-ni 
ink' ill thla th< 



Eddie M. Switzer 



Clothing and 

Haberdashery 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER it, 1998 



Maroon Tops Coast Guard 7-0; Try For Two In A Row Against Rensselaer 



CHET CONANT RACES 
FOR LONE MARKER 

uchdown Jinx After Five 
iig-ht Games Without 
a Score 



MIGHTY MITE 



Ky 






mi 



Art Copson 
rining before a large Dads' 
x,\ last Saturday, the States- 
eed back into the win eol- 
the first time In five games I 
i -topped the invading Coast I 
aggregation from New London i 
I ,r trying vainly for three 
• . find a clicking combination, 
<^ot their chance when the 
tried a touchdown pass near 
ite payline early in the third I 
Claying heads up ball in his 
u kin j^ position, Chet Conant, 
Maroon fullback, turned the I 
a boomerang as he snagged 
, hall on his own five yard stripe 
. ij down the sideline for the 
score ..f the game. Don Allen's 
pkick went true, the score WS 
ite'a touchdown jinx wa 

With the opening chukker well un- 
,i,i way, and the ball in Cadet hands, 
Howie Uudge dashed in to smother a 
ricki fumble and make it State's' 
ball "ii the fifty. The advantage van- 
ished however, as a Skogsberg areial 
try was (fathered in by Cadet back 
.-'wlnik who proceeded to jaunt for 
thirty yards before he was nailed by 
; State lineman. 

New Life 
ng out of the gym at the half, 
team seemed to have new life, 
as they quickly wiped out the advan- 




M1IIHI Nl% 



A(2<;Kh-:SSlYK KM) 



Leo Santuct'i 



brok- 



GET HAMMARSTROM 
IS STATESMEN'S AIM 



New England's Leading Scorer 

Paces Strong- Wesleyan 
Booters 



"Stop Hammarstrom" will be tin 
Statesmen's war cry when they meet playing sport 
the highly-rated Wesleyan eleven on 
| the home field tomorrow afternoon. 
Bryn Hammarstrom, New England's 
leading scorer, is the major threat in 
the fast and aggressive cardinal at- 
tack. If the Maroon can hold Ham- 



Intel fraternity cups are nice things 
to put over the fireplace. They are 
better than ash trays because they 
don't have to be emptied as often. The 
impression the cups of even two and 

three years age makes on Freshmen 
during rushing is a marvel to behold. 
The only way to garner one of these 
silver tropins is for the fraternity to 
post high averages in academics, 
studies and athletics. In the first two 
divisions of <up competition debating 
ability counts for little; but in the 
athletic phase some of the house ath- 
letic managers have the idea they can 
talk their teams into the cup. 

This idea was rather obvious, 
yesterday, v. hen one of the man- 
agers kept up a running line of 
conversation with the officials at 
the Greek football games. The of- 
ficials were netting along pretty 
well without any help and the 
team being boosted so loudly 
needed more than adjectives and 
a few referee's decisions to win. 
Spirit is great stuff, the will to 
win is a commendable trait, also; 
hut plain straight crabbing de- 
cisions has no place in an inter- 
fraternity program. 
If interfraternity athletics are to 
continue at State College some people 
have to realize that fraternities are 
r fun — the best tea i 
i. 




R P I TEAM IS GIVEN 
EDGE ON STATESMEN 

Troy Club Played Wei! in Logs 

to Worcester Tech 

Last Week 



Lou Norwood 



P0D0LAK SHINES AS 
MSC BEATS TRINITY 



STATE 




R. P. 1. 


Norw ood 


Ic 


Hoover 


Nelson 


ll 


like 


1 'ay son 


Ig 


l»ay 


Hlasko or 






O'Conncll 


c 


Yager 


Zajehowski 


rg 


Schnat/. 


I'rusick 


rt 


Schaffer 


(apt. Morey 


re 


Madden 


l./yk 


qh 


Shako 


Santucci 


Hit, 


Gelb 


Allan 


rhh 


M a u y a i 


Com* nt 


fb 


Schwartz 



sparks Maroon to 5-0 Win Over 
Hill toppers on Hartford 

Field 



hould win. not the loudest coacheo 

ALPHA SIG WINS TITLE 



Combining the 
In adwork of the 

hooters outplayed 



best passing and 
season the State 
the Trinity eleven 



gained by a long Coast Guard 
kick. Conant and Santucci both reeled , marst,,,m ™**** *«¥ have an ex 

■ :!' fains, hut the advance was tern- 



eel 



Dorarily halted when Conant fumbled 
with McClelland recovering for Coast 
Guard. State regained the advantage, 
\w\er. as Captain Morey recovered 
i teammate's punt on the C. G. forty 
yard line. State stock climbed quick- 
a- Allan and Conant lead a charge 
to the Coast Guard twenty-four and 
an Allan to Norwood toss was good 
for a first down. With a score close. 
State Fumbled again with West re- 
vering for the Cadets. 

Threaten 
11 wag Coast Guard's turn to threat- 
I in the fourth period, but as Goer- 
lected to pass into the end zone 
' el Conant intercepted and toted 
• line for State"s winning 
ire. 
Lineup: 



STATE 


r. 


S. C. G. A. 


Etadge 


le 


McLendon 


Malcolm 


It 


Ahlen 


bjchowski 


lg 


Miller 


Nasko 


c 


O'Neil 


■'•"lfri..i, 


rg 


Adams 




rt 


McClelland 


Norwoj 


re 


West 


Irzyk 


qb 


Goericki 


Santuci 


lhb 


Schrader 


berg 


rhb 


Sudnik 


Harding 


fb 


Lawrence 



cedent chance of setting back the 
MiddletoWll eleven. Theoretically the 
Cardinals have the edge 111 respect to 
wins and losses, but the Maroon 
eleven is never better than when un- 
der fire. 

The State lineup will probably re- 
main the same as last week's with the 
probable exception of center halfback. 

The enemy team which has beaten 
Amherst and Brown, is the strongest 
to represent Wesleyan in recent years. 
Hammarstrom, who has scored fifteen 
goals so far this year is the reason 
for the Wesmen'a success. 



Showing too much power for a Phi 
Sig team that had played its semi 
final round only three hours before, 
Alpha Sigma I'hi romped to a 56-20 
touch football win, last night in the 
Cage to gain the interfraternity dia- 
dem. 

Paced by A I Parsych and Bill 
Walsh, Alpha Sig had little trouble 
gaining the crown. In the afternoon 
Phi Sig gained the finals with an easy 
46-28 win over Theta Chi as Benny 
Frietas and F.v Langworth led the 
attack. 

Kappa Sigma gained the soccer 
crown last night with a 2-1 win over 
I'hi Sig after four overtime periods. 
In the afternoon the Silver and Ma- 
genta had gained the finals with a --(I 
victory over Alpha Gamma Rho. 



to the tune of 5-0 on the loser's field 
Saturday. Taking advantage of a 
strong and favorable wind, the |fa 
loon put the game on ice at the very 
beginning by scoring three markers 
in the first period. 

\\ ith excellent team WOtti and ac 

urate booting, the Amherst eleven 
were far out in front before the hill 
toppers could get set. The lirst State 

core came soon after the opening 
kick-off when Lyman made good on 
a penally shot. From then on the 
lirigg-adiers went to town and scored 
two more tallies before the quarter 
ended. Earl Mowen made the most sen 

sationa! goal of the game when be 
headed ■ high ball Into the goal with 

a terrific sideward twist of his head. 
Although they had the wind on their 
side in the next period, the Trinity 
hooters were unable to penetrate the 
Continued on Page 6 



Freshmen-Sophomore Battle Tomorrow Dates Back To 'Eighties When 
Underclassmen Fight With Each Other For Possession Of A Football 



^DEFEATED R. P. I. IS 
|HARRIERS' LAST FOE 

,l, V„ Given Little Chance at 
('apt. Pickard in 



Last Race 



I • 



1 

t 
» 

i 

t 



ale of the cross-country 
the Maroon harriers, the 
to Troy, New York, to 
'defeated Kensselear Cher- 
'' squad. This meet will 
varsity race of Cap- 
ickard who has done com- 
ning throughout his en- 
untry career. 
*t of its races by near- 
• Ivensselear. led by Cap- 
SB and Vic Head, who 
Squalling the college 
15, will be favored to 
consecutive victory over 
"n as a whole is made 
'''men, besides a coach 
1 'lie first time in three 

sw finishes the season 

«ch Eddy will attempt 
y> to the National. 



By Bert Hyman 

The annual numeral battle between 
the freshman and sophomore football 
teams, which this year decides wheth- 
er or not the frosh will have the priv- 
ilege of wearing their class numerals, 
takes place at Alumni Field tomorrow 
at 10:00 a. m. 

This classic originated during the 
dark days of the eighties when cours- 
es in freshman hazing were consid- 
ered an important part of every .-.oph- 
omore's curriculum. The main course 
was an elaborate affair expected to 
completely demoralize all freshman 
opposition for the remainder of the 
college year. It was hoped that mem- 
bers of the sophomore class would 
accomplish this in the following man- 
ner: the burlier sophs would form 
ranks and charge any yearlings seen 
on the campus. The only thing wrong 
with this was that the frosh usually- 
proved more than a match for the 
upper classmen. One morning, how- 
ever, the sophs were amazed to see 
one of the yearlings carrying an ob- 
ject resembling one of our modern 
«OCCer balls. After many taunts the 
freshman dared the sophs to try and 
take the hall away. All that morning 
and far into the afternoon they 
battled- first one class and then the 
other taking possession of the ball. 
The day ended with the sophomore 
class victorious, and M the bruised 
and battered heroes left the scene 
someone was heard to say: "Thev cer- 
tainly fought for that old ball." An- 
other wit immediately remarked on 
the roughness of "fought ball." Thi-- 
has deg ene r a ted through the year 



until we now speak of the game as 
but pshaWW, you can see that for 
yourself. The next year the freshman 
and sophomore classes ruled that the 
"game" was to he "played" with defi- 
nite rules and regulations. Only a cer- 
tain number of men were allowed on 
each team and the melee would be 

stopped after enough players wen 
severely Injured. This usually took 

about one hour. It was then decided 
that each team would try to carry 
the ball to one end of the field in 
a certain number of carries or downs. 
After this it was a simple matter 
to award points to those who carried 
the ball over the last line. The fresh 
man class lost consistently the first 
few years, but this was due more to 
their youth than to a lack of spirit. 
No Plan 
These games were carried on with- 
out any prearranged plan of battle, 
and it was not until one of the mem- 
bers of a team had angry words with 
a team-mate over possession of the 
ball that it was decided to plan every- 
thing in advance. Thus came about 
signals. 

The freshman (lass has consistently 
gone into these games the underdog, 
and it must be a truly good team to 
come out ahead. The main reason for 
this is that the sophs have the benefit 
of experience. However, the yearlings' 
have proven themselves a team above 
the average as compared with the 
past freshman teams. This year the 
'12 gridders completed an undefeated 
season, while running up a grand total 
of r..'{ points in three games. Com- 
posed of a fine array of high school 



-tars, the frosh hope to pin the sophs' 
ears back with a vengeance and thus 
prove themselves the better class. 

The sophomores will enter the game 
with 21 games to their credit against 
12 wins by the frosh. Seven games 
have ended in ties. 

Scores 

Freshman 12 Sophomore 12 

Sophomores win 



ISM 

IH!*1 

is. 12 
1X«»4 



Sophomore .'52 

Sophomore 86 

1896 Sophomore 4 

IH!*i; Sophomore (i 

1K!)<) Sophomore i\ 

190] Sophomores win 

l!'l»2 Freshmen win 

1908 Freshman 

i!>07 Sophomore >'< 

I !»<»!> Freshman H 

1911 Sophomore 8 

1!J14 Sophomore 20 

1916 Sophomore 8 

1017 Sophomore l!l 

1919 freshman 19 

Freshman 

Freshman 18 

Sophomore 

Freshman K 

1020 Sophomore .'5 

1027 Freshman 8 

1 02S Freshman 

I9S8 So ph omo re 8 

1930 Freshman 12 
1981 Freshman 

Freshman o 
Freshman i;» 

Freshman 2 
Freshman 8 
Freshman 10 
Sophomore 21 



Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman 



1922 
1928 

1024 
102. r , 



1932 

10M 
1984 

1 o:if> 
1 o:w 

HI.'! 7 



Sophomore 
Freshman 

Sophomore 

Freshman 

Freshman 

Freshman .''. 

Freshman 

Sophomore 

Sophomore 

Sophomore f, 

Freshman .'5 

Sophomore 

Freshman 

Sophomore 

Sophomore 

Freshman 

Sophomore 

Sophomore 

Sophomore 

Sophomore H 

Sophomore 

Sophomore fi 

Sophomore 6 

Freshman 



Coach Kbb Caraway's win-minded 
gridders will invade Troy Saturday 
lor the second last tussle of the year 
with Rensselaer. The Troy club play 
iug their final name of the season, 
will enter the fray with a record of 
only one win in six games, but their 
total of six touchdowns for the season 

hould give them an advantage over 
the score-shy Maroon team which has 
been able to chalk up only three allies 
all year. 

Against State's la.-t foe, Coast 
Guard Academy, the It. P. I. men were 
less successful, losing a tight battle 

10-7, when the Guardsmen turned on 

an aerial attack. In the Tech vs. 
Tech meet last Saturday, the Troy- 
men performed better than State did 

againsl the same opponent, denting 

the undefeated Worcester team for 
one seme. On the basis of compari 
tive scores (then), Stale will have 110 
edge on the Rensselaer club when 
they clash Sat unlay. 

Shako Star 
Tech aces George Shako and Red 

Newton will lead the offense against 
State, and their quarterback to half- 
back areial combination will be the 
play to watch. Jo Madden and Mor- 
gan Hoover, flank guardians will be 
in top shape. 

K. I'. I. mentor Hank Kumpf will 
field an eleven that outweighs the 
Maroon both in the backfiehl and the 
line. In the line, the Technien will 
Spot State thirteen pounds, and the 
backfleld will be heavier by at least 
eitfht pounds. The State theme will 
be two wins in succession, however, 
and if the offense shows a punch, it 
will be no easy day for the Fngincers. 
Hlasko Mint 

Two doubtful berths exist on the 
Maroon lineup, with Mlasko held back 

by an arm injury unstained in the 

C G. A. name, liable to be replaced 

by O'Conncll, and Ben Harding tie 

[fig with Chet Conant for starting 
honors. Norwood, Morey. I 'ay-sun. and 
Nelson, whose sterling line work was 

a strong factor in the Coast Guard 

defeat are slated to -fail against 
Rensselaer. 

COLLBGIATES GO TO 

MAINK: STATK NINTH 



<';i|»t;iin Larry Pickard Kinislios 

Ninth as Don Smith 

Leads Field 



On a day which was so hot that the 
Franklin I'ark course resembled a hos- 
pital ward pro (rated runners Donald 

c. Smith, a junior ai the University 

of Maine, won the New England inter 

collegiate cross-country champion hip 
for the second straight time over a 

field of 168 runners which represented 

11 collegM in New England. Ma 
state, led by Captain Lary Pickard 

who finished ninth, an advance .,f five 

places over last year, took tenth place. 

Smith's time f,,r the rugged CQUfS S 
was 21:45. l'.h seconds faster than 
hi- time of a year *go, Slate fmi bed 
ninth in the varsity run and the 
Frosh failed to post a SCOTS in the 
plebe meet. 

With five runner-, coming in emottg 

the first thirty, the University <>r 

Maine won the meet for the ninth 
time since the competition began. 






.V.R BASIL B. WOOD 

L I BRARY 



TBI MASSAC HISETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 193* 



ATTENTION MILITARY MAJORS!!! 

NETTLETON RIDING BOOTS— Now is the time to place your orders for Riding Boots. 
They will be made up to your measurements as in previous years. Consult us at your earliest convenience. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter 



FIVE-SIXTHS 



Continued from Page 4 
Blaisdell, 11. U, Salesman for fra- 
ternity jewelry, (ireenfield 

Blake, N. P., Service Salesman-Train- 
ing School, Socony Vacuum Oil Co., 
N. Y. 

Brown, H. E., Sales Representative, j 
Proctor & Gamble, Baltimore, M.I. 

Buasee, Robert, Chemistry Laboratory j 
of Fisk Rubber Co., Chi< JOpefl Fulls. 
Mass. 

Chase, P. B., v/etraore- Savage Co., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Clark, Norman, Fuller l'.rush Sales- 
man, Sharon, Mass. 

Cone, L. W., Jr.. Factory Hand, North 
Hrookfield, Mass. 

Czeluaniak, E. W., Undertaking busi- 
ness, Northampton, Mass. 

Davidson, A. A., Salesman, Gordon's 
Clothing store, Springfield, Mass 



Dunlop, J. T., Florist Business, Chic- 

opee, Mass. 
Eaton, William, Dean Dairy. Wal- 

tham, Mass. 
Feinberg, Robert, Junk Business, 

Medford, Mass. 
Ferguson, W. B., Mass. Mutual Life 

Ins. Co., Springfield, Mass. 
Gibba, B. L., Clerk, Davis Store, 

Saugus, Mass. 
GUI, Joseph, Grocery Store, Bonds- 

ville, Mass. 
Graham, William, with G. F. Radway, 

New London, Conn. 
Green, W. A., Drafting and Drawing, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Halpern, Herbert, employed by father, 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Harrison, W. H., Jr., Bookkeeper. Dill- 
on Chrysler-Plymouth Agency, 
Lawrence, Mass. 
Irving. Richard, Landscape Arch, at 
.Miss Fisher's Flower Shop, Ver- 
gennes, Vt. 



Jackson, Mitchell, Wholesale Grocery 
Company work, Fairhaven, Mass. 

Mildram, David, Frost and Higgins 
Co., Arlington, Mass. 

Mitchell, W. K., Jr., Tree Surgery at 
Frost and Higgins Co., Arlington, 
Mass. 

Newman, Edward, Quaboag Rubber 
Co., North Brookfield, Mass. 

Olivier, J. B., Household Finance 
Corp., Worcester, Mss. 

Osley, Donald, Actuarial Dept. of 
Met. Life Ins. Co., N. Y. C. 

Page, A. S., Benj. Foster & Co., Am- 
herst and Templeton, Mass. 

Potter, W. J., Chemist at Heveatex 
Corp., Melrose, Mass. 

Quast, Wentworth, Salesman for C. 

F. Hovey Co., Boston 
Riley, W. C, Plant Worker at Dean 

Dairy, Waltham, Mass. 
Rounds, D. L., Professional Insect Col- 
lector, Costa Rica, Central America 



Smith, R. C, Eastern States Farmers' 

ASSOC., Springfield, Mass. 
Tindale, J. W., Hood & Co., Spring- 
field, Mass. 
Welcker, W. F., Realtor and Auction- 
eer, Holyoke, Mass. 
Wildner, C. R., Control of dairy pro- 
ducts mfg. in Kenduskeag Valley 
Creamery, Bangor, Maine 
Willard, D. H., Apprentice Farm Man- 
ager for father, Salisbury, Conn. 
Miscellaneous 
Alcorn, R. E„ Highway Engneer for 

Commonwealth of Mass. 
Baker, W. S., Jr., 2nd Lieut., Fort 

Oglethorpe, Georgia 
l'.rox, F. A., Fort Ogelthorpe, Ga. 
Burke, James, Extension Editor, Mass. 

State College, Amherst 
Collins, Charles, National Youth Ad- 
ministration, Boston 
Flower, Stanley A., Assistant College 
Editor, News Service, Mass. State 
College, Amherst 



Heniond, Conrad, Rodman 

gineering Dept., Holyoki , 
Higgins, Edward, Flying ('■,-., 

dolph Field, Texas 
King, Richard, Fort Oglethor 
Linden, Norman, Fort Ktl 

Vt. 
Lombard, Elmer, Welfare 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
Morrison, R. K., Fort Ogletl 
Rozwenc, G. S., Flying < '■,. 

dolph Field, Texas 
Townsley, Floyd W., Fort 1 

len, Vt. 



* A. 



PODOLAK SHINES 

Continued from P.t 

impregnable State defense. 

Stan Podolak was easily 
standing player on the field 
only broke up the Trinity offi 
was also the sparkplug in tin 
attack. Fast and aggressive. . 
ally beats his opponent to tl 



#m& 







&*?:■* 






that's the reason Chesterfield 
stands out from the others 

The reason Chesterfield is 
different is because it combines the 
smoking qualities of the world's best 
cigarette tobaccos in one cigarette. 
It's the right combination of these 
tobaccos. . . mild ripe home-grown 
and aromatic Turkish, rolled in pure 
cigarette paper... that makes Chest- 
erfield a better cigarette for you to 
smoke... milder and better-tasting 



...the blend that cant be copied 

...the RIGHT COMBINATION of the 

world's best cigarette tobaccos 




XL1X 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17. 1938 



NO. 9 



52 PLEDGED AS 
SORORITY WEEK 
CLOSED SUNDAY 



rma Beta Chi and Phi Zeta 

Lead in Numbers With 
Fourteen 



SENIORS WHO PLAY LAST GAME OF STATE CAREER SATURDAY STATE FAVORED 



AGAINST TUFTS 
IN FINAL GAME 



PLEDGES LISTED 



Lambda Delta Mu, Alpha Lamb- 
da Mu, Sigma Iota 
Follow 



Fifty-two coeds last Sunday wen- 
pledged to sororities at State after 
a succession of open dates and in- 
formal teas, starting on Wednesday 
and winding U p with closed dates for 
all sororities on Saturday night. A 
silence period followed from 1<> :30 
o'clock on Saturday night until 5 
o'clock on Sunday. Freshmen express- 
ed their choices on Sunday at 4:30. 

Following is a list of the pledges 
of the several houses: 

Alpha Lambda Mu: Mary Kozak, 
Helen Watt, Phyllis Tower, Alice 
Belk, Ruth Cambridge. 

Lambda Helta Mu: Constance 
Beauregard, Phyllis Drinkwater, Mar- 
jorie Nichols, Gertrude Pelissier, 
lionise Olson, Evra Ward, Doris Ro- 
berti, Nancy Weber, Marguerite 
Bertbiaume, Agnes Lockhart, Jean 
M< Samara. 

Phi Zeta: Irene Johnston '41; Mar- 

Jorie Tyring '41; Nancy Alger, Mary 

Continued on Page 4 

DR. ROHR TELLS ASU 
OF MUNICIPAL GOVT. 



Professor Finds City Manage- 
ment to be a New Problem 

For Nation 



"The city as a problem of govern- 
ment is relatively a new one in this 
country" stated Professor Charles J. 
Rohr -peaking before the American 
nt Union last night. 
Di cussing the problem of munici- 
pal government, Professor Rohr out- 
the growth of urban population 
391 of the population in 1790 
to 5094 in 1930 and 90.8% in Mas- 
ts, and commented on the 
pli Jdty of the situation as present 
city government. 

Governmental Ties 
asizing the numerous ties the 
citizen with his government 
ray of health, morals, teach- 
I arbitration, he attributed the 
rapid growth of municipal services 
the unparalleled production of ma- 
wealth, the needs of modem 
? which requires a dense pop- 
higher standard of living re- 
' public activities, and a chang- 
■ I»t of justice. 
Public Employers 
Rohr also showed the relation- 
tween growth and an increas- 
umber of public employees in 
. police forces, etc. and spoke 
■ ' ing importance of ad- 
n in regulating and con- 
these public services. 
Three Types 
- -ing solutions for the prob- 
utlined the workings of the 
'lent types of municipal 
"t in the United States, 
"tincil, commission, and coun- 
' '. stressing the need for 
vet strong mode of admin- 
and government. 




Walt Zajchowski 



NOVELTIES FEATURE 
1938 MILITARY BALL 



Indiction Ceremony For New 

Honorary Colonel is 

Highlight 



Featuring Dorothy Nichols '.'59, re- 
tiring honorary colonel in a novel 
ceremony of induction for the new 
colonel, the grand march just before 
intermission, will be one of the many 
interesting high lights of the annual 
.Military P.all to be held in the Drill 
Hall on December 2. 

Under the baton of Ray Keating, 

the ball orchestra, which is foremost 
stylist of famous dance bands in the 
country, will play for dancing from 

9 p. m. to 2 a. m. Keating's hand 
has been playing at .Murray's in 
Westchester, \. Y., and has been on 
a coast to coast hookup from WOR In 
Newark for nine continuous months. 
His imitations, in the Keating per- 
sonal style, of such leading dance 
bands as Tommy Horsey. Hal Kemp, 
Artie Shaw, Penny Goodman, Larry 
Clinton, Glen Miller have made him 
famous. During the past three weeks 

Continued on /'. 




.'51 st Hat tic in Second Oldest 

New England Rivalry Takes 

Place Saturday 



JUMIiOS IMPROVED 



Passing Attack Will He Main 

Offensive Weapon of 

Ilolh Teams 



(bet Cona ni 



Capt. Clif Morey 



"State Week-end" 



Dance Friday Night is Feature 

of Two-Day Activities 

at Tufts 



COMMITTEE CHOSEN 
FOR CARNIVAL BALL 



With State College students ex- 
cused from classes this Saturday for 
the traditional '''ufts g-'ine, interest 
Is running high in tin 'Muss, State 
Week-end" planned by Tufts College. 

Starting with a formal dance Fri- 
day night to the music of Mine Bar 
ron, master of sweet swing, the week 
end program includes fraternity 
spreads before the football game, 
Saturday, and fraternity tea dances 
following the game with a State Col 
hue Alumni party in the Tufts gym 
late Saturday afternoon, Saturday 
evening the Tufts fraternities are 
playing host to State students with 
round-robin dances till 12:00. 

.More than three hundred State stu- 
dents are expected to travel to .Med 
ford this week to take part in t In- 
activities. 

Tickets for the Friday night dance 
have sold well but a few more are 
available through Art Noyes, Theta 
Chi. Subscription is $.'{..'(0. 



Reagan, Osmun, Malm Junior 

Members -Maroon Key 

lias Three 



By vote /if the junior class, Law- 
rence Reagan, John Osmun, and Irina 
Malm were elected to the Wintei Car 

nival Mall Committee last Thursday. 
Representatives from the Maroon Key 
are Clement llurr, Dana Frandsen, 
and John Crimmins. 

Combination 

The Winter Carnival Ball is a com 

bination of the .Junior From and Ma 
roon Key Mardi (Iras which were 
Combined Some years ago to make 
way for the Carnival dance. The Ball 
this year will probably be Thursday 
night between semesters and will be 
I titling start to the three days of 
festivitie 

Pitts Treasurer 
Also, on the same ballot, George 
Pitts was elected treasurer of the jun- 
ior class, breaking the tie which had 
existed since the former voting he 
tween In- and Robert Sheldon. 



Ky Art Copson 

Slate will he playing (he thirty- 
first game in the second oldest rival- 
ry between New ESngland colleges 
when the Caraway contingent travels 

to Medford this Saturday to bring 
down the curtain on the UI.'tK grid 
season. Only the Harvard Yale tussle 
ranks as an older classic in this part 
of the country. The rivalry ' began in 
1XX1 with live straight ties. 

When tin- Statesmen invade Tufts 
Oval Saturday, they will he entering 
their first, game in the role of slight 
favorites in view of the fact that the 
Jumbos have failed to turn in a win 

in seven attempts. Under the tute- 
lage of Coach Few Manly, the Frown 
and Blue has improved both offensive- 
ly and defensively since the opening 

of the Grid year, and State will be 
meeting a top rate opponent in spite 
of Tufts poor record. Only had breaks 
kept the Jumbos from breaking the 
Continued on Page 6 



SENATE WILL PROBE 
NEW ELECTION PLAN 

Issues Statement Following a 

10-1 Return on Referendum 

Favoring Change 



HOW MAROON WILL LINE UP AGAINST TUFTS COLLEGE 








•- 



Santucci (rhb), Ir/vk fqb), ( onant ffb), Allan (Ihb) 
Norwood (le). Nelson (It), Geoff rion (Ig). Hlawko (c), Zajrhownki (rg), Malcolm (rt), Morey (re) 



Following the referendum poll which 
ended Monday night with a 10 to I 
majority in favor of considering a 
new plan for the election of class 

nominating committer the student 

Senate stated that it would be will- 
ing to consider any new plan that 
any student would propose. Accord- 
ing to the Senate's answer to tie 
referendum, further initiative must 

he taki :i by individual, or groups of, 

students if any improvement bj to b*j 
made in our election System. 

TIM Senate received the ballots for 

counting ami che.-kine, Tuesday night, 
and from their meeting in the Senate 
room in the Mem Building, the fol- 
lowing complete statement, was la- 
sued: 

Senate Answer 
"The Senate believes that the new 
election plan is as efficient and as 
non-partisan as possible. We have. 

considered other plans ami will con- 
sider any new plan that a student 
•'' '• ' to lie an improvement." 
10 to I 

Ballots cast in Ooodell Library 

from blanks supplied in last week's 

Collegian showed clearly thai tu- 

dont opinion IS W tO I in favor of 
having a new plan for the election 

of da nominating committees adopt 
sd Many baltoti were embellished 

with further opinions, SQch ;is: "I 
think the Senate knows what it is 

doing." . . . "just, because wo elect 

the Senate bj „,, gjgj, Ul . |,. 1Vl . t() 

agree with them" . . . "Why did the 
Coliogian aay nothing againsi the old 

plan?" ... and "The Senate should 
not he dictators." 



' 



CorvriRht 19J8, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



* A 1 3 d V S OcOiW IffH 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMIIER 17. I93S 




/nbaeeacbueetwF Collegian 



BARTERING 

WITH JOE BART 



Official newaimper of the MasHachusettM State CloHtf 
Publiahad ev«ry Thursday by the students. 



Otlii-i' : Boom *, Memorial HuiUHns 



KMKKY MOOKK '39, Editor-in-Chief 
ARTHUR a. NOYES '40, Knaadng rilitor MABELLE BOOTH ".v.K Aanekkta Bdltoi 



KDITOK1AL HOAIil) 



Campus 

JOHN E. KH.IOS in, Editor 
BETTINA HAM. '.t'J. Art Editor 
MAKY T, MKKHAN '39 
PBANCES S. MKttltlM. "39 
JOSKI'I' BART '40 
NANCY K. LUCE 'in 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART 'I" 
LOKKTTA KENNY II, Secret a r> 
KENNETH HOWLAND '41 
WILLIAM T. GOODWIN Ml 

HAROLD FORREST n 
CHESTER KURALOWICZ '1! 

JOHN HAYES 'II 

Feature 

LLOYD B, COPSLAND '39, Bdltoi 
MYRON FISHER ';«» 
KATHLEEN TULLY n 
EVERETT 1!. SPENCER '40 



Sports 



It. ARTHUR COPSON 
VLBERT YANOW '41 



'40 



St in-lt I) i id ur Cor respondent 

JOHN KELSO S'.s'.i 

Colleee Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '39. Editor 

Financial Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 



hi; 



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MAXWELL H. GOLDBERG 



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liusiness Assistants 



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must be received at the Collegian office before 
9 o'clock. Monday evening. 



1937 Member J93« 

P^socidod OoOefciate Press 

Distributor of 

Gofletfide Digest 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BV 



Entered as second-class matter at the Am 
hernt Post Office. Accepted for mailing at 

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HOd, Act of October 1917, authorized August ^ ,, „ ... , „ .' 

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nnted by Carpenter & Morehouse, Cook PI., 

Amherst, Mass., Telephone 43 Chicago • Boston • Lo. tHU - s.s f.arcco 



(This week the editor of the Col- 
legian Quarterly is writing Bartering. 
Sidney Rosen is stooging for Joe Bart 
who is in the dog house.) 

Alice in Something-or-other 
"This is getting curiouser and 
euriouser," cried Alice. 

They were walking along a cement 
path, at the end of which Alice could 
see some buildings; first they looked 
Telephone 1102-M : jj ke barns, then they changed and 
became red-brick turrets, then they 
turned into a sign that said: I'.VV.A. 
FEDERAL EMERGENCY. 
"What's that?" asked Alice. 
"An emergency is an emerging," 
said the White Rabbit with a bored 
air, "any dunce knows that, and we 
are emerging on the Mass. State 
Campus." 

Before Alice could ask what that 

was, they were enveloped in a cloud 

of dust, out of which emerged a 

harsh, nasal voice: "Anything for me 

today, boys? Studyin' hard? Don't 

forget Dave! Byebye, now!" And the 

dust whirled away down the path. 

"Well!" said Alice. And, just 

as if she had spokes a magic 

word, there sprang up a great, red 

building, with four white columns 

before it. Alice clumsily spelled 

out the looking-glass-backward 

letters on the front: G-O-O-D- 

E-L-L LIB. . . 

"Let's go in," whined the White 
Rabbit, who sounded like a junior 
caught short on a Smith date. 
The white door that said, falsely, 
"Paint !" opened, and Alice walked 
in. 

"Quiet!" said a voice at her elbow. 
"But I'm not — " stuttered Alice. 
"Shhhhhhh!" came a hiss from the 
hookstacks. And now, from all sides j 
came a hissing, like leaky radiator | 
valves, and voices began to shout one | 
after the other, "Quiet! Quiet!" 

"What do they want?" Alice was 
quite perplexed. But the White Rab- 
bit only said: "Quiet!" 

"But they're making more noise 
than — " began Alice. 

"Don't be a dunce!" said the White 
TUFTS A friendly rivalry has existed between the two col- Rabbit sharply, and the whole build- 

RIVALRY in Amhewt for many years, a rivalry which adds con- ["* just J**** if \ to thi " air ' T , hey 

.... * * both stood on the edge of a pond in 

salerably to the excitement of the Massachusetts whk . h blue water , apped id]y at the 

State fall social season with its fame, house parties, and imports, hanks. 

This rivalry, most natural in view of the situation, is not at pres- "Oh. goody! 

<ent as evenly matched as it may be in years to come. 

Perhaps this situation has blinded many of us to the possi- 
bilities offered, both social and athletic, in other weekends which 
might hold as much if not more in store for men and women on 
campus. 

Such a week-end is approaching us now and with an evenly 
matched status in all respects between State and Tufts. The col- 
lege at Med ford lias gone out of its way to create an attractive 
atmosphere which might induce State students to participate in 
their activities. 

With such a historical rivalry as exists between Tufts and 

State, there is unlimited possibility for a real rivalry on held and 

dance floor, at rally and after game get-together. The average 

human gets mote of a thrill from an evenly matched battle. Why 

not make Tufts an equal of Amherst? 

DOZING? Is the student body of Massachusetts State College *■«*■ in delight, at which one of the 

ASLEEP! asleep on its feet, or is it too lazv and disinterested! hhu-k-hatted men took a bow. "We 

. . . . . . . .. _had one in Kensington, she contin- 

to evince any interest in things going on about them? U(i(i ., am , , reniembcr _ she broke olT 

Last week, the Collegian printed referendum blanks to ascertain "these birds look like slithey loves." 

the feelings of students regarding legislation of the Senate which "They're freshmen," yawned the 

affects all of us. This poll was only to clear up questions which White Rabbit. 

had arisen in some minds and which had seemed important "^t."" ? Like fresh aspa. a- 

gus n Why * What 1 Where 9 

enough to demand a referendum. Evidently, ten-elevenths of the AHrc ^ ^^ mixcdupper and 

campus population thought it ol no importance, but those who did mixedupper. 

turned in blanks showing a decided interest in having other plans "You want to know too damn 
considered by the Senate. much!" cried the White Rabbit (it was 

The Senate has decided in this light that they have delt with Wa "Jf* l " nnwI n,,w) aml ,lr ? k P- 

,, . . ., . , ~ . , . , , ... ped Alice gentlv on the back of the 

th«' question Wisely; the truth ol this can be seen onlv with pass- , . ... , . • , ,. 

1 J ' tit head with his umbrella. 

age of time. Had the Senate wanted to "pull the wool" over the ,\ m( u ajj^ san)< qu j,, t |y into the 

eyes of the average unsuspecting collegian here, there seems to water, she dimly saw the red-caps 

be little doubt that they could do it. There is no question but that floating toward her, and heard, ai in 

the Senate is doing a good and honest job. However, if they passed a '^am, th eir war-cry: 

a motion giving themselves power to elect all class officers, perhaps 
a dozen students who might be affected would open their eyes 
arid mouth. All others would slumber merrily through to their 
last commencement. 

There have been times in the terms of state and national 

legislature when mistakes were made, but the citizens made them- 

elves and other aware of this situation. If the student of today, 
hope of tomorrow, cannot keep his eyes on campus happenings, 
how can he be aware of current affairs when on his own in the 
world ? 



* STOCKBRIDGE 



By John Kelso 



cried Alice, "are 
we going to meet my old friends, 
the Mock Turtle and the Gry- 
phon?" The White Rabbit yawned. 
He was getting blase. "Oh, look, 
wild life!" cried Alice again. 

There, on the surface of the 
water, floated little red caps with 
white buttons; beneath these one 
could barely make out tiny, 
childish faces, grimacing in pain, 
anger, and surprise. About the 
bank stalked tall, stern, black- 
hatted men who carried long 
pieces of wood in their hands. 
The little red caps were kept cir- 
culating in the water by these 
men. 
"Oh, it's a Zoo!" Alice clapped her 



The Freshman Reception and Dance 
will be held Saturday evening, No- 
vember ly, in the Drill Hall. Every- 
one is urged to come; bring a girl 
and one for your roommate! There 
will be no admission fee, but re- 
freshments will be served. The Dance 
is in charge of Charles Mandell and 
Miss Helen Esselen. Committees are 
as follows: 

Chaperons: Howard Winter, James 
McDonough, and Michail Kandianis. 
Refreshments: Richard Sparks, Steven 
Morse, and Rinning Wentworth. Or- 
chestra: Robert Abbott, John Hibbard 
and Robert Berry. 

It is hoped that all Stockbridge stu- 
dents will be able to attend. 
* * 

The Stockbridge "Aggie*" lost a 
tricky football game to I'ittsfield High 
last Saturday by a score of Ki-7. 
Kolony Klub 

As the initiation of new member- 
of the house will take place soon, a 
committee, consisting of "Ray" Pot- 
ter, "Doug" Henderson, and "Tiny" 
Cordon, was chosen to conduct the 
ceremony. 

Only a few members remained at 
K. K. during the Armistice Day week- 
end, as most of the boys took ad- 
vantage of the long week-end to go 
home. 

W. T. I'earse, 8P86, fruit grower, 
and a member of the Class of '21, 
were K. K. alumni who visited the 
house recently. 

Alpha Tan Gamma 

The weekly meeting of the house 
was held Monday evening to give in- 
structions to pledges in regard to 
"hell week," which is the week of No- 
vember 14. 

Each new member of the house will 
have a specific duty to perform 
throughout the week. Paddles were 
turned in at the meeting and next 
Monday they will be used to the best 
of the seniors' ability, depending on 
the willingness of the initiates — good 
luck, freshmen. 

Leonard "Kim" Treat, a senior 
member, has donated a pool table, 
which will be installed at A. T. G. in 
the near future. The house wishes to 
thank "Kim" sincerely for this gift. 
Poultry Club 

The M. S. C. Poultry Club held its 
first meeting on Tuesday, November 
8. Instructor John Vondell directed 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Frehman Hygiene 

All freshmen who have not yet 
taken their hygiene course will meet 
for their first lecture on Tuesday, 
November 22, at 3:45 p. m. in Goes- 
mann Auditorium. They will meet 
again on Wednesday at 1 :55, and 
twice a week for the balance of the 
term. 

Wm. I,. Machmer, Dean. 
Wesley Foundation 

Professor Sears will give an il- 
lustrated lecture on his work in con- 
nection with the Grenfell Mission in 
Laborador at the regular meeting of 
the Wesley Foundation Sunday night 
at eight. Students and faculty cor- 
dially invited. 



Communications 



The MASSACHlISrTrTS COLLEGIAN <!«>» 
not necessarily a^ree with or oppoat- 
npinions voiced in this column. Communi- 
Datlom ii^-il not be signed, but the writer 
must be known to the editor-in-rhief. 



deat 



in 
Dr. 

■ak- 



girls' 



. 1 1. r- 
StoBf, 



the meeting. Dr. Parkhurst » 
the meeting with a short talk. 
Mr. Vondell showed some ei 
snapshots, officers for the ye 
elected, and refreshments w»i 
ed. Officers are as follows: I'i. 
Charles J. Russo S'W; Vice-IV ... 
Miss E. Gaudette 8*40; Secret***' 
Treasurer, G. Yale, M. S. C. *40; fw 
gram Committee: E. W. Spear 's^* 
G. Browning S'4(); L. Shubert M <j' 
C. '42. 

The next meeting will be h 
Tuesday, November 22, at 7 
Room 114, Stockbridge Hal 
I'arkhurst will be the principal 

er. Anyone interested is invi 
attend. 

The Stockbridge freshman 
archery group, under the direction of 
-Miss Marjorie Irwin, M. S. c. '4q 
is showing a marked Improvement in 
.M«,res over the first attempts *$ 
the bow and arrow. The outstanding 
archers are Elinor Berkeley, i ',,,.". 
stance iileumer, Rebecca Di(l 
othy Bger, Jane Gagnoii, Alii 
and Barbara Turnquist. 
* # 

Albert Conklin and Perry Gebharg 

Animal Husbandry senior.-, v. 
Boston last weekend, where they niuiie 
an examination and survey of Fam ui! 
Hall Market, Fish Biers, and Market 
Garden sections in the interests of 
their major study. 

Alumni News 

Alumni who visited the campus dur- 
ing the past week are as follows: W. 
T. I'earse S'2<i, now a fruit grower in 
Stow, Mass. During the recent hurri- 
cane, he was assistant buyer of sal- 
vaged apples for the Federal Surplus 
Commodities Commission; K. H. Wil- 
cox S"M), a successful florist, who 
owns his own establishment at Port 
Leyden, N. Y., and supplies cut flow- 
ers to the Adirondack trade; Law- 
rence Blackmer S'.'U, assistant poul- 
try man on a large range at Benacook, 
N. H.; and his brother, Randolph 
Blackmer S'Ufi, who is just married 
and stopped at the Short Course Of- 
fice on his wedding trip to Niagara 
Falls. 

Winter School 

The nine weeks short course in 
Poultry Husbandry is now in pro- 
gress; Unit I started Monday with a 
total enrollment of fourteen members 
— eight from Massachusetts, three 
from Connecticut, and one each from 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Ver- 
mont. 

The Eleventh Annual Poultry 
Breeders' School will be held Novem- 
ber 16, 17, and 18, at the Farley 4-H 
Club House under the sponsorship of 
the Poultry Department and Exten- 
sion Service cooperating. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 



INFORMAL 

A vacation night Informal has 
been announced hy the Informal 
Committee for the ni^ht before 

Thanksgiving holidays. The dance 
will be in the form of a poverty 
party in the Drill Hall, Tuesday. 
November 22, at M p. m. This will 
be the Uwl opportunity for a prc- 
vacation (linn on the campus. 



Hourly the ferocity of Nazi perse 
cut ion of German Jews readies more 

terrible depths. Not In ■ thousand 
years has such depravity, such organ- 
ized, widespread and ruthless tor- 
ture of a whole people been percp- 
trated. It was left for the most hrnl.il 
beast of Fascism in our day. lately 
encouraged at Munich by Chamber 
lain and Daladier, to tlevi.se the most 
fiendish tortues for BOO,OO0 innocent 
and helpless Jews. 

The Nazis have mu rd ered uncounted 

numbers of innocent Jews in their 
Continued >>n PWm ^ 



Illlllsll.M \l|-|'llll>l<! 17 

Poultry Brwden Sch«xii 

Women']. Ailviswiry Coiuuil 
Patterson Player* 

Friday. Novrmher 1 M 

FfuVral Theater. Dr. rVwrfltn iS«-i»l 
Union) 

Poultry Hrcilers Si'hool 

Saturday, Novrmhrr It, I93X 

Kiiotball Tufts - ther.> 

Vir party Alpha fliimmn Khi> 

Amherst Nature Club 
Freshman Reception llance S on p. m. 
Drill Hall 

Mondnj , Nmoiilici Jt 

Annual Extension Conference 

Tuesday, November 22 

Annual Extension Conference 

Fine Arts 
In formal 

Football at Deerfteld 

<;h-e Club; 8:48, Mem. I1M 

Wednesday, November 23 

Annual Bxtetiirfon Ooftfecenc* 
Thursday. Novrmhrr 21 
llolalav 



SENATE'S KEIM.Y 



Issued from the Sen.it. RdO* last 
Tuesday night : 

Th« Senate helieves 1 1 I 
election plan is as elli 
non-partisan as possih 
considered other plant 
sider any new plan thai 
feels to be an improveni' I 

Signed, 

The Sen»t« 



>,,. have 

, will ft* 
itudent 



ADDITION OF "THE SCIENCE REVIEW" AND 
MAGICIAN'S ACT MADE TO SOCIAL UNION 

,,,. , aid Wandt, Director of Science at the New Vork World'i 



HONORARY COLONEL 




BOSTON CAMERA CLUB EXHIBIT OF BOTH 
NATURE, ANIMAL PHOTOS IS AT LIBRARY 

Reviewer Kinds Photographs to be Fine Representations of Many 

Behind" 



U»*T 



\CoUe<J e 



Se^> 











Thumbers Organize 



Vked of 
h King cc 

; isl ass: 

-;>e *^: 
v «d Co. 
; jjnrxeo : 

'.: «y« 3 : 
;;*r«t« 



^ 



J 



• 



^ 



V 
• 




* 






?**: 



\ 



i . ■ , t ■ d , f 



Qucpn of the B.irnw>rmers 




i Hall 

exhibit now m 

a collection ' 'I 

membei nl t he 

i \ 1 1 hur 1 1. im 

ifii K. Harris, 

md Franklin I. 

,iv all \ i'i ;, fine 

man} di ii'ei iiit 
ij , fr oi I .ami 
ork. One of the 
he exhibition is 
s of a popular 

lamll' (I v. it h i'i- 
kgrouml I. in t 
iphsi i p the sub- 
tig the picture 
Iso in the cate- 
ictures are two 
s of water and 
i m hich have a 
toothing and ap- 
(>y Hammond is 
f a part of the 
iphaais on the 
e sand, and the 
water in the 
urr nf the -and 
<■{ of water mi 

e fur the intri- 
Ctive lighting, 
•turcs 

animal picture? 
• most striking 
i studies of the 

Iteliiml. ami A 
re very sympa- 

show, not only 
ii an understand' 
ne photographer 
ii has made tin- 
INilliwog's View 
I interesting for 
at her than com 

re design, Moris' 
jre of a water 
Brresting, espec 

•nt of light and 
he photographs. 

an nut tending 

•h ha a sweep 

and a fi>rcf <<( 
found in such 



SHOW 




NOV. 22 

I\ IM. 

)SI'.Y 
URRAY 



fOU 
RS M 



i $1.85 
$12.50 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COL LEG I \N, THURSDAY, NOV EM HER 17, H»is 



/Tlbase 







o 


Olllci' 1 


Room 


8, Mem. 


AIM HI 


i: \. 


NOYEfi 



Campus 

JOHN K. FILIOS in 
BETTINA HALL "39, 
MAKY T. MKKIIAN 
FKANCKS 8. MKItIM 
JOSEPH RAKT Mn 
NANCY E. LUCE '4 
JACQUELINE L. ST 
LOEETTA KENNY '• 
KENNETH llnwl-A^ 
WILLIAM T. <;<)()l) 

HAHOI.D FORBEST 
CHESTER KURALCM 
JOHN HAYES 11 

Feature 
LLOYD B. COPELAf 
MYRON FISHES ':S9 
KATHLEEN TULLY 
EVERETT R. SFENi 



AFtRAll \M CARP 



< 



K. EUCENE UKNAI 
ROGER H. LIND.SK 
JOSKI'H K. GORDO 
W.\, i'EB R. LALO? 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2 



Make nil orders i 
setts < "lit urn ii. In < 
subscriber will plwu 

BtC'T BS SiKjn ll.S IK): 

u.-ttf and faculty c 
encouraged. Any e 
must bo received at 
9 o'clock, Monday e 



Entered as second- 
hsrwl 1'oHt Office, 
special rate of |>o.iti 
1103, Act of Octob. 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpent 
Amherst, Mi 



TUFTS A 

RIVALRY in 

si< 
State fall soda 
This rivalry, in 
ent as evenly n 

Perhaps tl 
bilities offered, 
might hold as 
campus. 

Such a we 
matched statu; 
lege at Medfoi 
atmosphere wl 
their activities 

With sucl 

State, there ii 

dance floor, al 

human gets nv 

not make Tuft 

DOZING? Is 

U9LBEP! as 

to 

Last week, tlu 

the feelings of 

affects all of i 

had arisen in 

enough to den 

campus popula 

turned in Man 

considered l>y 

The Senate 

the question \\ 

age of time. 1 

eyes of the a 1 

be little doubt 

the Senate is c 

a motion givin 

a dozen stud* 

and mouth. P 

last commence 

Tli ere ha 

legislature \vh 

seh es and otl 

hope of tomo 
how can he b 
world ? 




BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOE BART 



(This week the editor of the Col- 
legian Quarterly la writing Bartering. 



* STOCKBRIDGE 



liy John Kelso 



The Freshman Reception and Dance 



. • » • t i. * i 



the meeting, Dr. Parkhurst 




* f 




Scientists Must Eat, Too/ 

Food and scientific reports went to- 
gether when the nation's leading 
researchers gathered to dedicate 
Rutgers' new Squibb Institute for 
Medical Research. (L to r) Dr. E. 
B. Astwood, Harvard; Prof. E. G. 
Conklin, Princeton; Dr. C. F. Gesch- 
icter, Johns Hopkins. a«m 



, 






r~< , 



j 



±U 



kW 



Engineers Given Building Demonstration 

Case School of Applied Science engineering students have a conve- 
nient building problem on their own campus, for they can watch daily 
the p r og ress on then stew chemical engineering building. Photo by Courtm 





r. 



Campus Leaders Preview New Mi 

When U. S. college campus leaders inspected the "«* C *|J I j 
Hedwig Shroyer, University of Illinois prom queen and F 
versity of Michigan's Big fen beauty queen, received i 
Buiclc's new carburetor from Charles A. Chayne, chief" 




College Students Recruited to Repulse C. I. O. "Invasion* 

When Washoe County. Nevada, authorities set out to "repulse" an "invasion" of C. I. O workers, they 
deputized a group of University of Nevada students to aid them in the fight. Here's a group of the students 
arriving lot strike duty. 



f,««* AIU " , °* .„.,.* • 



Acm# 



ss* 3 ** 



du« l - 
,er«« r 



/ 



.en 



c«* 



ADDITION OF "THE SCIENCE REVIEW" AND 
MaCICIAN'S ACT MADE TO SOCIAL UNION 

,-,!<! Wandt, Director of Science at the New York World's 



HONORARY ( OLONKL 




BOSTON CAMERA CLUB EXHIBIT OF BOTH 
NATURE, ANIMAL PHOTOS IS AT LIBRARY 



Reviewer Kinds Photographs t»> be 



Iffe Gain 

kje State's 
? n ef- 

Horth- 
feyin w»«h- 



play m 
[of the bat- 
lin a score- 




Fine Representations <>f Many 
eft Behind" 

g 



Una Mall 

iub exhibit now in 

a (illicit mil nf 

\i- members nt tlic 

!Iub: Arthur Ham 
pphen F\ llaii 1 
and Franklin I. 

are all vei 

• nt man j il 

apli', , from I and 
work. ( Inc of the 
■ n the exhibition is 
iph of a popular 
handled with re- 
background is ju I 
empha i ze the sub 
ow ing the picture 
. Also in the cad' 

• pictures are two 
idies of water and 
i ii in w 1 1 icli have a 

i untiling and ap- 

d. b) Hammond la 

e of a part of the 
empha i on the 
the sand, and the 

the water in the 

picture of the and 

>ffect i of water on 

stiii}' for the intri- 

dTective lighting. 

Pictures 

-al aniinal pictures 

i he in< * t -i riking 
t \^ n i udic nt' t he 
•II Behind, and A 

• arc very synipa- 
icli show, not only 
also an under it and 
f the photographer 
hich has made the 
A Polliwog's View 

I, is Interesting for 
ir rather than com 

pure design, Moris' 

iicl nrc of a water 

ly aire t ing, espec 
I rnent of light and 
if the photographs. 
is an out itanding 
vhich has a sweep 

e, and a force of 
'ten found in ^iicli 



Senior Policewomen Enforce Scut Rules 

The black mustache must be two inches lone — or else! This is just one of the rules 
upperclassmen have prescribed for Pembroke College freshmen 



IT SHOW 




<;., NOV. 22 
IS P. M. 

IROSBY 

cMURRAY 

ti 

-YOU 
(ERS" 

■i i 35c 

to $1.85 
» $12.50 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1938 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, I93S 



/Ifoase 



Offic 



Rimr 



o 



Mini' 



AK I'M ( K A. NOYES 



Campus 

JOHN K. I'lUOS '40 
BETTINA HAM, '.S'J, 
MAItY T. MKK1IAN 
PRANCES S. MKKItl 
JOSEPH HART *lo 
NANCY K. LUCE I 
JA('(H'KI.[\K I.. ST 
L( lit ETTA KENNY ' 
KENNETH HOWLA) 
WILLIAM T. GOOD 
HAKOI.li FORREST 
CHESTER Kl Ii.\I,o\ 
JOHN HAYES 11 

Feature 
LLOYD B. COPELAJ? 

MYRON FISHER '39 

KATHLEEN TOLLY 
EVERETT It. SPENi 



AIIKAH \M C \KI' 



K. EL'tiENE RENAI 
ROGER H. UNDSi 
JOSEPH R. GORDO 

WAl , l.K R. LALO: 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2 



Mak.' nil orders , 
setts < olU-giiin. In i 
guhsrrilitT will pleat 
agiT ns siKiti us i*o; 

imt«- and faculty c 
encouraged. Any <• 
mu; i bf received at 
9 o'clork, Monday e 



Entered as second-. 
herst Post Office. 
•pedal rate of ixjsti 
1 10;j. Act of Octobi 
20. 1018. 

Printed by Carpent 
Amherst, Mi 



TUFTS A 

RIVALRY in 

si< 

State fall socia 

This rivalry, m 

ont as evenly n 

Perhaps tl 

bilities offered, 
might hold as 
campus. 

Such a \vt 
matched statu: 
lege at Medfoi 
atmosphere wl 
their activities 

With sucl 
state, there is 
dance floor, at 
human gets m 
not make Tuft 
DOZING? Is 
ASLEEP! as 

to 

Last week, tin 

the feelings of 

affects all of i 

had arisen in 

enough to den 

campus popula 

turned in Man 

considered by 

The Senate 

the question v 

age of time. 1 

eyes of the a 1 

lie little doubt 

the Senate is < 

a motion givin 

a dozen stuck 

and mouth. / 

last comment'* 

There ha 

legislature vvh 

selves and otl 

hope of tomo 

how can he I? 

world? 




BA R T E R I N 6 

WITH JOE BART 



* STOCKBRID6E 

By John Kelso 



(This week the editor of the Col- 
legian Quarterly is writing Hartering. 



The Freshman Reception and Dance 



* i i i 



the meeting. Dr. 1'arkhurst 



ADDITION OF "THE SCIENCE REVIEW" AND 
MhCICIAN'S ACT MADE TO SOCIAL UNION 

,,.. , ;,|d Wandt. Director of Science at the New York World's 



HONORARY COLONEL 




BOSTON CAMERA CLUB EXHIBIT OF BOTH 
NATURE, ANIMAL PHOTOS IS AT LIBRARY 

Reviewer finds Photographs to be Fine Representations of Many 

Left Behind" 
ng 



1 


AmM KM • tm "^^Haaaaaaa> 

—^^MWr awt 




In Fall, Haze is in the Air 



». *»i 



Sophs Win Tug 

The Annual clan tug-o- 
war it a feminine affair 
at Swarthmore College, 
and the tecond-year 
class won the event this 
year. At the left is the 
finish, showing the fresh- 
men going down to de- 
feat. Wide World 



7 



*t 



I 



V 



I 



7 



/ 
i 



*^ 



& 



■- 






Close Harmony Brings Closer Friendships 

The college spirit is never stronger than when students gather for a "bull session 
or an informal songfest. Here is a typical college fraternity group at Duke Uni- 
versity joining in a little brotherly harmony. 




Battle "Smoke" is Flour 

Part of the freshman initiation ceremonies at New 
York University is the annual flour rush staged on 
Ohio held. Photo at right shows the "smoke" of 
battle rising above the battlers. Wide World 




FLAME GRAIN 

KAYW00DIE 




7ltejeut(l%id 

^Ptfies 



m 



True Flame Grain briar it very rare. The 
pram pattern runt deep and make* a beau 
tiful Maine like design on the pipe The 
wood it the oldett ever tmoked by man. 
mellow and tweet. It it not lest lhan a cen 
tury old. No one maket Flame-Grain pipet 
except Kaywoodie. Every ptpe-tmoker 
owe* himtelf one. Illuttrated: No. ?6B 
called BRITISH BILLIARD. 

KAYWOODIE COMPANY 

K'hkejeller Center, NI.W YORK .iii.I LONDON 



>* ' 



Women Battle It Out, Too 

triey had a ripping time of it at Lawrence College when the 
M» of the two lower classes entered actively into the class battle. 




"cUtsn 

h»e air 



They Get Plenty of " Ten-SrSun/" 

What soldier wouldn't stand inspection from "officers" like these. The five dark- 
eyed senoritas are the madrinas (godmothers) of the R. O. T. C. unit at the University 

of Puerto RiCO. Acme 



* *thlc 






Water Cures Unruly Frosh 

i «t Iowa State Teachers College thought Freshman 
<ic a bit too self-assured, so they sent him swinging 
'he water cure. 



"•" °<9e, 



&6 itp niltod' National Adverti^n- R« 
*«^ LAOt^l Uv€: N , (iona | Advertising 



Ucatioi 



riON 



RcprcxnU- 

S«rvic«, 



Inc., New York, Chkaeo, Boston, San 



MJsr »«=« 




WKATSTHrS-A rT5 FROM JACK, THE BOy 
LETTER FROM ONE WE MET IKJ CALIFORNIA 



OF YOUR HANP- 
SOME ADMIRERS f 



HE SAV5 HE HOPES TO 
SEE US 

AGAIN [Hm* 1 

RIVAL 




ARE you 
SURE HE'S 
ANXIOUS TO 
SEE BOTH 
OF US^ 



V NOW DON'T TEASE J 

OAPPy! HE WANTS TOi 

SEE VOU TOO. LISTEN! 

THrS-v 




'l WANT TO THANK 

"VOUR PAP ALL 

OVER AGAIN FOR 

INTRODUCING AAE 

TO PRINCE ALBERT. 

P. A. HAS BEEN /V\V 




NOW.EO, 

YOU'RE 

THE 

ONE 

I WHO'S 

TEASING I 



NOT AT ALL ! A FELLOW WHO APPRECIATES 
PRINCE ALBERT RATES AS HIGH WITH /V\E 
AS THE MAN WHO INTRODUCED HIM TO IT 



WELL, I THINK SOONER OR LATER 
JACK WOULD HAVE DISCOVERED P. A.'S 
EXTRA MILDNESS FOR HIMSELF 



>?>e-. 



><-*"\ 



fa GLAD I STARTED IN WITH A GRAND 
TOBACCO. PRINCE ALBERT PACKS RIGHT 
FOR COOLER, MELLOWER SMOKING-IT'S 
THAT SPECIAL CUT! THERE'S NO OTHER 
TOBACCO UKE RA. 



SMOKE 29 FRAGRANT PlKFUlS of Prince Albert. If 
you don't find it the mellowest, tattiett pipe to- 
— ^ // bacco you ever smoked, return the pocket tin 

^^ J with the rett of the tobacco in It to us at any 

time within a month from this date, and we will 
refund full purchase price, plus postafe. 

1 Signed I R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, 
^^■F Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

^t* a> Oi«rri«h«. ism, R, i. SWaaW Sakai • t 



hi nce Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 




pipeful, of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-o«. tin of Prince Albert 



tiimi Hall 

Club exhibll nuw is 

i.^ a collection of 

five members of the 

Cltlb: Arthur II. im 

Stephen K. Harris, 
It-, and Franklin I- 

ill - are ul I \ erj nne 

ii. t muti) different 

.• i .- 1 1 1 1 1 > , from I And 

mi work. One of the 

in the exhibition is 

,i;i|ih of a popular 

i handled with re* 

background id (its! 

to empha ize the ub 

growing tli" picture 

iii. Also in Hn 1 catc- 

pc pictures are two 

tudies of water and 

nations which have a 

I is soothing and ap- 

•a«l. by Hammond is 

ire of a part of the 

i emphasis on the 

>f the sand, and th** 

f the water in the 

picture 'if the sand 

effects of water en 

resting for the intri- 

effectivc lighting, 
il Plcturea 

'rial animal pictures 
i. the must sinking 
i' two studies of the 
Left Behind, and A 
•si' are very synipa- 
.liirh show, not only 
it also an under t and- 

of the photographer 
which has made the 
r. A I'olliwtig'M View 
ris, is interesting f<>r 
nor rather than cont- 
ra pure design, Boris' 

picture of a water 
tely arresting, espec 
•alment of lii^ht and 

rif the photographs. 
ik, i- an outstanding 

which has a sweep 

ine, and a force of 

often found in such 
on. 



HT SHOW 




ATFI 



► K., NOV. 22 
:!"» P. M. 

CROSBY 
acMURRAY 

in 

G YOU 
NERS" 

! to $1.85 

to $12.50 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 19:jk 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOYKMBKU 17. I93S 



/llbaes 



n 



Ofline : Room 8, Hemi 



AKTHIK A. NO YES 



Campus 

JOHN K. 1'IUOS Id 
BETTINA HALL '89, 
MARY T. MKKHAN 
FRANCES S. MKRRI 
JOSEPH flAICT '40 
NANCY K. LUCE I 
JACQUELINE I. BT 
LdKETTA KENNY ' 
KENNETH HOWLAt 
WILLIAM T. GOOD 
HAROLD FORREST 
CHESTER Kl i;\l.<i\ 
JOHN HAYES II 

Feature 

LLOYD B, COPELAt 
MYRON FISHER '.«• 
KATHLEEN Tl I.I.Y 
E\ ERETT R, SPENi 



AIIKAII \M CARP 



E. EL'C EN E KEN At 
ROGER H LINDSB 

JOSEPH K. i.OKIM) 

v\ a, , i.U K. LALO; 



SUBSCRIPTIONS $2 



Make nil order* , 
setts < oil. kiii ii. In i 
subscriber will plaac 
aifor n.s wion »« pen 
UHt«' and faculty e 

moouracad. Any c 

must itv r*'reiv.'il at 
9 o'clock, Monday ■ 



Entered as second- 
heist Pomt Offlc*. 

special rate of post; 
1108, Art of Octob. 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpent 
Amherst, Mi 



TUFTS A 

RIVALRY in 

sit 
State fall soda 
This rivalry, m 
out as evenly r 

Perhaps tl 
bilities offered, 
might hold as 
campus. 

Such a w€ 
matched statu; 
lege at Med fo I 
atmosphere wl 
their activities 

With sucl 
state, there is 
dance floor, al 
human gets m 
not make Tuft 
DOZING? Is 
ASLEEP! as 

to 

Last week, tin 

the feelings of 

affects all of i 

had arisen in 

enough to den 

campus populfi 

turned in lilan 

considered by 

The Senate 

the question v 

age of time. 1 

eyes of the a' 

be little doubt 

the Senate is < 

a motion givir, 

a dozen studt 

and mouth. / 

lasi commenci 

There ha 

legislature \vh 

selves and otl 

hope of tomo 

how can he b 

world ? 



«r» 




BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BART 

(This week the editor of the Col- 



* STOCKBRIDGE 

By John Kelso 



legian Quarterly is writing Battering. Tlu ' Freshman Reception and Dan..' 



the meeting. Dr. Parkhuret 



\ 



It's Hayriding 

Time Again 

When the Women's 
League of the Univer- 
sity of Detroit went on 
its ——I keyride petty, 



r 



they'd very their riding 
by dome • little 



* 


• 




Jfc 


•- 





^^- 




Yugoslav Dane* Introduced at Folk Dance Party 

Dean Virginia C. Gildersleeve joined the exponents of the Yugoslav Kolo when they 
presented their part of the show et the annual folk dance party at Barnard College. 

Wide World 



Spiked Helmets for Islands' ft. O. 7. C. 

Something new in R O T. C. attire is worn by the cadets of the collejH 
agriculture of the University of the Philippines, shown here in the.r 
spiked helmets. cs** ■^o-o* 




L g ^ ' ' J " '" i' 5 " o u ' d bo »v O r n A * L 



• j»v j« : za' 



.on$ervati»es itill ote itrongl> 



Off-the-face b'ack l e'*. tuxedo "j'?s 



t o ' 3 n n e r a:-.?' * e a 




an d evening 



Top Styles 
in Toppers 



Men's hats a/e assuming new Importance m 
^a>c, jshton scnem^ with' a great 

*"ay :* ne* supp ementing the : d 

standa r ds or campus *ear A hat fo r every 
occasion' is the decree of style pace-setters, 
and here Collegiate Digest presents a picture 
review of the most popular of the fall numbers. 




J" 



Ti t ,.kft corded r 

Ine lyrolean in a green mixture wiimv 

and feather is on the upswing 



ADDITION OF "THE SCIENCE REVIEW" AND 
MAGICIAN'S ACT MADE TO SOCIAL UNION 

aid Wandt, Director of Science at the New York World's 

Fair Will Present Scientific Program in February 

Magician Here in April 

~~ MUSIC CLUBS READY 

FOR WINTER SEASON 



HONORARY COLONEL 



ent has been made 

in Office that two new 

:,, the Social Union program 

• made. However these 

ill he held during second 

C< nt.nued on Pige 4 



rODAY. Till lis-. NOV. 17 

PADEREWSKJ 
►MOONLIGHT SONATA** 

— Co-Hit— 
DIONNE «Jl IMIT'I.KTS in 

•FIVE OF A KIND" 




MM. -SAT., NOV. IH-1B 



THREE SISTERS' ' . 
IN SEARCH OFiaM]j^ 

A great 




PRESENTS 



ERROL FLYNN 
BETTE DAVIS 



"The 



SISTERS 



WITH 

ANITA LOUISE 
IAN HUNTER 
DONALD CRISP 
BEULAH BONDI 



*c!i0« rmu'i < »tr toi" im' j 



Co-Hit 
Jane Withers 



'SAFETY IN NUMBERS" 

1 olor i 111 i toon New .- 



-I \ MUN.-TI IS., NO\. IQ-tt 
< "lit. Sun. 2-111:30 A. M. 




&*£%& 

■■^r* 



-And More 

PopCJTfl News 



Successful Series Brings Many 
Invitations For 

Return 

State'.- student music organizations 

the men's and women's glee clubs, 
the choir and the orchestra, after a 
series of appearances during the past 
week, ait- at present preparing for 
future engagements in the winter sea- 
son. Tentative plans for presentation 
of parts of Handel's Messiah by a 
group of 140 people, including the 
men's and women's glee clubs, the 
M. s. c. choir and that of the first 
church of Amherst, on December 8 
are being arranged. 

The orchestra, which made its de 
hut in convocation last Thursday, is 
to make the first outside appearance 
in Its history at a concert in Worces 
tri January •">■ Arrangements for a 
radio broadcast and an appearance 
at Stockbridge convocation in the 
near future are being completed. It 
is also hoped that at least two "Pops" 
concerts, modeled after those given 
by the Boston Symphony orchestra, 
may he given during this school year; 
one to be given during Commencement 
week as an alumni night. 

Choir Invitations 

The choir has received invitations 
to appear at a number of churches, 
as a result of its concert last Sun- 
day at Grace Church in Holyoke. The 
membership of the choir has been 
growing steadily every week. 

The men's and women's glee dubs 

have been offered a return engage- > 

ment at the First Church in North- j the hand lias played at Yale, Wea 
ampton, where they nave their first j leyan, Trinity and also, last spring, 
concert last Thursday night A con- at Connecticut State. 
Cert was also given in Concord last Decoration.-, which are to be in the 
night, The women have received of- blue and gold motif of cavalry color* 







BOSTON CAMERA CLUB EXHIBIT OF BOTH 
NATURE, ANIMAL PHOTOS IS AT LIBRARY 

Reviewer Finds Photographs to be Fine Representations of Many 
Tj pes of Work Two Studies of Setters, "Left Behind" 

ami "A Dogs Life" are Outstanding 

INFORMALITY THEME 
OF CIVIC ORCHESTRA 

"Scherzo" and "Suite" High- 
tights <d' Springfield Sym- 
phonic Concert 

The Nut-Cracker's Suite by Tschai- 
kowsk) and the "Scherzo" from Men 

dei.-s ihn's Midsummer Night's Dream 
highlighted a program of symphonic 
music by the Springfield Civic Or- 
chestra Thursday afternoon at Stock- 
bridge Hall. 

An informal identification of musi- 
cal instruments, classical and modern 
music, and an encore hy popular to 

que t made up the program which 
as attended bj an audience of t\\ 



B] Bettina Hall 

The Camera Club exhibit new in 
Goodell Library is a collection oi 
photographs by five members of the 
Boston Camera Club: Arthur Ham 
in 'ml, Boris, Stephen F. Harris, 
George F, Slade, and Franklin I. 
Jordan, 

The photographs are all very fine 
ones, and represent mail) dilFereiit 
types of photography, from Land 

scapes to portrait work. One of the 

most interesting in the exhibition is 
the first photographs <>f a popular 
tree. The (heme is handled with re 
-t i lint, and the background is just 
subdued enough to emphasize the sub 
ject , without throwing the picture 
out of proportion. Also in the cate- 
gory of landscape pictures are two 
especially line studies of water and 



Dorothv Nichols 'M\ 



MILITARY H.W.I, 



Continued from I'.i.k^ I 



hundred State College students, fac- • landscape combinations which have a 

ulty members, and high school pupils. 1 m j st( , ( | c ffect that is soothing and ep- 

Aronson Conducts pealing, Gaj Mead, by Hammond is 

Tin' Springfield Civic Orchestra, « powerful picture of s part of the 
sponsored by Amherst High School ocean side, with emphasis on the 
and State College, presented by the sweeping lines of the sand, and the 
Federal Music Project, was conducted moving force of the water in the 
by .Milton .1. Aronson. A member of background. The picture of the sand 
the Mount Holyoke College faculty rial showing the effects of water on 
for sixteen years, Aronson has had the sand is Interesting for the intri- 
eight yeai of conducting experience, cate design and effective lighting. 
two with the Springfield Civic Or Animal Pictures 

chestra. He has been associated with There are several animal pictures 
the music departments at both Smith I in the collection, the most striking 
and Mount Holyoke Colleges. of which are the two studies of the 

The program began with an identi- M H " r - ««tled Lefl BeWad, and A 
Mention of instruments in the orches- I ">»^ "'*• Thef are ve.y syn.pa- 

,, , ,• 4l .. ,i, ., i.,,,,„i thetic studies, which show, not oiilv 

tra. Members ol the orchestra piayea 

.. . .. ■ _ ,_ ,.,;,„, ;,,.,,.., line technique, hut also an understand 

a lew Pars on their respective instru-l ' 

ii ;. i,. i i ,!>.. Cr^-i «.;,.i;.i ; intr on the part of the photographer 
ments which included the lirsl VIOIM, m • ' " ' 

,..,,, n i ..ii l ,,»., , p.. for his subject, which has made the 

Viola, cello, dolllile hass, olioe, IMIR- J ' 

lish horn, Mule, piccolo, clarinet, has- P'"-'"''' : 'l »"«* A PolHweg's View 

soon, Flench horn, trumpet, trombone, ,,f '' a " a - h - v l,;,rris - ,s Interesting for 



ill, French 
and "tympani." 

Selections 

Selections rendered by the orches 
tra were: 



its sparkling humor rather than mm 
position. 
For emphasis on pure design, Boris* 

Design, and the picture of a water 
'all are immediately arresting, espe 



fers for appearances at Florence. 
Mass, and at Sunderland: a concert 
by the whole club sometime before 
Christmas vacati«.n is being consid- 
ered. Both clubs will probably give 
radio broadcasts during the year. 
Plans are being made for an operetta 
to be presented in the spring. 
Rehearsals 



will remain a surprise treat ami novel 
programs have been secured by the 
committee. During intermission, indi 
vidttal servings of ice cream will be 
an added attraction. 
Tickets are limited ami should be 

procured early from one of the fol- 
lowing members of the committee: 
George Benjamin, chairman, and Clif 
ford Lippincott, at Phi Sigma Kap 



Rehearsals for the men's glee club 
are Monday afternoons at 4:80, and! pa; Charles Griffin and George Hay- 
Tuesday evenings at 8:00. Rehearsals I Ion at Lambda Chi Alpha; Gardnei 
for the women are Wednesday after- Andersen at North College; Ralph 
noons at 4:80 and Thursday evenings Foster at Memorial Building; and 
al x;00. Goorge Pitts at the cafeteria. 



March of the Tin S ol d ier by the [ally for the treatment of light and 
French composer, Gabriel Pierne; shadows in both of the photograph-. 
Bach's Air for ('. String; Blue l>an- Lastly, The Wink, is an outstanding 
ii he Wall/, hy .lohann Strauss, the character study, which has a sweep 
Wall/. Kinn who had composed over and action of line, and a force of 
200 waltzes in his lifetime; Tschal personality not often found in such 
kowaky's Nat Cracker's Suite which happy combination. 
was divided into til Overture, (2) 
Marche, (8) Dance Arab, (4), Chi 
ne e Dance, (f>) Dance of the Mirli- 
tons, (6) Dance of the Sugar Plum, 
and (7) Russian Dance; and Carl von 
Weber's Overture to Kuryanthe. As an 
encore, Conductor Aronson gave the 
"scherzo" from Midsummer Night's 
Dream hy Mendelssohn. 



MIDNIGHT SHOW 



COLLEGE STORK 

Everything for the Student 



Banners and Souvenirs 
Books and 

Magazine* 



Luncheons 

Soda Fountain 

Student Supplies 

$15.00 Elgin Electric Shaver $1.98 

1 1 Year Guarantee) 
ON THE CAMPUS NOBTB COLLBGB 



PATTERSON PLAYERS 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 

ROOM ACCESSORIES RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL 7SS& CO. 

63 So. Pleasant St. Amherst, Mass. 



The Patterson Players, under (In- 
direction of Dr. Charles Praker, will 
present Jackson's three eel comedy 
"The Bishop Misbehaves" at Bowker 

Auditorium on Deceinhbor 12. Mr. 

Glatfelter is east as the bl hop, \!i . 
Frieda Bender as the bishop' I ter 
Emily, and Bob Tetro will play the 

part of I km Meadow . 

As a special inducement to BtU 

dent to attend the Patterson Play- 
ers' production, there will be a re 
duction in admittance fees upon pre 
ent.it ion of Student Activities tickets. 



EXHIBITS 



I. Memorial liuilding 

Exhibition of Stealage 

II. (ioodell Library 

Photographs by five mem- 
bers of I he I'.o-ion Camera 
Club 

III. Physical Education liuilding 

Collection of Posters 



f-y THEATFI ^| 



TUBS. EVE., NOV. 22 
AT 10:1 T, P. M. 

BING CROSBY 
FRED MacMURRAY 



— in 



»» 



SING YOU 
SINNERS" 



All Seats 35c 



I TERWOVEN: The Sock That Can Take It. See the new shades in silks, lisles and wools 35c to $1.85 
N a patterns in Botany Ties Hold their shape and do not wrinkle, $1 Suede Blouses $5 to $12.50 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOV EM BEE 17. !»:** 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, ISSs 



BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



Questionnaire Reveals That Typical Coeds 
Have Serious Tendencies, 25 Percent Drink 



RELIGIOUS MEETING 
WILL BE HELD HERE 



Rhyme - Reason - Rh vth 



From the Wheaten N«'w,s, we find 
a new column being Inaugurated call- 
ed M On Other Campuses." Sleuth bird 
is the author and he runs about t<> 
other campuses digging up small 
items nl news. Several ut them are of 

intere t to us. According to a Uni- 
versity of Denver survey, the aver- 
age co-ed wears a size fourteen dress. 
The co-eds are outnumbered by men 

in the M. 1. T. freshman class by a 
ratio of 164-1. And at Temple Uni- 
versity, the 200 lb. phys-ed majoring 
gridder8 must successfully complete a 
course in the modern dance. We hold 
that modern dancing is quite as stren- 
uous as football. 

As a result of a scientific investi- 
gation Mt. Holyoke has decided that 
the best way to recover from insom- 
nia is to count the fences going under 
the sheep. 

Alpha Lambda Mu 
From Alpha Lambda Mu we hear 
that Mr. and Mrs. Swen^on, and Mr, 
and Mrs. Varley have become new 
faculty sorority advisors. Also, a par- 
ent'- club was organized on Dad's 
Day. Dr. Smith was elected president, 
Mrs. Everson, Secretary-treasurer, 
and Mr. Pratt and Mrs. Spofford were 
elected to the executive committee. 

The following girls became members 
of Lambda Delta Mu Monday evening: 
Marion Gunness, Florence O'Neil, Bel 
ty Desmond, Priscilla Lane. Helen 
Fitch. Dot Decatur. 

Mai ion Avery 
At the pledge meeting held last 

Monday evening the Sigma Beta 
pledges elected Marion Avery, cap- 
tain, Patricia Newell, secretary, and 
Mary Judge, and Hetty Moulton in 
charge of social affairs. Tuesday eve- 
ning, the patronesses of Sigma Beta 
entertained members and pledges with 
dessert at the Stockbridge House. 

An excellent representation of the 
co-eds of State College is expected 
next week-end at Tufts. Let's hope 
Hot too many State buys are fixed up 
because we are still prejudiced on 

that subject. 

RAND LECTURES ON 
FINE ARTS PROGRAM 



Professor of English Talks on 

on Western I) ran 1 a 

Tuesday 



Prof. Frank P. Rand of the Lan- 
guage and Literature Department, 
presented for the Fine Arts program, 
on November 15, an interesting lec- 
ture dealing with the development, 
especially in drama, in the west. Pro- 
fessor Rand spent some time this 
summer in Colorado, in Central City. 
about which he lectured, and was well 
able to present very instructive at 
well as entertaining material on the 
subject. 

Illustrating his lecture with pic- 
tures of the country where he spent 
the summer, he more or less "debunk- 
ed" the wild and woolly we t, by trac- 
ing the growth of cultural interest 
from the very beginnings of mining 
towns, such as Central City was dur- 
ing the gold rush. Churches and "play 
houses" seemed to be very Important 
to these mining towns, according to 
Professor Hand, who read several 
articles referring to well known ac- 
tresses who played in Central City. 

Although no longer the booming 
town that it was during the gold rush, 
central city is a summer Broadway, 
where all the well-known playwrights 
and aetors gather to witness tome 
famous productions put on each sum- 
mer. 

The Fine Arts Council for its pro- 
gram on Tuesday. November 22. will 
present 1'rofessor F. A. Waugh, of the 
Landscape Architecture Department, 
who will lecture on the etchings now 
being shown in the Memorial Build- 
ing. 



B] Kathleen Fully 

The typical Massachusetts State 

College coed is not a Susy— the re- 
sults of fifty questionnaires circulat- 
ed recently among representative 
groups of upperclass coeds revealed 
much about the attitudes of the girls 
on this campus, and above all showed 
that the typical coed is an Intelligent 
girl who takes life seriously and who 
rates money — men please take note — 
least important to her in the quali- 
ties she desires in a boy friend! 

This is the low down, based en- 
tirely on the questionnaire answers 
received, She says "damn" and "hell" 
when she gets disgusted. She smokes 

( ■'. coeds to every 1 said yes). Cam- 
els seem to be a favorite, and Philip 
Morris' second. She likes best to wear 
expensive sport clothes; she attempts 
to look glamorous on special occasions, 
but give her comfortable sweaters and 
skirts and saddle shoes most of tin- 
time. 

She vows — again 3 coeds to every 
1 — that she is seriously interested in 
a career other than marriage. And 
she studies — contrary to the general 
masculine opinion — on an average of 
4 hours a day. As to drinking, the 
coed inbibers, according to these sta- 
tistics, are divided into three groups 
— 55 per cent said they never drank 
intoxicating beverages, 20 per cent 
that they drank only moderately or 
occasionally, and 25 per cent admit- 
ted frankly that they drank. 
Marriage 

Typical Miss M. S. C. is interested 

The speed with which your vision 
can adjust itself to dull light is u 
nutritional problem. The Home 
Kconomics Research department i< 
conducting a series of tests with 
a new instrument called an Adapt- 
ometer supplied by the American 
Optical Company, to discover how 
the glare of headlights affects the 
eyes, or how well you can find a 
seat in a theatre after leaving a 
brightly lighted street. 

These tests are supervi-ecl by 
Helen S. Mitchell with the aid of 
Eileen Miller, graduate assistant. 
Appointment may be made by sign- 
ing up on the chart provided in 
the corridor of the Phys Ed Bldg. 

WORK OF ETCHING 
SOCIETY IN MEM. HALL 



in marriage, however, and she wants 
three children (2.K average really but 
let's not bother with fractions.) In 
answer to the question, "Are you 
jealous of your boy friend?", the 
coedfl are about evenly divided, but 
the affirmative side won finally by a 
light margin. She is again rather un- 
decided about going steady while in 
college — in general, as she will admit, 
she approves because she likes the se- 
curity of a standing Saturday night 
date and the swell feeling a One and 
Only brings. She never goes to the 
movies alone in Amherst, but she says 
that she goes with other girls once in 
a while. 

Amherst Men 

She has opinions, too, that she is 
not hesitant to express and a mind 
of her own, especially where men are 
concerned. The questionnaire asked 
"What do you think of Amherst Col- 
lege men?", and we got throe 
answers — "Nothing," "Not much," 
"Plenty. " She knows what she wants 
in a boyfriend. She rates personality 
first, thoughtfulness a close second, 
dancing ability third, lots of brains 
fourth, good looks fifth, and money 
sixth in order of importance to her. 

Last but hardly least, she says her 
biggest criticisms of Mass. State men 
are that they lack manners, they im- 
port too many girls from other col- 
leges for big campus functions (sour 
grapes mebbe?), and they wait until 
the last minute to ask the coed; to 
anything. 



[itterfaith Conference Leaders 

Announced by William 

Foley 



SOCIAL UNION PLAY 
TO BE GIVEN FRIDAY 



Federal Theatre Players Will 

Present "Dr. Faustus" 

Tomorrow 



Active Group Prom Chicago, 111., 

Usually Shows in 

Galleries 



The exhibit in the Memorial Bttild- 
ing Es a collection of etchings from 

the Chicago Society of Etchers, and 

is one of the finest exhibits that has 
been shown on the campus Indeed 
we are very fortunate in having the 
exhibit here, as it usually shown only 
in museums and art galleries. 

The Chicago Society of Etchers is 

the most active group of its kind in 
the country, and each year invites 
the most famous etchers to contribute 
to an exhibition. This collection now 
being shown consists of some of the 
plates from that exhibition. All the 
etchings are so tine, and there are 
so many different techniques repre- 
sented that it is almost impossible to 
write a criticism, but some of the 
plates are worth special mention. 

Slimmer Night 
Summer Night is a striking ex- 
ample of the versatility of etching; 
here is a plate made up of straight 
fine lines, in basic technique, and yet 
it has a mistiness, and a softness that 
is unbelievable. Winter Pastoral has 
a well balanced composition, and del- 
icate sure details. In a different vein 
Continued on Page 5 



Federal Theatre will present "Dr. 
Faustus" in Howker Auditorium, No- 
vember 18, at 8:00 p. m. as part of 
the Social Union program for the 
first semester. 

The Federal Theatre is making a 
tour of New England colleges and 
schools presenting the unique and 
brilliantly entertaining production of 
"The Tragical History of Dr. Faus- 
tus." November 2nd, the Theatre pre- 
sented the play at Smith College, and 
will give the same entertainment this 
evening at Mount Holyoke. On No- 
vember 22nd, the Federal Theatre 
will interrupt their tour for the re- 
opening of the Copley Theatre (Bos- 
ton). 

This unusual play, better known as 
"Dr. Faustus" from the original te v 
of Christopher Marlowe, variously 
presented as "Faust" in both opera 
and drama, and as 'Mephistopheles," 
has been adapted and staged for the 
present production by Kliot Duvey 
whose main thought has been to cre- 
ate an atmosphere of enjoyment rath- 
er than one of a sermon, or some- 
thing tragical to be revered. 



Among the topics to be discussed 
at the interfaith conference of col- 
leges, to be held here on December 
.'{, will be Cerman-American relations 
in light of present world interfaith 
and interracial crises, and what col- 
lege students can do about the situa- 
tion. Germany's treatment of the 
Jews and Catholics will be one of 
the leading problems to be discussed. 

William Foley '40, speaking for the 
Student Religious Council announces 
the leaders of the conference: Rever- 
end J. Thoburn Legg, chairman; Dr. 
Everett N. Raker, representative lead- 
er for the Protestants, and Rabbi H. 
J. Schachtel, representative for the 
Jews. Mr. Foley and Father Martin 
of Amherst will indicate at a later 
date the leader who will represent 
the Catholics. 

Reverend Legg 
Reverend J. Thoburn Legg, chair- 

] man of the intercollegiate conference, 
is a Methodist minister at Newburg, 
] New York. He is a young minister 
1 who was very active in the Williams 
[ College Conference on Public Rela- 
tions which is conducted by the Na- 
tional Conference of Jews and Chris- 
tians. As a result of his work at this 
: conference, Reverend Legg was offer- 
ed the directorship of the New Eng- 
land region of the National Confer- 
ence this fall. Although he felt he 
had to decline the offer, it is a good 
indication of the high esteem in which 
he is held. 

Dr. E. N. Baker 
Dr. Everett N. Baker, Protestant 
representative at the conference, is 
executive vice-president of the Am- 
erican Unitarian Association, and for- 
mer pastor in the Unitarian Church 
in Providence, Rhode Island. He has 
been prominent in Student Christian 
Movements, and it was at the Inter- 
faith Conference at Brown a year ago 
that our representatives heard him 
speak and were very favorably im- 
pressed. Dr. Raker is a much sought 
after speaker. 

52 PLEDGED 



ADDITION OF 



( | ntni/nd Imtn Ptgt \ 

The first is on Tuesday, February 
21. 1989, Dr. Gerald Wan.lt, Director 
of Science, New York World's Fair 
will present "The Science Revue." 

The second additions to the program 
will be Magician, J. Elder Hlackledge 
on April 14. 1989. 

Faculty and staff season tickets for 
the 1988-1989 Social Union series are 
now on sale in the Treasurer's Office. 
The ticket costs $l.. r ,0. The season's 
program is as follows: 

Dr. Faustus, a Federal Theatre pre- 
sentation, Friday, November 18; The 
Jitney Players Tuesday, December 0, 
1!»:',K; Roland Hayes, tenor; Friday, 
January f>, 1939; State College Musi- 
cal Clubs, Friday, March 17, 1989, 



Continued from Page I 
Berry, Anne Chase, Mabelle Drury, 
Virginia Fearand, Ethel Gassett, 
Eleanor Gillette, Martha Hall, Ruth. 
Helyar, Retty Leeper, Alice Peder- 
zani, Evelyn Walker. 

Sigma iteta Chi: Virginia Little '40; 
Marion Avery, Esther lirown, Jean 
Carlisle, Priscilla Durland, Margaret 
Gale, Norma h -.dforth, Helen Janis. 
Mary Judge, Marjorie Merrill, Betty 
Moulton, Patricia Newell, Martha 

Shirley, Vivian Vantura. 

Sigma Iota: Helen Alperin '41; Dor- 
othy Adelson, Edith Fox, FloreiM e 
Goldberg, Gertrude Goldman, Shir- 
ley Gordon, Frances Lappen, Rar- 
bara Wanishel. 



m 



Not too long ago, Tony Pa 
Shaw's tenor sax man, slept 
Shaw's apartment. He tossed 
ty. and at three in the mori 
rudely awakened by the well 
ings of a clarinet. He hoppt 
ped and dashed into Artie 
There was Ait Shaw, Jotttl 
a new tune, tony mopped 
with relief. "Whew, I'm glad 
I thought I was having a nigl 
Shaw was excited. "Nightms 
Nightmare! . . . That's what 
this thing." And so, anion, 
things, this little parable . 
how Art Shaw's dynamic then 
got its name. All this stuff ,. 
leads up to a grand recording 
tune by the Art Shaw combo, 
mare" '(Bluebird P-787. r »). i 
in tempo, style, and orchestri 
as much a part of Shaw | 
-iiinnie the Moocher used t<> ... 
Cab Calloway. Reverse, \ 
Flight, is all of that, with Sh 
ing off on more chances thai 
gan ever dreamed of. 

In making recordings this band 
the height of nonchalance. Mo I . 
cording booths are insulated 
sound, which is another way <>. 
they're plenty hot, so the buy- ;„. 
down before they peal out. 
himself, is the acme of indifferen . 
Just before they were tak I . 
final impression on the wax 
disc, the final take, on "Nightmare," 
Artie lit a cigarette. Came th< 
for his clarinet solo, Shaw stole 
quick puif, calmly exhaled, ai 
ceeded to get off as beautiful a 
of clarineting as those tin ears 
yours will ever pick up. Nothing ; 
it. 

There's also a little story behind 
Larry Clinton's theme song that cur- 
rently has dancers by the ears. In, 
talking about "Reverie," which Est 
Amherst Week-end was worked I 
death by the round robin gypsies win 
always came into the house just a 
little too late to hear it in tli- 
set. 

The tune is based upon Claude !'• 
hussy's "Reverie." It seems that Lai- 
ry's piano lessons were always a jump 
ahead of him, when his pop WH 
shelling out a buck a week t o 
long hair. His fingers just couldnl 
keep up with the composition 
.hen he played "Reverie" he had to 
play it very slowly, or get all balled 
up. When, after many year-. I 
a king pin in this business, tli> 
melody was still in the bark 
head, and he just sat down and Btsdt 
it work for him. Nice work 
why he trite! 

Are you interested in voicing . •' 
opinions and comparing your idSM 
with those of other students' If - 
why don't you drop in at I 
Building Sunday «evening, N" v - - 
from 7:80 to 8:30. The discui lion wl 
concern itself with any subject 
you are interested in considering T" 
Rev. Henry N. Parsely of the 1 MiUlii - 
Rrooks Club will lead the diftSS 




THIS WEEK IS 

FOR GROWN UPS 

GONE WITH THE WIND $3.00 

NOW $1.49 

THE CITADEL $2.r>0 

NOW $1.39 

LISTEN! THE WIND 

by Anne Morrow Lindbergh $2.50 

ALONE 

by Richard E. Byrd $2.50 

WITH MALICE TOWARD SOME 

by Margaret Halsey $2.00 

Funny book 



BOOK WEEK 

FOR YOUNGSTERS 

WEE GILFJS 

by Leaf and Law 
originators of Ferdii 

HEIDI GROWS I P 

MR. POPPER'S PENGI N> 

by R. & F. Atwat 

WHILE THE STORY-LOO 
BURNS 

by Thornton W. Hun 



Eddie M. Switzer 



Clothing and 

Haberdashery 



Opening Shots Of Modernized Movie History | THEME PLANNED FOR Hawley Finds Athletes And Socialites Make 
Taken By Barrett, College Cinematographer RECREATION CONFAB Poor Showing In Later Civic, Social Life 



was started this week at i student body will be recorded fully. 

.^etts State College on a his- ,. • , . , . , 

Movies taken during the last few 

years will be incorporated int. i the 

record. At long these will be a reel 

showing the extensive damage done 

OH campus by the hurricane of Sept. 

21, when nearly 200 trees were blown 

down, and the subsequent activities 

of the students helping to clear up 

the debris. 



i, h will never be finished. 
movie camera instead of a 

feasor Rollin H. Barrett, of- 

Uege cinematographer, ha> be- 

ming of a continuous his- 

a.tivities at the College. As 

announced, the Senate will 

the project. 

novle record will include shots 

,;tv and students, buildings, 

improvements, visitors of 

,j other special events such 

Day programs, the annua 



One of the use.- of the visual rec- 
ord of the college and its activities 
will be as an aid to vocational guid- 
ance of high school students planning 



Winter carnival and so- to ••'iter each Fall. Professor Barrett 



entS. Professor Harrett also 
, take his camera into the 

im and laboratories to record 
•-• aching techniques and equip- 
>r comparison with the fu- 



expects to he able to show in detail 
the undergraduate work in various 
major lines of study and the facili- 
ties which the college provides in 
the way of dormitories, laboratory 



• ra-curricular activities of the ; equipment and teaching stall'. 



McCartney, editor 



Robert J. McCartney '40 has 
been chosen junior editor of the 
i ollcyian Quarterly, according to 
,,-i announcement made by Sidney 
Hoses '39. editor-in-chief, today. 
McCartney's selection came at the 
i nd of a six weeks' period of com- 
petition; a sophomore editor will 
i„- chosen in the near future. 

McCartney has been a member 
.if the (Jlee Club for two years; 
I ■»• i* also a member of the choir 
and of Q. T. V. fraternity, of 
i hicb he is secretary. He is a grad- 
ual* of Salem High School. 



Coordination to be Stressed; The fact that a student is an athlete 

Three Sections w a social lion during his college days 

Projected doesn't mean a thing so far as his 

social and civic life after college is 

"Coordination of Outdoor Commun- concerned. At least so finds Robert l>. 

ity Recreation" will be the theme of Hawley, secretary of the College, who 

the sixth annual Outdoor Recreation has just completed an analysts of a 

Conference to be held in a new and questionnaire received from 340 grad- 

enlarged form at Massachusetts State nates of the Massachusetts State. 

College March It- 12, according to an Athletics 

announcement today from William G. Secretary Hawley finds that stud- 

Vinal, chairman of the committee. ntS who never were active in athletics 

Three new sections have been add r Mademk activities in college sur- 

ed to the conference which each year Pass their former classmates in social 

draws an increasing number of ' ,1(l e ivfc activities after graduation, 

people, A section on horsemanship As an example, he cites the fact thai 

with Mrs. Gerald Jones of North ''"> percent of the Students who were 

Amherst as chairman; a photography llnt active in extracurricular doings 

section with Prof. .John Vondell, in in college are now participating sue 

structor in poultry husbandry, as «»'ssfully in civic activities as grad- 
chairman; and a section of interest 
to hotel and restaurant owners under 
the chairmanship of Alan \V. Chad- 
wick, manager of the college dining 
hall, will he added this year. 

Outstanding exhibit will be a large 

scale model of a typical New Eng- Voting to Take Place After 

laud community, to he arranged l>\ Uetlini From 

thi' community recreation section. A\ Holiday 

feature of this section will be a 

"town meeting," conducted according Nominations for freshman class of- 

to town meeting rules and open to all fleers were announced Tuesday by 

sections. ''"' Senate; these nominations will be 

Pre,. Hugh P. Baker, Dean Wil voted on by the freshmen in a forth- 



I nates. Only l!» percent of the athlete-; 
I ami iVl percent of the other Students 

hi now active in civic functions. 
.Student., who were active in both 
athletics ami academic activities in 
college make the second best showing 
with 62 percent now engaged in civic 
activities. 

Only U. r > percent of the athletes 

and 32 percent of the debaters, actors 
etc., are active in social affairs after 
graduation, he finds, while l.'i percent 
of those who were inactive in student 
affairs in college participated success- 
fully in social activities after grail 
nation. 

Apparently there is little correlation 
he concludes, between activities in 

college and In life after graduation. 



SENATE ANNOUNCES 
FR0SH .NOMINATIONS 



ETCHING SOCIETY 

Continued from P-ige 3 
are the utterly delightful and active 
aquatints such as l'p in the Morn- 
ing, and the mystic oriental-like Mar- 
ket Place. One of the finest plates in 
the collection is a titleless study of 
a torso, demonstrating perfection of 
technique and composition; and one 
of the most striking is the vivid 
Winter Moonlight, with its balancing 
of light and dark masses. The differ- 
ences in techniques is one of the finest I Ham I.. Machmer, Director Fred J. I coming election. 
things about the collection, for they Sievers, Director Willard A. Munson, Nominees are; for president 
Offer endless opportunity for Study and Home Demonstration Agent Charles Knox, Kappa Sigma; P.en 
and comparison; as, for example a Beatrice E. Billings attended the na- .i ami » Freitas, Phi Sigma Kappa; K.I 



contrast of Enchanted Mesa-Dawn and 
Cordon Setter both perfect expres- 
sion.^ of their subjects. 



Am 



Offer! 




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For Only $2.99 

Precision built, like a watch, high speed 
motor that runs on A.C. or D.C. current. By 
arrangement with the manufacturers of this 
$15.00 nationally advertised genuine Elgin 
Dry Shaver for only $2.99. 



tional Land Gran! Association meet Ward Sparks, Lambda Chi Alpha; 

ing Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesdaj Melville Baton, Theta Chi; Donald 
at Chicago. TriggS, Alpha Sigma Phi. 

For vice-president: Helen Janis, 

Sigma P.eta Chi; Anne Chase, Phi 
/ei a, .Nancy Webber. Lambda Del 
ta Mu; Elisabeth Harney, non-sor- 
ority; Marion N'agelschmidt, non-sor 
oiity. 

Treasurer 

Treasurer: Robert Perry, Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa; Walter Daniels, Kappa 
Sigma; William Williams, Theta Chi; 
John Conley, Sigma Phi Epsllon; 

John Sullivan, Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Secretary: Eleanor Gillette, Phi 

/•ta; Jean Carlisle, Sigma Beta Chi; 
Marjorie Nichols, Lambda Delta Mu; 
Lilian Martin, iion-sororily ; Doroth; 
r.iyward, non sorority. 

Sergeant-at arms: Carl Werme, Al- 
pha Camma Kin.; William Kimball, 
Phi Sigma Kappa; Richard Coffin, 
Kappa; Robert McCutcheon, Theta 
Chi; William Lvans, non-fraternity. 
Captain 

'lass Captain: Benjamin lladley, 
Phi Sigma Kappa; James Hullock, 
non-fraternity; George Oaumond, nun 
fraternity; John Seery. Kappa Sigma; 

Howard Sunden, Theta Chi. 

Athletic Council, two to be elected, 
William Cas a/a. Phi Sigma Kappa; 
Andrew Pierce, Kappa Sigma; Jam., 

Selkregg, Theta chi; George Kimball, 

Lambda Tin' Alpha; Sidney Zeitler, 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 



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THE CUT RATE DRUG STORE 



SODAS — CANDIES 
PASTRIES 

Tasty Meals 

SERVICE— 

Prompt and ( urteous 

"W« Si-rw to i'lease" 



College Candy 
Kitchen 

The Place With the Good Things 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(.ontinui'd from Page 2 

homes. They are daily torturing 
hundreds of thousands more. They 
have robbed the entire Jewish people 
already i educed, in some instances, to 
nakedness and starvation. They luivo 
arrested tens of thousand.-, consign- 
ing them to the horrors of Nazi con- 
centration camps which put the tor- 
tures of the Middle Ages in the shade. 
They have torn awa) every shred of 
human decency* 

And like the murderous hullies they 
are, they have arrogantly threatened 
the world to remain silent, boasting 
that what has already been committed 

is only a hare beginning! Having 
whipped up the nmst gruesome hy- 
steria against the Jewish people, the 
Nazi monsters began immediately to 
vent their fury against Catholics. Aim! 
this is obviously only the start of the 

program against Catholics. 

Should humanity permit the Nazi 
butchers to go on with their maiming 
and slaughtering of the Jewish people 

of Germany, Hitler's hounds will not 

rest until Jewish blood has dried he- 
fore they spill Catholic hlood likewise 
in torrents. 

It was in tin nan f and in the 

conscience of the Catholic people of 

the United states (hat the Most Rev. 
Michael .'. Oi'!ey, Archbishop of Bal- 
timore, last Sunday lashed out against 
the Nazi degenerates. Among Mi 
words of burning Indignation he said: 
"I feel that I can speak that con- 
demnation in behalf of all the people 

of United States, not only the Cath- 
olics hut of all creeds and no creeds. 
For surely no decent person can con- 
done the actions of the madman Hitler 
and the cripple minded Goebbels. 

Noi f us worthy of our manhood 

can remain silent while madness holds 

sway in Germany." 

As a revulsed world catches its 

breath from the terrible shock of 

what is going on under tin- Nazi .lie 

tatorship, protests and Indignation 

mount every minute. There is no time 

to lose. The numerous prote I com- 
Ing from all sections of public opinion 

1,1 ■*« I lilted State;, Ceat I'.lllaili 

and elsewhere, must become more 
thunderous, more universal, mors in 
ant and Insistent. 
The President has taken a wise step 
in rocallin^ our Amhassador to <„r 
many, hut this is not enough. The 

American government should exprt 
the abhorrence of the American 

people forthwith. The I're ident, fin 

their, io,e, [| authorised to clamp down 
on embargo against Nazi Germany 
an embargo long overdue. Keep hlood 

stained goods made in Nazi Germany 
out of this country. 

Now is the time t,, a<-t i,, help de- 
fend humanity from Worse horrors of 

Nazi degeneracy] 

American Student Union. 



Maas. State Chapter. 



BILLFOLDS AND 
COMPACTS 

in 
BAUY CALF 

Christmas Cards 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVKMHKR 17, 193* 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, NOVEMRER 17. IfU 



State's Allan and Tuft's Griffin to Vie For Passing Honors in Traditional Battk M)on Allan And Al Irzyk Pace Statesmen To Easy 37-0 Rout Of Rensselaer 



STATEMENTS 



MAROON MENTOR 



Saturday's meeting with traditional rival, Tufts, will bring 
together the last of the simon-pure football teams in New Eng- 
land. Now that Bates has elected to follow the steps of the other 
teams in the Maine conference, only the Jumbos and the Statesmen 

remain as squads that play football for the fun of the game. 
As a result of the amateur standing of the Tufts and 
State athletes, neither team can boast a record that com- 
mands any great amount of publicity in the public press. 
Tufts, with a record of one tie and no wins stands all 
alone at the bottom of New England's football pile. State, 
with a slightly better record made against teams not 
quite as good as the Jumbo opponents, stands only a few 
points above the Medford club. In place of big headlines 
and a large following ,State and Tufts have self-respect 
— an honor only they can enjoy. 

Once students at both State and Tufts wondered at the reason 
for the rivalry between these two institutions. Located in opposite 
ends of the state with little or no relations outside of the athletic 
field, it seemed to be an artificial rivalry. A few years ago, before 
football wins were put before self-respect, there were many teams 
in New England in the same class with Tufts and State. On equal 
terms, the Jumbos and the Statesmen more than held their own 
in the matter of wins. But one by one rivals began to offer scholar- 
ships to athletes in an attempt to win games with money they 
could never win with amateurs. As this policy grew State and 
Tufts, more and more were left out in the cold in the matter of 
victories until now a win for either team over any opponent is 
classified as an upset. 

Students in Medford and Amherst no longer wonder 
why their colleges are big rivals. They know when State 
and Tufts meet this Saturday they will be watching twen- 
ty-two men play football for the love of the game and 
love of the college. 




OVAL WILL BE FLOODED WITH AERIALS 
AS BOTH TEAMS PIN HOPES ON PASSES 

Captain Clif Morey, Walt Zajchowski, and diet Conant \ 
Playing Last Game for Maroon — Al Irzyk, Leo Santuot 
Allan, Conant are Starting Backs 

RPI DOWNS MAROON 
HARRIERS SATURDAY 



Captain Larry Pickard Places 

Third as State Bows 

18-37 



Coach Ebb Caraway 



ART COPSON PICKED 
FOR SPORTS EDITOR 



Succeeds Frank Davis as Head 

of Athletic Department 

of Paper 



FROSH HAND SOPHS 
3-0 SOCCER DEFEAT 



Arnold and Erickson Score For 

'12 in Annual Class 

Game 



An eleventh hour shot by Arnold 
gave the Freshman a 3 to U victory 
over the hard kicking sophomores in 
the annual numeral soccer classic. 

Despite the large number of fresh- 
men reserves against them the soph- 
omores played hard and fast with re- 
peated drives deep into the enemy ter- 
ritory. Going into the third period the 
rugged Freshmen started with all in- 
tent and purposes to score. Silverman, 
as a matter of fact had been so ef- 
ficient up to that time that it appear- 
ed unlikely that they would succeed, 
but did on a nicely placed goal by 
Mullaney, which came alter the ball 
had spent most of its inanimate ca- 
reer deep in the sophomore territory. 

Erickson gets credit for the second 
goal on a nicely timed play, from 
Shackley, while Arnold accounted for 
the third goal. A determined drive by 
the Sophomores was successfully stop- 
ped by Atwood. who was one of the 
thirty who saw action. 

Starting line up for the Freshmen 
was as follows: Coal, Pearson; full- 
hacks. Pierce and Mason; halfbacks, 
Erickson, Workman, Houlihan; for 
ward, Mullaney, Shackley, Callahan, 
Arnold, Doubleday. Representing the 
Sophs were: Coal, Silverman; full- 
backs, CoiTey and Johnson; halfbacks, 
Cohn, Ewing, and Bailor; forwards, 
Latow, Meyer, Goodwin, Flynn, and 
Stewart. 

The Frosh had the benefit of a 
group of long-hooting fullbacks and 
this advantage was a great handicap 
to the Sophs, also the Frosh forward 
line was trickier, faster and stronger. 
Mullaney, Erickson, and Arnold look 
like good varsity material for next 
year. 



BASKKTKAI.L PRACTICE 



Going into its third week, basket- 
ball practice, under Coach Hill 
Frigard, linds the State outlook not 
too gte0My with the prospects of 
three or four additions from the 
football squad after the season 
closes Saturday. 



12 


STATE RECORD 


6 


American International 





Howdoin 


32 





Connecticut State 


It 





Rhode island 


20 





Worcester Tech 


ft 





Amherst 


35 


7 


Coast Guard 





37 


Rensselaer 





56 




118 



Art CopSO!) '40 was picked, yester- 
day, as sports editor of the Collegian 
to take charge with the first edition 
following the Thanksgiving vacation. 
He succeeds Frank Davis '40 who was 
forced to retire last June because of 
a too-full schedule. 

For the first two months of the 
year the sports paper has been edited 
by the managing editor, Art Noyes. 
Copson will take over the Statements 
column and dictate the athletic pol- 
icies of the paper. 

The new sports editor is a resident 
of Bolton and a transfer from Boston 
College. He is a member of Phi Sigma 
Kappa social fraternity, a member 
of the interfraternity council, the in- 
tramural athletic hoard. For the past 
year Copson has served on the Col- 
legian staff as a sports reporter. New 
members of the sports staff will be 
selected Monday following a six weeks 
period of competition. 



Completing a not too successful 
season, the Maroon cross-country team 
lost to an undefeated Rensselear 
squad last Saturday at Troy, New- 
York, by a score of 18-37. Captain 
John Dugan won the 4 'a mile race 
over a hard, cement road in 25 min- 
utes 29.3 seconds, and was followed 
by his teammate, Vic Head. 

Captain Larry Pickard was the 

lirst State man to finish, placing third 
behind Head, this making the second; 
time that Larry has finished worse 
than second in a dual meet. Behind 

Pickard came three Cherry and White 
runners to score the one-sided victory 
for Rensselear; Nelson, Larson, and 
Bailey were the three additional point- 
scorers. Harold Rose, Putney, Ken-' 
nedy, and Scholz came in in that or- 
der to complete the race. Pickard, 
at one point in the race, was in tenth 
position, but he slowly worked him- 
self up to third place. 



STATE 


Tl 








j Capt. Morey re 


(apt. 1'. 






Malcolm rt 


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Zajchowski rg 


Honaban 




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lilasko c 


5 ■ radi 




f 


Payson or 








Geoffrion 1^ 


Beoattt 




krw.-tn 


Norwood le 


Ha eltos 








Nelson It 


Hiern 






fked 


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<■ riHin 








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Allan ll.l. 


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Conant fb 


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Continued from 


Page i 




' ' 






TUFTS RECORD 


23 


Colby 


7 


Amherst 


34 





Middlebury 


10 


I 


Williams 


6 


I 


Rrown 


48 


1 


New Hampshire 


10 


6 
25 


Howdoin 


19 


150 



tie with Williams three weeks ,-.. 
last Saturday up at Brunswick I, 
scored once and held the Polar I;, 
to three touchdowns while earlier i 
the season, State took a 32 1 
spanking from the same team, 
Griftin 

Art Griffin who was developed 
Manly to a triple threat should i 
the Tufts attack. Wash West, 
merchant, Clif Patterson a fullbad 
of the Lou Abdu type, and eithn 
Pollard or Chiros at quarterback « 
from the Jumbo backfield. Pollard 
Tufts blocking expert while I 
is the sparkplug type of hack. 

State's passing attack, the < 
for two of the touchdown- again* 
Continued i 

FRIETAS PACES '42 
TO WIN OVER SOPHS 



Frosh Ace Scores Lone Mark.'! 
in 8-0 Numeral 
Battle 



Captain Larry Pickard is Lone Stand-out As Cross Country Season 
Closes With Record of But One Win in Four Starts for .200 Average 



By A I Vanow 

Its only bright spot of the season 
being the running of Captain Larry 
Pickard, the Maroon cross-country 
team completed a none too successful 
Reason with an average of .200, win- 
ning but one of its five engagements, 
placing fourth in the Connecticut Val- 
ley championship meet and taking 
tenth place in the New England In- 
tercollegiates in P.ostoii. 

Never Behind 3rd 

Running admirably since he went 
out for the team in his sophomore 
year, I'ickard has finished first him- 
self or tied for first in no less than 
nine out of sixteen dual meets. All 
in all, he never finished worse than 
third in any of the sixteen meets. 
In the Conn. Valley race he finished 
fifth, bettering his last year's por- 
tion by two places, and in the New 
England Intercollegiates, Larry was 
ninth in a field of 168 runners, ad- 
vancing five places over his perform- 
ance the year before. Larry ran his 
last cross-country race for State 
against the Cherry and White of Rens- 
selear last Sat unlay, but managed to 
take only a third place. Despite out- 
side work which has kept him from 
doing much practicing, the An Hus 
major has given a good account of 
himself in every meet. 

Leaving the squad this year due t<> 
graduation, will be Harold Rose, who 
has been second to Pickard in every 
race when it came to adding up the 
points. Rose deserves considerable 
credit, plugging away very conscien- 
tious until he has been able to figure 
in the total in every meet on the 
State schedule. Charles Slater and 
Lury Hixby are other seniors who 
did some running, and will be lost 
to the team. 



In the first meet of the season, 1 
against Northeastern, the Huskies 

STAND-OUT 





*m 


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1 






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IT 

X 1 




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Capt. Lai IV I'ickard 



won 17-37, paced by Sam Drevitch, 
sophomore ace, and by Captain Bob 
Pritchard, a close second. This race 
was contested on the course in Dor- 
chester where the Intercollegiates are 
held. 

Coming home to take on the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology 
team, the Maroon harriers were upset 
25-34, losing to the Techmen for the 
first time in four years. Captain Pick- 
ard won the race, but strong sup- 
pi 'it was lacking to make it a team 
victor v. 



Heat W. P. 1. 

The fruits of victory were tasted worked his way up from behind. 



for the first time on the following 
Saturday when State took on the En- 
gineers from Worcester Polytech, and 
drubbed them by the sore of 19-41, 
taking five of the first six places, 
losing second place to the sturdy run- 
ner. Dunklee of Tech. Pickard again 
hreezed home the victor, leaving the 
rest of the field far behind, and 
finishing in front by a margin of 3] 

seconds. 

Ten days later the Conn. Valley 
meet took place on the Amherst Col- 
lege course, and besides finishing 
fourth in this meet, State was de- 
feated by Amherst in what was 
chalked up as a dual meet between 
the two town teams, winning by a 
close score, 86-80, in a race which 
marked Pickard's victory over Captain 
Phil Moyer of Amherst in their third 
meeting, after each had beaten the 
other once. 

New Englands 

Running again on the Franklin Park 
Course in Dorchester, the Maroon took 
tenth place in the New Englands in 
a field of fourteen teams, dropping 
four places over last year's perform- 
ance. Pickard took some of the sting 
out of the defeat by taking ninth 
place in a very good showing, con- 
sidering that men were dropping all 
over the course because of the ter- 
rific heat, entirely unsuitable for a 
race of this sort. 

The hist meet of the year was run 
in 'Proy against the Techmen of Rens- 
selear, and losing by dint of beauti- 
ful running by the veteran, experi- 
enced and undefeated team of Coach 
Eddy in which the Cherry and White 
took five of the first six places, third 
piece fotng to Captain Pickard, who 



Displaying a fine aerial attack, I ••■ 
freshman football team passed '- 
way to an 8-0 victory over a hitrhh- 
touted sophomore team Frid.r. 
Alumni Field. 

After the sophs kicked off, tin . 
got going with a long Fried ' 
to Kimball that was good for I 
yards. Strong running by Daniel-. 
Bullock, and Frietas advanced the 
ball to the soph's 10 yard line. rVfl 
here Frietas loafed around l> 
for the first score. The tiy for the 
extra point failed because of 
pass from center. 

Score: Freshman 6 Sophomore <• 

Simmons and Cohen itood N 
the sophs in both the defettS 
offense, and proved themselves 
the backbone of the team. Sin 
was in every play, running. 
ing, or tackling. Cohen shew 
speed in preventing another '!- 
in the last quarter when he nr 
Pen Frietas on the soph 1" yard 
Frietas started the run from I 
kick formation on the frosll 5 JW* 
line and went 85 yards bei 
caught him from behind. 

Sid Zeitler starred at quart«*tdl 
for the frosh. His 25 yard run back 
of a '41 kick brought the stands I 
their feet. Carl Werme and Dick 
Coffin played stand out gamw in* 
yearling line. Frandsen ihnwe't 1 
could take it, for he get off 
to Nastri after being hit by t* 
charging frosh linemen. 

The frosh scored their final t 
points on a safety, win n S 
was forced to fall on a I 
behind the goal line, in rdi r to f* 
vent a freshman touch'' 

Freshman 



Coffin 


le 


Werme 


It 


Clark 


lK 


I'rady 


c 


Pierce 


rg 


Uloom 


rt 


Kimball 


re 


Zeitler 


qb 


Pullock 


rhb 


Evans 


lhb 


Frietas 


fb 



HAND R.P.I- WORST DEFEAT OF SEASON AS 
'ASSING AND RUNNING ATTACKS CLICK 

Harding, Leo Santucci, Brud Malcolm, Allan and Irzyk Score 
For State as Caraway Charges Show Powerful Offense 
and Strong Defense 



i it 



taged the fall of Troy last 
as the spirited Caraway 
handed Rensselaer their 
it of the season. With half- 
Allan throwing beautiful 
and Al Irzyk leading the 
Utaek, the Maroon offense 
too well for the Trojans^ 
nal tally showed six touch- 
l a conversion for the States- 



B00TERS BATTLE TO 
TIE AGAINST CARDS 

Hold Ilammarstrom Without a 

Score in Overtime 

Game 



OUTSTANDING JUMBO GRIDMAN 



in 



The Maroon booters wound up a 
I fairly successful season last Friday 
>re of the game came b >' battling the highly rated Wesley - 
•■ oved R. P. I.'s kick- a " eleven through two scoreless over- 
time periods to a 1-1 deadlock. 

With their offense clicking admir- 
ably the Statesmen got the jump on 
the Wesmen at the very beginning 
when Cast, Rodda. received a beauti- 
ful pass from Karl Bowen, and, on 
a brilliantly executed play feinted the 
cardinal goalie out of position and 
rifled the hall into the goal for the 
lone State tally. For the rest of the 
half the I.riggsmen consistently car- 
ried the play to the Wesieyan terri- 
tory, but the cardinal defense stopped 
every threat. The McCunlyinen turned 
the tables in the second half, and, 
led by Ilammarstrom, Pond, and 
ball on the K. 1'. 1. .VS.. The Crapser, besieged the Statesmen's 
then was given to Allan who j goal, but fullbacks Auerbach and 

Podolak proved well-nigh impreg- 
nable until the cardinals' aggressive 
play was finally rewarded when Crap- 
ser scored in the last ten minutes of 
the game to tie up the score and 
send the game into an overtime period. 
Once more the Hrigg-adiers took to 
the offense, but the enemy defense 
tightened and repulsed the Maroon 
attacks to the end. 



and immediately State took 
to complete an Allan to 
tor 2!> yards. With the 
the Trojan goal line. lien 
•ainmed through for the 
'. 1. blockers foiled Allan's 
>r the extra point. 
- Engineers began one of 
marches which terminated 
h- IX yard line as the Ma- 
iled its defenses and held 
n for downs. A Santucci 
ii set the stage for the sec- 
tottchdown as Leo grabbed 
.nt for Sohl, the Tech half- 
scampered 28 yards to make 
hall on the R. I'. I. 82. The 




GRIFFIN IS THREAT 
TO STATE CHANCES 



Tufts Sports Editor Sees Hope 

For Jumbos in Objective 

Rivalry 

l'.\ Jack Killourh> 

(Sports Kilter, TUFTS WEEKLY) 

Completely oblivious of its poor 
record to date, and ja/./.ed to a fever 
pitch for its objective name, a scrappy 
Tufts eleven l»«| by Captain Al Hear 
son, will point for it-- lirst win of 

the season on Saturday. 

With George Chiros and Walter 
Yakoys still on the injured list, Lew 
Mauley is Concentrating his attack 
through Wash West ami toe versatile 
Art Griffin, Bob Patterson is sched 
Bled to .tart at right half hack, with 



the fullbac 

horse. 



k position ^oiiig to a dark 



Art Gri in. I lifts quarterback 



iei| and passed to Rudge who was 
copped hi the Trojan one yard line. 
This time Santucci sweeping around 
1 crossed for the score. Loe's at- 
• 'i I • a' conversion was low. 
Third Score 
\ blocked II. 1*. I. kick gave the 
men incentive for the third 
touchdown as Allan sliced through 
ickle for 23 yards and Santucci confl- 
icted an Allan toss on the Troy 
Lite's speedy quarterback Al 
Irzyk took the ball through right 
uckle fur the marker. For the first 
I State attempt at point after 
il with Allan drop kicking be- 
the posts. In the third period, 
■ntyh scored again on a pass from 
(Allan, after Morey had completed a 
11 yard toss also from Allan, am! ;. 
Ittle later Allan slanted off tackle 
make it 81-4). A fourth quarter 
•kogsberg to Malcolm toss added the 
inal >i\ points. 

Kensselaer 

Horver 

Rice 

Day 

Yager 

Schnats 

Schaffer 
Madden 
Magyar 

Sohl 

Gleb 

Schwartz 



ntinutd from PVfi (. 
■ ' • lasl Saturday and the means 
'!> two others, will be able 

the Tufts aerial advance. 

In. who does the tossing for Tufts, 

l 'I by State's ace sharp- 

Don Allan. The Griffin to 



CARAWAY SAYS TEAM 
CAN DEFEAT JUMBOS 

State Coach Only Asks Squad 

to Play Well Jumbo Capt. 

is Optimistic 



State 




1, N .], 


l.. 


F'ajson 


It 


peoffrion 


lg 




c 


''■ ^-ki 


rg 


Malci 


rt 


Morey 


re 


Mian 


Mb 
lhb 




rhb 


Hani 


fb 


v| ITI FAVORED 



I 






Sopheffom ■ 




Gee* ■ 


■ 


Fa' 1 




■ 


1 


Hubbard ■ 


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Ai < 1 


■ 


■ 


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MurphT ■ 


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IV: M 


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CoW ■ 


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Fr.r 1 


Wuu ha 


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: 



filiation has accounted for 
Jumbo scores this season. 
Captain Morey 

Clif Morey who has shown 

defensive power this year. 

w>ki who earned the title 

Man" by virtue of his sev- 

niinute games, and Chet 

tugged fullback whose 

•I paaa completions have 

m .v of the season's battles 

who will wind up their 

tor State on Saturday. 

■ 'ii field general Saturday 

k whose smart leader- 

ti a strong point in the 

■ success, Harding, Cohen, 

Skogsberg, and Rudge 

■f ha'-kfield reserves, and 

I' . <)'<Y>nnell, and Lavra- 

l"ie subs. 

1 ' nd the season with a 

Statesmen will have to 

lock hard and keep fight- 
minutes. 



Fast 

The game was marked by the hard, 
fast play of both teams, but the back- 
slap of the week should go to sopho- 
more Saul Klaman, who held Ham- 

tnarstrom, the leading scorer and 

league ace scoreless for three periods; 
another should go to Clem Burr for 
bottling him up the other quarter. 
This tie with Wesieyan sends the 

Staters up one berth to seventh place 

in the New England intercollegiate 

League Standing. The Maroon record 
puts State ahead of such colleges as 
Brown, Williams and Tufts. In the 
matter of scoring Capt. Rodda is tied 
for fourth place with four goals to 
his credit; Hammarstrom who was 
held scoreless by the Statesmen is 
leading the race with ten goals. 



The Physical Education department 

was brief and to the point when a.- k il 
to venture a comment as to the out 
come of this year's edition of the an- 
cient rivalry between the Statesmen 
and the Tuftsmen. The keynote is 
optimism, but it is generally agreed 
that State will have to fight hard for 
a victory. 

Head Coach Ebb Caraway "The 
kids can win, we'll Just play FOOT- 
BALL." 



TUFTS TICKETS 



Anyone expecting to attend the 
Tufts-M. S. C. football game may 
procare tickets at tin- Physical Ed- 
ucation OSes sometime before ItM 
p. m.. Friday, November IH. The 
price of these tickets will be 11.10 

•.ml will admit holders to the state 
«■ erved section. 
I'ickets purchased at Medford 
will cost $l.n.~>. 



I he plunging Griffin will call the 
signals for this Saturday. A reorgan- 
ized line, with Pearson and Heselton 

at ends, and Hruce Russell at tackle 

j will be plugged at center by the stal- 
wart Paul leradi. Mark I laiiabury and 
Ralph Sherry will also lie in the front 

low, along with "Watchcharm" Ben- 
nett, 

I It is anticipated hy those m the 

I know, that Lew Manly will feature 

I an aerial attack with Griffin doing 

the heaving, and llaselton on tin- re- 

I ceiving end. 

Young Washington West, given any 

interference at all, should romp 

through the Statesmen line at will. 

Tufts has been laying oil' for the 

past week in an effort to he at full 

potential) should the Caraway squad 

prove too large. The .lumboos have 
been running through Mass. State 
plays all week in an effort to find 
themselves ready to cope with the 
invaders. 



Soccer Squad Boasts Defensive Record 

Bettered Only Once in Booter's History 



defensive 



Harvard 
Springfield 

Wesieyan 
Amherst 
Dartmouth 
Mass. State 
Williams 
Tufts 
Brown 
Conn. State 
M. I. T. 
Trinity 



Won 
6 
:< 
5 
4 
4 
2 

2 

1 
1 






Lost 

1 

2 
2 
:; 
2 

4 
4 

«; 
.-{ 

4 



Tied 
(I 

1 
1 


II 

2 




(i 





Lou Hush, Backfield coach "Break 

will mean a I it in this ball game. 

Km Grayson, line 

have to run an I block hard, and main- 
tain the pace set last week if we 
want to BEAT TUFTS." 

Captain Moiey "Our offense has 
finally clicked, and we are set to roll 
Saturday." 

Former Capta'n Fred Sieven 

"Look-; like it will Ii • a different story 
than last year." 

Joe Paradise, Director of grounds 
"Successful season we'll make it 
three in a row." 

Tufts Captain Al Pearson- "We've 

improved and records mean nothing 
in the Tuft- State game." 

Coach Lew Manly "This is out- 
last chance." 



With a 

nly once in State's soccer history, 
Coach Larry Briggs 1 "'.x edition has 

'become a closed book. Hitting the 
coach "We'll ' ome stretch, the liriRgsinen white 



washed Trinity and tied 
Wesieyan eleven to cross 
line in a blaze of glory. 



•T.i-h" 
ments." 



"I am not givin' no state 



MAROON DEFENSE STARS 





Jim Payson 



Johnny lilawko 



In 1931 an undefeated State soccer 
team allowed their opponents but 
three goals. Not since then had any 
Maroon team approached that record, 
until this year when Capt. Kodda's 
defensive aces held their adversaries 
to six scores in seven games. Full- 
hacks Stan Podolak and Milt Auer 
bach along with goalie Wilson have 
fortified the goal so well, that three 
games went without an enemy score, 
two with only one tally, and none 
with any more than two. The average 
enemy score was less than one. Stan 
Podolak was the bulwark of the en- 
tire team, not only playing his own 
territory, but roaming all over the 
Held, while his running mate, crafty 
Milt Auerbach, did more than his 
hare to keep tin- Opposing force-, 
out. Eli Wilson at goalie usually kept 
out what got by his two defense men. 
In thr> Springfield game he turned 

in one of the best performances that 

has aver been seen on Alumni Field. 

Time after time he turned hack the 

Springfield attack, making one sen- 
sational lave after another. This 
year'- ha< k wall was without a doubt 

one of the beat in the league. 

Before the Springfield and Amherst 
game Coach Brigga was naked what, 
he thought of thi' Maroon's chances. 
Bach time he replied that both team 

were equally matched and that the 
outcome would be decided by the 
breaks. And so it happened, each 
game wa- decided by the will of the 

fates. The team that -cored first usu- 
ally won, for it Is then decidedly hard 
for the other team to get the goal 
back. That i- the explanation of the 
Amherst defeat, for the Statesmen 
,-diould have taken the Lord Jeffs by 



retold bettered virtue of having outplayed Wesieyan 
who had defeated the Amherst eleven. 
Next to the defensive work of the 
team the outstanding feature of the 
year was ('apt. Kodda's playing at 
center forward, lie was the high scor- 
er on the team and ranks among the 
BCOren of the Intercollegiate league, 
and Is our choice for all New Kng- 
land (enter forward. Willis of Am- 
herst is about the only one that can be 



the strong 

the finish 



LEADING SCORER 





Capt. Hud Rodda 



Bud as a pos- 
|i" ition. They 



considered along with 

sible choice for the 

both have cored four goals in league 

play, but Rodda is the more dangeroui 

of the two and ha been picked by 
Coach Hrigg a a hki ly candidate 
for the position on the ail New Eng 
land team. Karl Bowen, ipeedy wing, 
ended the season with five goals, 
threatening Rodda, high loorer. 

Tommy Lyman played his beet 
game of the season against the Wes- 
ini'ti, al o in la i game for the Ma- 
roon, while Whity Johnson and Sugar 

Kain have played well consistently. 






L I BRA R Y 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 19.1m 



— CLOTHING 

Tailoring Haberdashery Hand Pressing 

THOMAS F. WALSH, College Outfitter 



Profs Hobbies Include Military Strategy, Fishing, 
Collecting Stamps, And Hypnotism Check-up Reveals 



Ity Everett K. Spencer, Jr. 

What college professors and in- 
structors do in their free time has 
always been a matter of speculation 
on the part of college students. That 
college professors do something is ob- 
vious, but what that something is, 
students, the majority of them at 
least, do not know. (Whether they 
care or not, is also a matter for spec- 
ulation.) So, in order to enlighten the 
speculating college student, 1 shall 
reveal the outside activities of the 
profs; 1 shall reveal just what they 
do when they are far from the mad- 
ding crowd; and, in so revealing these 
hitherto unknown facts, I hope to 
show the college student that profes- 
sors are really human — away from 
the class room at least, and that, 



like most human beings, they do have 
hobbies . . . 

I'rince 

Professor I'rince, when not study- 
ing the stage or playing chess as lie 
dues when not preparing "1'ats" ex- 
ams, studies military strategy, or he 
as calls it, "armchair generalship." 
Colonel Apliztgton, oil the other hand, 
when not teaching or studying mili- 
tary strategy, has for a recreational 
hobby the "watching of intercollegiate 
athletic contest-;, particularly foot- 
ball." And Major Connor spends many 
of his siestas fishing. 

All types of sports — badminton, 
skating, swimming, hiking, golf, ski- 
ing, and tennis, attract the college 
profs on their off moments. The ma- 
jority play one sport or another. 



Hunting and fishing appeal to Prof. 
Rohr who says that he likes tennis 
also. 15. II. Wood, the college libra- 
rian, loves the out-of-doors and revels 
in mountain climbing. Debating is al- 
so one of his hobbies. Howling so at- 
tracts tlie profs and instructors that 
several teams of weary men meet 
every fall to contend for the college 
bowling championship. Luther I Santa 
prefers "fishing, bowling, and barn- 
yard golf." 

Some of the profs' hobbies may 
seem to the average student to be 
non-recreational. Hut to the profes- 
sors that have such avocations they 
oiler everything that a game of tennis 
can offer to the tennis enthusiast. 
For example "Doc" Ross says his 
hobby is "teaching physics." Dr. Al- 



exander, head of the entomology de- 
partment, collects and classifies crane 
flies from all over the world. G. C. 
Crampton of the department of en 
tomology likes to "study and work 
during the summer in my private lab- 
oratory on Lake May, East Lee." 

Daffodils 

And of course there are those profs 
who collect stamps. Philatelists, if 
you please. Prof. Cary, when not 
teaching freshman history, works in 
his garden. So does Dr. Click who 
also likes chickens and hypnotism. 
Prof. MacKimmie's recreational hob- 
by is "daffodils and tulips." Besides 
playing a good round of golf, as does 
Prof. Rice, Dean Machmer also works 
in his garden. 

Mr. Helming, English instructor, 
delights in "music, especially the 
piano, and national and international 
politics." Prof. Moore of the mathe- 
matics department is interested in 
philately and architecture of colonial 
and New England meeting houses. 
Professor Rand writes plays, directs 



them, and makes masks, 
foi ccasts human social hi 
also makes a hobby of i 
and social exploration, i | 
Evening Post is read froi 
cover by Prof. Osmun. Ml 
while troubled with 
problem, carves and wl 
Frank Waugh etches a 
medals — probably some 
Joe Rogers may win if 
his hobby of revolver sho 



' a| iird»J 



Radio Club 

There will be a meet 
Radio Club at the Phy.-d. 
Tuesday, November 22, at 6 ■;.", I 

DEBATING CLuF 

The Debating Club will hold 
first meeting Monday th, 
7:U0 p. m. in the Senate Koon- 
Memorial Building. All those , I 
ed in debating and who wish I 
out for the several positi. i 
the debating team are urged 
attend. 





e won 



*%, 



] killjul is the word that best describes 
Chesterfield's can 't-be-copied blend 

It is the RIGHT COMBINATION of mild ripe 
home-grown and aromatic Turkish . . . the 
world's best cigarette tobaccos . . . that makes 
Chesterfield different from all other cigarettes. 

And it's the skillful blending of 
these tobaccos with each other ... for 
flavor, for aroma, for mildness and 
for taste, that has made Chesterfield 
the cigarette in which millions of smokers 
find a new pleasure in smoking. 



hesterfield 

. . • the blend that can't be copied 

...a HAPPY COMBINATION of the 

world's best cigarette tobaccos 






Copyright 1938, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 




v 



Vol. XLIX 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, DECEMBER I, 



WM Z— 2H8 



NO. K 



7-COLLEGE RELIGIOUS PARLEY 
WILL BE HELD HERE SATURDAY 

Representatives From Amherst, Smith. Mount Holyoke, Brown, 

Williams, Springfield, and State to Take Part in' 

Council of Faiths 



DKIYK IS SUCCESS 



for 

rasa, 

on 

un- 



REV. LKGG CHAIRMAN 



William Foley, Student Director, 
lias Arranged For Many 
Speakers 



Will even New England colleges 

ii-l. Smith, Mount Holyoke, 

•ah. Williams, Springfield, and 

State showing interest in the eon- 

rence, the inter-faith, intercollegi- 

pariey, organized under the di- 

of William Foley, president 

'Uii, nt Religious Council with 

lupcrvision of J. Paul Williams, 

religioUH director hen-, will take place 

•I, is Saturday, from 10:00 a. m. until 

00 p. in. The chief speakers will 



Q.T.V. WINS CUP IN 
GREEK COMPETITION 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Alpha Sigma 

Phi Take Second and 

Third Trophy s 



Awarded first prize in the 1987-38 
interfraternity competition, (.,>. T. Y. 
v as presented with a loving cup at 
convocation this morning. Second and 
third in the competition were Lambda 
Chi Alpha and Alpha Sigma Phi, re 

spectively. 

Fraternity rating were Judged by 
Sidney Kauffman, in charge of fra 
Reverend J. Thoburn L«g8 of St. ,( ' n,il - v »thtottea; Dean .Machmer, in 



The annual Red Cress drive 
funds for the American Ucd (' 
ending its two-week period 
Thanksgiving, did fairly well 
der the circumstances, announced 
Charles Kodda, president of Adel- 
phia, under whose direction the 
drive w;vs conducted. 

Kodda wishes to thank the en- 
fire student body, the Stockhridgc 
Student Council, and members of 
the Stockhridgc School for I heir 
excellent cooperation. 

Because of extensive Hood and 
hurricane damage this year, the 
American Hed Cross has urgent 
need of the funds that have been 
canvassed at State College and 
over the entire countrv. 



RAY KEATING'S BAND TO PLAY 
AT MILITARY BALL TOMORROW 



Attendance is Low as Only (57 Couples Are Listed 
Few Moro Tickets Have Been Sold Effect of 

Week-end is Shown in Poor Support 



Although 
Tufts 



APPOINTMENT MADE 
FOR GROUP PHOTOS 



TICKETS AT DOOR 



Senior 

be 



Portrait Proofs 

at Mt. Pleasant 

Tomorrow 



Committee Expects Many 
( louts to Subscribe on 
Night of Dance 



Stu- 



Shouk 
by 



Charles Branch, business 
i>f the Index has announced 
ments for academic activitie 

pictures for t . .<l;i> in the ON 

ry, Kach student manager 

dent should make certain 



manager 

appoint - 
V roup 
Libra 
or presi 

that his 



.ii.ii . Methodist Church, Newburgh, 

York, chairman of the confer- 

; i>r. Everett M. Baker, ex-vice 

• d n\ of the American Unitarian 

tion, Protestant representa- 

Rabbi H. J. Sehachtel of West 

nagogue, New York City, Jaw* 

representative; and Father J. P. 

■ haii of Our Lady of the Kims 

College, Chicopee, who recently 

Bed to ad ai Catholic representa- 

I '" Merit Hugh P. Baker of 

Mas ! i etta State College will wel- 

guests. 

Round Table 

main meetings of the parley, 

open to entire staff, student 

and the public, are being- held 

taira In the Memorial building. 

table discussions in which a 

ider shall be picked to rop- 

C.nntinued nn Page (< 

COLLEGIAN SELECTS 
6 FR0SH FOR STAFF 



charge of fraternity scholarship; Dr, 
Helming, in charge of academics; and 
George Haylon, vice-president of the 
Interfraternity Council. 

Interfraternity athletics consisted 
of soccer, touch football, volleyball, 

basketball, and softball. 

Academic judging was based on two 
house inspections, an interfraternity 
sing, and an interfraternity declama 
tion. 

'39 Competition 

President of the Interfraternity 

Council, Dick Powers ':!!> announce 
that the 1988-39 competition is well 



CARNIVAL'S DATE IS 
CHANGED TO FEB. 10 



Smith, Mt. Holyoke Vacations 

Force Committee to Drop 

Plans for Mid-Semester 



The Carnival Committee has found 
it necessary to change the date of 
Winter Carnival to the first week-end 
of second semester, Feb, 10, II. The 
date Was first set for during inidsem- 
esters because at that time student 
rould be Uff from all classroom vvor 
to participate in events. 
It has beafl brought out, however. 



under way. Touch football and soccer that Mudents at Smith and Alt. Hol- 

have been ended this fall. One fra- yoke have exams until Friday of our 

ternity house inspection has been midsemester week. If, as at other 

held Xew addition to the academics iocial events at State, the Smith and 

section In the competition are the Mt. Holyoke students are to form 

Dad's Day skits which were present* the majority of those present, the 

ed November "», with Phi Sigma (Cap- ball would have to be held OS Friday 

pa placing first. Xew addition- to the night. .Many State College students, 

athletics section an ping-pong and moreover, who might not he able to 

bowling. Contimutd en !• , 



group be present on time, as there 
will he no retakes, All students are 
requested to be as quiet as possible, 
since the building is being used by 
other groups and classes at the same 
I ime. 

Senior Portraits 
In regard to Senior portraits, any 
seniors who have not yet taken their 
proofs to the photographer, Mr. Ma 

honey, should be at the Mount Pleas- 
ant Inn this afternoon from 2:00 till 

9:80 or tomorrow any time aftei 

o'( lock. This [f the last chance. 
Time 
Physical Education Staff 
Military Majors and Staff 
Division of Physical and BtO 
logical Sciences 

Division of Home Economics! 
Division of Horticulture 

Division of Agriculture 

Joint Committee on Intercol 

legiate Athletic* 
Collegian 

Orchestra (men m tuxedos and 

women in dark gowns) 
Men's Glee Club (in Tuxedo | 

Continued OH P,ij>e 6 



I I .00 

I .-on 

I. -on 

4:30 
4:46 
5:00 
6:16 



6:46 
7:00 



The annual Military Hall, IVai.ir 
ing Raj Keating and in Orchestra 

will be held En the Drill Hall ti - 

Friday evening, December f, from 
!»:<»it p. m. to 2:00 a. m. At the present 

time only 07 couples are listed wh< 
are going to attend, although a f « w 
more ticket.-, have heen sold over thil 

number. Either the Tufts' week end 
and Christinas are showing their ef- 
fect, or there will he many ticket-- 
Sold at the «|oor. 

The chapcrones for the Hall an 
Lt. Col. an. I Mrs. Horace T. Apl , 
ton, Major and Mrs. I.e.. H. Conn. 
Major and Mr Harold p. Stew, 
'aptain ami Mrs. tiniest .1. H, 
cllffe, ami Captain and Mrs. Carl 
son. Guesta are President ami Mi- 
Hugh I". Baker, and Dean and Mr* 
William I,. Machmer The commute 

, III charge of the dunce consist;- ' 

Cadet Lt. George C, Benjamin, cha 
man, Cadet Lt n. Gardner Audi 
sen, Cad.t i,i. Clifford F. Uppineotl 
Cadet Lt. Ralph L Poster, Cadet l I 
George .1. Haylon, Cadet Lt Chart*-' 
Hid ' 'adel Set George 



W. Griffin, 
Pitts, Jr. 



id 



M All. ihIimk 



I Ik 

■ I. I I.I <,.. 

Holyoki <: 

< /.all .... , . ■ 



ill 



Bdi li- 

lt, ,i. 
i i.t I.. 
mLiniit .1 un 



16 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 
IN RECITAL MONDAY 



Donahue, Dwyer, Litch- 
field, Il.vman and Potter 
Are Named 



Eugene List's Mastery of Technique Fails to Balance I 
Lack of Interpretation in Concert Program Monday 



Will 



Sing in I- In I < Ihurch 
Florence Program is 
Announced 



'ers of the freshman els 
ted to the editorial board 

CoDegtai last Monday eve- 

'I wing a period of seven 

petition in which twenty- 

"our fre hmefl were entered. The new 

will serve a six weeks pro- 

period, at the end of which 

at the approval of the edi- 



By Sidney Rosen 
Eugene last, snatched from a fal.e- 
worse-than-death of infant prodigy 
exploitation (according to the pro- 
gram notes) — played plea ingly 
through a popular program of piano 
music for the first Community Con 
cert audience Monday night. 

After the first few numbers, it was 



■ permanent members of evident that Mr. List's nineteen years 

Since nine positions are bad not heen spent in vain pursuit 

' tbe board for each class, a " f piano technique. For his fingers 

^petition will be held next w « pa u ' n streaks of accurate light- 

'" fill the three places left " in ^ r tnat flashed " v,r t,) " keyboard 

of '42. with almost unbelievable -peed, "l I 

elected were as follows: Eugene List's performance was an 

: ' in, Mary Donahue, Wil- excellent display of technical fire 

Bertram Hymen, George works; he did justice, indeed to the 

1,1 '»nd Louise Potter! DebttSSy, flew d'Artilice. And in 

Coffin is a graduate of similar fashion, he dazzled U! with 

' High School, where she the Liszt Rhapsody No. f,. a number 

tanl editor of the school written by that 

Mary Donahue also comes 



entirely meaningless manner. The 
Scarlatti could he excused, hut the 
Bach never. Hach was not meant t. 
he played as a finger exercise Hach 
i hetter played badly, yet with feel 
ing. than perfectly and with the ard- 

century 



or of a nineteenth 
governess. 



British K Hat 
heavily 



The in t concert <-f the Won . 

est spiritual significance. I must praise varsity glee ■ lull will b« giver, M 

his handling of the Third Movement, day evening, at the Pirsl Church 

a difficult scoring if there ever was Florence, acoid,.,,. to an ai un. 

one. 'Ihe Chopin was equally dleap meni made bj Directoi Done \ 
pointing the Fantaisie-lrnpromptu. am. Thlrtj i women will taki 
perhaps, the best. The Nocturne in m the program which 



I 



<e ,... 

t.ntat r . 



I 



choosing Beethoven'i Appasioaats 
i the piece-dt resistance of the eve- 
ning, was, in my estimation, a mis- 
take on Mr. List's part. Not that he 

did not play it correctly and brilliant' 

ly, but the meaning of the whole 



., follows: 

My Johnm u ., 



sonata was lost. Beethoven put his 

own experience, his own bitter fttlM in the Beethoven and Ltasl were 

t niggles in life in that music, and it eccompllshed with an amazing ease, 

takes an artist who has known life '" the Hungarian Rhapsody, the 

to bring out the real feeling of the '"'nuous run of octaves in the second 

sonata. Eugene List, I believe, is yet movement was excellently done. I 

too immature to interpret the Apas 



Major was, somehow, too 

played to he ■ convincing - 

" •>■> Jonnnj w., ., Mioemaker 
love song. As far the Polonaise. A , , . . .. 

Mat. well, more fireworks. ,.,.,,., ,. ... . .-i, , , ,. . ,?, 

1 rayei t rom Han el and Gretel 

Mr. List did show unusual power 1 Hump. , dmck Kie rr . 

,n his left hand a power that, at Csecho Slovakiaa D; 

times, ev.i, threatened to overshadow Indian Love Call 
the right. His trills were really some- Pair Wind and 
thing to marvel at, and the difficult 



Polksortf 

Romhi > i 






ISii. 



"yport High School, where 
'tor of the paper. She is 
: ' the Chemistry Club and 
r hib. William Dwyer is a 
f Holvoke High School. 
■' Si editor of the school 

>' ! 'i If a pledge of Phi 

a. 

"vman was graduated 
' »ter High School and 



also ' xc.'lled in technical pic-i 
and whose compositions are ■ chal- 
lenge to any concert artist's ability. 
Interpretation Missing 
|!ut there ffu lacking in Mr. I •' 
playing that which brings the high- 
est spiritual response from the listen- 
er— interpretation. Along with a max- 
imum of skill there was a minimum 
of fetdinp. The first two numbers 
the Scarlatti Sonatas and the Mach 



sionata in order to bring out its full 



QUARTERLY 



Continued on Page 2 Preludes— were played in a 



Co 



Id and 



The Collegian (Quarterly will he 
distributed tomorrow morning at 
these vantage points: Fraternity 
and Sorority Houses. The Cafeter- 
ia. Thatcher Hall, Adams House, 
Coodell Library, and outride the 
Collegian office in the Memorial 
Hldg. 



could go on for paragraphse, enum* 

.■rating the individual marvels ,,f Mr. 

List' technique. 

Eugene Lit will mature, and with 
his ripening will come, I hope, a rS 
birth of the spirit. There || | small 
difference between execellenee and 
genius, but that difference might well 
be an eternity. Can Mr. List step 

from on.- plane to the other? Will 
experience give him the divine spark 
. . . or must that spark be innate? 
Posterity holds the answer for thi 
nineteen year old pianist. 



ance Song 

Fr - 

U . alh. i 

Mexican 
Be <rt Song 

Other niimhei bj the glee erob 

be announced later; tentative 
rang. ■merit:-; or selections by a Q 
quartet compoi i -i of John Osmui 
Milton Auerfaau I M; run Hager, ai 

Stuart Hubbard are being made. F- 

itrumental musk by Julia Lynch "'.'. 
violinist, and Edith Fox ml', trump* 
ter may be included on the p rog ran 

S0PHOMOKK KDITOK 

( Ihestei Kurakm lei m b eh • u 
■ terday, by Sidnej Rosen, edit 

of the Collegian (Juarlerly, to 
po Ition of Sophomore editor of *'• 
publication. 



< 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. Till KSDAY. DECE.MItEU I. 19:5 



/Iftassacbuse 




BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOK BART 



STOCKBRIDGE 



By John Kelso 



Collegian 



Dear 

I .: 
,vh n 



.worn, 

ii<l I'd 



write 
back 



nil,. 



Oil. 



I'tiitit 



uiliiri; \. ;oVE 



nl ii. sv- I'.-i 1 1 
Published 

,.,: Building 

EMERY 

■ Managing 



■r of tin- Massachusetts 
■^ t t \ Thursday l/v tin* 



Stat 

-m-i 



foil 



Telethon* 11' 



M 



MOORE '3», Editor-in-Chief 
Edlioi MAQELLE BOOTH 



Editor 



t<> \ i ; i more ui ten 
I got back ai'ur Thanksgiving 
ml here's the first letter already. 
There is just as much . now here as 
there was in the driveway last Fii- 
daj morning. Everything is so white 
and pretty. I wish you could cone 

illt here to sec the campus Covered 

with mow, But don't come Sunday 
because I'll be much too busy study- 
ing and things. 

Could \<>u send me five dollars by 



Stockbridge re, DeerfteU 
Claying their final game <>f the 
ea on, the Stockbridge Ram-Roda 
went into the game full strength for 
.In first time in three weeics, sines 
•\)t-y lost to Hyannis State Teacher 
College on November iw with a score 
of 14-0. Captain Houle, Dick Spaik-, 
Norm Lawton, and Meruit* Chartier, 
who had been on the sidelines, re- 
turned ami once more Stockbridge K<it 
oil' to a flying start. 

The "Ram-Rods" were rated the 



return mail, please Mother. I know under dog, but came through with a 



Mi ll\l. KOAIMI 



C'ampiiK 

JOHN K. FILIOS ii. Editor 
BEHTINA HALL I'M. Art Editor 
MARY T. MKEHAN '39 
FRANCES S. MERRILL '39 
JOSKI'l' BART '40 
NANCY E. 1.1 CE '40 
JACQUELINE L. STEWART 'i" 
LORETTA KENNY 'II. Set retary 



Sports 



WILLIAM T. i.ddHW IN 
HAROLD FORRES! "41 
JOHN HAYES Ml 
ELIZABETH COFFIN I 
MARY HON Mil K IJ 
WILLI VM I»W v|.i; u 

1,1 l>" I I • , -'I. | Kl,| t 

LOUISE POTTBB '42 

Feature 
LLOYU I*.. COPELAND 'a 
alYliON FISHER '89 
KATHLEEN TI'I.I.V m 
EVERETT K SPENCER 



■|| 



Editor 



'40 



Ii. ARTHUR COPSON '40. Editor 
CAUL FREEUMAN Ml 
KENNETH HOWI.ANh Ml 
ALBERT YANOW Ml 

!:.".;:: i:am hyman M2 

Stoi kin iiIki- < in respondi'iit 
JOHN KKI.su S'S8 

( ullciro Quarterly 
SIDNEY ROSEN '.'id, Editor 

rubert McCartney '40 

f ii...- 1 KR ki I: \i.us\ icz n 

Financial Adviser 

PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

Faculty Adviser 
DR. MAXWELL II. COLDBERG 



I K'»t my allowance for December 
when I was home, but this is some- 
thing special. That Military Ball IS 
going to take a little more money 
than I thought, and I want to show 
Daisy May a good time. .Just befon 
I'm Koi'itf t 



tie, 14 all. 
The bo\ 
Hey 



from the North, though 
hey fought hard, were out-played 
through most of the game; however, 
they succeeded in scoring twice in 
the final minutes of the game by us- 



the da? 

lecture about hurricanes in the M 
building. Shell like it I'm sure 
cause there are going to he slides 
illustrate the lecture. You know, 
will be dark like the movies. 



take her to a ing two forward pass 
em 



to 
it 



Hi B1NE88 BOARD 
U.I.KN GOVE '■'■'■>. Business Managar 



ABRAHAM CARP '39, Adv. M«p. J - HENRY WINN 

GEORGE <'. BENJAMIN '89, Subacriptton Manogei 

liusiness Assistants 



39, Cir, 



i'.. BUCENE REN \ULT Mo 
ROGER II LINDSEY '40 
IOSEPI1 R. CORDON, JR. Ml 
lit R. LA LOR Ml 



Mgr. 



in 



SUBSCRIPTIONS SJ.im PER YEAR 



CHARLES A. POWERS 

ROBERT ROHMAN '40 
EDWARD J. O'llRIEN Ml 
DAVID I'. VAN MKTKR Ml 

SINGLE COPIES 10 CENTS 



M.ik.- all onlii . payable to The MasNiirhu- 
«etts i olleKiiin. In case of ebansra of address, 
aubacrlber will please notify the business man- 
agar as toon :i> poaalble. Alumni, undergrad- 
uate and faculty contributions are sincerely 
encouraged. Any (•ommiinicntious or notice 
must be received nt the Collrgian office befon 
9 o'clock, Monday evening. 



1438 



Member 1939 

Plssociated Golle&iate Press 

Distributor of 

Golle6iate Di6est 



Enteral as secoud-clasa matter at the Am- 
herst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in Section 

1103, Art of October 1917, authorized August 
20. 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter & Morehouse, Cook PI., 
Amherst. Mass.. Telephone IS 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Chicago * Boston ■ Los Angeles - san Fhabcisco 



I finally found out who those 
men here in the black hats with 
red trimtttagfl are. Remember the 
last time you were here you ask- 
ed why I tipped my hat to them. 
At first I thought it was because 
t h e y were senators. Keally, 
though, they're more than that. 
Those men are a kind of Varsity 
club. You see, most of them are 
big-shot football and basketball 
players. I guess that's why they 
made us take our hats off to 
them. I didn't mind (hough, be- 
cause I'll take my hat off to a 
•rood athlete any day. 

Something funny happened to me 
the other day. A man who works 
around the campus grounds stopped 
me and said with an air of secrecy 
in his voice, "Hey, you. you'd better 
keep your eyes open around here to- 
morrow. I was startled! Vivid pic- 
tures of someone assassinating the 
president or robbing- the dean came 



The seniors who have played their 
final game for Stockbridge were Cap- 
tain Proc Houle, Dick Sparks, Nor- 
man Lawton, Charles Manilell, Cas- 
per I'erednia, Charles Russo, and 
Oscar Bodweli. These boys played 
'heads-up" football all through their 
.wo years for Stockbridge and will not 
soon be forgotten for their fine sports- 
man hip and spirit. 

Bodweli did a fine job as fullback 
and carried the ball over the line 
for a point after Sparks and Lawton 
held up their side of the line very 
veil and starred on the defense. 

Captain Houle starred throughout 
and kept his team traveling. He also 
-liil a line job calling the plays and 
also made an excellent place kick 
after the first touchdown. Turnbull, 
MacDonald, Corfield, and othe other 
members of the team played an ex- 
cellent game as the Stockbridge stu- 
dent body looked Oil. 

After doing so much cheering- at 
uch an exciting game, the student 
body was thankful for the refresh- 
ments which the Deerfiehl Academy 
30 obligingly provided. 

The starting line-up is as follows: 

Left End, "Hob" Gamache; Right 



GROWING 

UP 



Not quite another year old, the Collegian Quarterly 

will blossom forth in its fall edition in a new coat of 

modern magazine size and with impressive literary System. I thought it was a 

thing, so noble and elevatinir 



to my mind! Quickly 1 asked the man ].] n( \ "|!ernie" Chartier; Left Tackle, 

why. He replied, "How do you expect "Hick" Sparks; Left Halfback, Leo 

to see if you don't." I had to laugh. Mm-Donald; Left Guard "Kd" Kon- 

Remember the first letter I wrote (eczny; Right Halfback, "Jim" Turn- 

Prom here telling all about the Honor hull; Center, "Vin" Sullivan; Fu'l- 

well 
The 



back, Oscar Bodweli; Right 
I aptain M Proc" Houle; Quai 

"Mel" Cleveland; Right 
"Norm" Lawton. 

Substitutions: Johnson, 
I Bingham, Frappier, Mamie: | 
field, Corbett, I'erednia, Tayi. 

Captain "1'roc" Houle and 
Spark- expect to continue tl, 
ball and educational careers at 
Bastem University next fall. 

Coach Loring E. Hall am 
that there will be several new 
played on the Stockbridge 
schedule next fall. In addition y. 
mont and Deerfield Academy, whu 
have been regularly included I 
few years, new additions a 
State Institute of Applied A 
ture at Farmingdale, Long L-lar.d, 
known as the "New York Aggio* 
taking- the place of the Natiomj 
Farm School at Doyleston, I'. 
vania; Kimball Union Acaden .: 
Meredith, New Hampshire, in plat? 
of Willistoii Academy, and the Went- 
worth In.-tiute, of Boston, in place 
of Green Mountain Junior < '"liege; 
and Gushing Academy, of Ashbonv 
ham, in place of I'ittsfield High. 

The Stockbridge Cross Country 
team, with "Reu Mackie aa captain. 
completed a successful season, having 
won all hut one meet out of four 
schools played. The scores for the 
season are as follows: (low .-.core 
wins) : 
S. S. A. 

'J4 lushing Academy 
25 Springfield College Prosh :;2 
2!) Gardner High School 2>'' 

IS West Springfield H. S. 

Candidates for winter track ; :- 
asked to have cards signed by 1' 
tor Radcliffe this week. 

Rev. K. C. MacArthur will 
at Convocation this week. Mr. Ma> 
Arthur will be well rembertd bj 
many of the seniors as the leader K* 
a series of in. piling- talks given It 
the Sociology Club last year. 
William Phillips, American Arab* 

adir t i naly, was on campus last 
Friday visiting his son, "Hill" I'hil- 
1'ps, 8*37, wh.o is majoring in Fruit 
Growing. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Wesley Foundation 

"Relig-ious Adjustments of the Stu- 
dent" will be the topic for discussion 

meeting 
The dis- 



•onU'nl. Not marking a birthday, but a substantial stage in its| t " in * T ' *° , 

,. ** , ,. . ,. , , -other day I saw some upper-classm-n 

process oi growing up, the Quarterly, under the guiding hand of \ COVfint[ from earh other during an 
Sidney Kosen and his editors, will appear tomorrow for the first oxaminntion In one of my classes. 
time as a magazine of .Massachusetts State College, still fostered {According to the Honor System I'm 
by the Collegian but like a cuckoo in its phenomenal growth. From supposed to tell them to stop or that 

a two page supplement in a regular issue of the weekly paper, ™ «P°*J *«* * *» H,,nor ^ u ?" 

. , , i.i • «• , i r <H1. Gee, I wish I had the nerve to do tl • gtrndav at the weekly 

this voice of the literati has jumped through the pamlul stages of ^ ^ jf , (M thoy)fl throw me [n «..^ j-y^ Foundati(m ; 

four, six. and eight page supple : ent on its own to a supplement tno pon H. 

if which the Collegian can truly be proud. After Chem lab Wednesday after- 

Professor David Morton, well-known Amherst poet and teach- noon I didn't feel like going up to 
.,■ after seeing an issue of the <»uarU,-..v. said "I an, in„„;,ss,d J*^« - £-*£ ^S 
vith the excellent material in the Quarterly and its attention to (o snmf , ||mtfc frnm t)l(1 ro( . ords tho .. 
the P.rst requisite of literature, interest for the reader. Its quality | iaV( . there. A very select clique wa«i 
struck me as much above the average." Vith such a recognition, in the room having Brahm's Third 
there can be no doubt hut that the (Hmrlerly is also worth the Symphony played. They teemed to 
. , e know all about everything connected 

.pace and paper used for it. 1^ m ^, , trfed to pnter thp con . 

11 has hmg been a recognized fact that Massachusetts State J versation a few times but they are 
College harbors students of unusual literary ability. This very an unhospitable group, tft maybe 
fact was one Of the principle arguments used for the granting of they don't talk to freshmen. 



cussion will be based 
faith Conference to be 
urday. 



in the Inter- 
held her Sat- 



an A.B. degree by the Trustees of the college and has greatly 
Influenced the growth and improvement of the arts courses in the 
curriculum. The interest shown by students and faculty in the 
liberal arts and in this recent literary project has helped tre- 
mendously in broadening the somewhat stifled view of culture 
held by the student here. 

Although the hour has not yet come when the Quarterly 
an swing itself without the backing of the Collegian, the time 
must s-oon come, provided its present standard continues to im- 
prove as it has in the past two years, when it will be able to stand 
•n its own feet as a separate division of student and campus life. 
There are several college magazines of differing types now 
printed, but with few exceptions, they are composites of contri- 
butions from many colleges edited by ore board. Such magazines 
,s the Collegiate Review, College Years, are representatives of this 
order. The field of magazines edited and contributed to by mem- 
bers of one student body is limited. It is this held on which the 
Quarterly is now charging, and with a very determined and well 
acki d effort. 

When the time comes for the Collegian Quarterly to break 

t. ; apron strings and e m erg e on its own. it may find itself on 

rough waters. If, however, the attitude of the college body will 

hold as it has till now, and will grow with the Quarterly, there 

can be no doubt that its life will be long and interesting. 



Well. I've got to go now. Some of re jj cg 
the boys are going to 'Hump tonight ^^ ^ 
and I m going with them. We re go- 
ing to a kind of smoker at a place 
called Rahar's Inn. I'll write so m 
again and don't forget the five dol- 
lars. 

Your loving- son, 

Abercrombie 



■ n-iw Bus 

The outing club features a Snow 
Pus Trip to Mt. Creylock, with Smith 
Mt. Holyoke, and Amherst colleges. 
The bus will leave the east expert- 
RM nt station, Sunday at !>:00. A 
record crowd is expected to sig-n at 
the library for this trip. 

The Outing Club meeting- will be 

'held Tuesday at French Hall at 7:0ft 

Seaton Mendel will speak on Indian 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Kriilny. ncrpinhcr 2 
Military Hall 

Skrinn Xi, I |>. n 
I'hvsirs Meeting 



I colleges 



Saturday, Orrrmhcr 8 
Iiit.'1-lii'liv.'iniis Council 

da new 
Amherst Nature Cltrti 



cloned to 



Tuesday, Dcroinhcr 4 

Fin- Arts 

Jitney Player* "Both Year Kbuwa" 

Mawv.ll AltdWMMI, is©*. Hmv.li 



There will he an Important meeting 
of the Newman Club Thursday eve- 
ning at seven o'clock in the Mem 
building. All members please attend. 
Flockey Candidates 

All candidates for the varsity hoek- 
0V squad will report to Coach Hall 
Friday afternoon, in The Physical 
Education building, room 1<>, at 4:45. 
Any sophomores interested in trv- 
'pt out for assistant manag-er, will 
: port to Ed Willard. varsity mana- 
ger, in the I'hys. Kd. buildi""- any 
af'ern on the week of IV • . iheT ?>■ 
I. R. C. Speaker 

Continued "n Page 6 



RAY HEATING'S HAM) 

(. ;/.' n$H I \rtnn PUp I 
Cowl.' . ! i>\> M:iromlipr : Cadet Lt. ' " 
<;, ii'in. Do <>thy Nichols : Cedel Lt. 
Hay Ion, Rather! m Lowney of R. I- BMj 
C ulii Lt. Robert Matter. Virjtinta Om 
mink'.- of Smith ; CuuVt Lt. Lloyd It Q«* 
lanil, tilrf— Simon of Woreenti i ' "•! « 
Lawrcnea Johnson. Patricia Hum "f BM 
Quiet Lt. Si-aton Mendall. Pemo ft 
Ckdat Lt. Rbtwrt Cain. Julia Lyiirh . CtM 

Lt. II. Qardnar Andfrm-n. Heter HMii- 4 
Newton ; CauVt Lt. Gaors> Benjarol», \ lM 
CHIlin of tee ; Ca.Iot Lt. Clifford 
i-ott. Phyllis Gladden of Smith; OiA'tt. 
lialph L. Foster. Audrey Larribee ol 
|aM : an.l Ca«l*t Lt. Donald Calo, ami M«"- 

{arte Erwin 

Cadet BgL P'rank R. L. Daley, J' ■ vlr- 
rin in Clark of W.stfi.dd : CaiM Sjrt. 0** 
Thomas. Deaiwr RirchaH of S|.i-iin-.fi'-l>l 
det Strt. CSarald X. Tallx.t. Sh. i.-.-s CrowH 

Cail.t Set. Warren Tappln, Patrtcta B»W 
.if Smith : Ci.d.t BBt. K-'!" ' """"' '** 

Sullivan of Smith: Cadet Sirt. * 

ar.ls. Frances Hrnckett of Smith CadH ^ 

L. Flatehaf Proaty. PriBcllla n 



Cadet » 



COLLEGIAN SELECTS 



l.y 



\VcHn«'sdn> 


December ■"> 






Smith ( 


oUaaja Coaeerl 






Intarnat' 


l Relation* CM 


Hi 


. Henry 


Will 


am». 7 :ini. I-H 


Club 




Thursday. 


December 6 






Yonne 


•'acuity firoup 






Hand II 


>h ear sal 







Continued from Page 1 
'< ■ a pledge of Alpha Kpsilon Pi. 
George Litchfield is a graduate of 
Wayland High School, and is a mem- 
ber of the college band. Louise Pot- 
ter was graduated from Ware High 
School, and is a member of the Out- 
ing Club. 



,/ « • 



Svrt. John Swi-nson. Ann CoOTW 
MgM Slater. Phyllis Tolmm: i '<'!•' 
Jam-s Botklar. Hilda Jarisch M Si 
Qidet S»rt. Kvi S<holz. Judy K 
bridffe; (Mat Set. Wilfrid Winter. VW 
liah-: ('inlet Set. Oniric- I' 
trice Wood; Cadet Set. Jul" >•" 
Moultis; Cad.t Set. FianM' P** 
Malm ; Cadel Set. I ;..>".'" P 
voni ; Cadet Set. Han.hl Griffll "•''' 
Ciul.-t Set. Willard Porter, 
ami Cadet Set. Ml s ' ' 

Stewart. 

Richard P o w ar a , Kath.Tir.. 

eeatar i Phillip Burtrun, •' 
Smith ; Koliert Sheldon. !'■ 
Fian K.ville. Kuth Hdh. 
Hetty Mutes j Art Waslih i 
of Smith : John Hcyman. 
Tain in Stuart, Ann CofTorai 

Mary Knlsten of Mouil 
Harny. Candace Preston CM 
Henry I'arzyih. Wnnda Ki 
Haivey Harke, Virginia !'• 
son, Barba ra Wnitner i Rooi 

Harper | Kichaid Taft. H' 
Tetro. Marjorla Unmnn ' 
Flynn of Sprinefield : Vi 
Kell : Kd Hr.«l,.rlck, Mir 
W. Washburn, Ruth Thou 
Elliot. Nahell Preston: F^l 
Sherman ; Hoy Minick. II 
Hairy Scollin. Jean PhiH ■ 
Patience Sanderson: Ftal 

Benjamin of Laa I aaw 

Parks: D. Arthur Cop*"' 
Rn«er Decker. Ruth B»P 
Joseph Doherty, Ronalind 
Willinm Con, and (inrnct I 



' 
K"> 



„f Vie**' 
Httr** 1 ' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DECEMBER I. HC.'i 



MAXWELL ANDERSON'S PUY "BOTH YOUR 
HOUSES" TO BE PRESENTED ON TUESDAY 

Jitney Players Will Produce Famous Pulitzer Prize Drama— Story 

is of a Young Radical Who Plights With Parties and 

Politics in Congress 



WITH JITXKY PLAYERS 




BENTLEY'S WORLD - FAMOUS COLLECTION 
OF SN0WFLAKE PHOTOS IN WILDER HALL 

Pictures by Authority in Striking Exhibit Japanese 1'nnts An 

Shown in Memorial Building Travel Posters Hung 

in Physical Education Building 














.'< 



w 



T • 



v- N 






Harvard- Cambridge 
'Divorce' Burlesqued 

C t V 

• On 
Se- 

ncn- 

H t 



I Acw 




»*War 



a ti,cUmv«»«W2. f , c<# v,onV>yt 
tn «r rrtancen*«P«« 



a. ^«9* 



c««»n- 



Another Dry Night Club 

©llowinq (ri 

Ursities of ^ 
? Univt-rsity % 

•ened a 

Manrlv 

the ope i 
«*f|otu-s Kuh 
Jrtion ol (I 
Ur ent 
nged fo 



Wide World 



til is a Rfnal bul 
illcct ions uf photo- 
akr;-, taken li> Wi) 
|pi devoted his lif» 
ip>\\ (lakr formf am 
the fore moat author 

ordinary New ' r»i 
• became intei • t< 
mowflake formn h; 

throtifrh a hum r. 
,- developed met h <.- 
nicrographn of 
dwllakcs. A pibneei 
fevoted 'J. r > year* ii 
i^ a si-rics of |ih'it< • 
hi<'li are lined every- 
>rl<l of ail and iri- 

hs ar«- interesting. 
if their untiBoalheac 
beauty of the f< rmi 
•i>ms incredible tdat 
( form ihould «'xiHt 
ias caught a small 
tflnite variations of 
Engl) different 

IC Prints 

of Japanese \n ■ ; i 
unn in the Memori- 
unuaually lim . ■■« 
llection of far 

liri'll |illt OUt '•' 
i, hut also for < oir,- 

The collection <-*.n- 

greatefH artists iri 
prints are «>f \;.- >- 
•ro is great i i ; 
f pattern and • 
. Japanene Pi 
iII.tI them . ■ 

duplicate* • 

it inn can \>> 

Pontera 

Ms in Ihi' I'i 

tv., although 
iro unuRuallj d 
i an emphaab 
on. The colon ha • 
iih a clarit) ^.h l 
viT\ effect ive M l 
poster of N'« « 
large nnowflaki 
the colon in i' » 
ided, and tin • • 
rikin^. The n pi 
color sketch < ' ■ 
mountain! 
ie enlarged pi 

in art ioi 

r, The ptwtei ' 
it t It- more 

HI . Illlt . . • 

i-r. wit Ii nil < 

!: ■ 



i miitini nf 
I ue da) . d' 

Parley 1 II Cli 
allng wild :mi 

presented. All . 

■ lilrn ar< 
ml are entitled ' 

Ctom) " and 

Ai A< ut< ' ■ 



ty Sets 

I I'ilTI'S 

i Mod«-llcil 



antcrn.- 
ig Can« 
Boxes 



*s Gift Shop 



Ill K MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER I. 191 



THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, TIM KSI»W DECEMItKK I, 19 




BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BART 



STOCKBRIDGE 



By John Krlsu 



flSaseacbueenP 'Collegian 



Dear M<>m, 

I . aid I'd write to you i ore wie 
. h M I g ■' bacl after Thanksgiving 
n -i here' tl e first letl it already 
PI re i iust as much . now here a 



Stockbridge va, Deerfleld k Oscar Uodwell; 1 

aying their final game of the Captain "I'roc" Houle; Quai 

i: " 'Mel" < Kin 

. ri ■ " l rton. 

ill-"' pen i - , lohnoi n 



ti 



OlHrc: Ro 



u;i'in i; \ N'tJVES 



<!>mpu> 

JOHN K. KIl.loS 'In, 
BETTINA HALL '8§, 
MARY T. MLKHAN ' 
Kl; \NCKS S. MERRIL 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY K. LI CE '40 
JACQUELINE L. STE 
LORETTA KENNY '41 
WILLIAM T. oooiiW 
HAROLD FORRES! I 
JOHN HAYES "41 
i-'.LI/. \IU.IH COFFIN 
MARY DON Mil E I. 
WILLI \M DWYER i 

i. in" ■ i i ' ■ [EL 

LOUISE POTTER *42 

Feature 
l.l.o> UB. I OPELAN1 
MYKdN FISHER ' «t 
K \ I HLEEN Till V 
EVERETT U SPENC" 



IBRAH \M C \ l; I ' 'Sfi 

(I 



E. Ll 'KM. RENAU 
ROGER II I.INHSFA 
lOSEl'H R liORDOh 

a .:: it la lor 

SUBSCRIPTIONS IS. 



Make all order* pa: 

tetts Colll-ginU. Ill ra.- 

subscriber will plaass 

*|[cr a* soon aa imMsi 

uatf and faculty con 
•neourag*ad. Any eo) 

must hf rerfivd at t 

9 o'clock, Monday >v 



Bntcr«l aa Kprond-c 
heist Post Office. 
Special rate of postal 
I 103. Art of Octobo. 

20. I'M-. 

Printed by Carpente 
Amherst. Mas 



GROWING N 

UP w: 

m 

content. Not n 

process <>t' gro? 

Sidney Rosen ; 

time as a map:; 
>y the Collegia 
t two page su 

this voice of th 

four, six, and i 
d which the C 

Professor 

>>• after seeing 

ih the excel 

the frst requifi 

-.true!, me as i 

there can be 1 

space and pap< 

It has Ion 

College harbo: 

fact was one i 

in A.B. degrt 

Influenced the 

curriculum, T 

liberal arts a 

mendously In 

leld by the st 

Although 

an swing its 

must soon co 

prove as it ha 

on its own fe» 

There ar 

printed, but 

buttons from 

as the ( olli'jfi 

order. The ti« 

bers of one s 

Quarterly is 

■ d effoti 

When 11 

t apron stt 

•< i i«cii water 

hold as it rw 

~an he no do 




Co-ed Rules Sports Desk 

At least Mary Kay Scott does half of the time on the Drake Uni- 
versity Times-Delphic, where she was caught by the cameraman 
jotting down her sports round-up (or the day. 



... on the Louisiana 
Polytechnic Institute 
campus is Virginia Fra- 
zier, leading vote-getter 
in a campus contest. 





Champion Cake-making Pencil Pusher 

Pacemake cakemaker'was the title conferred on Jean Unger in the cake- 
making contest recently sponsored by the University of Akron Buchttlitt 
Editor Richard Greenwald is doing the tasting. 



Net Guards Talk Over Day's Game 

Winnie Hawley of Drexel Institute and Virginia Romeyn of the University of Pennsylvania, 
goal guards for their respective hockey teams, go over the exciting plays of the game won by 
Penn, 8 to 1 Wid€ Wofld 



Modem Cafeteria for Hungry Student 

Early this month the University of Omaha moved into a new 
campus — the only completely air-conditioned university 
Here's a scene in the building's up-to-date cafeteria. 



,e-buildi«9 

the wo'ld 



MAXWELL ANDERSON'S PLAY "BOTH YOUR 
HOUSES" TO BE PRESENTED ON TUESDAY 

jjtj w Players Will Produce Famous Pulitzer Prize Drama Story 

Is of a Young Radical Who Fights With Parties and 

Politics in Congress 



WITH JITNEY PLAYKKS 



r* m 



BENTLEY'S WORLD - FAMOUS COLLECTION 
OF SNOWFLAKE PHOTOS IN WILDER HALL 

Pictures by Authority in Striking Exhibit Japanese Print- An 

shown in .Memorial Building Travel Posters Hung 

in Physical Education Building 




Walking on Air 

An alert cameraman caught this walking-on-air act as Holy Cross College defeated Georgia 
Tech, 29 to 6, to tumble the engineers from the unbeaten class. acm 



Moving Flag Paces Swimmers 

Forty different speeds are obtainable on the electrified, automatically reversible 
swimming pacer which Don Park, University of California at Los Angeles coach, 
has invented. 



Call a halt 



on nee 



di ess NERVE STBAIN 



HE'S RESTING 
NERVES 




GREYHOUND 

Swift, graceful, and remarkably wise. Ancient Egyp- 
tian and Creek royalty stamped him as a symbol of 
aristocracy. Distinguished lines and proud bearing 
can be found on Egyptian carvings dating to 350© 
B. ( :. Racing has made this breed popular in the U. S. 



ITS THRILLING to watch the flashing grey- despite increasing ten- 
hound in full flight. But it's important sion, strain. Be kind to 
to note that when the race is over he rats your nerves if you want 
-as the greyhound above is doing now. them to be kind to you. Pause a while, 
Though the dog's highly keyed nervous now and then. LET UP— LIGHT UP A 
s% stem closely resembles our own, the dog CAMEL! Let the frequent enjoyment of 
relaxes instinctively! Life as it is today leads Camel's mild, ripe tobaccos help you take 
MS to ignore fatigued nerves. Wc carry on life more calmly, pleasantly, profitably! 

They know how pleasant life can be when they 

"LET UP— LIGHT UP A CAMEL" 




"A THOUSANDTH OF AN INCH is im- 
portant in my work," says Charles Dietrich, 
lens grinder. " I've got to be absolutely ac- 
curate, and so I've got to concentrate. Nat- 
urally, my nerves would be on the spot if 
I didn't pause now and then. 1 let up— light 
up a Camel. Camels comfort my nerves." 

TRAP-SHOOTING CHAMPION of North 
America (Women's Clay Targets), Mrs. Lela 
Hall, says: "Holding a shooting title four 
years straight puts plenty of pressure on the 
nerves. I give my nerves frequent rests, es- 
pecially during matches. I let up— light up 
a Camel - often .' Camels are so soothing." 





\ 



: 5£aS ^ ' Cw " """ I » rTwr, » ,. oat. ft* ,- -at, <,», m rat 




a. J BatmMa TaMrr* 



I ET UP- LIGHT UP A CAMEL ! 

Smokers find Camel's Costlier Tobaeeos are SOOTHING TO THE NERVES 



ill III U in..- bui 

•Uectioni Hi' photo 
nkes, taken bj A i 
ho devoted hit lif* 
nowflake formt an< 
the foremoat author 

ordinary New * ■ , 
i became mo • t< 
■nowflake form* h 

through a ii 
.• developed im i 
Blici Hi' ra i'li; id .. 
bwflakes. A pioneer 
levoted 'J^ r > yeai 
i"; a scries of photi • 
nich are used every 
'lid of arl and ii 

lis arc interesl > 
»f their unUHUalneiw 
beauty <>f the f< mi 
temn incredible that 
J fnrin should oist 

uu caught a Rmall 

dinite variation- of 
dngly dlfferei I 

la Prints 

of .lapaiii -i | ■ tl 
ling m t he Mei 

unusually lint 
lleetion of r ..<- 
been put out 
i, hut alao fin . 
The collection i • i 
greatest artiati In 
print.' are id 

■re in c I im; 
e pattern ami • 
.l.i i > ■ i ti. i 

illect then , • 
duplicate! 

Ction ran hi 
Posters 

i in thi PI 

if. aitllOUgl 

ii< unuHuall) ' 

i an emphasi 
■ in. The color" hi 

i'li a (iant.\ 

verj effective M si 

pn ti i ol '■■ 
large snowflaki 
> he colore ii, ■ • 

ided, and t In .. ■ • 

rikinc. Tin n i 

color sketi I 

mountaim 

ii enlarged 
■ ,n tioi 

> iii. i ■ 

rUle inor< 



i neettn^ 

I ii< daj . 1 1 

laiiev t 
almc with 
pre enter! 

Mi. p lilm 

ml .in enl 

\. A. ii 



ty Sets 

, Plea 
t Modelled 

aril • i n 
!*>: Cans 

Pioxis 



\s inft Shop 



TIIK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THUtSDAY. DKCEMIIEIt I, 193 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Till RSDAY. DECEMBER 




/Hbaeeacbuseltw Colleqian 



BA R T E R I N 6 
WITH JOE MAUI 

Dear Mom, 

I said I'll write ' w>re uiten 

I. ■! i <> ■' Lack al'K r Thanksgiving 
■ i ;,.! e first letter already. 

There is lust as much - now here 



* 



STOCKBRIDGE 



Hy John Kelso 



Stockbridge vs. Deerfield back, Oscar Bodwell; 1 

. i final game of the Captain "Proc" Houle; Quai 

n. the Sto .. ■■ Ram Ro •■.'■■ i ,. an A- i.» i ,. h i 



Sorm 1 ;nvton. 



Oill 



Olli-- : Ri 



M-n 



,1,'iliri: V, iivk 



tmpui 



JOHN 


K. I'll. 


!OS '40, 


HKT'I II 


J \ II M.L '». 


MARY 


I M I 


KHAN • 


Ki: \\< 




MKRRU 


rosi c 


' BAR 


r 'Hi 


NAN("i 


K. 1. 


1 ICE "40 


JACQU 


BLINK 


I. STK 


LORET 


1 A KI 


NNY '41 


WILLI. 


\M T. 


i.ool i\\ 


HAROI 


n i hi 


RES! '4 


JOHN 


HAYES Ml 


BLIZ \ 


u-.ni 


i ( ) 1 KIN 


tyi A R Y 


IMIN \ 


III i 


M IL1 i 


*> M 1 ' 1 


\ Y IK ' ' 


LOUIS 


B POT 


I'KU M2 


Feature 




I.l.OYI 


i: ( t 


PELANI 


MYROr 


- I-ISI 


EH '39 


KATH1 


,i;en ' 


II II Y 




TT R. 


SI'ENC. 


IBRA 


1AM i 


\K'I' ';;; 


E, hi 


IEN k 


REN AD 


ROUE] 


; ii i 


.INKSK' 


IOSE1 


II R 1 
;H i; 


IORDOI 

I.AI.Oli 


IUBSI 


RIPTIONS |2. 


Make 


all 01 


dera p», 


Mttl C 


> i 1 « K > >> > > 


. In cai 


subscri 


n-r wil 


|tl.-asi' 


tlfi-r B| 


.^iinli 


II {M 


ii.it>' ■ 


,j f.,(. 


illy con 


mu-.t 1 




...1 Ml 1 


B o'clt 


ek. M. 


nday ev 



Ent«»ri",l as ■econd-i 
hei ' i'n.it Ofl 

■pecial rate of lKjstfl 
I 103, Art of OrU>b<> 
JO. I 9 I - 

' by • 'a 
Amherst, Mas 



GROWING N 
UP w 

n 

intent. Not n 

irocess of gtw 

.Sidney Rosen ; 

*,inn' as a magi 

>y the Collegia 

i two page su 

this voice of th 

four, six. and 

if which the ( 

Professor 

QT after seeinj. 
' ith the excel 

the frst requii 
i\ ruck me as • 

there can be i 

space and pap 

It has lor 

illege harbo 

fact was i>ne i 

m A.B. degn 

influenced the 

curriculum. T 

liberal arts a 

mendously in 

held by the si 

Although 

an swing its 

must soon co 

prove as it hi 

on its ov, n Pe 
There ai 
printed, but 
buttons from 
is the Collegi 
order. The (i 
bers of one i 
Quarterly is 
;•;•'.< d effort 
When tl 
i: apron st 
rough water 
hold as it hi 
can he no dc 




Wo. I rem§ntne Lab o ratory Head 

Dr. Irene Levis, internationally known micro-analytical chemi$t,| 
duties as first woman laboratory head at Case School of Applied! 



Mf/.dr World 




Windows Show Robot's Workings 

"Rollo the Robot", University of California's radioactive man. poses 
with laboratory assistant Robert Welch before leaving for the Golden 
Gate Exposition, where he'll show visitors how the human body re- 
acts to radioactive substances. Wide WoHd 




4 



/ST 



V 




Sponsors 

With football helmets « I 
four Oglethorpe Universitr| 
go into a huddle to pd'J 
the ball. (L rorjW 
Bone, Grace Ruthin, I 



Room Service, ^ 

.■ertjjf hotel is* 

iagcd the Hote Ne* ' 

•• a day to g« r : 
1 1 it 



service waiter. 



Mew Pres ide nt AecetVes B a dg e of Office 

John R. Williams, president of Kent State University trustees, in- 
vests Dr. K C. Leebrick with the symbol of authority as president of 
the university. Chancellor W. P. Graham, Syracuse University (cen- 
ter), presented Dr. Leebrick for induction 



MAXWELL ANDERSON'S PLAY "BOTH YOUR WIT " J1TNEV PLAYBRS 
HOUSES" TO BE PRESENTED ON TUESDAY 

Jitney Players Will Produce Famous Pulit/.er Prize Drama Story 

is of a Young Radical Who Fights With Parties and 

Politics in Congress 




BENTLEY'S WORLD - FAMOUS COLLECTION 
OF SNOWFLAKE PHOTOS IN WILDER HALL 



Pictures by Authoritj in Striking Exhibit Japanese Print* An 

Shown in Memorial Building Travel Posters Hung 

in Physical Education Building 




Mud Slinging of a Non-Political Nature 

. . . featured the annual Mud Brawl of freshman and sophomore teams at Santa Barbara State 
College, in the sunshine state. 



5s 



¥ 



I 




■ ■ 



u'm 



She's Just One of Five 
m "'"« baton wielders who lead the South Dakota Stste College 
f^ c « oand when it parades down the street. Joan Swenson s • 
1 «nd the youngest of the quintet. *«■■ 




ill is 8 in,. Ihj 
■Recti ont of photi 
ake8, taken In A i 

bo devoted hit lio 
inowfiake form.' an< 
tlic foremost author- 

, ordinary Ne* I 
ii became inten t< 
■nowfiake form* bj 
through a mim n 
\ developed metl 
micrographs of .i' 
owflaki's. A pibneei 
devoted 26 yean b 
ig a BerieB of i>h.>t« ■ 
'hich are used every 
't'M df art and n 

ihs are inter* • i » 
nf their unnsoalneaa 
beauty of the formi 
«'»'tns Incredible that 
■ f form should «-?on1 
has Taught a small 
nfinitf variations of 
kingly different •! 

MM* Prints 

nf JapaneHe pi i I ' 
'iiinp in tin- Memori- 
i unusually fini 
ollection "f r .-' 

s been put nul o1 
»n, but also for i i 

. The collection con 

c r 1 1 aif t art ltd i ii 
print - are oi . • 

lerr is ^icat ; ; 

he pattern and i 
es Japanese i 
collect t hem , i 
'. duplicate! 
lection can l>« 

I Posters 
;t«-rs in the PI 

iiiij.'. althougl 

arc unusual! . 
ith an emphasii 

t ton. The color;- ha 

with a claritA wh ' 

s ver\ effective ^l 

he poster nf 

a large snowflaki 

c; the colors ,i thii 
lender!, and I h< 
striking, Th< r. i 
ercolor sketcl 

mountain 
i he ciila rgod pi 
T m actio) 
ling, Tin i :■ 
little on,,, 

other., hut i ■ • 
with ■ 

I 



.1 ,'Jleet iU[_ 

ii 'I uesda y, Di 
be Parte) i I 
dealing witl 
ne presented A 
.. These film 

.i in! ,ii'i . ' ' I i 

Mi. i i omj " 
For An Ac lit- 

i\." 



vity Sets 

teen Pieo 
ullv Modelled 



I Lanterns 

(ring Can- 
ing BoXl - 

It. 



er's Gift Shop 



THE MAS! \( [I17SETTS COLLEGIAN, TH UBS DAY, DECEMBER 1. !<>:s. 




/Ifcaseacbuselw Colleqian 



BA R T E R 1 N G 


Willi JOE BABT 


rear Mom, 


1 said I'd ■ I ■ ■■>■■ uite 


h ii I go1 back rhanksjrivini 


i :i here' tl ■ ttci alreadj 


just much snow hei «• a 



STOCKBRIDGE 

liy John Kelso 



Stockbridge v*. Deerfletd back, Oseai iiodwell; 

their final game of the Captain "Proc" Houle 



the Stockbridge 



Ram I: ■ I 



1 1 " I 



1..1 



om 



■ iniiri: \ mvk 



:ini|HI . 

IUHN E. Kil.los '40, 
BETH IN A HALL ;'M. 
MARY T. MHKHAN ' 
FR \NCKS S. MKItlHI 
JOSEPH BART '40 
NANCY E. II CE 'I" 
JACQUELINE I. n 
LORETTA KENNY '41 
WILLIAM T. <;<)i»|i\V 
HAROLD FORREST ' 
JOHN HATES H 
BLIZAHKTH CI 'I FIN 
in \RY iui.. \ni K ' I 
WILLIAM UWYEH ' 
i,ii ■■■ ill 

LOUISE PCI I'KK '42 

Feature 

LLOYH H COPI I \ ' 

MYltiiN FISHER 
KA I lll.ll'.N Tl I.I Y 
EVERETT H sl'ENC 



v.lltAH V.M i UIP 



E. LI i, KNK KENAU 

KOGER II I.INhSK' 

roSKI'II i: tiORDOr 

R i; LALOB 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2. 



Make all order* pa 

tetts I ollcginii. In eai 

subucrlber will pleaae 

titer as soon as posal 

ijate :iml faculty eoi 

encouraged- Any co 

miiHi be received at i 

9 o'clock, Monday ev 



Enteml as neronj-i 
heist Post Or 
■pecial i ute of poata 
I 103. Art of Ortobc 
20. 1918, 

Printed by Qarpent* 

Amherst, Mas 



GROWING N 

UP w 

n 
jontent. Not n 
irocess of gr<>\ 

Sidney Rosen ; 

time as a mag; 

by the Collegia 
i two page su 

this voice of tl 

four, six, and 
►f which the ( 

Professor 
it after seeinj 

vith the excel 
".lie Prst requii 
struck me as 
there can be ! 
space and pap 
ll has lol 
College harbo 
fact was one < 
in A.B. degn 
influenced the 
curriculum. 1 
liberal arts a 
mendously in 

u -Id by the s 
Uthoug] 

an swing its 
must soon co 
prove as it hi 

>n Its own IV 
There ai 
printed, hut 
tuitions from 

,s the Collegi 
order. The Ii 

bers of one 

Quarterly is 
;•:■',< d effort 

When tl 

ts apron st 
ough watei 

Hold as it li 
■an he no d< 






%, 





i% 







&$< 












^y% 












(\^y M 


N 


k 








^^ 


iw 


\ 




, 




\'m N 


> 


i 


■ 






\v^ 


"i 


> 

< 


.^•^^^ 






' 




^ ' .^^^ 






^ 


/ 


' x 


V A 






f*% 


V 








Z^ 


■~ 


f 

V 






^^^^ * 






o 




y 




\ 




X. 



This Queen Can Cook, Too! 

A royal highness who can also reign in the kitchen is LeNore Ulvedal, campus 
queen at the University of North Dakota. Here she's demonstrating her culinary 
prowess in a home economics class. 




All-Westem Champion Drum M< 

That's the title won in a recent west-cooti 
by Robert Briclcer, baton swinger supreme ( 
Loyola University (Los Angeles) band. 



Z2 



~U 



Lumberjack Rulers Riding rM 

Arizona State Teachers College* lumberjack' 
name provided the theme for a recent «**P*° 
bration, and King Aljan Pendergraft *n«Q» 
Lavinia Rigby rode ceremoniously atop"* 
time "high wheels" logging cart. 






.me *' . 

gin»« 
iut«- 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I'll 1 RSDAY, DECEMBER I, l'> 



MAXWELL ANDERSON'S PLAY "BOTH YOUR 
HOUSES" TO BE PRESENTED ON TUESDAY 

Players Will Produce Famous Pulitzer Prize Drama- Story 
is of a Young Radical Who Fights With Parties and 
Politics in Congress 



WITH JITNEY PLAYERS 




BENTLEY'S WORLD - FAMOUS COLLECTION 
OF SNOWFLAKE PHOTOS IN WILDER HALL 



Pictures by Authority in Striking Exhibit Japanese Print? Art- 
Shown in Memorial Building Travel Posters Hung 
in Physical Education Building 








Mirror-Smooth Wings Increase Speeds 

William H. Bowen, California Institute of Technology, polishes an 
extra smoothness onto the wing surface being tested in a wind tun- 
nel. He believes plane speeds can be increased as much as 40 miles 
per hour at a result of hi* teats. wid« worn 



Wins Buck Shooting Buck 

Gwendolyn Weymouth. University 
of Maine, bet a dollar she could 
shoot a deer. She won both a green- 
paper buck and a six-point buck. 



Gridiron Gets More Glamour 

protect the permanent waves of Alma College's freshman 
i football eleven, all lined up here before a practice session. 




Hi 



*Y'rt L 

Nversity 






WE 

COULDN'T 
PASS 
VOUR 
NEIGHBOR- 1 

HOOO 
WITHOUT 
STOPPING I 



L 



ANP LOOK MOW CHUBBINS^5 
HAS G*OWN.« VOU 
PROBABLV PONT RE- 
MEMBER THE LAST 
TIME VOU SAW ME, BUT 
IT WAS AN EVENTFUL 
cv\y IN My LIFE 



IS THIS A CHILPHOOP 
STORY I HAVENT HEARD 
ABOUT, PAPPy? 



C* 



r 



w 



WE WERE VISITING THE CAPTAIN ON HIS SHIP, ANP 
VOU THREW HIS TOBACCO TIN OVERBOARP. I CAN 
SEE THE EXPRESSION ON YOUR FACE YET 



OH, HOW 
(AWFUL.' HOW 
ICOULP I HAVE 
BEEN SO 
RUPE? 



b ?<rf 



S»Al 



£%r 



AS IT TURNEP OUT, VOU 
PtD ME A GOOD TURN 
THAT PAV. IF I HADN'T 
HAP TO BORROW VOUR 
DAPS PRINCE 

ALBEirr, I 
MIGHT NOT BE 
SMOKING PA. 
NOW.' 



j ■ hm; i u i 



OH, I THINK. 
BV THIS TIME 

you WOULP 

HAVE DIS - 
COVERED THAT 
PRINCE ALBERT 
MEANS NOBITE 

SMOKING_ 

1 



THAT'S UKtLY BUT I'M GLAD 
I LEARNED IT SO EARLY. LOOK 

AT THE VEARS I'VE HAD TO 
ENJOy PA.'S EXTffA MILDNESS ! 





*0W 



aye 



ning About Strata and Storms 

'ogy students listen to Prof. A. W. Quinn 
sand were formed ages ago and how erosion 
lf id hurricane clawed awav the shoreline. 



7$ *6est 



•tCT 

I* 0*k< 



,M, 



*Ht P r 



^3 Fawkes 
^innetota. 



National Advtrtislnf Rtpr«i«nU- 
Uve: National Advertiiinf Servict, 
Inc., New York, Chieaeo, Boston, San 
Francisco, Lot Angeles. 



PRINCE ALBERT SMOKES MELLOW 
FROM FIRST PUFF TO LAST MO BITI, 
MO HARSHNESS- JUST RIPE, RICH 
TASTE IN EVER* PIPE-UDADl 



t*_V 



*0 "T^ 



**>r 



50 



pippfult of fraarant tobacco in 
every 2-ox. tin of Prince Albert 



SMOKE ?0 F RACRUNT PlrtFULS of Prince Albert. If you 
don't find it the mellowest, tastiest pipe tobacco you 
ever smoked, return the pocket tin with the rest of 
the tobacco in it to us •• any lime within a month 
from this date, and we will refund lull purchase price, 
plus postaae. (Signed) R. J. Reynolds Tobacco to, 
Winston -Salem, North Carolina 

CsarHefct. ItM. R I. RngeMiT.lwnO. 



Prince Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



all [« o ma ba 

lllt'C t Kill, ill pl,nt( 

lakes, taken bj rVi 
•hii ili-\Mtci| hi lifi 

ntowflake fornti am 
the foremost author- 

I ordinary New I i ► 
hi became inn ■ • (• 
snowflake formf 

thr<»UKli -i ii 
y developed mi I 
imicroajraphri of .. 
sowflakes, A pioneer 
devoted 25 yean ' 

lit,' a mtii's of |i|nit< • 
which arc uaed every- 
orld «>f art and in 

phs are mien Mmj: 

of their unusualnesc 

* beauty of t h< Pormt 

-niiis incredible I hat 
r>f form .should exist 
has caught a small 
infinite variation.* of 
[kingly different 

ese Prints 

of .lapam i | i atl 
hunf in the Memori- 
n anuaually Hi i 

•ollectioll of '..i 

i-- been put n-i* ol 
on, hut also for 1 1 i 
i. The collection c< i 
m Rreatedt artist- in 
,■ prints are ill 
hen- la {treat <■! | 
the pattern and i ■" 

'.es Japanese !'■ 
collect the . , ■ 
to, duplicate . 

Ilect inn i an In 

ll Posters 

stern in the I'i 
dinp. althouajh 

. are unusiialh <: 

'ith an emphaaii 
et ion. The colors I... 

with a clarit) J.h • 
l> Verj effe< t i\c M 
the poster of N ■ 

i a large snowflaki 

re; the colon i '' 

ilended, and th< ■ • 
striking. The n pr - 
tercolor sket< I 
i mountains 

t he enl.i ijii, 

hi in ai i '"i 

dint' Thi i U ' 

a little mon 

•>! hei . hill . • 

'it with ' k i 



• .i mi -et ira 

• i I liesdav . I le, 

the Parle) -i H 
:- dealing; with . 

he pre enled ' 

i These Aim 

i and are erit,! 1 

oidectomj " ai i 

For At Aiut. 
di.x." 



ivity Sets 

rteen Piecei 
fulh Modelled 



ll Lanterm 
i-rinrr Canp 

ving Boxen 
i t. 



let's Gift Shop 



5 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER I. 19a 



<4s 

/Iftassacbuse 




BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOE MAIM 



STOCKBRIDGE 



ISy John Kelno 



Golleqian 



tear .uoiii, 

I said I'd 

.- h n I g "■■' bach afti 
nd here' the I alread 

■ ist as much i n< >w hei e a.- 



Stockbridge its, Deerfield <> 

ying theii fi nal game ui I ■ 

|" « 



llodwell? Rig i 
Houle; Quai 



i 



lull. 



oii, 



IXIi.'e I 



* it II II [{ v, ;oyes 



'ainpux 

IOIIN K, I'll, Ids '|(», 
BETT1NA HAI.L, '», 
M \UY T. MKKHAN ' 
FRANCES S. MKRRII 
JOSEPH BART '4fi 
NANCY E. I.ICK '!" 
JAOQUEMNK I. I l 
I.OKin T\ KENNY I! 
WII.UAM T. COOIIM 
H VROL!) I (H.'KKSl ■ 
JOHN HAYES '11 
BLIZ VHKTH COI I IN 
I Y I Kl.-. Mil E I 
W 'I.I .1 AM I'WYI-.i; ' 
,,(,(,'• ' 1 ' ■ -''ll- I 

I/HJISE POTTER '42 

Feature 
II m It II. 4 OPELANi 
MYRON FISHER 'St 

k vi iii,i;i:n 11 1,1 y 
BVERETT U. Sl'ENC 



> IH Ml VM I VHP 



El 1 IENE KEN M 
[OCEH II l.l.MiSK" 

ioski'ii k coRtior 
i; R, LALOF 

u i: ' IMPTIONS tg, 



M.ii.. all orders pa 

Wtls I iilli-Klllll. If 

■ubacrlber will itlmae 

tget an BOOn u 1 

tiate .i:k| faculty eoi 
encouraged. Any eo 
must be received at 1 
•} o'clock, Monday ev 



Ent>ir<-,] n, MContUl 

heist Port Office. 

hi la) rote of po ita 

liojf, Aet <>f Octobe 

.10. lets. 

Printed by CarpenU 
Amh'Tsl. Mai 



GROWING N 
UP w 

11 

:ontent. Not n 

irocess of grot 

Sidney Rosen ; 

time as a mas;; 

by the Collegia 

1 two page sii 

this voice of tl 

four, six. and 

►f which the ( 

Professor 

after seeinj 

1 h the excel 

the i"->! requii 
•truck me as 
there can be 

space and pap 
It has loi 

College harbo 

fact was one < 
in A.B. degr< 

nlhienced the 
curriculum. '1 
liberal arts a 
mendously in 

ield by the s 
Althougl 

an swing iti 
must soon c< 
prove as it hi 

»n its own fe 

There ai 

printed, but 
butions from 
ta the Collegi 

order. The fi 
bera <»f one 
Quarterly is 

'.< d ell'or 
When t 

apron st 
rough uatei 
hold as it h 
•an he no dc 




*v 



/ 



V 



/ 










New Record 

Six beauty queens in 
one class is the claim to 
fame of the juniors at 
Christian College. (L to 
r) Bette Ambler, Miss 
Iowa,- Darleen McNeill, 
Miss Arkansas, Anita 
Underwood, Miss 
Wichita Falls,- Virginia 
Miller,MissCentennial; 
Kathleen Colter, queen 
of Round Valley Ro- 
deo,- Louise Cross, Miss 
Electra Texas. 





\ , 



All Emotions Measured Through the Hands 

Love, Hate, Fear, Scorn 









■*1*»«M .,..., 



Important in the determination of human emotions by psychologi 
the new emotion meter (dermohmograph) developed by the Univj 
Dr. D U Greenwald under the direction of Prof. C A. Ruckmick. 



• ]*■ |T'J| JL|J iT'^l ■■•■'/ J ■• [Ijla! g]i iT*l ■• fc^avW^Bm" f .11'/ 1 if • ! ■ I f"J ■ 'J aaT . I •!• aaf-M-l •I*llL.' L 



copper plates. The sponge is placed in the hand, because increal 
creases the electrical resistance of the cell walls in the skin. At left 
measures emotional reaction to newspaper reading Center, the 
strated in the sound-proof room in which it operates best Right, tl 
to measure emotional effects of love and danger scenes in moving 



Sty or w- 

-, n inOP< 



motio" 
Ruck" 

c if 4** c 
vice i« u,; 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, Till RSDAY. DECEMBER I. !' 



IVAXWELL ANDERSON'S PLAY "BOTH YOUR 
HOUSES" TO BE PRESENTED ON TUESDAY 

Players Will Produce Famous Pulitzer Prize Drama Story 
is of a Young Radical Who Fights With Parties and 

Politics in Congress 



WITH JITNEY PLAYERS 



sdaj evening the Jitney Play- 

1 bring Maxwell Anderson's 

i- Pulitzer Prize play "Both 

Houses" tu the campus for. pre« 

on in Bowker Auditorium at 

p in. 

th Your Houses," a play in 3 

I 6 scenes, was the first play 
lax well Anderson to win a Pul- 

Prize. other playa by this dis- 
hed writer include, "What 
(dory," "Winterset," M High 
and "The Star Wagon." 
[] "Both Your Houses," Maxwell 

II takes the House of Hepre- 
1- apart and lets the entire 
ee how it ticks. The "houses" 

, d to in the play's title are not 
tuses of Congress but the two 
political parties; to which Mr. An- 
derson is. at least, impartial. He lam- 
da:-!.- the Democrats as well as the 
Republicans, and just for good meas 
un', brings in a member of the Farm- 
Labor party. 

The story concerns a young radical 

who has been elected to Congress by 

farmers of the west. He comes 

Washington, hooted and spurred, 

rare, eager to ride an extrava- 

ngress to a fare-thee-welL 

He defies the leaders, who remind 

that he can do nothing without 

, endorsement. He exposes them 

in the midst of their bartering and 

trades and even heats them at their 

own games. He marshalls the non- 

partisan group on his side when the 

"ii an outrageous appropriation 

close, in the hope of making it 

ridiculous. 

He is defeated in the end but leave- 
with his eloquent threats of what 
the people will one day do to ita dis- 
honest politicians. 

Excerpts from New York papers 

about the Jitney Players presentation 

: "Both Your Houses." 

"An excellent play . . . real and 

ulating."- Brooks Atkinson — The 

Times. 

incing and entertaining." 

Robert Benchley — The New Yorker. 

"Timely and top-notch entertain- 

Walter Winchell — Daily Mir- 

\ entertainment as well as an 
alarm." Percy Hammond — Herald- 



FINE ARTS COUNCIL 
PRESENTS LECTURER 



"Escape to the Caribbean" is 

The Subject of Talk 

by Curtis 




BENTLEY'S WORLD - FAMOUS COLLECTION 
OF SNOWFLAKE PHOTOS IN WILDER HALL 



Pictures by Authority in Striking Exhibit Japanese Prints Art 
shown in Memorial Building Travel Posters Hung 

in Physical Education Building- 



PATTERSON PLAYERS JSJKS SaJU TUZ 

VTART NFW ^FA^flN * ra ' ,hs " f «nowflakes, taken bv We 

ji/\i\i ncn ocaouh , iam n „ Mtl ,. Vi wh(1 (l)>Vllt) . cl hl , ljf , 

to the stud) of snow flake formi are 



Kthel Ha try more Colt 



"Escape to the Carribbean an ad- 
venture in color on Harbuda Island" 
was the subject of the lecture by Mr. 
James I). Curtis at the weeklv Fine pAfainiTIOMC CTADTCTi 
Arts Council program last Tuesday vUllUI 1 lUHu O I AK 1 Li) 
afternoon in the Memorial Building. CAD >OQ A R nFl^PFF 
Barbuda, a small island outermost in Tv/IV «J«/ A. Da ULiVJlXtit. 
the Caribbean group, was chosen by 

Mr. Curtis as the spot for his vacation Seniors Must Indicate Choice 
last summer, not only because of it> to Their Advisors P.efoiv 

beautiful setting, but because of the Christmas 

opportunities it offered for hunting 

and at the same time seclusion from Released this week from the Dean's 

tourists, the only approach being by office, 8 statement on specific coiidi- 

boat from Antigua, thirty miles tion and requirements makes clear 

miles away. which seniors can expect the A.B. de 

Unlike Other islands in the Carib- K, '' v tnis < '" l "'"tf commencement, 
bean gTOUp, Mr. Curtis stated, Par- The statement is as follows: "All slu- 

buda 18 of coral rather than volcanic dents who have fulfilled the fresh 

formation. Its highest point being only man and sophomore requirements as 

two hundred feet above sea level, prescribed by the division of liberal 

( oral reefs surround the island on arts and the junior- and senior require- 

all sides, stretching at some points ments as prescribed by the depart* 

for eleven miles into the sea, a ments of languages and literature and 

menace to unwary steamers. Settled history are automatically candidates 

by Codrington in 1670, the island was for the Bachelor of Art degree. Any 

once the scene of slave breeding ex- members of the class of \'X','.>, how- 
peri ments; descendants of these early ever, who are thus qualified and who 
inhabitants, negroes from six to eight 'nay prefer the Bachelor of Science 
feet tall, comprise its present popu degree should indicate their prefer 
latioii ( ,f eleven or twelve hundred, ence to the head of the department 



"The Bishop Misbehaves" to he is recognised a.- the foremost author- 
Presented Here <m Ity in the field. 

December (2 Bentlej mi an ordinary New ! -. 

land farmer who became into. i. 
"The Bishop Misbehaves." a three- m ,,„, s , U(|v ((f sn „ vvM . tk( . f(in ,,. „ 

act comedy by Frederick Jackson, will | ()llki , 1K .„ ,,,,.„, lhl „ llRn „ MllJM r . 



be presented by the Patterson Play- 



scope, and finially developed met) •«,- 



ers. faculty dramatic group at Mas fll| . tak , ng photomicrographs of ..r 

sachuse.ts state College on Deean [ouj , tV|M ,. ,,,- >m , w , la kes. A pltmoti 
her 12 as the first performance in in nj „ , u . l(i ,„. ,,,. Vlltt ,,| gg Vt . ;u , r 
their winter schedule, The production this W((| . k ( . V( ,i vil , K a S1 .,. i( . s ,; f ph ,, t( . 

is being directed by Dr. Charles F. Kra|ini( . stU(ii ,. s whidl ar< , us ,. (l ,, v ,. rv 

I- raker, assistant professor of Ro- vv he,,, |„ , he Wl ,rld of art aruf .r. 

mance languages, and Prof. Guy V. dustry. 

Glatfelter, placement officer for men. ,,,, , . 

.,•11 - ., , I he photographs are interest mir 

will play the title role. . , , , . , 

not only because of their unusualnes* 
Also having important parts in the hut for the sheer beauty of the forrm 
production are Mrs. Dorothy Burke thc> depict. It seems incredible that 
of North Amherst; Hohert C. Tetrolsuch perfection of form should exist 
of the department of agricultural eco- bul the camera has caught ■ small 
nomics; Herbert F. Warfel, assistant number of the infinite variation! of 
professor of zoology; Alan W. chad design in a strfldngi) different 
wick, manager of the college dining lection. 

hall; Harold Smart, assistant profes Japanese Prints 

so, ot English and law; Crum.w o. Th( . ,, l || ) „. t i„n of Japanese pr,. ! t^ 
Oteson, extension editor; Charles Mor- whi,-h are to he hung in the Memori- 
an. graduate student; Mrs. Lucille :i | Building it an unusually fim and 

Warfel of Amherst and Mrs. Frieda ,,,mprehensive collection of ^... - 

prints, which has been put out (H 
only for exhibition, but also for corn- 



work to the extent of eighteen junii 



mercial purpoaes. The collection COB 



and senior credits in languages and tains work f the greatest artistt iri 

literature, history, philosophy, music the field, and the print.- an- of '..' • fi 
and landscape architecture, may, if sizes, so that there is nn-at . j i 
they so prefer, he considered as can tunit) to Rtud} th. pattern an.' i 
dictates for the Bachelor of Arts de that characterises Japanese Pi 
gree but should indicate their prefer- For those who collect the m pi 



Illustrating his talk with interest- «»»*«»«* t,, ' f " 1 " Christmas, 

Ing cob,,- photographs taken during "Studento who have me, ,|„. fresh- 1 ,.,„.,. l)( th ,. jr ln;(j(i| . :i(|vjsu ;. , | ; ( . ) .' i( ; ( ,'„. ' w ;; i ' l|(j ' | ik( '." t.r'dupb.'a",, 

his vacation. Mr. Curtis spoke enthus- ""'" and sophomore requirements as I Christmas." prints in the collection can b, 

lastically of the snorts on the island prescribed by the division of liberal 



S]»< 

sailing, fishing and hunting, and ;,rl> ■'""' wh " nave fulfilled the junior 
presented a colorful picture of it.- ; "" 1 wnior requirements in any de 

beautiful Betting. partment within that division except 

those indicated above, and who have 

further supplemented their major 



< \KMV.VI. DATE 



BAKER TO SPEAK 



Tribune. 




President Huuh P. Baker will de 

liver his annual address at vespers 

on Sunday evening, December i at 

5:(HJ p. m. in the Memorial building. 
Mis topic is "Exploring Frontiers." 

In former years President Baker 
has been very popular with the stu- 
dent body and the public a- a .-peak 
er at vesper services, and undoubted- 
ly his address this year will be (if 
the same quality, 

The annual Christmas sing will 
take place the following Sunday eve 
nini_'. Dean Machmer will speak. 



KX II I HITS 



I. Memorial Building 

Japanese Prints 

II. (ioodcll Library 

P hoto graphs bj members of 
the Bo s ton Camera Cluh 

III. Wilder Hall 

Photographs of Snowflak.es 

IV. Physical Education Building 

< oil, , 1 1, ,n of Pesters 



A Drop in the Bucket 

PCI — hul it tnkt'* man> dtopi 

fill a bucket and it takes many items 

I" -lock of a COMPLETE (IruK 

Ban arc -mail and infrequently 

' far, tint »r have them — lend* 

"ii mIuii \),n need them. Save time 

Mwstj . . . TKV WBLLWORTH 
^\< \ I IRST1 > 



Snlve 


^7c / 

19r ' 






JSr^ 




S»r 


lalli 


79c \ 


"")| i ( rtsaafl . . 




1 lll»< r Oil ( niisul, || 


•i~, 


l"-)lh lliii-h 


S.lr 


•*l TddIIi Pouder 


:ll) 



lu.t n I i» »f the Many Hargain* 

WELLWORTH 
PHARMACY 

INC. 




U. S. CAMERA 
1939 

NOW AVAILABLE 

at 

JEFFERY AMHERST 
BOOKSHOP 





COLLEG 


i<; STORK 


Everything 


for the Student 


Luncheons 


Banners and Souvenirs 


Soda Fountain 


Books and 


Student Supplies 


Magazine* 


Mass. State Xmas Cards at 5c 


(S]» < ill offer to M. -S 


< Students while they last i 


ON THE CAMPUS 


NORTH COLLEGI 







ll. 

Travel Pasters 

The travel posters in the Pi 

. . ,, Education Building, although 

< oniinuni from I'aee 1 c K 

lour in number, are unusual!} rj 

come back to the college during mid and colorful, with an emphasii 

semesters, will be able to participate simplicity and action. The color- I,.. 

in events If they are scheduled at ■ been reproduced with a clarity wh l 

time when college is open. make- the posters Verj effective. M Kl 

The Carnival Committee stated '"tererting Is the poster of Men 
that, although they feel certain that Hampshire, w " 1 ' ; * large snowflaki 

at some time in the fill me the Car ""' <( '" ,r: ' 1 Sf«rei the COrOH in thl! 

nival should he held during midsern '""' •'"'' " u,l y blended, and tbi 

esters as are carnivals at other New an ' a,,iv '' ar "' striki »K- The repi 

England colleges, i :»:',!» i s not ■ suit * lu,,i "" " f ■ "mtereohw aketcli of i ■ 

able year for the change. ^'^ Hampshire mountain: 

interesting, and the enlarged , I 

Final negotiations are being mad- r , .,,,,, ,,, . ^ |(r (n ;u , fjii| 

with the band which will be announc „,atiealh appealing Th. , u 
1 <'»"egian. Su|) V|l , |ej |a „ ,„,,„ Inn(i 

lional than the others, fmt , n • 
thelesi a tim- pnater, « it 1 ■ . 
oramic effect. 



Pre Med I ihn 

There « ill i« .« meet mi 

Pie Med Clue ■■! I » .lay. De. . 

7 -■"" p. m. m the Parle) t ll Clul 
hou e. Two dim:- dealing wit h sun 

operation'- will be pre toted All ..• 

cordially m\ ited. The .- film , lt . 
major Operation and are entitle. 

Subtotal Thyroidectomy" and 
v ppendet ton Poi K\ A. nt< I 
grenou Appendix." 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 

ROOM ACCESSORIES RADIO REPAIR WORK 



THE MUTUAL Mlffi. CO. 



63 So. Pleasant St. 



Amherst, Mass. 



Nativity Sets 

Fourteen Piece 
Beautifull) Modelled 



Small Lantern 

Watering Cam 
Sew ing Boxt > 

it. 



Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 






Saranac Buckskifl Gloves and MitteBs 

Warmest and Most Comfortable. Not affected by water. Priced from $1.00 to $3.75 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE MASS \( Hi skits COLLEGIAN, THl KSDay. DECEMBER l, l 



938 




Rhyme -Reason -Rhythm Professor Matston Compiles Flood Data of 

Past Hundred Years; Control Factors Noted 



Not M lone, ago that he can't still 
regret it, Gene Krupa left the home 
fires of the Goodman ensemble for 
better «r for worn, I think that he 
had some vagtte notion that the min- 
ute he turned his hack on it, it would 
fizzle into a smouldering heap of ash- 
es. Perhaps you can't blame him too 
mueh. Kenny gave him a terrific build 
up for a band member, and the "Sling- 
erland" drum manufacturers ran full 
page ads of Krupa using their toys 
all over the countryside. He pot so 
much publicity that it went either to 
his head, or to his pocket, or both. 
Now, he has the satisfaction of 
painting "Gk on all the stand fronts 
in his band, as well as on his own 
drum head. Then, that inane spout- 
ing of tomtoms, that puts a little 
drum in front of every member of 
the band. Well, maybe that's all right 
... but the band isn't . . . What I 
mean is; at first they all said, "Give 
him time, it's raw yet," but "time's 
a wasting." I just heard his "Love 
Doesn't Grow On Tree's," (Bruns- 
wick 8246). It starts off on a routine 
sax chorus, and the only possible ex- 
cuse for preserving this third-rate 
ballroom stuff on wax for ever and 
ever, and ever, is some snappy brass 
cutups. There's a thin, reedy vocal by 
Irene Daye that adds to the general 
brown taste, and a piano chorus is 
slaughtered with off beat bass drum 
kicks that are good, but as out of 
place as Einstein in Germany, and 
that stand out like so many red hick- 
ics beneath a coed's face powder . . . 
Ke\erse, "Tell Me With Your Eyes" 
preludes another lament by Irene 
Dave, and that's all that can be said 
within the bounds of decency, ethics, 
Will Hays, etc. . . . 

Bringing back that man again, Ar- 
tie Shaw, because he's one of my 
favorites, and bound to be yours. If 
still skeptical, by all means listen to 
this Shaw disc . . . "Yesterdays" from 
Jerome Kern's "Showboat," on (Blue- 
bird B-10001-A). It's a fairly slow- 
disc with those typical "go native" 
chords that set any Shaw number 
apart. There's a little unison work 
anticipating that sob sister act on 
the clarinet. Shaw gets more out of 
that wooden stick of his than Edgar 
Bergen gets out of Charlie McCarthy. 
He'll try anything. His fingers seem 
to hover over shady, doubtful chords, 
and then set victoriously on happier 
harmonies. The whole bundle is then 
tied up with a beautiful high above 
high . . . Reverse, "What Is This 
Thing Called Love?", a Cole Porter 
tune from the musicale, "Wake Up 
and Dream," features a muted, al- ' 
most nasal brass in unison, and swift 
precision work by the reeds. From i 
here on it's practically a one-man 
show again, with more pied-piping 
that'd make anybody throw away his 
crutches and follow him up the Street. 



CCCD NCTE5 

BY JACQUELINE STEWART 



The unruly Connecticut river has 
had a major flood on the average of 
every five years since 1896, according 
to 1'rofessor George A. Marston of 
the newly formed engineering depart- 
ment at Massachusetts State College. 
{ Prof. Marston is making a detailed 
study of Connecticut river flood stag- 
es at Hartford, Conn., and correlating 
his figures with rainfall records kept 
at Amherst College up to 1889, the 
State College, and at Dartmouth Col- 
lege in Hanover, N. H. 

"There is no section of the country 
which has a more complete long time 
record of rainfall and river stage than 
the Connecticut Valley. The Geologi- 
cal Survey lists the earliest authen- 
tic record of a flood stage in 1683. 
With the United States engineers 
centering their attention on a flood- 
control program that may ultimately 
cost $40,000,000, it is interesting to 
take a post mortem view of past 
floods and determine their causes and 
distribution of their occurrences," 
Prof. Marston said last week in re- 
leasing some of his findings. 

In magnitude, the flood of 19.'ifi was 
greatest on record, with the flood of 
1988 about two feet less. Third larg- 
est flood was in 1854 with 29.8 feet. 
The floods of 1898 and 1905 were 
the least, both being exactly 24 feet 
in height. 

In arranging his data, Prof. Mars- 
ton discovered that April is the "best" 
month for floods, there having been 
eight during that month. March is 
second best with seven. January and 



., , , ., „ Military Ball has "snuck up" on us, 

May have two each, whi e September if . .nu i- * 

, . . , ., , , "• WWBW tt'l still sneaking up on some of us. 

October, ><ovember and December | t 

have all 



seen one flood. February, 
Mune, July and August have never 
had a major flood during the period 
studied. 

He explained that in February, the 
mean temperature at the State Col- 
lege weather station is 23.5 degrees, 
which acts as a natural flood control 
factor. June, July and August, he as- 
serted, are the wettest of the year 
and the rainfall during these months 
occurs in storms of great intensity. 
"The principal flood control factor 
at work during these months is the 
growing vegetation which covers the 
Connecticut Valley," he stated. "But 
in addition to the moisture actually 
consumed in plant growth, there is 
that part of the rainfall which is 
evaporated. With high temperatures 
during the summer months, evapor- 
ation reaches a maximum, both from 
water surface and the ground." 

The March and January floods usu- 
ally resulting from rainfall and rising 
temperatures following freezing tem- 
peratures the preceding months. Of 
the flood of March 29, 1843, Marston 
says: "It was undobutedly fortunate 
that higher temperatures did not pre- 
vail or a flood of much larger pro- 
portions would have occurred." And 
the proof of this statement may be 
found in the study for the greatest 
flood on record, that of 1936. In this 
year, the flood resulted from an ex- 
treme change in temperature. 



Marsh Speaks 

Secretary of People's Lobby 

Talks to State Students 

Yesterday 



"America is headed for dictator- 
ship in fact, if not in name, unless we 
stop subsidizing the exploiting inter- 
ests; open opportunities for people 
to produce and consume what they 
need; and develop self-government," 
Benjamin C. Marsh of Washington, 
executive secretary of the People's 
Lobby, told about 150 State College 
students yesterday morning at 
Stockbridge Hall and Goessmann Au- 
ditorium. 

In giving his purpose of speaking 
before State College students, Marsh 
said after his speech in an exclusive 
interview for the Collegian: 



ADMINISTRATORS AT 
CONFERENCE SERIES 



Prexy, Dean Machmer, Plot's. 

Hicks and Carpenter Attend 

Meetings 



seems to be the exception rather 
than the rule to be attending this 
opening dance of the season. Tufts 
week-end found many co-eds attend- 
ing. In fact, every fraternity house 
jammed with State students with 
narry a Tufts couple in sight. After 
investigation we discovered the rea- 
son — it seems that all fraternities in- 
vite chaperones but they never 
come. 

Social Notes 
More social notes — Pledge formals 
dates are being settled. Lambda Delt's 
will be held at the Munson Memorial 
Library in South Amherst on Decem- 
ber 10. Sigma Beta's, Phi Zeta's, Al- 
pha Lambda's, and Sigma Iota's dates 
for their dances are still pending. 
The patronesses of Lambda Delt are 
giving a supper this Sunday night 
to the members and pledges at the 
home of President and Mrs. Baker. 
Alpha Lambda Mu is holding a 
Christmas "Vic" party in the Memori- 
al building on Saturday evening, De- 
cember 10. On the same evening, the 
pledges of Sigma Beta are giving the 
members a party. It seems that it 
will be in the form of a baby party. 
The pledges also gave a tea for the 
freshman class last Tuesday. 

Sororities 

Sorority business — From Sigma 
Iota, we learn that Frances Lappen 
has been elected secretary of the 
pledges. Eight pledges joined Phi 
Zeta, Thursday, November 10: Rose 
Elaine Agambar, Erma Alvord. 
Gladys Fish, Anna Harrington, Mar- 
jorie Irwin, Eleanor Jewell, Jean Ty- 
ler, and Patricia Robbins. At Lamb- 
da Delt, the pledges elected officers 
iast Monday night. They are: Chair- 
man, Jean McNamara; Secretary, 
Evera Ward; Treasurer, Doris Roba- 
taille. 




President Baker, Dean Machmer, 
Professor Curry Hicks, head of the 
physical education department, andiality 



Earle Carpenter, secretary of the 
Extension Service, will travel to Bos- 
ton this weekend for a series of repre- 
sentative conferences. 

Tomorrow the president and the 
dean will attend the meeting of the 
New England Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools which will be 
held at the Hotel Statler. On Satur- 
day, President Baker will preside at 



Clubs 

The Home Economics Club held it's 
second meeting of the year. Dr. 
Rhodes gave a speech on "Person- 
Problems and Their Adjust- 



States. Whether or not these eco- 
nomic changes are to be peaceful 



depends partly on the college student 

In all my years of speaking before 
various organizations, I find college 
students about the clearest-thinking 
and Open-minded of my audiences. 
Harry L. Allen, for 81 years a r " ]] 'W students are volatile. Further- 
member of the staff of the Experiment """'°- < ' o,,PR0 *»*»* are able to 



ALLEN RETIRES 



"We could have, and probably will the meeting of the New England Con 
have, basic economic changes within ference on Athletics, where Dean 
the coming decade here in the United Machmer and Mr. Carpenter will be 

in attendance. This conference is for 
the land grant colleges and North- 
eastern. The New England College 
Faculty Conference on Athletics, 
drawing representatives from prac- 
tically all the colleges in New Eng- 
land, will meet next Monday. The 
dean and Professor Hicks will attend. 



Station at the College, will be re- 
tired from duty on November 29 
when he reaches the state compulsory 
retirement age of 70. 

Mr. Allen was graduated from the 
Amherfll high school and joined the 
t.-itF of the college in 190? as an as- 
sistant in the experiment station. In 
1910 he was appointed laboratory as- 
sistant in the regulatory service, and 
has held that position to the present 
time. 

President Baker publicly commend- 
ed Mr. Allen for his faithful and 
efficient service. 



influence their parents to think about 
the state ..f afTairs in the United 
States. I find that older people — I 
must include myself in this category 
since I am over sixty — worry more 
over changes. If the owning classes 
make concessions, we will have a 
peaceful transition; if the proletariat 
resorts to force and violence, we 
probably will have a dictatorship. I 
want to commend college students in 



their protest against militaristic Doll- j conditions 



cies which advocate force and vio- 
lence instead of peaceful means." 

Marsh, a graduate of a mid-west- 
ern college, took five years of post- 
graduate work in Chicago and Penn- 
sylvania universities. For the past 
few years he has traveled in Ger- 
many, Austria, Russia, Poland, and 
most of the other European coun- 
tries, studying economic systems and 



ments". On Wednesday morning and 
afternoon, Mr. Harold Van Ruren, a 
former professor at Princeton Uni- 
versity, gave a very interesting and 
informative speech on Hand Blocked 
Linens, demonstrating how they are 
made and exhibiting a number of very 
fine examples. 

The Badminton Club wishes to an- 
nounce that they are starting a num- 
ber of "Mystery Tournaments." Sign 
up for them and then discover what 
the rules of the tournament are. Tues- 
day and Wednesday afternoons are the 
times set for these lively affairs, so 
be sure and turn up and enjoy the 
excitement. Now that snow has set 
in we find that Miss Virginia Gale 
and Miss Toby Colgate are starting 
a skiing class. We feel that this will 
fill a much needed gap in the ath- 
letic curriculum for the coeds. By the 
way, who won the tennis tournament ? 



SIGMA XI 



The first public program to be giv- 
( n hy the recently chartered Sigma 
Xi chapter will take place tomorrow 
night at the Memorial Building. 
Charles K. Brooks, director of the 
Blue Hills observatory, will discuss 
the "Recent New England Hurricane 
and Earlier Storms." The lecture Is 

illustrated, and the public- is invited 
to attend. 

Sigma Xi, national scientific soci- 
ety, established a chapter here last 
ipfing which is headed by Dr. Carl 
R, Fellers, research professor of hor- 
ticultural manufactures. 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



THIS WEEK IS BOOK WEEK 



FOR GROWN UPS 

GONE WITH THE WIND $3.00 

NOW $1.49 

THE CITADEL $2.50 

NOW $1.39 
LISTEN! THE WIND 

by Anne Morrow Lindbergh |2.60 

ALONE 

by Richard K. Ilyrd |2.60 

WITH MALICE TOWARD SOME 

l>.\ Margaret Halsey $2.00 
Funny book 



FOR YOUNGSTERS 

WEE GILLIS 

by Leaf and Lawson $1.50 
originators of Ferdinand 

HEIDI GROWS IP 50c 

MR. POPPER'S PENGUINS 

by R. & F. Atwater $1.50 

WHILE THE STORY-LOG 
BURNS 

by Thornton W. Burgess $2.00 



SODAS — CANDIES 
PASTRIES 
Salted Nuts 

Tasty Meals 

SERVICE— 

Prompt and (urteous 

"We Serve to Please" 



College Candy 
Kitchen 

The Place With the Good Things 



F 



G M MUSICAL ROMANTl 




THI 



GREAT 
WALTZ 



RAINER GRAVET KOK ! 



HUGH HERBERT 
JONEL ATWILL 

Dirrcted by Julicn Duvivicr 




Hear (Jreat StiHUHs Mu- 

"'Tale Vienna Woodf 

"Blue Danube Wall. 

"At The MoBUtW] 

"You and You" 

And Seven Others 

FINK (O-HIT 

drama that will thrill 
and warm your hear. 



will 
youi 

YOUNG DR. 
KILDARE" 

with 

Lionel Barrymore — Lew 

AIho: Color Cartoon - N. « - , 

si 'X.-.dON.-TTES., DEC 

font. Sun. 2-10:30 I'. M 



you 



Ayiw 

t-.Vfi 



ft 

Hotu V^illium Became 
A Brother Rat! 




When William (aged 2i.o fcrrtvtd 
at Virginia Military Institute In 
wasnt exactly a one-man army 







<3r 



A 






While other folk ., 
called each other 'Bi 
they called William 
'Dorcy* ar.J EOftdt I,. 
of all their jokes. 
\ 




But, one day, the other ftUowl 
made William a 'Brother R. ■ 
because oh well, just h 
•nd now he winks at >;ir: 
salutes generals and in 
peachy fun, £ener;ilh 



Brother 



WARNER BROS.' ho. I 
military »chool comedv. wirh 

PriscillaLme 
WayneMorris 

lAN, J r?»„ NN,ESCA ' r DAWS 
fBRVAN-EDDIh 
RONALD REACAN . 
WVMan . HENRY O NUM. 
<>'r«Cfd8 v WU . KFK .1 



i 



—AND LOOK — 

MARCH OF T! 

Present ■> 
"Unele Sam <;•"»! 

Color Cartoon I 

FXTKAH 

"Birth of Charlie V< " ,l 



THE MASS \(m setts COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER I. 19! 



i)3H 



STATEMENTS 

Bj Art ( up on 



v . aptly, someone once -aid 

• erial makes the i oach. 
i ..'- w here matei ial lias 

lied by faulty c aching. 
umber "f years, experi- 

• .■ .iiit the licit! of | 
starting point fur any 

£ : ate we have a good 

lack of victories in 

i . ..-a -. >ns would tend ' i 

something was wrong. 

vei it is only necessary 

- . material that has 

to Ebb Caraway. This 
id thirty-three aspirants 

>n the varsity football 
- number Has swelled by 

hut tin' important thing 
• v i\ ely few of t he play- 

l<i previous expit ii | 

n football success, 
roach's iob is hardest in a 
tough ■'•.I'm'. When the going is 

(,,:i;l it requires real effort to 
bring » -quad up to the winning 
ii. In: n. Such has been faraway's 
job t'i year. Paced with a light 
,i wa« necessary to organ* 
./, an effective offense built 
■round a passing attack. Witness 
the Ren*.«»*h-er game. State was 
out v. • _ 'I both in the line and 
lull, hut when thev took to 



Basketeers Will Open Season Against Lowell Tech. Dec. 13 



CARAWAY PICKS ALL 
OPPONENT GRIDDERS 



Amherst and Tufta Represented 

by Three Men- Bowdoin, 

Rams by Two 



COURT LEADER 



Coach Ebb Caraway'.- selection of 
an All-Opponent team finds Amherst 
and Tufts, the strongest and weak- 
est team.- from the "88 standpoint of 
records, placing three men each on 
the squad. Bowdoin and Rhode Is- 
land State follow with two each, ami 
Connectiut State with one. The choice 
was made mi a ba-i, of performance 
against the Statesmen. 

At left end i- Cordner of Amherst, 
win . e educated toe counted for many 
a point-after-touchdown I'm- tin- Jeffs. 
I "ivy, of Bowdoin, captain of his 
team, holds down the left tackle job. 
Whitten, sterling Amherst linesman 
is at left guard. Pace's aggressive 

plaj for U. 1. State rates him the 




3 RETURNING REGULARS BUILD NUCLEUS 
OF 1938-39 MAROON BASKETCALL TEAM 

Good Spirit ami High Enthusiasm of Candidates Indicates Success- 
ful Year t<> Coach Frigard Ankle Injury Maj Keep 
Zelazo Out of Opener 



"Find that little yellow basket" in 
Coach Hi! 1 Frigard's theme sone, as 
I 1 '' tart . i,> whip hi . lump quard 
into shape for the early opening 
..inie against Lowell textile. At the 

Three Lettermen in Squad of '' :i " '" aim lu " * e * ka i,K " ov « r 

twenty five candidates re|K»rted for 
practice, bringing with them a spirit 

..!nl enthusiasm that s^ill produce a 

Coach Lorin Ball's varsity hockej k '''" baU,fl '''"' '' V, ''- N - |; »'t"'K Posi 
•quad is spending most of its time """• Wlth " nl > two u '" k l " lt l '" 1 '"" 



LAKE PLACID JOUST 
HEADS HOCKEY CARD 



went v-livc Open 
With Huskies 



ai (M -ii i in' 



>kati 



blades with hiuh 



th 



ipemng toss up the squad i 



(apt. Stan Zela/.o 



of K.'tli.iK on the ice within ,ln,,ln8 ' , '"'- N - l,l,il,|i "* "I' a sp,„|y 

the next week fai the first practice '" liH * k : "" 1 an :u,tl ^ l,t defense, ami 
ession of the year. Although it. men wl "'" Capt ' /vUr ''" ***** ,lis teM 

have come out fo, the team, onh '" ,ll( ' """ r for tln ' '"^ lm "' "" "'• 

three are lettermen. Tom l.v.nan ami ^ ember VA > ""' Maroon h stars will 

ho in tip top shape. 



I 'nil .Mayo are veterans who saw ser- 



Three Regulars Back 



tin' a 
lioint- 
behind 



I he -core piled up to .'17 
lid the Trojans were left 

■• i 1 ! material, state has to 

• • e attractions of Massa- 

tati t ollegc as a college. 

are waved in the faces 

ares to entiee them to 
ate to exhibit their talent. 
a -on. State, like its time- 
i in Medford, has to re- 
material to build its 



-"'liter place. The right side of the WINTER SPORTS FOR '"'■ M win f« hist year, and Ciill 

line fmds Tufts en masse, with lien- rnroiuiiii at^hi r«^r.n Morey, who played goalie, will cap- 

net, Sherry and apt,, .ears FRESHMAN ATHLETES 

deck. Joy.-. Captain of Amherst's un- 
defeated eleven, ami a speedy, decep ,, . . 

live back, is placed at quarterback. ' ,,,mism K' [rack and Swimming State Ski 

.,.;,, Mars Report Fifteen 

Fencers Out rhis year me hockey team received roon quintet, while Frank Southwlck 

;UI Invitation to play in the tourna the only other letter man should lit 

,, ,, , . went =*' Lake Placid. Three names well tnt 

following their usual procedure, win |„ 



Abbruzzi, of Rhode Island State, witl 
two more years of college ball befon 

him, i.- at left half. KarsoicAS of Mow 

doin is placed at right half back 

I'osner, a brilliant hark from Connec- l ' n ' I'hysica 

ticut State completes the All-Oppon 
<nt team at the post of fullback. 



tain the team at that position. Morey ,„. . . ■ ,- , 

,.,... , . • iv>o regulars limn last year, the re 

■ mi tine work in the catre ast season, . ,i ,. .',. , . , 

, ... . ' immune, three. I- ran Kiel, .lohnnv 

and will he an important roe; m the ,, , . i ,. .-. >, \ i 

l.oinhou. ami (apt. Stan /ela/.o, af- 

ate machine this year. r . i . r .. .. 

I nil a strong nucleus for the Ma 

This year the hockey team received 



•lie of the vacant spots. 
• played during the team's stay Coach Frigard seems to be grooming 

" ''•">« ; < t «"« Department there. The tournament starts Dec. 26 big Hank Parzych for the center 
uis made no definite schedules t 



ALL-AMERICAN 



Viatiag Khb Caraway this week 
wai an old crony. Ralph "IVst" 

Welch, who is assistant coach at 

the University of Washington in 

Seattle. Harry played ball with 
Ebb both in High School and at 
Purdue where he made All- Ameri- 
can in HI2«). 



and continues through Dec. 29. State's post that was vacated by Vn-<l Kiel. 

fres* .man sports, he first ^cali ot the regular season oj s against North- Cap.. Zelazo, whose footballing land 

las ke lull season found .... plebee re astern here on Jan. 4. ,,| h,m in the hospital with a broken 

ceiving instructions from Coaches Fri •■., ■ . * . 

gard and Bush. The basketballers re -, , , " m i " am< ; ,,t •'" , ' ; ' k " M»cid ;,,lkl " " |; '> ""' '»• «**** for the ope,, 

ported in th.ee groups, and after w,, ' uk f e ' ,l;, «" ,, " f '"''' "'" «"""' has Ing whistle, but will strengthen the 

each one had a brief session of pass- . J™ '" l " ;,r,,r ''' '"" i( «*« Leani by his reaj amnce later in the 

ing and shooting, the groups were lMV " 1 "T ,, ' ; "' 1 ' a , ' l,a " , ' , ' '" ««* tot0 '■■'""• J! :m - s ra '" s,:m l ' , " l;,l;,k '" 

divided into s.cions according to the ""! < ' ,,a, "\ hy T^"* '" i,ms "" , T S - ?' b "? f '" m laM ***** 

ahilitv.,f.hecamlida.es. Winter. rack '" ' '/' ^^ «*•*»* lliu * f "" i " "" ,; " 1 ' * *"« t( » '•" j » «*« 

brought out a swarm of yearline ! n «™ e P Urpo8e of *■* contests . This the wounded captain's return. At the 

hopefuls, many of them former school !! "'"' "T Slate ^ , ""'" *• l '" rw; "' ,l " us,s KriKanl ,,as a |,il " "'' 

c ,. ,.,,. .,.> . , .. recipient ,,| 8U ch a i, opporiunitv, and reserves in Kud^e, Glick, and Ha r ret 

l»o\ Stars. I he first practice was Coll- ,, . . , , • I. , 

( : i , „ . ,. .,,,•. , i 'he hoys inteml to make the most of 'rom last years squad, and Kv Kl 

lnie.l to pule vaulting, lii|,'h lumpihu ■, , . , ', 

..,,.i >k i . ,. "• itreoge, the speedy no\ who was on 

and the running broad pimp. All , ..... 



jump, 
further meetings are to he held in 

the athletic cage. The frosh swim 



line Game Football Schedule of 1938 Finds 

Statesmen Passing Way to Three Vk*m\?5L£2lX: £*ET1' 



(C)IKI CARD 



the best brea. t . ' r l.e art '.. it I yet e 



Dec IS Lowell Textile 
I* r. 15 Middteburr' 



Bj AI Vanow Unbeaten and untied Worcester in these part., while Bob Dor.n llj 

ruggted through a rather Polytech was the next visitor to Alum- i ; ■ streamlined version of peel ;, 



Jan. 7 Springfield 
Jan. I I Williams 



i 
mtbalai 



pe»- i i, 

.'id season this fall, but "i Field and went away undefeated the crawl. One .f the better beck . ' Ajnnersl 

atisfaction more than and untied though State threw a strokes is Dave K.kin. The lads are J* "' 'j* J^° r 5' ,,l *!j ' , ' < ' 1 ' 

' win-l0SS record of the healthy scare into the Tech followers, lowly rounding into shape under t'n ,.' .' BfcljL. i 

ib which closed its sched- holding Tech scoreless until the final watchful <•>.• of Coach Rogers, A »"?" |( , r«l« SUt * 

tree wins in nine attempts, quarter when Forkey faded back and small group of huskies met for !i ,. . ..' °'! s ,liar< 

i passing attack took an hurled a short pas.- to (Justafson to ing ami wrestling with Assistant ,,.'■' .'* ., mu,s . , 

hi in the victories this make the score (i-0, and this was the Coach Hunter. Most of them ar<- al ./.' .... ■.'"*"' 

the season's finale down Rnal and only scoring of the day. A ready In fine shape, and should be . ,, .,, .." " , 

Oval, the Statesmen were pass interception hy Forkey set up going strong within the next few ..." _, „ .. 

• the ganM marking the this scoring opportunity. week . Fifteen cavaliers reported tu 

college football ca Making ■ bid for the town title. si(l Rosen for training in the art of 

■ seniors Captain ClifF State struggled vainly on Pratt Field r,,il :UI(| s;t, »re. Pencing has finally 

/ajchowski. and Chet against a fast Sabrina outfit which coma into its own at State. Although 

nam. 



Home Games 



.villi appendicitis last season. Sharp 

hooting Kill Walsh should see plenty 

of action and is a good choice to 

take Fred Kiel's place as hie;h scorer. 

Nine Home Games 

An unpredictable Lowell Textile 

five opens the Maroon slate on Tues., 
; ecember 13 with the Middlebur) 
quintet invading the cage two days 

later; after these two opening tilts 

the Statesmen lay low till after va 
cation when i hey grapple with Spring 
field in the first contest of the new 
year. The schedule this year will give 

the State backers a chance to see 

nine of the slated fourteen games on 

the home court. The Lowell outfit is 
a newcomer to .he Maroon opponent 

list, taking the place of M. I. I. 



I 
h'kl I 



eeraed to find no difficulty penetrat- 7!' frosh expressed a desire for in- HARVARD AHKAI) IN Wh " 1 : " k " ,, f '"' '"""" |,n " s *' as "" 
1 <' tbe season came ing the Maroon offense. The Lord stroction in fencing, only five have inil «mi«CH" IKAriTi; • !T\T l ! "T'i V'^T'' 7*" !"" 

ents had completely tin- Jeffs .allied in each of the four peri- , .. .. ; LUlJ l>U^H UlAClUL '"" ■««wing a lot of /.est and enlhus, 



| C1 

i , . ... lulu iin\ «'.\pt'i ii'iit r. 

• last .Saturday ol So ,d.-, with \'i«' Pattengill leading th. 



the Maro.m squad tucked scoring with two touchdown-. State's . , 

Under its belt when lone hid for a touchdown came when 1938 WINIKR I RACK 

■ 

1 



ttional College sue- fullback Leo Santuccl made a long JUPrV OPFN TRAINING 



(Ii 



■ grounds 12-6. A ".:■ dash town the sideline, and crossed 
by sub-back Art Cohen the goal line only to have the ball 



Prusick*€oached Team Winner 

in Frosh Football 

Round-Robin 



ism; if they keep it Up, we should 
have ;i pretty k<„,<1 .season". 



COACHES AVAILABLE 

Big name- were the ,tyle as the FOR SKIKRS' CLASS 



issue In favor of State, railed back when the official- decided Statesmen Will Enter Anmial '"' l "" , '" , "'"""l K"bin tourney un- 

K. of ('. and i:. A. A. • , '• , ' th « ''i""""" "'' '"•" Bu ,h finished Kauffman, Smart. Vincent Cole 



te. at Brunswick, Maine. ,at he had stepped offside. The , ,, 

Polar l!e,-u-. clipped () f this game Was 38-0 in favor of 

back to the tune ..f 32-fl Amherst. 

I Slnling attack. Ke- \l„uu- again once more. State per 

in the Derson of Hank •■ 



ii|, the carrj over frosh football ac- 
tion. Winning four, losing one, and 
tying one, "Harvard" came out on 



Will InstrUd al Clark 

inn 




' of Blue that rolled 

coring territory and 

:: ' -<• victory. 

•'it home for the second 

' ' avid Sta.e football 



Ing turns scoring, tna Maroon rout- several good men already training, 

ed the Cherry and White by the <r,,yr an< j ne extend- a cordial welcome to 

i.f 37-u, piling up si* touchdowns tu all others. The running events are 

give Ransselaer Its worst defeat of dashes, I •'-,,. inn, -J.2u and 300 yards). 



the year. Irsyk, Harding, Allen, San- middle distance (80() and 1000 yards) 

'""" ,H " "" Its l,, ' s, tUCci, and Bllld Malcolm were the ,„„, atM | two mile-. 

"■<r even though los .,,„,.,. an(| A ]|,. n ( . ;iM1 e through with .,., ,. ... 

1 '""'I 2o-(» state out "'" *"" . . , I he jumping Includes high jump, 

rough! the fa,, Ka,„- ^ one |mlnt after touchdown. hp ^ Juwp an() pnl( . va(jIt _ ^ 

''•> the sophomore stai The season's final was played in weights al-. in the field events. (Jet 

I went down to rle- the Tuft, bowl in Medford, and the x , ,„,.„. |,- a 1); ,j t spikes, come down 

" rwood, starting his Jumbos won the gam- hy the narrow \^ aftarnoon 

■-'at-.. e alT j,.d ,,!r the margin of one point as the gain 
oaj with his stalwart 'tided T-»! giving Tuft- it- only 

:..rv of the Mar. ir ^ r > 



you maj De a Jesse 
Owens or a Cunnirnrham in the mak- 



Mesoff, A ii B. 
Wall ll. B. 
Tewhill, .1. ll. ll. 

I'm--, H. II. B, 

Galley, l>. V. B. 

Stone, C. C. 

Potter, s. E, 
White K. 
Cohan, V. T. 

Hutching- T. 
/.ielin,ki, ('. I. 
Iliitner, M. (J, 
llivoli, .1. <;. 
V\U-. C. il 



There an- a number of kn , poles 

and hauie . available for those 
fre-hmen who have elected skiing a- 
a port, and all other fre-hmen are 

o, eluded m this invitation to -.rap 

on the wine board and t r\ In -tern 
and Christie. If anyone is interested 
in purchasing kling equipment, Sid 
Kauffman will handle ordei 

Clans are rn,w uuderwav for an ,n 
tiv« winter -ports team to repreerit 

' i,e College in some of the major 

winter carnival, tkjf year. I,a-l \e.u 

a team was lent to the Middlebur) 

Carnival bul poor weather limited it 



an-iv<; nniw irn-i 



\8 



THE MASSACHl SKITS COLLSOIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, Lifts' 



ATTENTION MILITARY MAJORS!!! 

NETTLETON RIDING BOOTS-Now is the time to place your orders for Riding Boots 

They will be made up to your measurements as in previous years. Consult us at your earliest convenience. 

THOMAS F. WALSH, College Outfitter 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Continued from Page 2 

Dr. H. Franklin Williams will 
speak at the meeting of the Inter- 
national Relations Club, Wednesday, 
Dec. 7, at 7:00 p. m. His subject will 
be "United States' Relations with the 
South American Nations." 

Engineering Students 

There will be a meeting of all stu- 
dents interested in Engineering, 
Tuesday evening, Dec. 6, in room 
.301, Stockbridge Hall. Mr. Clifford 
Symancyk 'H7, will give a short talk 
on his experiences in the engineering 
field. Following this there will be a 
business meeting. 

Biology Club 

The newly formed Biology Club will 
hold a meeting tonight, Thursday, 
December 1, at Fernald Hall. The 
business meeting will begin at 7:30, 
followed at S:lil) by the first monthly 
seminar by Roger Cole '39 will speak 
informally on the Marine Biological 
Laboratory at Woods Hole. All those 



interested in biological work are cor- 
dially invited to attend. 
Math Club 

The Mathematics Club will meet 
on December 7, at 7:00 p. m. in the 
math building. In addition to the 
regular business, the program will 
consist of informal talks by Nancy 
Perks '.'{!) and Casty J. Ajauskas '41. 
Those interested are invited to at- 
tend. 

Band Rehearsal 

The regular weekly rehearsal of 
the Band will be held tonight at 
7:30 in the Memorial Building. It 
is important that all members be 
present as work will be continued in 
preparation for the first concert ap- 
pearance of the Band on Dec. 14. 
The Band is still in need of clarinet, 
flute, and trombone players. Any stu- 
dent who plays either of these instru- 
ments and who is interested in play- 
ing in the Band in its concert work 
this winter is urged to attend this 
rehearsal. There will also be a re- 
hearsal Tuesday night, Dec. 6, at 7:30 
in the Memorial Building. 



APPAONTMENTS MADE 



7:30 
7:45 

8:00 

8:15 
8:20 
8:30 

8:40 
8:50 
9:00 
9:10 
9:20 
9:30 

9:40 

9:50 

10:00 

10:05 

10:10 



10:15 



Continued from Page 1 

Band (in uniform and with in- 
struments) 

Women's Glee Club (dark 
gowns) 

Roister Doisters 

Winter Carnival Committee 

Sigma Iota sorority 

Index Staff (Juniors and Sen- 
iors) 

Dad's Day Committee 

Interclass Athletic Board 

Academics Activities Board 

Senate 

Maroon Key 

Adelphia (in Adelphia Jack- 
ets) 

W. S. G. A. 

Honor Council 

Religious Council 

Carnival Ball committee (tux- 
edos and dark formal gowns) 

1938 Soph-Senior Hop Com- 
mittee (Tuxedos and dark 
formal gowns) 

Informal Committee. 



7 (OLLEGION RELIGION 



Continued from P^ge 1 
resent each table at a panel will fol- 
low. The program follows: 

10:00 Registration of Delegates 

10:30 Address of Welcome — Pres- 
ident Hugh P. Baker, Massa- 
chusetts State College 
Address: "How Can This 
Sort of Parley Be Made Most 
Fruitful?" The Rev. J. Tho- 
burn Legg 

Addresses: "How the Faiths 
and Races Might Live To- 
gether." 

Father J. P. Sheehan 
Dr. Everett M. Baker 
Rabbi H. J. Schachtel 

11:15 Round Tables: The Causes of 
Inter-Faith and Inter-Racial 
Friction. 

12:30 Lunch 

2:00 Round Tables: "How Can 
Inter-Faith and Inter-Ra- 
cial Friction Be Decreased?" 
3:00 Panel: "What Can College 
Students Do to Increase In- 






ter-Faith and 

Cooperation ?" 

Chairman: Mr. I 

Members: Parley I,. 

Students Repress 

Round Tables. 
The discussion will be 
the assembly after a pi 
Reverend J. P. She, I 
D.C.L., who has just sgre< 
ticipate in the conference 
sentative for the Catbolii ?ri 
Professor of Religion at I ;r 
of the Elms College in Chicopee } 
undergraduate work wa.- at H 
Cross College and the Grand. 
inare of the University of M 
while his post-graduate w< rV 
biennium at Rome. 

Permanent 
William Foley, president , 
Student Religious Council, ha- & 
idea of forming a permanent inter- 
collegiate inter-faith conference 
made up of New England c 
which would meet at regular periodic 
intervals. This proposal will be . I 
cussed during the panel. 



YOU CAN 







ON THIS COMBINATION 



T, 



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make the United States 
admired and respected 
the whole world over 



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in a cigarette you can depend on 
the happy combination of mild 
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Each type of Chesterfield tobacco 
is outstanding for some fine quality 
that makes smoking more pleasure. 

Combined... blended together 
the Chesterfield way. . . they give 
you more pleasure than any 
cigarette you ever smoked. 

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and better taste satisfy millions. 



Copyright 1938, LiwiErr Ac Myers Tobacco Co 



Isterfield 

...the blend that can't be copied 

...the RIGHT COMBINATION of the 

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y k BASIL b. *00I> 

L I BRARY 





Vol. XLIX 



Mm 



SI 



AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 19S8 Z-288 



NO I i 



GLENN MILLER'S BAND CHOSEN 
FOR WINTER CARNIVAL DANCE 

Noted Arranger, Composer, Trombonist, Signed to Play at Winter 

Event — Orchestra Features Six-piece Brass Section 

and Five Saxes in Novel Arrangement 



INDEX PICTURES 



HUTTON SINGS 



SINGS WITH MILLER 



Blond, Sensuous Cousin of Ina 
Ray Hutton is Big 
Attraction 



The orchestra of Glenn Miller, 
Bdted arranger, composer, trombonist 
has been signed to appear at the 
Carnival Hall, feature event of the 
Winter Carnival program. 

Miller has long been known as one 
the greatest arrangers in the 
country. He organized his orchestra 
last year and since then has played 
and been acclaimed on many college 
campuses, waxed discs for Decca, 
Brunswick and Victor and played a 
long engagement at Manhattan's Par- 
adise Restaurant. 

Marion Hutton 

Blond, sensuous Marion Hutton, 
coma "f renowned Ina Ray Hutton, 
is Miller's vocalist and one of the 
outstanding features of the band. The 
orchestra itself includes a six-piece 
brass section and five saxes in ad- 
dition to the conventional four man 
rhythm section. The features of Mill- 
ie's arranging, which include certain 
futuristic ideas, incomparable tech- 
nique and originality, have been so 
effectively applied to the band's style, 
that it has already influenced the ar- 
rangementa of several top bands such 
a- that of Henny Goodman. 

Miller's band was featured last 
*eek at the Sphinx Club's fall dance 
i ■' ■ r-st College. 

KNOX ELECTED HEAD 
OF FRESHMAN CLASS 




Mr. Mahoncy of the Winn Studio 
will he at the Mount Pleasant Inn 
all day Thursday and Friday of 
next week to distribute the senior 
portraits which were ordered last 
week. At this same time, he will 
also receive proofs of those seniors 
who have not yet returned theirs. 
This is your la.st chance, if yon 
want your portrait to go in the 
Index. 

In regard to group pictures, the 
junior class will he photographed 
on the steps of Stockbridge Hall 
next Thursday immediately after 
convocation. All other classes and 
groups will have their pictures 
taken after Christmas vacation. 



DR. GLICK TALKS AT 
CONVOCATION HERE 



WINTER SPORTS DIRECTORS TO 
MEET FOR RECREATION CONFAB 

Professor Harold If, Gore of Physical Education Department 
Heads Commit tec for Conference Sponsored l>y Western 

Winter Sports Council 



Mas 



HEADS CONFERENCE 






"The Burden of Knowledge 
Explained by Psych 
Professor 



is 



Marion Hutton 



SONG BY ULLMAN TO 
BE PLAYED ON N.B.C. 



Miller to Play "You'll be Gone 

Tomorrow" Over the Radio 

— Words by Noyes 



\\ 



ma 



Chase, Eleanor Gillette, 
John Sullivan are 
Also Chosen 



• rving ten weeks as tem- 

president, Charles Knox was 

''"l to the permanent presidency 

freshman class by a vote of 

- indents at the last convo- 

Knox>a home is in East Long- 

lxre he attended Classi- 

! High School, and he is a pledge 

| Sigma. In the same election 

IM M. Chase was chosen vice-pres- 

• class. A pledge of Phi 

Chase resides in Fox- 
boro, 



"You"! He (lone Tomorrow," blue 
song by Robert Oilman to be featured 

at the Winter Carnival Ball, will mak 
its initial bow in the next two > eek 
over the radio, when (ilenn Miller's 
band introduces it to the NBC radio 
public. 

Asked to arrange the sung for the 
Carnival Hall, Miller was so taken 
by the tune that he told the Hall 
Committee that he would play it u 
soon as he could get the arrange- 
ment down, and that he expects it 
to be a hit by Carnival-time. 

Lyrics to the tune are by Arthur 
N'oyes. I ilrian is a senior and N'oyes 
a Junior. 



Dr. Harry N. Click, head of M. S. 
Ca Department of Psychology, spoke 
an "The Burden of Knowledge" at 
the student convocation in Bowker 
auditorium today, explaining this 
seemingly paradoxical subject by 
questioning the concept that the goal 
of life copsits of amassing of facts 
alone, and showing under what con- 
ditions knowledge is a burden to man. 
"Knowledge bocosnes «• burden when 
it is misapplied" said Professor Click, 
citing the use of scientific knowledge 
to make implements for man's des- 
truction. "Secondly, knowledge la a 
burden when it makes available more 
power than we have moral character 

wisely control," he continued, stat 
ng that our civilization today la in 
this state of unstable equilibrium due 
t-> the outstripping by material pro- 
gress of our moral progress. 

Declaring that, knowledge again 
bee. mies a burden when it is unassi- 
m Mated and unorganized, and when 
the collecting of objective facts is 
considered to be the only worth- 
while knowledge the intangible val- 
ues of God, Faith, hope, love and > 
th<tic appreciation are eliminated, Dr. 
Click concluded by showing how. 
through philosophy, man can best 
assimilate his knowledge. 




MANY SPEAKERS 



Cuddeback, Aull, O'Hearn, Lane- 
ley, Thompson and Taylor 
Will Talk 



Harold M. Gore 



PATTERSON PLAYERS 
TO PRESENT COMEDY 



Tin 



Bishop Misbehaves" 

l>e Faculty Croup's 
Production 



Will 



Presenting their fourth straight 

coined; production, the Patterson 

Players, faculty dramatic group, will 
introduce the rollicking farce "The 
Bishop Misbehaves" m their first play 
oi the season. 

The production Ifondaj evening at 

8 p. m. in Stockbridge Hall will have 

two innovations. The two sets will be 
built, the lirst inside the second, thus 
saving minutes iii scene transition. 
The second new feature will be a 
large stage crew under the direction 

of M. Leland Varfey, new Instructor 
of English. Mrs. Guy V. Glatfelter 



Winter sports moguls will meet 

here this weekend when the wint.«>' 

I sports section of the annual Recr. ., 

rtiofl Conference! which is sponsored 

by the Western Massachusetts Win- 

ttC Sports Council, will hold its fall 

conclave at the College. Profoamn 

j Harold M. Gore, of the department of 
physical education, is chairman ( .| 
the committee in charge. 

An all da] program, starting 

10:00 a. m. on Sunday will be hrad<-< 

by a general session at .'<:.'«) p. .., 

in the physical education building a1 

which l.anv Mriggs, secretary ftl th< 

w. M. w. s. c. will preside; k.- 

Beth Cuddeback, chairman o| t.b« 
W. M. W. S. C. and member of t»„ 
National Ski I'atrol Committee, ;,mj 
Dr. L. M. Thompson, of the Nation*) 
Red Cross will speak. The dinner ••• 
sion at the Lord .lelfery Inn will 
hear, M gunet speakers, Dr. Thoo i 
•son and Roger F. Mangley, presidei • 
of the National Ski Association J 
America. 

Sat a r da > Meeting 
Preceding the Sunday conclt • 
there will be a Saturday ifterm i 
me rting of the • astern member | 
the edvisorj committee on skiing f 
the National Park Service to dlSCUM 
Continued on Page t 

SINGER TO PRESENT 
HISTORICAL RECITAL 



Mi 



'S. 



Hufstader bings 

in Friday Music 

Program 



TV 



Alice Hufi tadi r, famous 

lo.nal singer, will give two 
will be in charge of stags decorations, [at Massachusetts Stale < 
Continu ed on Page 6 sontine a CTOM section of 

Prom Bach to Pavel 



Inter-Faith Council Established As a Permanent 

Organization As 100 Students Take Part in Parley 



I as treasurer was John J. 

Sullivan f rurn Chelsea, who is a 

Alpha Sigma Phi. Eleanor 

was chosen secretary. Mia 

■ pledge of Phi Zeta and 

hi Towanda, Penna, 

■^ergeant-at-Arms 

P. Coffin was voted ser- 

arras, A pledge of Kappa 

n is from Dorcester. Th 

eaptain is Benjamin L. 

Of Par Harbor, Me. ,who 

dft of Phi Sigma Kappa. 

the Inter-class Athletic 

Sydney Zeitler, a pledge 

Phi, who's home is in 

\'ilrew Pierce of Brook- 

at Kappa Sigma. 

1 officers were among 
ate ! November 15 by the 
the freshman nominating 



Pio ne e r ing in the field of inter- I resolution stating the objectives of 
racial and inter-faith understanding, the Interfaitfl Council was adopted 
William Foley, president of the Stu- i by delegates from all the represented 
dent Religious Council, and J. Paul colleges. 
Williams, religious director here and Resolution 

faculty chairman of the Parley, have J The resolution, Co mp o s ed by Rabbi 
named a success the Inter-Faith Par- II. J. Schachtel, is as follows: 
ley held in the Memorial Building "Whereas the Constitution of the 
last Saturday and attended by about I United States and the constitutions 
100 student representatives from of the individual states guarantee 
Amherst, Brown, Mount Holyoke, [ freedom of religion and freedom of 
Springfield and State colleges. 'speech and equality before the law. 

In the morning President Hugh P. ! "Whereas it is the conviction of 
Baker, Reverend I. Thohurn Legg of this conference that any Htate which 
Newburgfc, Dr. Everett M. Baker of jaup pra aa aa these human rightH is a 
New York, Rabbi H. 3, Schachtel of menace to civilization, 
New York, and Father J. P. Sheehan I "Whereas good democratic forms 

depend on tolerance, understanding, 

and good will, 

"Whereas there is greater freedom 

and opportunity for the individual in 

a democracy than under any other 



stitution of the United States, 

"And be it further resolved that 
this conference joins and supports 
and heartily endorses all efforts and ' ital is as follows: 



I lit « I ft, 

COM ■ 

'Hege, |„. 

SOttf 

this Pridaj 

lernoon and evening, at 4 :.'',<> and 
p. m., in the Old Chapel au.litoriui- 

Recently returned from ■ most am 
cessful recital tour of Europe, Mr< 

Hufstader has been noted in the 
country for her lecture recitals an« 
oratorio appearances. Itoth concert- 
are open to the public. 

The program for the afternoon n 



were 



the principal speak- 



of Chicopee 
era. 

In the afternoon two round tablet 
and a general panel discussion was 

held. As a result of the disco 



an Intcr-cnlleiriatc Interfaitfl Coun- ' form of government, 
cil for New England wa established] "Me it re sol v ed that this conference 
with I J. Speigel of Amhei '-t 'ol- reaffirms the principles of American 
lege as temporary chairman; and a j democracy as set forth in the con- 



movements aimed at good will and 
common understanding between all 
racial and religious groups: 

"and be it further resolved that we 
call upon our fellow students in the 
colleges and universities in the United 
States to join with us in resisting 
prejudice by forming themselves in- 
to and working with interfaith coun- 
cils." 

On the success and future of the 
Inter-Faith Parley, Mr. Williams, who 
was a sort of promoter and organizer 
along with Foley, said, 

"The Inter-raith Parley demon- 
trated that State College students 
are far in the van in their thinking 
and acting on inter racial matt, r 
and that they can successfully pro- 
mote inter-collegiate conferences. 
The members of the Student Religion 
Continued an Page 4 



Milestones in Vocal Literature 
I. Recitative and Aria in Church aZH 
Theatre 

1. Recitative, Arioso, am) Aria 

from Cantata 1X0 n ;i , r 

"Schmucke dich, O Llchs Seele" 

2. Aria, "My Father! Ah! Me- 

thinks I see" Han.i. 

from "Hercules" 
.'5 Recitative and Aria, from thi 

Cantata "Ce Berger 

Fidele" 

4. Recitative and Aria 

IphieYnic en Tauride 

II. Some Parly Art Songs 

Mitten (Geilerl i |{ af t 

Das Veiichen (Goethe) Mozart 
Freudvoil und LsMvoll (Goethe) 

Beethovet 
The evening program will deal win 

The Art Song, and will in. hide . 
lections from Schubert, lirahm-. Wi!' 



Ramos i 

from 

CIiji I 






Tiir: 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY, DECEMBER ft. l!» 







BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BART 



/TfcassacbuseilP Co lleg tan 



OlTxinl riinv:,|i.'ipi-r of the MimilK lllHHUl State ('ulli-w. 

Published every Thursday by the students. 



(Mil. 



K.MI 



'. Memorial C'liliill.e 



EMERY MOORE 
AIM'IU'K A, NOYES '40. Managing Editor 



i'.t, E.litor-iri-f'hi.-f 

MAHKI.I.K BOOTH 



Telephone 1W2-M 



Associate Kilitor 



i IHTOKI \l i:i.\i;n 



Campus 

JOHN B. Fii.ios in. Editor 

BETTINA HAT. I. ';■&. Art Editor 
MAKV T. MKKHAN '39 
FRANCKS 8. MKKIMI.I. ':t'j 
JOSEPH HART '4n 
NANCY E. LUCE 'in 
JACOl'KUNK I.. BTEWART '4n 
LORETTA KENNY '41. Secretary 
WII.I.IAM T. liOODWIN II 
HAROI.H FORREST '41 
JOHN HAYKS II 
ELIZABETH COFFIN '42 
MARY DONAHUE il' 
WII.I.IAM IIWYEH U 
liEOROE i i i CHFIELD '42 
LOUISE POTTKB '48 

Feature 

LLOYD U. fOPKLANH 'H9, Editor 
MYRON FISHER '39 
KATHLKKN TULLY "41 
EVEREIT It. SI'ENCER Mo 



Sports 

li. ARTHUR COFSON ' 
CARL FREEDMAN Ml 
KENNETH HOWLAND 
M.BERT YANOW '41 
BERTRAM HYMAN '43 



K«lit< 



II 



Stii..|.lni(l(fc Correspondent 

John KELSO B*M 

I ill li Itc () II. I III ll\ 

SIDNEY ROSEN '39. Editor 

robert McCartney '40 

CHESTER KURALOWICZ 11 

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PROF. LAWRENCE IMCKINSON 

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HALL Must our campus halls be used until the time comes when 
ROOM floor and seat spate will be apportioned out per person 
or per COUple? Whether a new hall is to follow the re-| 
pair of South College or whether we must continue to hold Up 
under the present Inadequate facilities for social functions on 
campus is a question of some import to us as a student body. 

Mention has been made frequently in this column of the' 
present conditions which require a division of the student body 
for convocations and like functions. Note has also been made of | 
the nearly impossible situation which ties up dances in the Drill 
Hall with its lack of facilities for Comfortable rest and coat rooms;) 
with its narrow congested staircase jammed with ascending and 
descending people, trying to wait patiently for an opening through 
which they can squeeze for fresh air. This situation arose at the 
Military Hall — crowding was noticeable at Social Union and if all 
who had paid for their seats had gone to the entertainment, 
standing room would have been at a premium. Many remain home 
because they feel that Stockbridge Hall will be too crowded for 
them to enjoy the play or concert. 

With the winter social season approaching, and plans being 
made for the biggest and best winter carnival yet, some thought 
should be given to facilities for comfort and room. The Carnival 
Ball, one of the year's largest dances, cannot be expected to 
continue in the Drill Hall for much longer. At a dance with a 
medium attendance, space is at a premium. From appearances, 
the Carnival Ball will attartc an unduly large number of guests 
from outside. Our hospitality can be but crude, to say the least, 
at present. 

The only other place on campus which is large enough to 
hold a good crowd is the cage. It does not seem out of place to 
suggest that, If it lie possible, the space there be utilized provid- 
ing it does not conflict with the Physical Education Division. 
Much development would be necessary, but there would be plenty 
of space with the basketball floor and the balconies. 

We may call ourselves members of a culture conscious col- 
lege but we cannot prove our culture if our habits are those of 
barbarians. There is a definite need here, for an enlarged build- 
ing program. Make it known! 

The opening of the basketball season brings the passing of 
Paul Putnam, one of the outstanding players of last year's bas- 
ketball team, to the attention of the student body. Paul, who was 
well known to his classmates of '88 and underclassmen alike, 
passed away on Monday before Thanksgiving. 

Paul will be remembered by graduates and undergraduates; 
his passing has left a mark on the memories of the class of 1938. 



A DREAM 

or 
THINGS TO COME 

By H. <;. Well-Well 

Once again peace reigned on the 
campus. The revolution at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts had finally 
subsided. In the history of the col- 
lege a new chapter had been written. 
Ten years ego the A. I!, decree was 
granted, Five years ago the college 
became a university, and now the 
students obtained their latest de- 
mand. They now had the right to un- 
limited ruts. Lecturers would have to 
('raw the students, not students the 
lecturers. 

The banners which were carried 
around the campus in the campaign 
for unlimited cuts were burned at 
a monster victory rally. Such slogans 
as "Why indict us with dehydrated 
lecturers'.'"; "Progress depends upon 
freedom," and similar exhortations 
were consigned to the flames. 

I'ut all was not so rosy in the 
enemy camp. Around a table in 
• he chapel sat the stern-faced 
faculty. Dr. (irainhuster asked. 
"Gentlemen how can we get the 
students to come to our classes? 
Who ever heard of a professor 
without students? Kadi of you 
must suggest a solution to this 
problem. We shall meet here on 
the morrow at dawn." 
The rising sun saw figures stealing 
into the chapel. The nefarious facul- 
ty were planning to plot the destruc- 
tion of the students. After the meet- 
ing had been called to order the first 
speaker was heard. "I suggest that 
we include a Mickey Mouse cartoon 
in the first 10 minutes of every class. 
That should draw out the students," 
aid the speaker. 

"Prof. Pretense's idea is a 
good one," added Mr. Albany, 
"but how about those students 
who have eight o'clocks. I believe 
the best way to have them come 
is to serve coffee and doughnuts." 
The next speaker, Dr. Moss ob- 
jected. He queried, "What can 
we do about the afternoon class- 
es. All my laboratory periods are 
scheduled for the afternoon. I 
believe we should serve tea and 
cakes as well as coffee and 
doughnuts." 

The suggestions poured forth like 
plans to end the depression. Some 
instructors suggested that the cours- 
es in public speaking should be taken 
by the faculty. Others believed that 
that body should read Dale Carnegie's 
book "How to Make Friends and In- 
fluence People." Far into the day the 
ideas came forth and toward night 
plans were formulated. 

To tackle the problem, the follow- 
ing plans were decided upon. Pro- 
fessor Ex would work with Mr. Alert 
to perfect the machine by which stu- 
dents could learn by osmosis. In the 
meantime the others in the group 
would work on the lecture notes ex- 
changing ideas, injecting new jokes 
in place of the old ones, and strictly 
(Continued on Page 6) 





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TEN MINUTES WITH 
THE PRESIDENT 

BY EVERETT It. SPENCER, Ji. 



"Ten minutes with the Presi- 
dent," a weekly chat v. i!h Pres- 
ident Maker, makes its first ap- 
pearance in the Co'legian this 
week. It will pre ent Ihe Presi- 
dent's thoughts on subjects of 
interest to the whole college. Its 
purpose is to bridge the gap be- 
tween the administration and the 
student body. It will be a man-to- 
man talk with no holds barred. 
Students wishing to make sug- 
gestions for subjects for discus- 
sion should inform Everett II. 
Spencer of the Collegian staff 
who will interview the President. 
Monday Dec. 12. 1938, 2:30 P. M. 
I should like to raise a question and 
■m rwer it. It Is a question that I 
have often been asked by people 
unacquainted with the aims of the 

college. 

Is this college, as a land-grant col- 
lege, a type of educational institution 
quite different from the privatelv en- 
dowed institutions around us, meeting 
a need in the Commonwealth for the 
educating of the young men and 
women in the Commonwealth? 

"In answer to any question as 
whether or not educational institu- 
tions are meeting the needs of the 
peop'e, we must understand the de- 
velopment in our colleges and uni- 
versities over the years. The private- 
ly endowed institutions were all de- 
veloped with the idea of educating 
young people for certain professions 
such as the ministry, law, medicine. 
With such objectives, the curriculum 
in these schools was decidedly classi- 
cal in character. Thus the whole 
• tructure of education in New Eng- 
land was founded on rather narrow 
conceptions of education — -an educa- 
tion of the few. Later came the de- 
ve'opment of engineering schools 
which based their curriculum on lib- 
eral arts, or were largely strictly 
vocational schools offering highly 
penalized work in the fields of en- 
gineering. 

The introduction of land-grant col- 
leges brought a new type of college 
into existence a type which was quite 



different from the classical oi ,. n i 

neering schools. 

While the objectives of the | and 
grant colleges were to give 
cation to the young people both i n 
arts and engineering, many of the- 
colleges! because of the leader**! 
back of them, felt that agri.-uC 
was their principal objective. Certe 
other land-grant colleges such ai Z 
Western universities expanded bgj 
| in agriculture and engineering, Z 
achieving a balance. 

When a part of the land-grant fund, 

i were given to M. I. T. to carry ,, 

| engineering, the State College officii 

were convinced that agricult* 

I should be developed to what might be 

; termed an exclusion of mechanic 

arts. Finally when a president «•« 

installed who was a graduate of an. 

other land-grant college, the State 

""liege was developed to extremes in 

the field of agriculture. 

The tendency during the past few 
vears is to bring the college to a 
more perfect balance between the 
mechanic arts and agriculture. Today 
a balance has been achieved. The col. 
lege not only ofTers excellent advan- 
tages in agriculture, but offers ex- 
eel lent opportunities to the yi , m 
men and women of the state in gen- 
eral engineeri»nr, the liberal arts, an <j 
particularly the sciences. 

Such a history and study of the 

differences of colleges that I havn 

briefly outlined will show that u> 

State College is the only college in 

the Commonwealth which is design: 

primarily to serve the young peopk 

I >f the Commonwealth. Almost ever, 

J one of the fine privately endowed in- 

I stitutions are national, rather th.r 

I state in character. 

In closing, let me say that it - 

my strong feeling that the trustee?. 

I faculty, students, and friends of tftl 

| college slvmld emphasise that mi 

i-nlv is thh college offering ■ type 

of eduction needed in this state hut 

it is the only college in Ha 

setts which is givintr its entire effort! 

to the young people of the C ( >r< 

wealth." 



coed notes 

RY JACQUELINE STEWART 



Rhyme - Reason - Rhythm 

Ry Peter Rarreca 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday. December 1 
Voting Faculty Omp 
Hand Kehearsal 

AST Meeting. I p. m.. Memorial Hldg. 
Friday, Deoemher 9 

Concert — Alice Hufstadter, Old Chapel, 

1:30 and llM P. M. 
Vic I'uitii - 
Thatcher Hall 
Phi /.eta 

Alpha Gamma Klin 
Saturday, Dec. 10 

Lambda Deltrt Mu hormal 
Vic Parlies 
Kappa Sigma 
Sigma lleta Chi 
Tau Kpsilon Phi 
Alpha Lambda Mu 
Sunday. Dec. II 

Western Mass. Winter Sport* Council 
Monday. Dec. 12 

Wagner Concert — Springfield 
Patterson Players — Dr. Fraker 
Tuesday, December 13 
Fine Arts 

Haskethall — Lowell Textile — here 
Amherst Nature Club 
Wednesday, Dec. 14 
Amherst Masquer* 
Hand Concert 
Thuraday, Dec. I.'i 

Haskethall — Middlehury — here 



The Military I'all was a grand suc- 
Cess. Many coeds attended, and the 
music was very good for dancing. 
The selection of the honorary colonel 
was impressive. Humorous incident — ' 
ask her about the slip she made. 

Coed bouquet of the week goes to | 
Mob (Jllman and Arthur Noyes for 
respectively composing and writing 
lyrics of "You'll Be Cone Tomorrow." 
Glen Miller, leader of the orchestra 
picked for the Carnival Rail, heard 
the selection and is having it ar- 
ranged and copyrighted. He plans 
to play it over the radio soon. Con- 
gratulations, boys! 

Sigma Reta Chi will hold its 
annual pledge formal at the Lord 
Jeffery Inn on January 7. On 
the following week, January 14 
to be exact, Phi Zeta will hold 
theirs, also at the Lord Jeflf. As 
previously noted. Lambda Delta 
Mu's pledge formal will take 
place at the Munsnn Memorial 
Ruilding on Saturday. Marge 
Harris is in charge of the ar- 
rangements. Music will be fur- 
nished by the "Esquires" of 
Westfield. The chape rones ,ve *Ir. 
and Mrs. Helming and Mr. and 
Mrs. Caldwell. Sigma lota's 
pledge formal is also scheduled 
for January 7. If will be held in 
the Hills Memorial Clubhouse. 
Vic parties will be popular this 
weekend. Phi Zeta will start off with 
one on Friday, Besides the fraternity 
shindigs, vie parties conducted by 
Sigma Reta and Alpha Lambda Mu 
are scheduled for Saturday. Alpha 
Lamb's will be in the form of a 
Continued on Page 4 



Since thumb sketches of the men 
who create popular dance music KM 
to ring the bell more often than semi- 
technical reports on the records they 
make, this week's bit of gossip tear* 
to shreads the shrouds of mystery 
swathed about boogie, Erskine Haw- 
kins. 

This star has risen, and is shininft. 
His torrid trumpeting has brought 
him wide acclaim from critics, includ- 
ing "an orchid" from Win. hell. Hailed 
by thousands of addicts as the hit- 
test trumpeter in the game today. 
Hawkins is a past master of triple 
tonguing in the dizzier runes nf th' 
scale, and reputedly the only. one who 
can hit C above high C. That nay 
or may not mean anything to yol 
but take my word for it, it's as hard 
Bfl making the first dean's board at 
State. (I don't mean the one that 
just came out, either.) 
Instructor 

Four years ago Hawkins left J 
post as instructor of music at Ala- 
bama State teachers '''liege, and 
brought with him a hand of younf 
collegians who had worked their *$ 
through school with tin ii leader » 



the " 'Rama State Colli RJ«»* 



fw 



shot at the Roseland Ballroom « * 
jhury Park was aplenty, and the haj 
I was signed for a New Von • 
at the Harlem Opera House, Bj 
Hawkins got his real break. The W" 
*r failed to appear, and Hawkinl 
his dynamic bugle lead the *"■ " 
the first time. They ' •' h " 
at the Ubangi Club, an«i a year W 
left to go on the re ^ 

Then, in l!)3fi, they openef 1 
Continued o* T*V 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER ft, l»M 



'BOTH YOUR HOUSES" DELIGHTS CAPACITY 
AUDIENCE AT TUESDAY'S SOCIAL UNION 

A ;lN /ell Anderson Play, Presented Under Difficulties by Jitney 
Players, Proves Them Good Troupers as Performance 

is Given Smoothly 



HONORARY COLONEL 




EXCEPTIONAL COLLECTION OF PRINTS IS 
ON EXHIBITION IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Japanese Art Features Work of Old and Modern Masters <;old- 

lish and The Great Wave Arc of Especial Interest 



VaU*^ 



o^i" 



ul<'1 














StudmntB Own and Opmrmtm Their Own Railroad 

Built by students of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the "Rensselaer Central 
Railroad" is operated on the campus by undergraduates. Chief backer of the 
line is Guy Stillman, shown here telling Prof. Fessenden all abaut the engine. 
Funds are raised by bond issues to the students who liquidate their investment 
after graduation by selling their stock to incoming students. imtiMtiMMi 



^ e I iio««« ,i, PJ» woo *» 
Gam *° V\as ^° 

(CWieoa ) 






"no M 

F n '*er»it 



f 
hi 



Fmn—d Slngt Sentenced 

, opera star, necktie-less alter a session with the 

Iowa's kangaroo court, goodnaturedly kissed two 

* violation of o non-necktie rule enforced during 




CoM.t»*t DtffMl Male by H««4 objects of the f Un 



Airs Fair Wham mimic* Oat To g e t her 

And it was a riot of fun when the University of Pennsylvania Mask and Wig club presented its 
annual parody on important events of the day. Here's the take-off on the burying of the time 
capsule at the New York World's Fair, with Albert Einstein and Grover Whelan being the chief 

BBBBBBlBBBEV 



Election of .Jui 
tenting both i.. 

irks of the Krca: 

n<»\v on exhibi 

al Building an< 

ection is brilliant 

for the finenes' 

end is one w lu< > 
stiiiK and wnrtl 

-iitinii \b perhui 
ng thins ahou: 
panene [huiiI <>' 
'erenl from oun. 
f elements par- 
Boticed for then' 
e balance, an in 
lank spaces, and 
form that make* 
nportant in tin 

■h 

ippeal in tin <■;■ 
tin- Goldfish, bj 
colors, and the 
nt of the subject 
nt are especially 
Depression of m< 
tin- whole prin! 
B air of humoi 
est are the four 
of which wen 
tst famous artist 
"intfl are spirited 
f life and gaity 
ful Htroket which 
greatest painter 
'. Wave is on, i.f 
rious print* ; rid 
i. extensive ii | ,. 
her pictun thwl 
of great mei in 
'int is a dramal < 
of the f< •!■*•« <■ i ■ 
st mail 

part iculai I; 

who 1 1 (\ i 
be intei eKtei in 
I), Morning Mi't 

finest exampli • 
> •< hniijue n i h«- 
boat on Mi.- n 
i>« . ;ni(l i . |" 
iti HUhjecti t 
man) will I ml 
I Jeer, Geem ami 
Persimmoi 

i« rl , thesi | nil!' 
ew, whether one 

nts or merely a 
oveiy pictures 
B t 

3 SPEAKS 

will hi i . 
ins of ili< 

I this afti'inoi 

imorial Buildini 
irks will prefaei 
Of the ASH 

es such ,-i es 
national conven 
f the six collegi 

II be dlscu ' i 
.'••rl to eome Ai 
l to attend 

mas 

nd Tyinjz.v 



BLTS 

KTII BRUftHBf 

d Siesta 

les 

Gift Shop 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, fHURSDAY, DECEMBER 8. 19 




/IfoassaclnisetW ■ (lollcaian 



BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOE BART 



A DRKA.M 



or 



THINGS TO COME 
By H. (.. Well-Well 




TEN MINUTES WITH 
THE PRESIDENT 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, IMS 



"BOTH YOUR HOUSES" DELIGHTS CAPACITY 
AUDIENCE AT TUESDAY'S SOCIAL UNION 

.11 Anderson Play. Presented Under Difficulties by Jitney 
•layers, Proves Them Good Troupers U s Performance 
is Given Smoothly 



HONOKAKY COLONEL 




EXCEPTIONAL COLLECTION OF PRINTS IS 
ON EXHIBITION IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Japanese Art Features Work of Old and Modern Masters (;«iri- 
flgfc and The Greal Wave Are of Especial Interest 



Olli 



Office : Boom S, Mini 



ARTlll'K A. NOYES 



Cinipuii 

JOHN E. KIM OS '4u, 
BETTINA HAM, l J i*. 
MARY T. MKKHAN 
FRANCES 8. M ERR 1 1 
JOSEPH HART '40 
NANCY E. LICE '40 
JACQUELINE L. STF 
LOR ETTA KENNY M 
WILLIAM T. COOnV 
HAROLD FORREST ' 
JOHN HAYES 41 
ELIZABETH COFFIN 
MARY DONAHUE I 
WILLIAM DWYBH ' 
fJEORCE I 1 ''f'lKiKI 
LOUISE POTTER '4* 

Feature 
LLOYI) B. COPELAN 
MYRON FISHER '89 
KATHLEEN TILLY 
EVERETT 1! SI'ENC 



ABRAHAM CARP '3 
( 

E. EUGENE RENAL 
ROGER H. L1NDSE 
JOSEPH R. COROOI 
\ I. TEH R. LALOI 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2 



Make nil orili'is pi 
nitis t olli yimi. In c, 
■ubucrilier will i>l<-:i s- • 
«Bcr an soon BJ ikjss 
uate :uul family o<> 
encoiirnjjetl. Any co 
must b«' rt'rt'ivcd at t 
9 o'clock, Monday evt 



Entprml a.s socond-cl 
her«t Pont Oliice. / 
■npi'rial rate of poxt&g 
1103. Act of October 
20, 1 9 1 s . 

Print rd by Carpenter 
Amherst, Ma 



HALL Must < 

ROOM lloor i 

or |)e 

pail' of South 
under the pre 
campus is a qi 

Mention 1 
present condit 
for convocatio 
the nearly imj 
Hall with its U 
with its narro 
descending pet 
which they ca 
Military Ball- 
who had paic 
standing room 
because they 
them to enjoj 

With the 
made for the 
should be g'iv« 
Ball, one of 
continue in t 
medium attei 
the Carnival 
from outside, 
at present. 

The only 
hold a good ( 
suggest that, 
inj? it does 1 
Much develop 
of space with 

We may 
lege but we 

barbarians, T 
ing - program, 

The opei 

Paul Putnam 
ketball team, 
well known 
passed away 

Paul will 
his passing h 



Radio Favors Collegians I 

Behind the Scenes at a Radio Broadcast L 



Radio has brought something new to entertainment — 
but it has done so only by degrees. 

Entertainment has gone educational in a big way be- 
cause of the demand of radio for college-trained talent 
and technicians. Thanks to a general educational back- 
ground and specific experience in one of many extra- 
curricular activities, the modern college graduate stands 
a better chance than the average person to crash into 
radio. 

Many topflight programs are staffed almost entirely 
by college graduates. One of the most typical of these 
is Hal Kemp s "Time to Shine" program over C. B. S. 
Pictured here are the leading planners and performers on 
that program, all of whom started in radio via campus 
extra-curricular activities. 



1 



f ♦ 



*> -4 



Badger Beauty 

Carol Kirschner was one of the 
five honored in a beauty 
court for a recent University 
of Wisconsin dance. 



r* 




*£m 



Radio Engineer John McCartney took a general engi- 
neering course at the University of Minnesota before 
joining Columbia's engineering staff in the east. 



Although campus critics may disagree, collejthr 
magazines have spawned many clever writers. JaddL 

?ained his first experience on the Ohio State Jad.| 
mnttrn. 




Oral Love Letters 

. . . may soon be a by-prod- 
uct of Georgia Tech's new 
public speaking course. 
Here's footballer Jack Chiv- 
ington doing a little record- 
ing — and from the interest 
shown by the spectators, it 
must be good. 





/ -. 



rt 






/ 



"<*J 



Production Manager Edmund Cashman (Rhode Island 
State) and John Peterson (Butler), road-manager, find 
their business administration training invaluable in set- 
tling business details. 



Announcer David Ross studied at Rutgers and Colum- 
bia, has found his major in English a great help in attain- 
ing the perfect enunciation required of him. 



Top vocal entertainment is furnished by Judy Starr, 
got her start at West Virginia. Saxie Do well (M)i 
with Kemp (center) in his original band at NortfiCa 
lina. 




seAuert 



ick the smokers on your Christmas list — 
ielight them with those gaily-wrapped, 
expensive gifts— Camels and Prince Albert 



CAMELS — what could be a nicer gift 
for those who smoke cigarettes than 
Camels, by far the most popular ciga- 
rette in America? Remember. ..Camels 
are made of finer, MORE EXPEN- 
SIVE tobaccos — Turkish and Domes- 
tic. There's a world of Christmas cheer 
in receiving a fine gift of mild, rich- 
tasting Camel cigarettes — and 
a lot of satisfaction in 
giving them too! 






PRINCE ALBERT— If you want to 
please a man who smokes a pipe, give 
him the tobacco that is extra mild and 
extra tasty— Prince Albert! Watch his 
happy smile as he lights up this ripe, 
rich tobacco that smokes so cool and 
mellow because it's specially cut and 
"no-bite" treated. If you want to 
make this a real Christmas for the 
pipe-smokers you know— give Prince 
Albert, the National Joy Smoke. 

(above) A pound package of rich- 
tasting, "no-bite" smoking in this 
eye-filling gift package of Prince 
Albert, the world's most popular 
smoking tobacco. Be sure to see 
the big, generous one-pound tin 
on display at your nearest dealer's. 



(left) The handsome 
Christmas-wrapped Camel 
carton— 10 packs of "20's" 
—200 cigarettes. Your 
dealer is featuring it now. 




rar*0A 

Itimelv 
hrbox, 
PH," ] , 
"gift t 



mired in 
iday dress— 
I Camels in "flat 

like (and is) a lot 
what you pay! 



i. j. lUrlMMa 
Tofcarro < o «»M>7 
,M.C 



You'd Make a Face, Too 

... if you'd been assigned to pose with a snake as co-ed Ernestine 
Bazemore is doing here. She's holding a six-foot pine snake from the 
famed collection of Martin Knowlton at Birmingham-Southern College. 

ASM 



A PERFECT WAY TO SAY 

IKY CHRISTMAS 




Election of Jul 
enting both fa 
»rks of the great 
now on exhibi 
al Building and 
action is brilliant 
for tin- fineness 

and is one v. Iim i 
sting and wortl 

sition is perlui] 

n^ tiling aln i 

panese point oi 
erent from our?, 
f elements par 
noticed for then 
C balance, an in 
lank spaces, am 

form thai maker 
aiportanl in th< 

Mil 

ippeal in tin • . 

tin- (loldtish t>- 
Colore, and tin 
nt of the aubjecl 
nt are especial! 
mpresaion of iim 
the whole prinl 

«■ air of huino! 
'■ I are the four 
of which wen 
■st. famous artist 
•ints are spirited 

f life and galty, 

•ful strokes which 

greatest paintei 

t Wav«' is urn of 
rnous print! I I 
I extensivi > • i u 
In i picture thai 
of greal mei n 
'int is a drumuti" 

of t III tl-l'Cl i 

st mail 

'K 

particularly mil 

who 1 1 k i 
t»e inlervHtei in 

I), Nomiai Mi»t 

finest ex an i i< 
technique u tin- 
hoal on Me 

• and ' 1 1 
■:• i uhjetrl | ■ 
i , 1 1 1 \ v. 1 1 b f ul 
Deer, UeetM ,. mi 

I'ersirnmei 

ft ci , tin ,,i | nut! 
rw, whethei ors 
nts or mere!) i 

lively picture' 
I' ' 

E SPEAKS 

• will Ik i , 
Hi)' nf l|n 

I till: aft- Til'.. 

tmirial Buildinj 

will plef.'ii' 

of the ABU, 

mil a c;i.i 

ational convei 
f the six college 

be di en i( 
ri'd to come Al 
*• to attend 

nas 

nd Tyinir* 



BLT8 

Hill BRUAH& 

d W a a t a 

Gift Shop 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, .HURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, I!) 




BA R T E R I N 6 

WITH JOE BART 



"HE M \ss\( m skits COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DECEMBER B. IftM 



A DREAM 



or 



/IftaesnclntB&IP ''-Colleen an 



THINGS TO COME 
liy H. (.. Well-Well 




TEN MINUTES WITH 
THE PRESIDENT 



on 



I Xli 



M.tii. 



AKTIIUK A. NOVES 



Ctmpu.i 

JOHN B. PII40S '40, 
BETTINA HAM, '», 
MARY T. MKKHAN 
FRANCES 8. MKKliil 
JOSKi'i' BART "40 
NANCY E. LUCE '40 
JACOI'EI.INE L. ST1 
LOR ETTA KENNY I 
WILLIAM T. coonv 
HAKOl.lt FORREST ' 
JOHN HAYES 11 
ELIZABETH COFFIN 
MARY DONAHUE I 
WILLIAM I1WYEB ' 
CEORCE I i i('i|. | El 
LOUISE POTTER '4' 

Featare 
LLOYD If. COPELAN 
MYKON FISHER '39 
KATHLEEN TILLY 
EVERETT I! SPEN( 



ABRAHAM CARP '3 



E. EU<; EN E KENA1 
RoUEK H. UNDSE 
JOSEPH R. CORDOl 
\- LTER R. LALOI 

SUBSCRIPTIONS $2 



Make all orders pi 
■rtts Collegian. In et 
subscriber will please 
aifer an wmn an POM 
uati' atnl faculty en 
eneournufod. Any co 
must be received at 1 
9 o'clock, Monday ev. 



Entered as second-c 
herst Post Office. 
special rule of povtSS 

1103. Art of October 
20, 1918. 

Printed by Carpenter 
Amherst, Ma 



HALL .Must. 

ROOM floor . 

or pe 

pair of South 
under the pre 
campus is a q 

Mention I 
present condit 
for convocatio 
the nearly im] 
Hall with its li 
with its narro 
descending pe< 
which they ca 
Military P.all- 
who had pai( 

standing room 
because they 
them to enjoj 

With the 
made for the 
should be Ki\"' 
Ball, one of 
continue in t 
medium attei 
the Carnival 
from outside, 
at present. 

Tin 1 only 
hold a good < 
suggest that, 
ing it does 1 
Much develop 
of space with 

We may 
lege but we 

barbarians. 7 
nig program. 

m 

The opei 
Paul Putnam 
ketball team, 
well known 
passed away 

Paul wil 

his passing h 





Son, Daughter of Famed Chinese Statesmen 

The son of one prominent Chinese statesman and the daughter of another are among 
the Chinese students attending Cornell University. An Hsui Wang is the daughter 
of the former ambassador to the U. S., while Teh-Chang Koo is the son of the am- 
bassador to France. 



V 



Perfect Sport: Ice Cream Testing 

And L M. McCalla it the intercollegiate champion) The Missis- 
sippi State College student won hit laurels in competition at the 
Dairy Induttries Exposition. Acme 



... mil 



#v 




Now Machines Chart Human Reactions to Stimuli 

Dr. R. E. Dunford, University of Tennessee, operates the "chronoscope", invented by Dr. K L 
Hertel under his direction. Each person taking the test is equipped with a telegraph key which* 
operates as soon as he receives a stimulus (such as a light flash), thereby giving psychologists nr»| 
data on reaction time. <** 



L^L^L^L^s^L^L^B^^^^^^, Too' . j b« 

-..Wed- ~\ "Ifetn^ 
own 9* 9 




Crime Pays His Way Through College 

Robert Kaiser, Creighton University law student, is a night dispatcher 
police radio station, working from 11 p. m. to 7 a. m. daily. And he ha 
class, too! 



"BOTH YOUR HOUSES" DELIGHTS CAPACITY 
AUDIENCE AT TUESDAY'S SOCIAL UNION 

ell Anderson Play, Presented Under Difficulties by Jitney 
Players. Proves Them Good Troupes a > Performance 

18 (bven Smoothly 



HONORARY COLONEL 




EXCEPTIONAL COLLECTION OF PRINTS IS 
ON EXHIBITION IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Japanese Art Features Work of Old and Modern Masters Oolri- 

lish and The Great Wave Are of Especial Interest 

in Series of Klchinirs 



0& *^ 



* 









*-- 



tr Baltimore Belle of the Ball 

It, Baltimore senior at Woman's College, 
jrtfi Carolina, appeared in the figure of the 
a gown worn by her great-grandmother 




Beauties Fight Slogan 

Irmgard Dietel, "Miss Miami 1937',' Mary 
Joyce Walsh, "Miss Florida 1938" and 
Patrician Hollarn, "Miss Delray Beach 
1938", really study at the University of 
Miami to beat the old saw, "beautiful but 
dumb". 



Makes Them from All Angles! Ji 



| every basketball player in 

would like to make just 

|ng a game are just all in a 

for Wilfred Hctxel, Uni- 

f Minnesota Freshman. But 

K payoff: the unofficial 

rt champion has never 

a team, and isn't particu- 

lested in doing so. Here is 

>nic proof of his prowess 

|l and basket. 

Hhoto by Goldsinn 



"*, 



•he 0> 
, 8 o'eW 




Election of Jai 
tenting both fa 
irks of the great 
now on exhibi 
a I Building am 
•■it ion is brilliant 
for the ftnenesr 
and Is him v li.' 
stin^ and wortl 

sition 'm |„ rliuj 
riM tiling abou 

panese point ol 
'•rent from ours 
t elements pair 

noticed for then 

e balance, an in 
lank spaces, an«' 
form tliat make' 

important in tin 



•h 

ippeal m tin i 

tile (Mtldtish, l)> 

colors, and th< 
nt of the subject 
nt are especially 
ttpresgion of m< 
the whole print 

e air of humor 

est are the foil* 

of which wen 

■st famous artist 

"in Is are spirited 

f life anil galt> 

fill st roke* which 

greatest painter 

t Wave is urn if 

mous prints unrl 
i extensive t< i . 
her pictun t hi I 
of ureal im ' 

•int is a dramal * 

Of lh< I. •■ • - | | 

ist man 

part irulai I 

who )ii>. 
be interextei in 
i», Morning Met 

firwsl es.n- i ii 

technique ii the 
boal on Mi. 

.lllll l | i 

i!i subject • 

rnan\ v. il 'ml 

I >«'€•!•, t.eesi ; in! 

Persinnoi 

l**'^ , the., i | rii.i i 
IW, whelhei imi 

Mts or me re I . i 
ovely pictun 

I • 

2 SPEAKS 

'ill In | i 
ing of 1 Im 

i this ftfteraoi 
rmorial Ruildini 

ik will puf.-H. 

'if the ASM ;r 

ss such ;i 
national convei 

f the six c.ller. 
II lie <|| ( ii (•< 

•ei| to roiiii Al 

" to attend 

mas 

nd Tyinj/s 



dSLTS 

KTII BRUSBB 

«d Siesta 

lea 

Gift Shop 



Jay, 



"* »* easy. 



'* *<*9h 



Up, over and in from behind the backboard. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, IIUBSDAY, DECEMBER ft, lit 







■/" 



GoIIeatan 



BA R T E R I N G 
WITH JOE BART 



A DREAM 

THINGS TO COME 
H\ H. (i. Well-Well 




TEN MINUTES WITH 
THE PRESIDENT 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, fHURSDAY, DECEMBER ft. 1938 



iKimnioM ™— , ; acmmAl C0LLECTI0N 0F PRmS - 

AiTOltNlt Al lUtMMYi SOCIAL UNION ■f^HaSBBsHI 0N EXHIBITION IN MEMORIAL BUILDINl 

I! Anderson Play, Presented Under Difficulties by Jitney 
layers, Proves Them Good Troupers as Performance 



is Given Smoothly 




Japanese Art Features Work of Old and Modern Hasten Geld- 

fish ami The (ileal Wave Are of Especial Interest 

in Series of Etchings 



Men 



ARTHUR \. NOVES 



Campus 

JOHN K. FII.Ios I' 
HBTTINA HA I.I, .K 
MARY T. MKKHAN 
PRANCES 8. MEIili 
JOSKI'H BART '40 
NANCY K. LUCE • 
JACQUELINE I,. SI 
LORKTTA KENNY ' 

wii.ia \m t. coon 

HAltoi.h FORREST 
JOHN HAYES Ml 
ELIZABETH COFFI 
MM!Y DON Ml IK 
WILLIAM DWYEH 
'JKOKHK l I PCHFIE 
LOUISE POTTER ' 

Featare 
i.l.ovn H COPELA1 
MYRON FISHER "8J 
KM HI. KEN TILLY 
EVERETT R SPEN 



AKRAHAM CARP ' 



E. Kl i.KNK REN A 

rocjer h. limisi 
joski'h r. cordo 
\. i.ter r. lalo 



SUBSCRIPTIONS Ji 



M;iki- all ordera p 
setts Collegian. In c- 

BiibscribtT will plflaUN 

at' t as *hiii as ikjs, 
uati' and faculty n 

enoourajred. Any m 

must b<- received at 
9 o'clock, Monday e* 



Ent'T«! a .1 

herst Poet 
a pec ial rate < if 
H0:i. Art of Octobei 
20. 1918. 

Priutixl by Cai pente 
Amherst, Ml 



HALL Must 
ROOM floor 
or pe 
pair of South 
under the pre 
campus is a q 

Mention I 
present condit 
for convocatio 
the nearly im] 
Hall with its h 
with its narro 
descending pet 
which they ca 
Military Iiall- 
uliu had pai( 
standing room 
because they 
them to enjoj 

With the 
made for the 
should be jriv' 
Ball, one of 

continue in t 
medium attei 
the Carnival 

from outside. 

at present. 

The only 
hold a good i 
suggest that, 
in<r it d<»es I 
Much develop 
of space with 

We may 
lege but W« 

barbarians, 1 
ing program. 

SB 

The opei 

Paul Putnam 
ketball team. 
well known 
passed away 

Paul wil 
his passing h 



New Aid for Education 



Motion Pictures Tell the Story Bet 



Rapidly expanding is the use of motion pictures in the modern college classri 
educators are finding that sight-and-sound stories more effectively impress the i 
students. Outstanding in this movement is the work being done in Western Reu ., 
University's cinema laboratory, where films are made to illustrate lectures and to re 
vividly important mileposts in the university's history. Included among the labors 
activities are: (1) filming of student events for the campus newsreel, (2) making c 1 
structipnal films, such as this photo of a new technic in dentistry and (3) editing of : - 
;o tell complete and coherent stories. Dr. James E Bliss, director of the labor*tc, 
shown in upper left of picture three 



I 



■ 



* A 






0tfr39 



. 



'^ 



■ 



^* 



si*.* 



•->> 






absbj 






hi r 



X 



;. 



' 



THEN 



Sports styles for women have changed as much as have their dress styles, as these graphic now- 
and-then photos prove. At the left is shown the staid sport and sports dress of Mount Holyoke 
College students back in the days when it was a seminary. At the right is a fast game of bad- 
minton in the modernly equipped gymnasium 



Human Piano 

Members of Kappa 
appa Gamma sor- 
rity at Northwestern 
niversity have a novel 
unt to go along with 
eir singing of their 
ma mater song, Go 
Northwestern. The 
rector plays keys on 
oves worn by mem- 
ersof the group. 






Nii ^ 



\ 



It's a Sad, Sad Story 

And if would have been quite 
tragic if it had been true But the 
scene af the left is just a mock trial 
of a breach of promise suit being 
staged by University of Kentucky 
law students to give them pre- 
graduation practice in courtroom 
procedure. Prof Frank Randall is 
the presiding judge, and the sup- 
posedly jilted beauty- is Agnes 
Gilbert. , 






KAYWOODIE/ 

$352 



W A 



■» 






if - ••••>» ' I 



v-^ 



/ 



Radish Corsages 

ded their male escorts when the co-eds of Pi Zeta 

3 'l State Teachers College held a gold-diggers' 

wished bids, soft drinks, eats and transportation 

sages were brought out when the men told the 

,n ce was incomplete because they had no flowers. 

& IB UlrtPKf National Advertising Rcpresente- 

;!OM ^J*'-"' «ve: National AoVtrtUini Servlct, 
'«•: It3 Fawfc« *»«., New Yorfc, Chicajo, Bosten, San 



i Mir 



iA\ : 



eta 



i m 



JNf 



the (£}<rrf<is C )ittt>s1 (Briar 

When you look at this Kaywoodie. you 
•re lookinc al nnv- twenty -fifth of the 
briar hurl from which it wn made— the 
sertion that is called the prime cut The 
prime cut producea the tweetett smokine 
pipe*; Kaywoodiea are made only from 
the prime cut of coat ly !•■« burls. Picture,] 
above: a new atyle called TOWN. 
(No. 71 Bl very popular in Britain. 
KAYWOODIE COMPANY 
R«*cfe//tr Outer, New rOM and iondon 



WELL, JUPGE, I GUESS 
THIS PIPE MEETS ALL 
YOUR REQUIREMENTS | 
AND MINE TOO. 
WONDER HOW IT 
SUITS AAV FACE 



NOTHING LIKE 
SEEING FOR 
YOURSELF, 
BOB. TAKE 
| A GLANCE IN 
THE MIRROR 



TRIP 



<4 ~ 



V 



c^ 



*& 



OH-H, I SUPPOSE IT'S ALL 
RIGHT. 0UT SOMEHOW IT 
DOESNT LOOK QUITE THE 
WAY I THOUGHT MY FIRST 
RIPE WOULD 



*fer 






us 



N 



TRY IT WITH A BIG SMILE, 
BOB. AFTER ALL, THAT'S 
HOW YOU'LL LOOK WHEN 
YOU GET PRINCE ALBERT i 
IN THAT PIPE ^r-w< 



•FEW 



w 



T 



HA! HA! THAT SMILE CERTAINLY \ . 

MAKES A DIFFERENCE. AND BELIEVE 
Mfc, I'M AAIGHTY ANXIOUS TO HAVE 
THAT FIRST PIPEFUL OF PRINCE ALBERT 



YOU'LL BE 
LOOKING FOR- 
WARD TO 
EACH PRINCE 
AL8ERT SMOK7 
AFTER THAT, 
TOO. RA. 
ASSURES A 
COOL, MILD 
SMOKE 
EVERY 
TIME 



C. 



fy 



WANT A TOBACCO SPECIALLY CUT 

TO CAKE YOUR PIPE RIGHT? GET 

THAT BIG REP TIN OF PRINCE ALBERT. 

THERE'S NO OTHER TOBACCO LIKE IT! 



SMOKE 20 FRAGRANT PIPEFbtS of Prince Albert. If 
you don't find it the mellowest, tastiest pipe to- 
bacco you ever smoked, return the pocket tin 
with the rest of the tobacco in It to us at any 
time within a month from this date, and we will 
refund full purchase price, plus postage. 

f Signed) R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. 
Winston-Salem. North Carolina 

CaerrleM. ISM. a. i. asrasMs Tsfteas* Os. 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKI 



fringe Albert 



50 



pipefula of fragrant tobacco in 
e»ery 2-o*. tin of Prince Albert 



collection of Jmi 

'■■ <ntiii>.' both !';. 
works of I In' k '•«•<'' : 
i now on i'xIhIm 
>H;il Building ami 
Election i- brilliant 

I fot" tilt' lirit'iu •■ • 

is ;iinl in i>n< »' hii 
resting and wortl 

xisil inn i.^ |>i id;, | 
<liiiL r thing abou 
fapanene point ol 
[fferenl from oora. 
of elements par 
■ noticed fur tru-n 
tie balance, an ii, 

blank spaces, an< 
6 form that maki" 

important in th< 

IfiHh 
appeal in tht < . 

y the Go ldflah , b: 

ir colors, an<l tin 
lent of the subject 
»rint are especially 

impression of iik 

1 the whole print 

hie air of humoi 
rest are the four 
"e of which wen 
lost famous artist 
prints are spirited 
of life and Kait.y , 
ei fui st rokei which 
t' greatest painter 
at Wave is oik of 
amous printt ;ii<it 
oi extensivt n i u 
other pictun I hi I 
«• of greal men is 
print is a drams I 

.1 of (III (.,.•• | j 

irist riiati 
ori» 

part ii ularl 
m who 1 1 h. • 

I" Kill I i ' li i Ml 

■•it i, Meniiai Mini 
ii finest exarrt| /• 
let hnique u the 
<l»h«iat on M«. n 
• and ' |i 
riU subject I 
man) will I mi 
r Deer, fceem 

el I'erMiiiniei 
bjeel , thest i i 

view, whelhei >mh 

trints or merei. a 
lovely picture- 
R I 

•E SI»KAKS 

)l«' Will III 1 |< 

etins of iin 
on this aftemot 
Memorial Buildins 
nai k m ill prefat • 

1 of the ASI 

Uei : mil :i < :. ■ 

national convei 
of t in i v collegi 

vill he dlsCU •' 

rged to conn A I 
me to attend. 

tmas 

and Tyin^ 



BELTS 

AIM If HKISHI* 
ind SicHta 
mil's 

p s Gift Shop 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, I'HURSDAY, DECEMBER 8. 19 







BA R T E R I N G 
Willi JOB BART 



(Eolleatan 



A DREAM 

or 

THINGS TO COME 

li\ H. (i. Well-Well 



. sW 



■I 



f 



TEN MINUTES WITH 
THE PRESIDENT 



Otfit 



KiHirti 



M.T 



Airniri; A. NOYES 



Campus 

john e. moos i 

BKTTINA HA1.I, '."« 
MAHY T. MKKHAN 
FRANCES S. MKltlt 
JOSKI'F HART "4»i 
NANCY' B. LUCE ' 
JACQUELINE I.. 81 
LORETTA KENNY 
WIl.UVM T. (iOOl 
HAKOI.Ii FORREST 
JOHN HAYES il 
ELIZABETH COFF1 
MARY' DONAHUE 
WII.MAM DVVYEB 
(JEORCK I I 'f'lKIF 
LOUISE POTTER ' 

Feature 
LLOYD B. COPELA 
MYRON FISHER '» 
KATIU.KKN TULLH 
EVERETT It SPEN 



VHRAHAM CARP 



E. El -i.ENE RENA 
ROCER II. LINKS) 
JOSEPH R. (SORDC 

\. i .i'ER R. LALC 

SUBSCRIPTIONS Ji 



Makr all order* i 
■etu < iiIIiki.iii in e 
subscriber will i>lens» 

ajfcr an .soon M |hjs 
uaU' and facility vt 
enrotir aired. Any c< 
must be received at 

9 o'clock. Monthly <v 



Entered as w-conti-r 
herst Post (i 
•special rate of ri>~tai 

110;(. Act of Ootobei 

20, 1 9 1 S . 

Printed by Carpenta 
Amherst, Mr 



HALL Must 
ROOM floor 

or pe 
pair of South 
under the pre 

campus is a q 

Mention 1 
present condit 
for convocatio 

the nearly inn 
Hall with its It 
with its nam 
descending pet 

which they ca 
Military Hall- 

ulio had |>ai( 

standing roon 
because they 

them to enjoj 

With the 
made for the 
should be tfiv 
Ball, one of 

continue in t 
medium attei 
the Carnival 
from outside. 

at present. 

The onlv 
hold a good < 
suggest that, 
ni}, r it does I 
Much develop 
of space with 

We may 
lege but we 
barbarians, 1 
inp; program. 

The ope 
Paul Putnam 
kethall team, 
well known 
passed away 

Paul wil 
his passing r 



Up-Sweeps Sweep the Campuses 



Here's How Mountains Are Built of Hair 







*'m 




Coitfures are going higher and higher in collegiate circles ;\ 
we thought you'd be interested in just how its done. Bette Mass, 
Syracuse University junior, went through the entire half-hour d* 
formance for our cameraman just to demonstrate how theturr: 
the century up-sweep has been adapted by ♦oday's co-tc 
(1) First you comb up those tantalizing front curls, (j) Then f. 
bark hair is swept up into an artistic knot. (3) And the wit 
thing is set off with a precariously situated hat and a veil. 














Queens Get Trophies, Too 

At least Bethany Deane did when she 
was acclaimed prom queen at the fall 
house-party weekend at Colgate Uni- 
versity 



Hotel Students Learn to Cook 

Preparing meals is just part of the train- 
ing given in the University of New 
Hampshire's new hotel administration 
course. 

Coll«,i.»« DiftH Ptioto by Moera 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY. DECEMBER ft. 19M 



iSI^fSifS? 1 ;*?!! HON,),<AKY <0,0NKI iEXCEPTIONAL COLLECTION OF PRINTS^ 



AUDIENCE AT TUESDAY'S SOCIAL UNION 

ell Anderson Play, Presented Under Difficulties by Jitnej 
-Mayers, Proves Them Good Troupers as Performance 
is Given Smoothly 



l>\ Sidney Roeen ' » ■ nrir ._, . _^ 

a,!, ,, a,,,, i ALBERTA JOHNSON 

is commentary on the inner- 
kings "f our government, 
Viiui' Houses," presented Tues- 



g by the Jitney Players at 
d Social Union, delighted a 
audience at Bowker Audi- 

ij itself was totally different 

tl would expect from the 

Mr. Anderson, who is far more 
(1 for his experiments in the 
Irama; vide, Winter-set, High 
l„r, ind Mary of Scotland. Of 
What Price Glory shows that 
derson is no slouch at the 
echnique of the drama either. 
But H<>th Your Houses has that flair 
burlesque that puts it in the 
of such modern master- 
is Three Men on a Horse, and 
|{o(tm Service. 

Had the Stuff 
Considering the difficulties the Jit- 
I 'layers have undergone, what 
their scenery and costumes hav- 



IS CHOSEN COLONEL 



270 Persons Attend Military 

Pall on Friday 

Evening 

climaxed by a colorful ceremony in 
which Alberta Johnson '4u was in- 
stalied as honorary colonel of the 
Massachusetts State R. O. T. C. Cav- 
alry Unit for the coming year, tin- 
Military Ball last Friday was attend- 
ed by 1^70 people, the largest crowd 
in five years. 

The ceremony of induction was held 
just previous to intermission as the 
retiring colonel, Dorothy Nichols '30 
presented the cloak and insignia of 
office to Miss Johnson who was es- 
corted through the double line of 
military majors by chairman Cadet 
Lieutenant Benjamin, 

Miss Johnson is a member of Sig- 
ma Beta Chi and is majoring in home 



ng been destroyed by hre and the „,,,.,„„„;,. wu u 

f f . 4l _. economics. She was an alternate s g 

itv of performing this n av at „„i a ■ »,.... 

,' • , .. .. , ' ,- . , naI drum major of the band ast vea? 

IS< minute, they did a good job 



| . certainly showed themselves to 
ha-, the stuff troupers are made of. 
The performance ran smoothly (even 
with the ventilators blowing the 
roads and mountains about outside 
the window), and the audience fell 
right into line with the spirit of the 
play, 

Of the players, Douglas Rowland, 
Is Solomon Fitzmaurice, a Senator 
•he old school, turned out the fin- 
'M performance, even though his part 
wa- clearly the most sympathetic in 
the play. Bus, the modem, tough, 
young secretary, played by Bettina 
Cerf, ran a close second — she looked, 
acted, and expressed the part per- 
fectly. Our good hero, Alan McClean, 
portrayed by Pendleton Harrison, had 
jusl too much of the Hairbreadth 
Harrj about him; if he had relaxed 
once, during the first act, merely sat 
a desk, or put his hands in his 
instead of standing like a 
■ haffner, and Marx clothing 
dumniv, the audience would have sigh- 
ed with relief. Rut he spoke his pari 
Continued <-n Pak? 6 




ON EXHIBITION IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Japanese Art Features Work of Ok) and Modern Masters <;olri 

lish and The (.'real \Va\e Are of Kspecial Interest 

in Series of Etchings 



.Alberta Johnson 



Decorated in cavlary colors, blue 
and gold, the Drill Hall lost all its 
ugliness. Ray Keating and his band n\ rr C*\ f IDC a^UTlIDC 
of stylists provided music for the VjLLL LLUDO, LllUIKiJ 
dancing from 9 to 2 a. m. His imi |\J fUHDm DDHf'DAM 
tations and the band's specialty num- *^ l^llUIVCll 9 KULlKAIVl 
hers were an aid to the success of 



ORANGE PHOTO CLUB A x " " ' f 

«*•»' anese (irmts. representing l»oth fa 

EXHIBIT IN G00DELL i ' k • ^ 

artists of Japan, is now on exhibi 
... . tion in the Memorial Building and 

Work ol^ Fine Technicians is I Wilder Hall. The collection is brilliant 
Evident in All for Its ccdora, and for the flnenew 

01 Studies of the reproductions and is one whirl 

all should And interesting ami wort! 
I he collection of photographs in while, 
the library Is an exhibition from the The exoti< composition is perfaai 
Orange Camera Club, and contains the most outstanding thing aboii 
the work ol such well-known techni ,„-i„ t .s. for the Japanese point ..' 
cians u Dr. Paul K. Truesdell. vl , w is „. rtaiu1y dilleren, from OUTfl 

Indeed the first picture in the e\ The arrangement of elements par 
hibition is one of Truesdeli's, Winter tlcularly should be noticed for then- 
Sentinels, which has unusually fine »■ ■ definite eccentric balance, an in 
snow texture, and a neat combination cremental us* of blank spaces, an«! 
of lines which bring the hill and trees an emphasis on line form that make« 
into one pattern. He has brought out prints like these important in tl>. 
the rugged quality of the treat very held of art. 
nicely, in setting their boles off (.oldlisb 

against a background of snow and <>f most popular appeal in Hit ea 
delicate branches, and on the whole hibition is probably the (.oldfish le 
has created an interesting and serene reason of its clear colors, and tin 
study of winter. Sheckell — Atlantic. is sympathetic treatment of the subject 
a line arrangement of dark and light The lines of the print are especiall 
tones, with the emphasis on the lines Mine, conveying the impression of m» 
f an unusual grouping of trees, tion and life, anil the whole print 



which are silhouetted against light 
sparkling water. The photograph is 

an arresting one for its effectiveness, 



has an unmistakable air of humor 
Also of groat interest are the four 
horse studies, three of which wen 



the dance. 
Members 



of the committee in 



charge were Cadet Lieutenants 



Combined Choruses to Present 

Parts of Messiah 

Sunday 



George Benjamin, chairman, Ralph 

Foster (ioorge Haylon, Charles (irif- A ppogrwn J , him . h nuisic jn . 
fin, < hfford L.ppmcott, Gardner An- Huding parts of Handel's Messiah 
aersen, and Cadet Sergeant George is to be given on Sunday at the morn- 
I ltts. 



EXHIKITS 



I. Memorial Building 

Japanese Prints 

II. (loodell Library 

Photographs from the Or- 
ange Camera Club 

III. Wilder Hall 

Japanese Prints, and Repro- 
ductions of Paintings 

IV. Physical Education Kuilding 

travel Posters 



and has a spark of life which keeps [done by Japan's most famous artist 
it from being flat and drab, as are of horse-life. His prints are spirited 
many similar silhouette scenes. and powerful, full of |jf,. and gait.y 

Truesdell- Cut Yourself a Piece of and done wit 1, masterful Stroke! which 
Okc, is the most appealing;, (and eel him up as the greatest painter 
mouth watering) still life that th< I of bones. The Great Wave la on of 
coil ction contains. The simple and the world's most famous prints and 
dramatic treatment, and placing of probably has a mor. extensive repu 
the elements give the photograph an Nation than an) other pietun thai 

astounding reality, (especially if [exists. Dom b) otu of great met in 

viewed just before lunch), and the 'Japanese art . this print is a dram;, i e- 
,ng service of the First Congrega- I whole theme has been done in a svm- and vivid portrayal of lb, for*** ' 
tional Church of Amherst by the M.I pathetic, and down-to earth manner, nature set up against man 
S. C. men's and women's varsity glee For character studies, one could ask 
clubs, the ,M. S. C. choir and the choir for tin more than the excentional Tl, . . ) 

,,f T h " ,h ""' ,, t' , el'*'" ?<**«!*' *»"" «f standing, and those who „k, 

•The program ,, to be as follows: Hghty-Three in which Sheckell, the M( ,., ot „.,„ Wlll hl lliU ^. Ui 

Deai Land of Home photographer has caught iuch a spir- \ri. , lh wild., ii. i. m .„ M , 

, /•_ ci; i i- i ,,., ,, '!■■ his, i in v\ iioer tiaii ,, Yiorniiiu Mj»I 

,fr, " n '■'"'■•"Hha) Sibelius H of (,„,, as well a, grandness of at \«ra ,,„• ,f fh ,, , , 

\i, , ,• /•) /.|,,i i >aia, .lie ot tn, finest pxtifunli < 

rh ,.,, h M ,' >U '- ( , IUh , -•''••".•..•...,■, thai one can't help smil- f .,.,,„„„ .„ <( , 1()1 t( , ( ,„„ '„„. 

h ;" al " h ' • ,, '" , • " ,y " f " ,a " s n !"« ,; " k : '* ,h - '"•""•"• 'n^'rmission. collection, and F.shhoal on Moon I 

aesinng Bach in the same general field, portrays Sea Uiin ds of couitm and 

Women's Glee club ., differenl feeling in that it a study |y bod ,,. favorh ' i . 

• '•-•-"ina Of childh I. and childhood in a par- theae prints, and many wTil I i,d 

ularly naive and innocuous role. 



t 'oh > ~ 

am particularly 



Choir 



WHY DO YOUR CHRISTMAS 
SHOPPING ON YOUR OWN TIME? 

BUY IX AMHERST AND SAVE VOIP VACATION POP 
YOURSELF. 

BOOKS SHIPPED FREE OF CHARGE ANYWHERE IN 
Till: UNITED STATES. YOU DONT HAVE TO 
CARRY THEM HOME. 

BUY IN AMHERST — HI V HOOKS 
AT 

hffery Amhrest Bookshop 



p.., prints -u.i, *{ lour Deer. Gees* and 

Parts of Messiah Handel Aa a final word, Anderson The-M„ on . Bnd llirH aniJ IVrMnimil| , 

uroups Mr«gon deserves mention for Its clev- refresh ina 

Clubs Will repeal er play in lines, reminding one of \\'U., ,,.,„, ,, ,» , ., 

M • i ,, r , ., e ... * Wll.llexei tin sufiecl. Hi,-.,, 

parts of the Messiah at the afternoon the fantasi 



print' 



The M. S. c 

intasies of the Arabian Nitrhts .,.-,. .i.,ii.,k«r..i . \ ., 

"•,;•; ;:;,.r /-.r " '" f r\'"" ? " - ' Tt ' ".^£S2 5 X: :::,,"": 

college. Part ol the same program lively picture very much in keeping ,„. 

will also be B feature of the student with the Japanese prints which are 

convocation on Thursday, December also being shown in the earapos 

»'»• lY. H. 



person u ho ,-,, „,, t |,,vrd 



y picture 



P » 



COLLEGE STORE 

Everything for the Student 

I iinrhcons Hanners and Souvenirs 

Srula Fountain Beefa and 

Student Supplies Magazines 

Mass. wState Xmas Cards at 5c 

fSpeddl offer ti, M. S. ('. Stuflents while lhe| last 
Mass. Stale IVIillens UTtc 



RADIOS 
LAMPS 
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES . . 



M ACCESSORIES 



RADIO REPAIR WORK 



T 



HE MUTUAL MS CO. 

Amherst, Mass. 



So. Pleasant St. 



ON TIIK CAMPLS 



NORTH COLLKGE 



DR (.AIVIKEK SPEAKS 

Dr. Philip Gamble will b» y ■ 
peaker at tin meeting of the 
erican student Union this afternoi 
: " '! i'- "i.. In the Memorial Buildiru 

Dr. Gamble'i remarks will pre! 
the regular meeting of the asl a 
which Importanl Issues such as ean 

pus activities, the national COnven 
tion, arirl the work of the six collee. 

regional council will be dlscu << 

Every member Is urged to conn A I 

students are welcome to attend 



Patterson's Service Station 

303 MAIN STREET, AMHERST 
(Just Before Railroad Tracks) 



BLUE SUNOCO GASOLINE 



Christmas 
Wrappings and Tyinpm 



SILVKKH K 



WORT HE LIS 

HEARTH BRUSBB 

Shanghai and Siesta 
Perfumes 



I „ i Miss Cutler's Gift Shop 



Pick Up a Gift for "Dad" or Brother 

Botany Ties, Interwoven Sox, Arrow Shirts and Dozens of Attractive Gifts that will be Appreciated 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1938 



THt: MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. THURSDAY. DECEMBER s. i«» is 






♦ STOCKBRIDGE ♦ 



By John Kelso 



GEORGE YARWOOD IS 
LANDSCAPE SPEAKER 



Coach Lorin E. Hall announces that 
the following men, having completed 
a creditable season's playing as the 
Stockbridge "Ramroads," are to be 
awarded letters in recognition of their 
excellent playing and spirit in de- 
fense of Stockbridge: 

Oscar P. Hodwell of Sharon, Ray- 
mond "1'roc'' Houle, captain, of New- 
bury, Norman F. Lawton of Fox- 
boro, O. Theodore Lindgren of New 
Bedford, Chart. » F. Mandell of Rock- 
land, James J. MeDonough of Spring- 
field, Casper J. Perednia of Norwood, 
Charles J. Russo of Lawrence, Rich- 
ard M. Sparks of Wakefield, Vincent 
T. Sullivan of Chicopee, Raymond E. 
Taylor of Worcester, and Benning L. 
Wentworth, Jr., of Melrose, all of the 
Class of "A9; and from the Class of 
'40 the following will receive letters: 
Bernard J. Chartier of Willimansett, 
Melvin F. Cleveland of Tisbury, 
Richard L. Corfield of Worcester, Ar- 
thur R. Frappier of Springfield, Rob- 
ert C. Gamache of Leominster, Ed- 
ward F. Johnson of Barnstable, Ed- 
ward Konieczny of Amherst, Stephen; 
R. Kosakowski of Amherst, James L. j 
McDonald of South Boston, and 
James Turnbull of Waltham. Law- 
rence Tierney of Cambridge, has 
been appointed manager for next] 
year. , 

Cross-Country 

Llewellyn L. Derby, Coach of Track 
and Cross-Country, will award letters; 
to the following for outstanding work | 
in Fall Cross-Country: 

Class of *39: Weikko A. Mackie, ( 
captain, of Hubbardston, Malcolm S. 
Clark of Ashfield, Norman E. Bick- 
ford of West Chelmsford, and Michael 
W. Kandianis of Fitchburg; Class of 
*40: Charles F. Chunglo of Hadley, 
Karl E. DeVine of Ferrisburg, Vt., 
Orman H. Glazier of Leverett, George 
C. Hibbard of North Hadley, and 
William R. Spear of Agawam; num- 
erals will be awarded to Percy E. 
Brown of South Hanson and Alan R. 
Pollock of Franklin. 

The annual Tri-Sig Supper Party 
will be held Sunday evening at the 
home of Miss Margaret Hamlin, 
Placement Officer for Women. All 
Stockbridge girls are invited. 

A. T. G. 

The weekly meeting of the house 
was held Monday evening at 7:15 
with President Proctor Houle presid- 
ing. A table-tennis tournament is to 
be organized and will start as soon 
as possible; this will be an elimina- 
tion tournament, in which challenges 
will be made later. 

In a short time the attention of 



students will be attracted to the bril- 
liant green flannel hats with yellow 
letters, which have been ordered for 
all members of A. T. G. 

"Jim" Turnbull had a pleasant 
weekend at the home of Louis Riedl 
S'40, in Worcester. Incidentally, Mr. 
Riedl soon will be marching down the 
aisle to the tune of "Here Comes the 
Pride." 

Kolony Klub 

A delightful birthday party was 
held Sunday evening for David 
Treadway "A ( J, the victim, who cele- 
brated his twenty-first birthday Mon- 
day. This terminated Kolony Klub's 
annual "hell week." 

Members have received letters from 
Louis Schwaab 8*38, who is at present 
in Washington, D. C; he will con- 
tinue to Virginia and Florida and 
thence to New Orleans for New 
Year's. 

John Hibbard S'89, has recently 
presented a ping-pong table to the 
house. 

Several members of the house went 
to West Hartford for the week-end. 

Eliot Hall 8*86, visited the house 
last week-end. 

Professor Harold W. Smart, facul- 
ty adviser for the house, gave an in- 
teresting short talk at the weekly 
business meeting, which was held 
Monday evening at 7:00 p. m. 

The Stockbridge Horticulture Club 
will hold a meeting Thursday eve- 
ning at 7:00 p. m. in Wilder Hall. 
Mr. Bagg, a tree expert, will speak 
to the club. The club will publish 
a horticultural newspaper in the near 
future. 

Alumni News 

Alumni who have visited the Cam- 
pus during the past week are as fol- 
lows: 

Nancy Estelle Peirce S'38, Flori- 
culture major, who is now employed 
as bookkeeper and salesgirl at the 
florist establishment of O. G. Ander- 
son & Son, in Arlington. 

Lowell K. Hammond S'38, of Hope- 
dale, who expects to return to the 
employ of O. F. Whitney, a leading 
carnation grower, in Northboro. 

A. Lowell Eastman S*33, Horticul- 
ture major, who for the last three 
years has been in charge of the greens 
at the municipal golf course at Suf- 
field, Conn. 

Samuel T. Bouglas, Jr. S'36, who 
now has charge of the Vegetable 
Gardening Department at Conyers 
Manor Farm, in Greenwich, Conn., 
and Raymond W. Richardson S'36 who 
is a beekeeper and home canner at 
Greenwich, Conn. 



CAROL SING 



The annual Christmas carol sing 
will be held at vespers next Sunday 
evening in the Memorial building at 
5:00 p. m. Dean Machmer will deliver 
the address. The combined choir and 
glee clubs will sing three numbers 
from the Messiah; they will also lead 
the audience in the singing of carols. 

Following the service, the audience 
will gather outside around the Christ- 
mas tree to continue the carol sing- 
ing. 

President Baker, speaker at Ves- 
pers last Sunday, gave a most inter- 
esting talk on "Exploring Frontiers" 
with many illustrations from his own 
experience exploring for the govern- 
ment in the great basin region. 

Holyoke Drama 



COED SHARPSHOOTERS 



Mount Holyoke College Dramatic 
Club is presenting "The Admirable 
Ciitchton" by Sir James Barrie. The 
performance is this coming Saturday 
evening, December tenth, in Chapin 
Hall. The tickets are fifty cents, sev- 
enty-five cents and one dollar. For 
reservations call Dorothy Knapp Hol- 
voke 8211. 



It's not too late to come and try out 
for the Coed Rifle Team! This after- 
noon, and every Tuesday and Thurs- 
day afternoon before vacation, from 
1:80-4:90 at the Rifle Range in Drill 
Hall. This is your last chance to 
make a bull's eye! Come and try your 
luck. 



BAND CONCERT 



State Graduate Lectures on 

Practices in England, 

Holland 



George A. Yarwood, a graduate of 
Massachusetts State College, will 
speak before the Landscape Club next 
Thursday at 7:00 p. m. in Wilder 
Hall. Mr. Yarwood will discuss land- 
scape architecture as it is being prac- 
ticed in England and Holland. His 
talk will be illustrated with fifty 
slides made while visiting those coun- 
tries last summer. 

Mr. Yarwood has held positions 
with several of the leading landscape 
officers in the east at present is a 
landscape technician with the federal 
government. An informal discussion 
will follow his lecture. 



In its first concert appearance 
of the year, the college band will 
present a Christmas program on 
Wednesday, Dec. 11. at 7:30 p. m. 
in Stockbridge Hall. 

The program will be featured by 
Tobani's two characteristic Christ- 
mas selections, Around the Christ- 
mas Tree and Five Favorite Yule- 
tide Songs, and will include such 
well-known band numbers as Saf- 
ranek's Don Quixote Suite, Sere- 
dy's Campus Memories, Friml's 
Rose Marie, Walter Smith's Three 
Kings — a cornet Trio and Carl 
Mader's National Music Educators 
March, Chicago Police Band 
March, and National High School 
Band March. 

Students and faculty members 
are cordially invited to attend this 
concert to which admission in free. 



FINE ARTS LECTURE 
PRESENTED TUESDAY 

Recital of Miss Ball E i , ,. 
By Last Week's Ai 
Audience 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1 NTER- FAITH CO V NCI L 



Chemistry Club 

The Chemistry Club will present 
Paul A. Leichtle of the research de- 
partment of the Chase Brass & Cop- 
per Co. tonight at seven o'clock in 
Goessmann auditorium. Leichtle, il- 
lustrating the talk with slides and 
charts, will speak on "Qualitive and 
Quantitative Spectrographic Analysis 
of Copper Alloys." 

Forestry 

A wild life seminar will be con- 
ducted on Sunday, December 11, at 
4:00 p. m. by Professor R. E. Trip- 
pensee of the forestry department. 
Films of Canadian wild life, especial- 
ly big game, will be shown. Fresh- 
men and sophomore are particularly 
invited. 

Band Rehearsal 

The regular weekly rehearsal of 
the Band will be held tonight at 7:30 
in Stockbridge Hall. All members ex- 
pecting to play at the Christmas con- 
cert on December 14 will have to at- 
tend. 

Newman Club 

All members are invited to attend 
the communion breakiast that will 
be held Sunday in the parish hall 
immediately following the nine o'clock 
mass. All those wishing to attend 
please get tickets from the officers 
or at the Abbey or Thatcher Hall. 

Zoological Club 

The Zoological Club will present at 
Fernald Hall on Thursday evening 
next, December 15th, one of the fore- 
most embryologists in the United 
States — Dr. Oscar Schotte, Assistant 
Professor of Biology at Amherst Col- 
lege. Dr. Schotte will speak on "Em- 
bryological Organizers." 

The speaker will be preceded by a 
short business meeting at 7:30 p. m. 
for the purpose of ratifying the con- 
stitution of the club. A copy of the 
constitution will be available to all 
those interested all next week in Fer- 
nald Hall. 

All interested students are invited 
to attend. 



JAM 



A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



CHRISTMAS BOOKS 



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LISTEN! THE WIND 

by Anne Lindbergh 

U. 8. CAMERA— 19.19 

THE CITADEL- Now 

GONE WITH THE WIND Now 

CHRISTMAS DAYS 

hy JoHfjih C. Lincoln 

MAN THE UNKNOWN 

by Cnrrell Now 

ALL THIS AND HEAVEN TOO 

by Rachel Field 



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Continued from Page 1 

Council deserve much commendation. 
I predict that the newly formed In- 
tercollegiate Inter-Faith Council will I 
one day be one of the most vigorous 
collegiate organizations of New Eng- 
land." 

For further organization and de- 1 
velopment the Intercollegiate Inter- 1 
Faith Council will meet in early Jan- | 
uary at the American International | 
College in Springfield. 

Baker's Speech 

Optimistically President Baker ' 
praised the purpose of the inter-faith 
movement and emphasized the need 
of harmonious living among the races 
and religions in a democracy such as 
the United States. He began his ad- 
dress of welcome as follows: 

"It is particularly fitting that such 
a conference as this should be held 
at a college supported by state and 
federal funds. If the melting pot of 
which we have had much to say in 
this country — and with which I am 
personally quite sympathetic — can 
work out satisfactorily in any type 
of educational institution, it is in a 
state college. 

Harmonious and satisfactory living 
together with a family and within 
a community and a Nation depends, 
after all, said President Baker, upon 
the willingness of people to try to 
work in harmony with others. The 
demagogue in politics, who under our 
form of government, seeks to pit 
race against race certainly does not 
recognize either the opportunities un- 
der our form of government or the 
Continued on Page 6 

COME IN AND 
TRY OUR 

STUDENT PLATE 
SPECIAL 

We Have All Kinds 
of 

Sandwiches 

Toasted or Plain 



OUR 

Soda Fountain 

Offers the Best of Service and 
Serves the Best 



"Architecture in the New 
Colonies" will be the topic of 
ture of the Fine Arts Proj • 
Tuesday, December 13; wh 
sents as the speaker, Kail 
nam of Northampton. A me a 
alize more an more that th ;,,■ 
tecture of the early colon 
noteworthy in art, and the i j, 
signs are widely adapted t 
day use. Mr. Putnam, a.- a 
ing architect, has put the-, 
to use, and as a member . s ; 
College faculty he has colli v. 
lustrative material which hi 
in his lecture on Tuesday. 

Proving herself to be an t-xci 
musician with almost fault h 
nique and a wide range of i 
tative powers, Miss Carolyn Ball Mi 
sented an enjoyable recital 
music under the sponsorship of ■ 
Fine Arts Council on Tuesd.v. 
noon, December f> in the OW I 
auditorium. Opening her p 
with a group of 17th and ;-• 
tury Irish pieces, interesting in t 
various forms, Miss Pall showed hi 
versatility an easy flowing technii 
from the first. T • ■ Hail: C 
preludes, further confirmed the iu 
ence's opinion of her powers u 
artist. 

It wa ■ n the la t half at 
gram, however, e insisting of 
B minor sonata, that Miss Ball rea 
ed the high point of her perform* 
This selection gave her an opp>rt 
ity to display her best qualities, 
it was difficult to decide in which 



cne pi 
Chooi 



" THEATRE ^ 



THl RS. THRt SAT., DEC. -in 



College Candy 
Kitchen 

The Place With the Good Things 




5 STARS IN 1HE 
YEAR'S GREATEST 

HEART DRAMA' 



10 AN 



CRAWFORD 

MARGARET 

SULLAVAN 

ROICRT "Cl»'« 

YOUNG DOUGLAS 

0TH£ FAY BAINTkR 

TJ/</^\ II »Fr**Bo«7age Product* 

■—Fine Co-hit — 

Thf Kinndcst role of hi 




PIiib: Cnrtonn -- NVu- at WW 



■UN. THRU Tl KS.. HI ' U'M 



Pulitzer Prize Play 
Screened At lost! 

?a*h6 Comas 



• 



yiUCAIHiK 
ITWITH!!! 



ARTHUR BARRYMORf STE&TAJN01B 



A Columbia F 



AIho ; A'o|>i ) I 



Eddie M. Switzer 



Clothing and 

Haberdashery 



"^ffiES" Frigardmen Will Face Unpredictable Textile Aggregation 



• - who hav< 
h material 



ition of State coaches is 

representative team- as 

; the material at hand. 

handled t h< - 

have Learned 

- more than ordinary tab 

ranks of class of 1942. 

uparently on the upswing 

iterial cycle which has seem- 

Maroon athletic fortune 

■ years. 

soERC rather indefinite rea- 
, seems to be a remark- 
,'ki relation between athletic 
, -, and poor scholarship in 
,,-h case this year. With the 
i, . available. State would be 
to have teams which the stu- 
might support with reason 
p ide. Indications are, BOW- 
that many of the men will 
„■ here next semester, and 
ill, great majority of those who 
,l,i survive trill be kept out of 
tarditj >ports next year by de- 

tl , . %, So it seems that unless 

t|„ food experts start serving 
I,: .i,n building food at the cafe- 
teria, or the day is made longer 
>u that the freshmen will have 
lime to satisfy their profs and 
live, Mate will reap no benefits 
from these athlete sons. 

It . quite generally admitted that 

, , man curriculum is tough. No 

can take the requirements 



I ■ 

.oil. 

ftbli 
prow 
tin- f 
tthle 
ibte 

dent 
an<i 

not 



CAGE PRACTICE FOR 
ICELESS JHJCKSTERS 

Coach Hall Holds Blackboard 

Drill to Emphasize 

New Rules 

I oach Red Ball's hockey plans were 
rice more upset ai old Man White 
loosened up long enough to spoil the 
Practice. L'ntil the rink is available. 
practice will he indoors, with especial 
stress laid on shooting. In accordance 
with his plans. Ball is also placing 
pecial emphasis on blackboard and 
skull sessions. Changes in current 
hockey rules have been carefully con- 
i idered at the last two meetings. The 
most important change deals with s 
penalty shot, with the shooter re- 
quired to carry the puck from his 
own zone to the shooting line. 

The Ballmen plan to get on the 
ice as soon as the pond freezes, and 
in order to make a good showing up 
at Lake l'lacid late in December, it | 
will be necessary that the team get 
Some ice practice in as soon as pos- 
sible. Opponents in the Lake Placid 
tournament have not as been an 
nounced. The tourney will be a round 
robin affair. Any talented hockey 

players who have not reported to 
Coach Ball should do so immediately 
since the squad will be picked early. 



BACK AFTER IN.H'KY 




FRESHMAN, TRANSFER ELIGIBILITY WILL 
BRING UNTRIED AND UNKNOWN TEAM HERE 



It'll. Bemben, 

I '<>sit M»11S 



:if! Southwick, BIdridge or Glick in Starting 
Zelazo, Nudge, Parsyck, Smith, Podolak 
and Blasko are Reserves 



STATE DIVING TEAM 
COMPETES SATURDAY 



Salmela, Palumbo, Page De 
.Maroon in Nutmegger 
Pool fill 



t'tni 



Andy Andersen 



A pre-season glimpse of the Ma 
roon natatora will be afforded Sal 

unlay as the State diving team will 

compete against the Connecticut nier 

men in a neutral pool at Springfield known strength. Culminating about 

three weeks of intensive drill, the 
Frigardmen will be set for the first 



Capt. Zelazo will throw in the fit I 
ball of the season next Tuesday night 
when the unpredictable I owell Tex 
tile five openi the .Maroon basketball 
slate c ,n the cage il or. Since, like 
A. i. <'.. the textile school h;is no 
ruling against freshmen playing on 
varsity teams, there Ea no way of 
knowing the qualitj of the enemy 

hoopers. Completely in the dark as 
to wh.tt kind of a team or wh:tt sort 

of attack Lowell ha-, the Statesmen 

will be opposing unseen force and un- 



(l . through unscathed without Captain Morey in the cage, and Ly- 

g ' deal more effort than is re- man, Mayo, Harding, and Dalton are 

most colleges. Yet the time strong candidates for hockey posts. 

ident'a coming to college is Northeastern University's Huskies 

radical change. State is no will open the season January 1th at 

HIGH SCHOOL and those freshmen Amjierst. The second and third games 

at present worried by two will be played st Clinton on January 

"lows" and "betows" are well 7 and B against the Clinton and ll:im- 

Hware ' the fact. ilton hockey clubs. On January 10 

|. education tha aim of the college, the State Skates will try to avenge 

an increase in the student last year's r>-.'{ loss t<> Brown when 

' The answer that those they meet at Providence. The N'ew 



SPRINGFIELD HEADS 
'39 GRID SCHEDULE 



Since the low ceiling at the 

iool will not permit diving, 

used, with Jump 



Gymnasts Will Replace A. 
Outfit Five Home 
Games Carded 



I. ('. al 



'ailing and thus giving evi- 

if inability to do college work 

eliminated is hardly satis- 

Is the brand of athlete oh 

by our fair alma mater so far 

to other colleges that 7a'; 

I to make the grade? 

no attempt to tell the pro- 

1 to teacn, but it does seem 

are other means of getting 

to work than telling them 

• tei that they are in 

having to say farewell to 

Few students will neglect 

for quizzes, and to these 

■ I requent, the chances are 

drill keep up with the work. 

red freshman courses may be 

• . for State is now a lib* 

. and the frost) require- 
muld not be designed express- 

in those courses. 



Hampshire pueksters and Union Col- 
lege teams invade State's rink on 
January 14 and 17. The final gam< 
of the season will be against Boston 

< College. 
The following candidates reported 

to Coach Hall: Murphy, Irzyk, Dal 
ton, Bagge, Knight, Hopkins. Haul 
ing, Taylor, Silfen, Lyman, Ma 
Stoddard. Rockwood, Peters. La Fren- 
iere, and Fitzpatrick. 



Close on the heel.- of closing ^lid 
iron activities has come the release 
of the 1939 football schedule, with 

Springfield College replacing Ameri 

can International College. 

Other than the dropping of A. I. 
C, the grid schedule will remain the 
same, and, as such, has been approv- 
ed by the Joint Commitl m Intel 

collegiate Activities. 



Collect 
Storr's 

the neutral pool will hi 
the remainder of the meet scheduled 
at Connecticut early in January. Sal 
mela, Palumbo, and Page will repre- 
sent the Maroon. 

Coach Joe Rogers offered his usu 

al gloomy pre-season predictions, but 

similar expectations last year found 
the Statesmen losing only to VVil- 
liams* strong outfit, and winning live 
out of six meets. 

Co Captain Gardiner Andersen is 
back in the pool, after a layoff caused 
by a shoulder injury. Coach Rogers- 
has round satisfaction in (he work 
of Parker Jones and Lob Hall, with 
McCallum, Herbie Howes, and Ray 
Morse also showing well. Morse has 
been converted from a middle dis 
tance man to a breast stroker, and 



I'he Gymnasts are a strong team, will he .-» threat to Maroon opponents 
rate with the beat of the Pol, class will probably be a can- 
By virtue of a didate for the breast stroke event. 

The season will get under fidl swing 



Maroon opponents. By 
8-6 tie with Amherst in the past 
son, the Springfield club offer plenty 
of competition when they open 
against State on their home field. 

The second game of the season will 
find Bowdoin coming t<> Alumni field 
to play then last game against the 



immediately after the Christ mas vii 

cation, starting with the nieel with 

Williams in their tank. The States 

men have been working in the pool 
since the opening of college, and most 
(he natators should be in top form 



I. 



SWIM 
January 


MING 


CARD 




11. 


Willi; 


m.s at 


Williamstown 


14. 


w. p 


. 1. at 


Worcester 


20. 


Conn. 


Slate 


at Starrs 


February 






11. 


Wcsleyan at 


M. S. ( . 


17. 


Coast 


Guard 


at M. S. C. 


2.">. 


ii. r. 


at M. 


v ('. 



Statesmen. Connecticut state's \ut ,,, ,,,„.,, their schedule. In an attempt 



meggers will follow nexl in the pig 
skin parade at home. The followini 



keep his squad in top condition. 
' ".i h Rogers will try to have several 



game will be at Worcester with the men in training during the vacation 

Maroon invading Worcester Tech bar p ■ 

rietory. The Sabrina outfit of Am 
herst next continues the Purple-Ma 
noon conflicts on the State field. The 
last away-from home game for the 



FIFTY- EIGHT FROSH 

SELECT BASKETBALL 



Bashful Hoop Captain, Zelazo, Seeks Ideal 

Coed— Three Letter Athlete Refuses to Talk SWIMMING MEET FOR 

CLASS COMPETITION 



Caraway squad will be in Connecticut Hoop and Track Candidates Are 

ai the Statesmen endeavor to sink Training Hockey Squad 

the ( ,,a-t Guard. Rensselaer Polytoch A waits [C6 

nic Institute at Troy, will come to 

Amherst In an attempt to avenge The start of the freshman ba ket 

the,, :;; ii defeat of the current sea ball season brought 58 yearling on 

'he final of the season will find the floor. The plebes have b.oi, di 
being welcomed to Alumn 



Tufts 
held. 



f the season. Said Coach Fri 

gard, "Although Coach Varnell usu- 
ally produces a strong .and aggres- 
sive team, we'll he ready for any- 
thing." 

Southwick al Center 

With Stan Zelazo out with a bad 
leg Fran Riel and Johnny Bemben, 
both regulars from hist year, will lead 
the State team. Don Allen will be 
. Pemben's running mate at the other 
gttard spot while either Herb Click 
or Ev Bldredge will work with Fran 
in the front line. Frank Southwick, 
letter man from last year, will prob- 
ably alternate with Hank Parsych at 
the center post. Forwards Howie 
Rudge, Vera Smith, and Pill Walsh 
will see some service in a relief role, 
while Blasko and Podolak will be the 

reserve guards. The Statesmen have 
lost some of iheir reserve strength 
through graduation, bui have Rudge 
ami Bldredge back, b,,Mi having been 
out last year with appendicitis, while 

Allen, Walsh and Parsych from t la- 
last freshman team strengthen the 

quad considerably. 

Offense Changed 

Tin' Maroon fans may remember 

la ' rear 1 attack in which the team 
circled uniformly just within the 
/.one line waiting for an opening. 
Thai system has been dropped so (hat 
the Stale rooters will see a new of 
I'M '• flu's year. The : quad ha been 
drilling on this attack ever sine,- the 
111 I call of the sea on ami are run- 
ning like a well oiled machine. 
Coach Wilh, , Frigard's quintet is 

Ottt fo heal la t year' record of six 
losses and < i^-hl wins. Included on 

thl year" tough icheduie of four 
teen gamei are tome of N'ew Bag 
'ind'j be I teams, hut if the team 



Bj Carl Freedman football, ,a.-ehall. and basketball. He 

gee, I haven't anything doesn't think that studying is a weak 

ness, but if it were, it would be his 

/.a/a" was finally cornered biggest. Although he's a chemistry 

that he was about to be major, his ambition is to date a 
'■1. a disgusted grin stole State co-ed, a fact which he denies. 
tare, which immediately on St;in ,..,„„. ,,, St;it( . u .j tn : , ri Adams 

Alumni scholarship which goes to the 
athletes with the highest marks. In 



• 



r 



•f his Maroon uniform, and. 
like a condemned man. 



Six Natatorial Kvents \\i 
Scheduled in Meet 
Wednesday 



II p. 



with the above remark. He H |gj, s ,.| 1( „ ( i he was mentioned for 
ml what he said, for Stan , ( ,| Western Mass. basketball guard 

nd captained the baseball team. This 



' 



nythlng to say unless 
thing worth saying 



information was found in the records, 
no other important man f()r {hv tacitUIH Stan vcuhl never 

- • different, so unique in hi) . iA abl)Ut any thing. 

i- this modest, unassum- , . , 

B8 in ,,r A.i..^. u;„», y.a,,...i So modest i he that when he made 



let of Adams High School, 
• ai was elected to the sen- 
year captains the bas- 
and who for the past 



this 
tin. 



has been a hig factor in 



his letter in his sophomon year, it 
took him a year to wear it; although 
a member of the senate, ho rarely 
wears his hat. His second letter was 
earned in football last year, and he 
. (1(i WOUld probably have started on the 
first team this year if not for a ca- 
tastrophic leg injury at the beginning 






Miotics. 

bo modest and reserv 
basketball court he's dyna- 

and aggressive, Stan is 

eker when he's on the " f *• st ' ason ' 

best remembered showing NoW U1 Mi senior year Man has an 

Springfield game of last excellent college record both as an 

he starred in a nip athlete and student. When you see 

ittle that hnallv went to him on the basketball floor, you wiH 

■ b) ,,ne point ' *• why his fellow players elector! 

■test weakness, savs Stan. Mm captain, he's a fighter all the 

but where he can find way. always in the midst of the 

»' is a real puzzle, unless brawl. Anyone that knows h.m will 

this art between playing tell you Stan Zelazo is a man s man. 



An Interclasa swimming meet will 

take place in the college pool on 
Wednesday, I »<■< . 11. This meet is 
open to all those who have not earn- 
ed a varsity "M" In swimming. Since 
this is a pre-season meet it will af 

ford the many members of the team 
a chance to net some worthwhile com- 
petition practice. Coach Joe Rogei 
has announced that there will ho 
events scheduled for the meet. These 
will consist of freestyle events over 

the B0, 100, and KO yard lengths, 
and two races in the backstroke and 

breaststroke events over the imo yard 
distance. Also Included in the pro- 
gram Is a relay race open to teams 
with fr<>m three to five men. 

The races will ho Judged b) the 
coaching school of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department. 



VETERAN UNDERMKN 



Supply New Material 
ror Squad 



vided into squads for practice work clicks they will make a better i 
in passing and shooting. The frosh average showing, 
who reported to Coaches Frigard and 

Push are: Ahraham-on. Ahraoi 

Arnold, Bennet, Bishop, J. Brady 

Baxbaum, Callahan, Casassa, dark: FOR BOSTON RELAYS 

J. Cohen, \. Cohen, Conklin, Daniel.-. 

Divoll. Doyle, Bdminster, <. Erics Promising Sophomon' Crop Will 
son, Evans, Parrel I, Pertlg, FYoydy 
nruii Click, Graham, Hiboard, Holm 
berg, Hurley, tiutner, Kennedy, G. 

Kimball. Kirchen, Kirv.n, Kolodsinski, With two \<ie,an 

Line,, in, Litchfield, Mahan, Mendall, promising, sophomores, Coach Derby 
Mexoff, Mikeis, w. Kosher, Mullany, ftndi the outlook for the Boston re 
Pearson, Pin--. Rosemark, Ruben lay meet, , l() i too gloomy, although 
stein. Seery, Shaw. Smolak, Spark-, M „ outstanding team Is expected. Ed, 
Stonoga, J. Sullivan, Triggs, Tripp, Roesmau and Glenn Boyd competed 

Wall, Ward. We,,,,,., ||. Williams, last year, and the remaining two men 
Workman, and Coffln. 
Coach Pall's plebe pucksten have 

heed Waiting to Ket started for the 
past week, but bad skating weather 
ha kept them indoors. Those who 



POLK VAILTKK LEAVES 



Trufarit. WiMhrop, and Wolk. 

Wintei track under Coach Derbj 
lia 20 frosh running and jumping 
in the cage, 

The following reported: Adams, C. 
Chet Pud/, of the class of 1!»1I left Bishop, Pouhleday, Filios, Fn-itas, 
State tin- week to enroll at Cornwall Greenfield, W. Kimball, Krasnecki, 

on the Hudson, a preparatory school Long, McLean, stcLeod, Morrill, 

for West Point where he has an ap- Mother, Powers, Kadding, Rlst, Rod 
pointment. Pudz was an outstanding man, Sparling, Steinberg, and D. Sttl 
polo vaulter ofl the frosh track team, livan. 



will be selected from the sophomore 

candidate! Crimmlna, Haskell, Skol 
nick, Klaman, Joyce, O'Connor, and 

Vincent. There is alway- the possi- 
bility that I he veterans may be re 

reported are: Atwood, Bolahan, Bui placed by other ambition candidate 
lock Eaton, Gaumond, Gewirtz, Glllis, DfmculUet In keeping the man in 
Mason, Nottenberg, Papp, condition will ar.se, nines the first 

meet comes during finals, and the sec- 
ond follow.- a short vacation, The 
K. of c. rela) i- scheduled for Janu- 
ary liH, at Boston, and the P.. A. A. 
meel follows on February II. 



Leland 

Pearlman, Plummer, Pabitiow, Shack- 

ly, J. Shepardson, Stone, Thayer, 



SPORTSMANSHIP 

It is hoped that spectators at bas- 
ketball Karnes will remember thai 

apposing players are guests of the 

college and should be treated at* 
siirh. OhVials want good judgment 
in games as well a* spectators. 



I* * 



» ai3jvs oaDi w i r n 4 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1938 



U. A. C. Library. 



CARPENTER SINGS 



Robert Carpenter! M. S. C. grad- 
uate student in landscape architec- 
ture, will take the part of Aeneas 
in a presentation of Henry Purcell's 

three-act opera "Dido and Aeneas" 
at the Jones Library, Sunday after- 
noon, December 2 at 5:30 p. m. A 
chorus of twenty-four voices, Boioists ( 

and a string quartette will be under 

the direction of Victor I'rahl of 
Northampton. 

The time of the concert, which is 



"With Malice Toward Some" Is Present Favorite Among Professors; 
Readers Digest, New York Times Fill Faculty Current Events Bill 



With Malice Toward Some, current that, although it did set at some of 

best-seller, is the present favorite England*! weak points, the book did 

among the members of the faculty, not give a complete and true picture 

according to a recent pedagogical and that it was probably not intended 

checkup. Rated high by many pro- to do so 
feasors, Margaret Halsev's book en- 



joyed a largo lead over all competi- 
tors. Faculty members continually ex- 
plained their limited fictional read- 



open to the public, has been changed fog by explaining that they had to 



to .'?:.'}() from the usual 5:00, to avoir' 
conflict with programs of Christmas 
music at the various churches. 



INTER FAITH 



the 



ContintttA frowt P~ige 4 
teachings of Christ through 
Christian religion, he continued. 

"To some, the community in which 
I was brought up as a boy might 
well have been considered as a rather 
unsatisfactory place for boys to grow 
up. A rather rough and tough log- 
ging village where people with differ- 
ent racial backgrounds were coming 
together in an attitude of rough and 
tumble, and yet of good fellowship, 
and common endeavor. As I look back, 
it is my feeling that I was fortu- 
nate in having been brought up in 
such a community. Fortunate, also, 
in a father whose experience had 
been wide and who, if he preached 
anything to his family of ten chil- 
dren, it was that we must never be 
critical of other people because of 
race, color, or religion. In this com- 
munity there was little or no feeling 
of racial origin and there was re- 
spect and regard as between people 
with different religious upbringing. 
As I look about me today, I question 
often whether fifty years has taken 
us much further along the road to 
truly democratic living," President 
Baker went on. "In closing, let me 
express the hope that such confer- 
ences as these be continued and that 
groups as representatives of different 
racial origins and church upbringing 
come together often for friendly dis- 
cussion of the important problems of 
living together satisfactorily under 
our form of government." 

The Rev. J. Thoburn Legg next 
spoke on "How Can This Sort of 
Parley be Made Most Fruitful?" He 
urged that good-will should last and 
that the delegates should bring our 
experiences, as individuals, to the lev- 
el attained at the Parlev. His further 



do a great amount of reading in their 
respective fields to keep up with 
latest developments. 

Said Miss Horrigan, the first one 
interviewed, "As I am taking a course 
at Smith College, my reading is al- 
most purely academic and I'm afraid 
it wouldn't be very interesting." 

Of the ones who conceded that their 
private reading might be of interest, 
there seemed to be a general inclin- 
ation toward Margaret Halsey's Mal- 
ice Toward Some. Messrs. Rand and 
Helming thought it quite witty and 
not entirely unfair — agreeing in gen- 
eral with conditions which they had 
found prevalent in their visits to 
England. Mr. Gamble of the Econom- 
ics Division, on the other hand, 
thought the book to be a "smart-al- 



the main ideas of an articles in an 
effort to make it readable. 

J. Paul Williams, head of the State 
College United Religious Council, is 
currently enjoying The Conquest of 
Violence, Cooperation or Coercion, and 
The Self You Have to Live With. 

The biographies find an interested 
! reader in Prof. Rand, head of the 
Dept. of Languages and Literature, 
who recently finished This Was a 
Poet, a re-reading of Vanity Fair and 
With Malice Toward Some. 
35 Books 

Prof. Gamble, a very widely-read 
member of the Economies Dept., has 
completed a total of 35 books since 



Religion 

Professor Click of the Psychology 
Dept. is a religious reader of the 
Reader's Digest, and in addition has 
recently read The Freedom of Mart, 
A Return to Religion, and Man the 
I'nknown. Mr. Click also greatly en- 
joys reading the latest texts on Psy- 
chology and Philosophy. 

Professor Caldwell has finished 
With Malice Toward Some and daily 

devours the New York Times. His pet | last" June, averaging about a book 
readings, though, are 17th century j a week— although he confessed that 
English Autobiographies and Diaries, j he frequently finds it necessary to 
With Malice Toward Some has j drop below this average during the 
found another reader in Mr. Helm- ' school year. These readings have 
ing of the English Dept., who has ! ranged from economic studies to nov- 
also been reading deeply in books els. Among his most-liked were Jos- 
which have suggested themselves dur- eph in Egypt, Northwest Passage, 
ing the course of his class work. Mr. The Citadel, When Labor Organizes, 
Helming finds the magazines Time, and With Malice Toward Some — the 
New Yorker, Fortune, and Reader's last having been least enjoyed. Con- 
Digest interesting and instructive trary to popular practice, Mr. Gam- 



WORCESTER DAN< r ; 

A Christmas dance for 
setts State undergraduates ,, , : . 
ni will be held on December to 
last Friday of vacation, at 
House on Elm street in V . , 
Music will be by the Boj 
Worcester Tech awing eon 
the time of the affair will 

A committee made up of - 
cester residents; Robert 
chairman, lima Malm. Bleat 
and Richard Crerie, is in 
the dance. This is the fii 
dance of this type has bee 
and it is hoped that it * 
good support. Tickets for , . 
are $1.75. 



V 



Swimming Managers 

All sophomore candidate 
sistant manager o* swimmi 
to Coach Rogers at the poo 
tomorrow at 5 p. m. 

RHYME REASON 



"lav 



reading. He advises, though, that a i ble does not read a "best-seller" uti- 
lecky treatment of the subject by a I steadily diet of only the Reader's Di- til after it has passed the peak of 
flippant woman." He further said I gest is bad, since it often sacrifices I it popularity. 



problem; it affects not only Israel but 
Christendom. The world crisis is a 
tidal wave that is sweeping into a 
harbor, lifting all ships, not asking 
what flag they are flying or what 
port they are headed for." 

Foley, president will be State Col- 
lege's representative at the Inter- 
collegiate Inter-Faith Council which 
will meet in early January at Spring- 
field. Unlike former inter-faith com- 
mittees, the Inter-Faith Council will 
strive to interest all students in the 
colleges participating. 

"BOTH YOUR HOUSES" 



PATTERSON PLAYERS 



Continued from Page 3 
clearly and distinctly, and with good 
dramatic precision, except when he 
became ostentatiously overheated. 
Ethel Barrymore Colt failed to make 
the best thing of a rather soupy part. 
And the part of Levering, the Party 
Leader, was played with a sort of 
Tom Mixian quality, instead of the 
sarcastic vehemence it demanded. 
No Gestapo 
The most wonderful thing for the 



audience to consider is that it could 
advice was to continue and work to- sit in P er f«-t safety and laugh at its 
gether on problems on each of the I government. There were no Gestapo 
campuses. agents, nor G. P. U. men sneaking 

about under the chairs. No one rush- 
ed to the stage to arrest old Sol, 
when he said: "It's bad enough to 
have this government, but imagine 



A series of addresses on the sub- 
ject of "How the Faiths and Races 
Might Live Together" were given by 
Father Sheehan, Dr. Baker, and Rab- 
bi Schachtel. 

Sheehan's Talk 

Father Sheehan, Professor of Re- 
ligion at Our Lady of the Elms Col- 
lege, had a new aspect on the ques- 
tion: "The real problem of this kind 
is the understanding of understand- 
ing. Put, among most people, there 
is a will not to understand. They for- 
get that 'all Cod's chillun's got wings.' 
Crack down on the superiority and 
intelligentia complexes like those of 
Hitler and even of certain clans and 
legions in the United States, if you 
want to eliminate friction so that 
faiths and religions may live to- 
gether. Furthermore, respect the min- 
ority even if it is not your minority!" 

Executive vice-president of the 
American Unitarian Association, Dr. 
Everett M. Baker showed the need 
of the coming together of fellowship. 



having to pay for it!" or "The sole 
business of government is graft!" or 
such a gem as: "What you been do- 
ing at the White House, taking les- 
sons in smiling?" 

Yes, sdf-parody in a governmental 
system is a wonderful thing, and 
Both Your Houses, exaggeration or 
no, good or bad, is a great lesson 
in liberty and democracy. 
COED NOTES 

Continued from Page 2 
Christmas vie party. Professor and 
Mrs. R. C. Packard and Mr. and 
Mrs. J. N. Everson will chaperon. 
Alpha Lambda Mu will also hold a 
"backwards" party for their soror- 
ity advisors tomorrow evening at 
8:00 p. m. 

A kiddy party for pledges from 
all other houses is planned for Sat- 
urday in the Abbey Center bv the 



Continued from Page I 

The play itself has its locale in 
England. Written by Frederick Jack- 
son, it was first produced in New 
York with Walter Connolly playing 
the title role. The story concerns a 
robbery engineered by Don Meadows, 
played by Robert C. Tetro of the 
department of agricultural economics, 
a new-comer to the major produc- 
tions. The Bishop, a lively figure with 
a love of adventure and detective 
stories, of course becomes involved. 
From then on, the story moves with 
swiftness and humor and a tangle of 
situations, toward the denouement. 

The heroine is played by Mrs. Dor- 
othy Burke of North Amherst, who 



PLAY DIRECTOR 




FINE ARTS SECTION 



Continued from Page 4 
excelled — the Scherso, in which her 
runs were a marvel of airiness and 
sureness, or the slow. moving Largo, 
in which her one control and inter- 
pretative powers were given full 
sway. That Miss Ball herself was 
more at home with the Chopin was 
evidenced by the fact that she chose 
as encores for her enthusiastic audi- 
ence two Chopin Etudes. 



Masquers to Present 
"What Price Glory" 



Rehearsals are being conducted and 
sets are being constructed for "What 
Price Glory?" by Lawrence Stallings 
and Maxwell Anderson, second in the 



Continued from Page ; 

UP-Roar House. This young , 
and his orchestra who had com 
from the deep South with ;i trick- 
brand of Dixieland seined a gay 
hit. Broadway beckoned, the s 2 
Ballroom, Loew's State, etc. 
Same Band 
Hawkins has never changed tl 
in the band since the day | 
organized eight years ago b 
college expenses. He mak. t 
arrangements, and has written - 
eral hit-; "Because of Yo U ." baa 
most p ipular. 

The" recenth recorded "Easy | 
er" and "Study In Blue," (Blade 
B-10029). These tunes really d 
that (indefinable "Swing." The * 
sax and everything in genen 
easily on a par with Erskine'i 
trumpet in this sepian disc. 



BARTERING 



Continued from Psgt 2 
censoring the freshman hygier. 
ject matter. 

It was not long before a new m 
dawned at the University nf Utat 
chusetts. Students and faculty WSJ 



series of five Anderson plays to be 

presented by the Amherst College; walking about arm in arm. The ideu'l 



DR. CHARLES F. FRAKER 



Masquers this season. This war drama 
will be produced next week on Wed- 
nesday, Thursday, and Friday nights 
in the new Kirby Memorial Theater. 
In the large cast of twenty-seven 
actors the leading parts will be taken 
by George Hunter '40, of Thompson- 
ville and J. Potter Smart '40, of 
Greenfield. The only feminine role 
in the play will be taken by Mrs. 
Fred B. Phleger, Jr., of Amherst, who 
will undertake the difficult part of 
Charmaine. The full cast is as fol- 
lows : 

Captain Flagg G. Hunter *40 

Sergeant Quirt J. P. Smart '40 

Charmaine Mrs. F. B. Phleger 

Corporal Lipinsky 



board was taken down and rebuilt in 
a new Physics building. At eon» 
cation each week there was a musira 
comedy. Joy and pleasure reigned 
this new Utopia. 



WINTER SPORT'' 



or social intercourse, for brotherhood, pledge of Sigma Iota. A prize will 
To think clearly and to recognize in- 1 be in orfler for tne best costume. 



herent good qualities in each other. 
he added, will also help solve this 
question. 

"Let us rid ourselves of puerile 
notions and let us stop fiddling while 
the world is burning!" insisted Rahhi 
H. J. Schachtel as the final speaker. 
Rabbi Schachtel is from the West 
End Synagogue in New York City. 

Taking an international view of the 
question, he stated that the young 
people are going to pay the great 
price of the dictators in the coming 
war between religion and irrelligion. 
"If all religions do not unite, they 
will all fall. It is not an anti-Jewish 



Phi Zeta's pledges elected the 
following officers during the past 
week: president, Betty Leeper; 
secretary-treasurer, Anne Chase. 
Lambda Delt's Phyllis MacDonald 
is in charge of a tea for the of- 
ficers of all the sororities who 
will tinkle cups on Sunday after- 
noon. Others on the committee — 
Marge Smith, Betty Desmond, 
and Agnes Lockhard. Final note 
— Dotty Jenkins and Cyrus 
French, both of the class of 18* 
will be married on December 17. 
C> is an instructor in chemistry 
at Pennsylvania State College. 



has been promoted to a female lead 
after numerous appearances in small 
bits. Herbert B. Warfel, assistant pro* 
lessor of zoology, is expected to tint 
in a thoroughly convincing perform- 
ance as the tough owner of an Eng- 
lish Pub. 

Mrs. Warfel, as the woman who 
is bound, gagged and robbed in the 
Pub, will be a match for Harold 
Smart, assistant professor of English 
and law, who plays her overbearing 
but hen-pecked husband. Another 
newcomer to the Players, Charles 
Moran, a graduate student, has had 
considerable experience with the un- 
dergraduate Roister Doisters, and 
will play the double-crossing chauf- 
fer. Alan W. Chadwick, manager of 
the college dining hall, plays what 
may be the oldest butler in England 
and one who is considerably dismayed 
at the antics of his master, the Bish- 
op. GrtinoW O. Oleson, extension edi- 
tor, will portray the character of the 
man scheduled as the go-between; and 
Mrs. Frieda Bender of Amherst as 
the prim sister of the Bishop com- 
pletes the capable cast. 



... J. B. Bean '41 
F. W. Poland '40 
C. M. Kieser'M 
J. H. Firman '40 
J. B. Green *89 
C. Thompson '.'«) 
J. A. Stewart '.'{•.) 



Corporal Kiper 

Corporal Gowdy 

Lieutenant Moore .. 
Lieutenant Aldrich . 

Louis Lewisohn 

Cognac Pete .... R. 
Lieutenant Schmidt 
Gunnery Sergeant Sockel 

F. C. Porter '40 

Private Mulcahy F. C. Porter '40 

Sergeant Ferguson J. P. Good '40 

First Runner T. A. Youst '89 

Second Runner N. M. Warner, Jr., '41 
Brigadier General Cokeley 

D. O. Smiley, Jr. '40 

A Colonel R. C. Boshco '39 

A Staff Lieutenant 

T. B. Armistead, III '39 
Another Lieutenant C. L. Murray '41 

Chaplain H. C. Rudden '.'{!» 

Mayor W. F. Bodine '41 

Spike A. H. Meyers '41 

Pharmacist's Mate .. N. F. Lacey '39 
Lieutenant Cunningham 

C. H. Plimpton '39 
Lieutenant Lundstrom 
Lieutenant Lundstrom G. Spens '40 
German Officer s. L. Sagendorph '•'!!» 
Tickets may be obtained only at 
the box office of the theater, which 
is open every afternoon from 2 to 
5, or by mail. Reservations may 1>< 
made by telephone. No seats will be 
available on the night of the per- 
formance. 



Continued from Page I 
cooperation of the Park Servio 
recreational programs in New Eng- 
land involving development of 
sports facilities. Attending the BS*> 
ing, called by Roger F. Lanpl< 
be Park Carpenter, editor of tin SN 
Bulletin; Roland Palmedo of Lake 
Placid, and Edward Ballard of tb 

R. F. Lewis**89 1 National Park Service. 

Besides the business meeting, H 
Sunday morning session will inclu* 
talks on maintenance, competitive I 
ing, and junior skiing. <i< >rge I 
O'Hearn, of Pittsfield; NetooB 1 
Bond, of the Thunderbolt Ski W 
Adams; and Norman Myri.k, of ** 
herst High School will be reaped 
the chairmen of these group.-. 

Figure Skating 

A skating program, a • 
skiing program, and the general s 
sion will take up Sunday aft- 
Edward O'Flaherty, of the H 
Figure Skating Club will chai 
the skating program, which will C*> 
elude with a skating figure and dan* 
demonstration if there Is suitable » 
—a roller skating demonstration! 
there is not. Among thetaltoo** 
ing will be "Ice Sculpture for 
vals" by Robert Taylor, of th€ WW* 
field Outing Club of New Hs»J" 

Theodore Farwell, of the Greer 
field Outing Club, will be the 
man of the recreational lW 
gram, which will c ' ' 
"Mountain Touring of 
Alps" by Miss Hani 
physical education 
Smith College. 

Further informal 

inga can be obtained 
Briggi of the physii 

partment. 



I talk 

\ , " 



the iW'- 

.j.-ati"' 




fc 









Vol. XLIX 



tM HERST. MASSACHUSETTS, THURSDAY, DECEMBER i:>. IM8 



NO. 12 



STUDENTS HEAR 
CASEY ADDRESS 
THIS MORNING 



CONVOCATION SPEAKER 



Former 
Coach 



Harvard and Tufts 
is Speaker at Insignia 
Convocation 



N. Y. A. DIRECTOR 



Serving Third Year as Head of 
New England College 
District 



Edward L. Casey, .Massachusetts di- 
rector of the National Youth Admin- 
-tration and former Harvard Uni- 
.. -v-ity All-American halfback in '17 
. d coach in "29 through '35, spoke 
• today's insignia convocation. 

<(implimenting the newly elected 

aptains and men who had just heen 

.warded letters for football, soccer 

isd cross-country, Casey cited the 

antagefl of varsity sport participa- 




MACHAMER TO 
DRAW COVER TO 
BALL PROGRAM 



HOLDS CONFERENCE 



Famous "College Humor" Artist 
to Sketch Design for Winter 

Carnival Dance 



llu- 



trat. 



Kdward Casey 



THREE PHILOSOPHY 
COURSES OUTLINED 



lb- told many interesting stories of • 

own connection with sports, going J),-. H a , rv (Jhck Ann.. ll Hers New 



to the days when he was the 
leading ground-gainer. A 
former coach of Tufts, State's major 
ll, Casey also talked about State- 
Tufts games t na t np y laf j seen Most 
interr.-ting story was that of a Tufts 
playei who kicked a 80-yard field- 
poal against State to break a tie and 



Subjects to be Approved 
by Committee 



ffersun Machamer, famous 
o for College Humor magazine, 
is going to .haw tin- cover design for 
the Winter Carnival Ball programs! 
according to an announcement yester- 
day, by Myron llagar, chairman of 
the Mall committee 

Machamer, probably the beat known 

artist in his field, is also well-known 
for his movie short.-- and is at the 
present time in Hollywood working 
on one. The program cover will tea 
tun- one of the typical Machamer 
girls in | winter setting. This will be 
the first time in the history of a 
State College "lance that a \. ell-Known 
comin. rcial artist has taken part in 
the de i'Miine of the program , 

Other plan- for the Ball are well 
underway with arrangements for the 
favors to be settled this week. 




LANDSCAPE ART 
CONFAB BRINGS 
200 TO CAMPUS 



Alumni Come From All Parts of 

the Country to Attend 

( Conference 



STARTED HY WAUGH 



Albert Taylor '06 Heads List of 

Speaker! at Second 

Annual Affair 



Dr. I i. ml, A. Waugh 

NINE INITIATED TO 
SCHOLARSHIP GROUP 



Three new courses in Philosophy 

are being outlined at the present 

time and will he offered in the near 
future if approved by the Course of 



CHRISTMAS DANCE 



Medford team a .lose win Study committee. Dr. Harry V Glick, 



local field. It was not until 
the game. Casey said, that he 
ned that the Jumbo back had boot- 
ed th. goal with a broken ankle. 

Continued on Page 5 

RELEASE PROGRAM 
FOR 1939 CARNIVAL 



ackard, Chairman of Winter 
Event Lists the Tentative 

Schedule 



Professor of Philosophy, said this 

Week thai the ll.'W Cotll'seS WOttld be 

Logic, History of Philosophy, and 
Ethics. A total of five Philosophy 
courses will !»• offered in the 
catalogue* 

The trustee- :hi<I administration nf 
the college have already approved the 

expansion of the Philosophy depart 
ment. In addition to the new .ours.-, 
further extension <>f the Philosophy 
courses is being contemplated, but no 

definite plana have heen announced. 



With promised support from a 
meat number <>f alumni and under 
graduates, the lirst Hestarh— rttn 

Mate College ChriittBias dance will 
be held in Worcester on December 
•'10. the last Friday of vacation, at 
the Town Mouse on Kim street. 
Plans have been completed for the 
affair and Robed Packard, chair- 
man of the dance, has announced 
mttsic by the Po\ntoniaris, Worces- 
ter lech dance orchestra. 

loin Worcester residents] lima 
Malm, Kleanor Jewell. Richard 
Crerie, and Packard make up the 

dance committee. Subscription for 

the dance will be $1.79. 



rwo hundred alumni of Maaaachu- 
•ii State College from all part of 
the United States are expected to re- 
turn to the college thii weed Friday 
and Saturday to take part in the Sec- 
ond Annual Landscape Alumni Con- 
ference. 

The conference was started last 
year under the direction of Dr. Frank 
A. WaUgh, head of the depart in. lit of 
l a nd s cap e architecture. This year it 
has been expanded to a two da\ event 

because of the unusual Interest -hown 
and the large attendance expected 
Taylor to Speak 
Nine seniors were initate.l into Phi Prominent landscape architect are 

Kappa Phi last Friday when that Included on the Ust of apeakers, head> 

honorary iwciety held it: animal fall '''' ,,v Albert D. Taylor "06 of ci.-ve- 

ceremonj in the seminar room of the ' ;m< '- (, ''i". president of the Americaa 

Old chapei. ii,,,.,,. initiate, i were as Society of Landscape Architect-. |.v>l- 

foilows: Milton E. luerbach, George ' owin « through the general theme of 

II. Biachoff, Mabelle Booth, Leon S. " s '" llin ^ Landscape Architecture/' 

Ciercazko, Constat C. Fortin, Harold >l "' 1 ' "P«*kera as Karl M. Tomfohrdt 

i Gordon, Jeanette Herman. A. Fern ' ;(l "' l: ' ,s '"". ■ member of the \. K. 



Seniors Become Members of 

Kappa Phi in Annual 
( leremony 



in 



Kaplmsky and Alexander A. Miller 
The officers of the society who en 

ducted the meeting were as follows: 

mu hal, i»r Jacob K. Shaw; acting 

treasurer, Prof. Marshall Lanphear; 

ei retarj . Prof. Arthur \. Julian; 

vice president. Prof. Merrill Mack. 

president, |) r . Maxwell II. Goldberg. 

The neu members were nominated 

to the o.iety in October, at which 

time Miss Booth wa- named phi Kap 

pa Phi icholar. 



Planning Board; Peter DeGelleke '38 
of the National Park Service; Alex- 
ander <;. W'inton 'l'!) of the National 

I'm re i Service; Jack Amatt 'JS of 
< ftniinued <t P <, 

BALL COMMITTEE IS 
ELECTED BY GREEKS 



I'- 



\ tentative program for the 1939 

Carnival has been arranged 

to Include all the events featured in 

f "rm. r yean with several additional 

' m| ■' ■' events, according to Robert 

chairman. 

■ pageant on the last night of 

.1 will feature expert figure- 

■ crowning of the Carnival 

and presentation of medals. 

'ture is to be encouraged on 

■ competitive basis between fratemi- 

rorities, and a permanent 

be established and inscribed 

^ith the names of winners from year 

new event this year will be 
iffei luncheon at the Memorial 
n Saturday after the skat- 
ing events of the morning. 
Program 
Afternoon: 
Skating races 
Hockey Game 
^canning 



Average State College Student Rates Personality 

Face, Figure and Brains as Traits Desired in Coeds 



Glick, Chairman 

Ion, Foley, Morse are 
Picked 



Itv Harold Forrest 



education 



Richard Powers, Herb Click, <;<•,, rgo 
llaylon, William Foley, and Roy 
Morse were elected (.. t| lt . cmim' 

making arrangement for the Intei 

fraternity Pall at a mosthlg of tho 

Interfraternlty Council la t weak, The 

Committee chose Click chairman and 

hist under six feet tall and well-built, graduate work in their major Raid admitted that they voted for frater- jS '^1 ^ d' , .'" 'r'l '""' i'''"" 1 f " r 
You have probably seen him around Very few. even the seniors, except nity brother M personal acquaint 

Qoessmann Lab or on Fraternity row! those who will do graduate work, ances. About 7% said they didn't both 

for he is a chemistry major and a know, now, what they will do after <-r to vote, 
fraernitv man. He wears a sweater graduation. The ratio of those who 0v ,.,. 



generally. Their original h.-wever, for the cunt was 

Meet Mr. Average Man On Campus. Intentions as to their plans after grad* even between those who da 
You've seen him lots of times. He's Bath* WSJ to teach, work, or do vote f,, r the best man, and those who 



highlight of the [nteifratomlty i 
■on. 



wrkts] 



'■>'>''. of the men rive to the 
or odd coat and pants spring and fall, place -Indies first, those who think R ,. ( | r ,., )S . am , ;ih()1)t r(( ,, ; rf (nf>m 

and a jacket or opcoat when its chil- axtra-CUrrlCUlar activities most im- have -onie other charity. 

ly. He can look pretty neat, though, pnrtant. and those who think they 

when he wants to, whey he even OWM should he equally balanced is about 

1',', of a tuxedo. He doesn't own a R :2:.'{. 

car, but he usually has the family Prefer Swing 

limousine fo* big weekends. ^ slight majority of the men prefer 

Questionnaire interview with a swing music above all else. The rest 

cr.-ss-section of wphomore, junior think swing is all right but prefer ,!,.„ thf . ir opinion 

and senior fraternity and non-frater- semi-classiral or sweet music. Kenny changed since coming to State. One 

it as the 

ivory cloistered tower, but now it 

typical reply has been chosen and in program, with Jack Renny coming „, 

uses leave for Bull Hill SA • <<,m *' PHK*I ■ choice remark thrown do e behind. 64.29 of the State men 

want or did want to he a military 
major. 



Phi Kappi Phi is considered the 
most important single honor, rated 
either first or se c o n d by a majority of 
the students, 

Specialized Vagrants 

Mo i of the interviewees admitted 



in. 



'amival Ball: Glen Miller's nity men produced these results. Many Goodman and Charlie McCarthy tie . ljfJ nr . ha( , thnUffhi f)f 
orchestra and varied were the answers. The for fir^t plate M the favorite radio 

emed more like a country dub. An- 
other said college riow seemed like a 
factory for turning out specialized va 

grants, They said they would allow 
The majority think that the honor I their son or daughter to come to State 

ystem as it works here is better, if he wanted, 
work," than the monitor system and they ap The average man on campus ipend 
need that prove "f the State fraternity system. 4H hour- | Week sleeping, U bottl I 
the question was serloUfl they replied 
that they came to raise their living 
standard, culturally 
increase their earning power. 



Sing Set 

At this same meet ing, the dat. •■ for 

trials for the Interfraternlty Sing and 

the finals were set for Wed,,, day, 

March 22 and Friday, March 84. In- 

terfraternity house in paction, hi 

been set fof May a. The e two event 

both count heavily in the academic 
credits toward the Interfraternity 
cups which are awarded annually. 

Interfraternity ping pone and bowl- 
ing were also discussed again and 
houses asked to report then 

ment regarding tin pha <• 

competition. Regular rate 



meet 

eshman Hockey 
Skijoring 

'let Luncheon 
Building 
dimming meet 
•xing and Wrestling 

•Inner 



at 



The hoys scfratched their heads 
when asked why they came ?.. college. 
M The spontaneous answers usually 
were "so I wouldn't have t 
but when they were convi 



charged for 

the Memorial 



he a 

Bulb 



ley 
ing. 



■lenti- 

of winter 

will he 
and table- m 



: "rmal 
'cigh Ridei 



48 h 
When asked whether they voted for | week exercising and 2.fir. hour 
the person best qualified for class of- j s tud yi ng. About half »,f tl 
md materially, to ficership. or whether they voted fori nervous at exam time, 

to study the one they knew best many ware Nisi Tally's comment 



I day 

get 



a definite major, or 



to further their insulted. The question was justified, 



(''.niinurJ n% Pipe 4 



PHTITKKS 



Mr. Mahoney of lb,. Winn studio 
will be at the Mount Pleasant Inn 
all day today and tomorrow to di*, 
tribute senior portraits. Any sen 
tors who ha\c not returned proof- 
must do mo at this time. 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15. I»jh 




/iftaesacbuselWF Collegian 



Otliiiiil MWatNipw »f the Mns*nrhtlsctt.s Stntf Colletif. 
I'iitilish<iJ every Thurwlay by the students. 



Ollir« ■; Room s . Mfniiirifil Building 



Telephone 1102-M 



EMERY MOOKB "'.'». Biitoi -in-Chief 
ARTHUR A. NOYE8 '40. Maiuulng Kditor MABELLE BOOTH '», tssacUts Edito 



KIMTOKIAI. I«)AIM> 



( impus 

JOHN K. PILIOfi '40. Kilter 
BKTTINA HALL ;'J. Art Editor 
MARY T. MKKHAN '39 
FRANCKS S. MERRILL '39 
JOSKI'H BART '40 
NANCY K. LUCE I" 
JAC QUE LINE I. STEWART '40 
LORETTA KENNY '41. Secretary 
WILLIAM T. GOODWIN 41 
HAROLD KOHKKST '41 
JOHN HAYES '41 
ELIZABETH COFFIN "42 
MANY DONAHUE '42 
WILLIAM DWYER '4! 
(IEOROE LITi'Hl IKI.Ii 12 
LOUISE POTTER '42 

Feature 

LLOYD B. COPELAND :i9. Editor 
MYRON FISHER '39 

KATHLEEN TCLLY '41 
EVERETT R srENCER '40 



Sports 

II. ARTHUR coi'SON ' 
CARL FREEDMAN 11 
KENNKTH HOW'LAND 
ALBERT YANOW '41 
BERTRAM HYMAN '42 



KtlitOt' 



11 



-I... I, III llltfr < HI I . >S|>OIUl«'Ilt 

JOHN KELSO B'W 

College Quarterly 
SIDNBY ROSEN '39, Editor 

Robert McCartney '40 

CHESTER KURALOWICZ '41 

I iii.uici.'il Adviser 
PROF. LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

I in ultk Adviser 
1>R. MAXWELL H. i.OI.DHERd 



HI SINKSS BOARD 

ALLEN' HOVE ':tH. Business Manage! 



AHK\HAM CARP '.:;•. Adv. Mur. J. HENRY WINN :t'.i, Cir. M*r. 

GEORGE C. BENJAMIN '39. Subscription Manner 
Business Assistants 



E. ELT.ENE RENAULT •«" 
ROi.ER H. LINDSEY i 
JOSEPH R. CORDON. JR. '41 
WALTER R. LALOR '41 

SUBSCRIPTIONS J2.00 PER YEAR 



Make all orders payable to The Massachu- 
setts Collegian. In case of change of addn is, 
subscriber will please notify the business man- 
ager as soon as laiviible. Alumni, undergrad- 
uate and faculty contributions are sincerely 
encouraged. Any communications or notices 
snuet be received at the Collegian office before 
• o'clock, Monday evening. 



CHARLES A POWERS "40 
ROBERT RODMAN '40 
EDWARD J. O'BRIEN '41 
DAVID F. VAN METER '41 



S1NCLE COPIES lo CENTS 



1938 Member 1939 

Pbsoclded Golle6iate Press 

Distributor ot 

Cblle6iate Di6est 



Entered as aecond-clagg matter at the Am- 
herst Post Office. Accepted for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in Section 
1103. Act of October 1917. authorized August 
2». IMS. 

Printed by Carpenter & Morehouse, Cook Pl~ 
Amherst. M«ss., Telephone 43 



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College Publishers Representative 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

Chicago Boston ' Los Audits - sun f»a»ciico 



FIVE President Baker, in his Ten Minutes, could not have 

YEARS selected a more appropriate topic to discuss with us at 
the present time, than that question of building- which 
is uppermost in many minds. 

Only today, the announcement of more courses in philosophy 
has heen made, and more courses means more room and teaching 
facilities. These little things are catching up with us and as Prexy 
has said, any new building relieves pressure in the older ones, any 
addition to the teaching staff takes a load from the shouders of 
some already overburdened professor. The need is more than evi- 
dent and President Baker has outlined for us the college's pro- 
gram of expansion. Here we have what we want in the way of 
definite fact. Ours is now the opportunity of working on that fact. 

Plans for the women's building have been complete for some 
time and with sufficient push might be allotted to us by the legis- 
lature. All of us must lie familiar with the conditions which neces- 
sitate immediate action on provisions for women, and which place 
it first in importance. Hut there is more than this first building 
at stake with the college's five year plan. If it is possible to im- 
press the need of a women's building upon our legislators, then 
it will also be possible to impress the necessity for these many 
other improvements upon the minds of those who represent us in 
the legislature and elsewhere. 

The outline of a new auditorium sounds most encouraging 
and is perhaps the next need most evident to the majority of us as 
a whole student body. Planning for the future was one of the prim- 
ary points when Stockbridge Hall was erected, but far-sighted 
as those plans were then, they are entirely inadequate now. The 
plans which are being presented now, in the light of past experi- 
ence, cannot seem too extensive for the college. We have only 
started to grow! 

Overshadowed by the fame and present size of the many col- 
leges and universities nearer the state capitol, Massachusetts State 
must let its virtues be known. We have probably as much room 
for advancement as any college or university in New England, 
but it takes more than two or three men to let that be known. 
Therein, we can all give our support by letting people know that 
we have "got something" here in the wild and wooly western part 
of the state. A word here or there, a chat with your representative, 
a letter to your friends, and whole hearted cooperation with those 
who are working for us. 

WOMEN A rather disgruntled group of men and a group 

1)0 SMOKE of freshmen women, probably no less bothered, 

have been afflicted with the penalties of freshman 

women's smoking rules given because some women answered 
truthfully in incriminating question 1 

Continued <i» Vi.u h 



BA R T E R I N G 

WITH JOB BART 

Tin- night WSl <lark. A Rusty wind 
creaked and groaned in the elnu 

around the house. Faint murmurs 
that Bounded like the soul in final 
agony came from the place. Weird 
high pitched tones broke through in 
pagan rhythm. The two figures that 
moved toward the house walked closer 
when they saw the place in dark- 
ness, except for a feehle litfht J n a 
third floor window. Sehastian tremhl- 
ed, hut he was not afraid. Daisy May, 
too, experienced disquietude for this 
was her first Vic Party date. 

Once inside the door the scene 
changed, What they had mistaken for 
darkness was the dim amber light in 
the hall ami the pilot light on the 
vie. The atmosphere was nothing more 
than cozy and private. To the scuff of 
dancing feet and the tunes of Glen 
Miller* our friends soon lost them- 
selves in the crowd. 

Sebastian and Daisy May were 
an ideal couple. He was just about 
tall enough and she was just 
about enough. As they danced Se- 
bastian became increasingly 
aware that Daisy May was beau- 
tiful in the dim light. He steeled 
himself against it hut finally he 
had to yield, and found himself 
dancing cheek to cheek. Daisy 
May did not resist for she rather 
liked him, and they could dance 
better that way she said when 
Sehastian sought to apologize for 
his audacity. Besides Daisy May 
knew Christmas was not far off, 
and with a white heard and red 
nose Sebastian might pass for 
Santa Claus. At least, she thought 
he can get a car when he has a 
date, and some of the other girl's 
dates can't get them. 

Later in the evening Sehastian sug- 
gested that they go to Riley's on the | 
Pelham road to dance. They climbed 
into the car and were there in no 
minutes flat. Sebastian felt brave af- 
ter making that